Policy Studies

This master's level policy course would be of particular interest to policy practitioners, educators and human service providers in the human service fields of education, social and community services, and health. The course is also offered at graduate diploma and graduate certificate levels.

The course aims to equip students with conceptual skills required for practical policy analysis and policy development in educational and social and community services domains. The course will have a strong focus on policy practice for policy professionals and service workers in non-government human services organisations.

Master of Policy Studies

To qualify for the award of Master of Policy Studies, candidates must complete 8 units of study (48 credit points), comprising:

  • a minimum of 2 units (12 credit points) of core units; and
  • a minimum of 1 unit (6 credit points) of capstone units; plus
  • a maximum of 5 units (30 credit points) of elective units; including
    a maximum of 2 units (12 credit points) of postgraduate approved units from another faculty.

Capstone experience

A capstone unit is completed in the last semester of the award course. It provides an opportunity to integrate ideas and understandings drawn from units of study taken in the course. The capstone is a compulsory requirement and is undertaken by completing a special project, authorised independent study or a dissertation with an upper limit of 12,000 words.

Students who intend on undertaking a higher degree by research (MPhil, PhD, Doctor of Education or Doctor of Social Work) in future, should enrol in the Dissertation option (please note that entry requirements apply for this unit of study – consult your course coodinator for further details).

Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies

To qualify for the award of Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies, candidates must complete 6 units of study (36 credit points), comprising:

  • a minimum of 2 units (12 credit points) of core units; and
  • a maximum of 4 units (24 credit points) of elective units; including
  • a minimum of 3 units (18 credit points) elective units from the table below and
  • a maximum of 1 unit (6 credit points) of postgraduate approved units from another faculty.

Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies

To qualify for the award of Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies, candidates must complete 4 units of study (24 credit points), comprising

  • a minimum of 2 units (12 credit points) of core units; and
  • a maximum of 2 units (12 credit points) of elective units from the table below.

Course convenor

Dr Margaret Spencer
T 02 9036 9316
Room 729, Education Building, A35
E

Units of study table

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Policy Studies

Core Units

EDPA6018
Social Policy Process
6      Semester 2
SCWK6948
Social Policy Frameworks
6      Semester 1
SCWK6949
Global Social Policy
6      Semester 2

Elective Units

SCWK6902
Social Research
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
SCWK6910
Working with Communities
6      Semester 2
SCWK6917
Practice Development
6      Semester 1
Semester 2
SCWK6943
Practice Theory Development
6      Semester 2
SCWK6944
Dying, Death and Mourning
6      Semester 1
EDPA6016
Organisations as Learning Communities
6      Semester 1
EDPB5016
Global Poverty, Social Policy and Ed
6      Semester 2
EDPK5003
Developing a Research Project
6      Semester 1
Semester 2

Capstone units

EDPZ6724
Dissertation Part 1
6    C EDPZ6725

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
EDPZ6725
Dissertation Part 2
6    P EDPZ6724
Semester 1
Semester 2
EDPZ6720
Dissertation
12   
Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 1
Semester 2
EDPZ6730
Special Project 1
6    P 24 credit points
Semester 1
Semester 2
SCWK6908
Authorised Independent Study and Report
6      Semester 1
Semester 2

Elective units from other faculties

Master of Policy Studies students may select up to two units of study from the following selected units of policy orientated study. Students in the Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies may select up to one unit of study from this list.
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
SCLG6903
New Debates in Social Theory
6      Semester 2
Faculty of Law
LAWS6257
Public Policy
6    N LAWS6042, LAWS6139, LAWS6113


Core unit for MALP students.
Intensive September
Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health
HPOL5003
Analysing Health Policy
6      Semester 2

Units of study listing

Policy Studies

Core Units

EDPA6018 Social Policy Process

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Anthony Welch Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: class attendance and participation, including discussion and mini-presentations (15%); presentation (35%) and essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The world of policy is changing, from a centralised model to a decentralised one, in which you may be involved, at least at institutional level. Whether you work in the public, private, or third sector as an educator, social worker, civil servant or in another capacity, it is important to understand the changing world of policy. Another change that we examine is the rise of neo-liberalism and its effects on the policy process. Critics charge that policy is now framed with economic rather than social good in mind, and that the success of policies is measured by the same calculus. How is policy made, and by whom? How does Australian federalism influence the making and implementation of policy? What kinds of transnational influences affect the policy process, and to what extent? Do different countries respond to difference (class, ethnic, gender, age), in a world of increasing diversity, migration and mobility?
SCWK6948 Social Policy Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Sue Goodwin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: 1x2000wd essay proposal and presentation (40%); 1x4000wd major essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to provide students with a sound understanding of the key institutional components of the Australian welfare system and the key issues and debates associated with the theory and practice of contemporary social policy. The target audience for this unit includes participants from a diverse range of organisations involved in human service provision. All human service work takes place in the context of social policy: social policy provides the mandate and the resources for human service work, and the activities of workers are extensively defined and shaped by social policy. In turn, human service workers are increasingly involved in the shaping of policy, or policy action. The rationale for this unit is to provide an opportunity for students to develop an advanced understanding of social policy frameworks in order to inform policy action.
SCWK6949 Global Social Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ruth Phillips Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr seminar/week - evening Assessment: tutorial presentation and paper (40%); global social policy research exercise (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
There is a well-established scholarship and governmental interest in both the impact of globalisation on social policy and the emergence of what is increasingly termed 'global social policy' which is a direct response to global social problems. It is a field that is growing in the areas of social policy and social work research and practice and can be clearly linked to increased employment opportunities for social workers and social policy graduates in the international/global arena. A key perspective of this unit of study is from non-government organisations' participation in the development of a global civil society and their contribution to global social policy. It also examines the United Nations Millennium Development Goals and how NGOs have contributed to both the ambitions of the goals as well as the outcomes for different countries. This unit provides opportunities for students to deepen their understanding and knowledge of core global concerns such as poverty, health, education, environment, NGO corporate engagement and gender equality and make links to the vital role of NGOs in these areas.

Elective Units

SCWK6902 Social Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Margot Rawsthorne Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2000wd Ethics essay (30%); 1x1000wd blog posting (20%); and 1x3000wd research proposal (50% ) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to a range of research methods and focus on quantitative and qualitative methods. Many other research issues in developing a research proposal will be addressed through the semester. It is intended that, at the conclusion of this unit, students will have developed a research project able to implement through either further study or in workplaces.
SCWK6910 Working with Communities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Margot Rawsthorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x250wd blog postings (35%); 1x4000wd practice essay (45%); and class participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Working with communities is a key policy and practice priority for government and non-government agencies in Australia. This unit will critically examine the current policy frameworks informing work with communities as well as current practice models of community development and community engagement. The unit seeks to explore the why and how of work with communities. It will draw on an emerging Australian body of research about working with communities based in the community of Glebe. This unit is suitable for practitioners seeking to work more effectively with communities.
SCWK6917 Practice Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joanne Clarke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: independent study - meet with supervisor 3 times Assessment: 1x2000wd proposal (40%) and 1x4000wd research essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit of study is designed to provide students with the opportunity to undertake in-depth, guided study with a supervisor. It provides students with the opportunity to explore a specific practice issue such as working with women experiencing violence or effective policy advocacy in-depth. Students must initially develop a short proposal and discuss this with the unit coordinator. A suitable supervisor will then be appointed to work intensively with students. This unit provides students with flexibility, enabling them to tailor study around practice issues of interest. Field based learning can be arranged for students enrolled in this unit.
SCWK6943 Practice Theory Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Susan Heward-Belle Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: presentation (30%); essay (55%) and participation statement (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to provide students with a sound understanding of a range of theorewill have the opportunity to examine current practices and practice theories in light of competing ideas espoused and employed in social work and community services. This unit will take an interdisciplinary approach to professional practice issues. It aims for the development of knowledge for reflective practice in contemporary sites of social work and community services endeavours.
SCWK6944 Dying, Death and Mourning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lindsey Napier Session: Semester 1 Classes: on-line Assessment: 6x500wd postings (30%) and participation (10%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit of study is to introduce students to the various, often competing discourses both constituting and challenging notions of self around death, dying and mourning. An important focus is sociological approaches to these issues as they reflect broader cultural understanding of such issues as community relations and continuity, sex and sexuality, disease, stigma and social control. This unit is also available as a single unit of study to professionals who wish to undertake this as a stand-alone unit.
EDPA6016 Organisations as Learning Communities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr George Odhiambo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1xhr seminar/week and 1hr on-line/week Assessment: 1x2000wd review (35%) and 1x3000wd essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a rapidly changing world the necessity for an organisation to improve performance in order to keep pace and even be in the forefront of changes is an imperative for long-term survival. This unit explores the concepts of the learning organisation, organisational learning and communities of practice and professional learning communities. Emphasis is placed upon the importance of dialogue in organisational learning. The use of scenario analysis, scenario planning and learning histories as means of supporting organisational learning is studied. Please note that intensive delivery is only available to Scots College Cohort.
EDPB5016 Global Poverty, Social Policy and Ed

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Anthony Welch Session: Semester 2 Classes: on-line Assessment: 500wd minor overview (10%) and 1200wd review (10%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 1500wd minor essay (20%) and 2500wd case study (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Investigation and analysis of: basic indicators of global poverty; key theories of poverty and development and their implications for social policy and education; western paradigms and their effects in non-western contexts; alternatives to westernisation; education as a form of foreign aid and development co-operation in multilateral, bilateral and non-government programs; multisectoral approaches to poverty alleviation strategies.
EDPK5003 Developing a Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rachel Wilson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x4.5 hr Saturday workshops, plus online lectures and activities Assessment: online exercises (40%) and class presentation (20%) and research proposal (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This core unit is seen as the foundation unit in research methods and it provides an overview of the research process, with a focus on critical evaluation of research reports and the design of research projects. It covers a wide range of basic research techniques and introduces other research methods that are the focus of more in-depth study in other search methods units. Research design issues and various methods of data collection examined. Students explore the use of quantitative and qualitative approaches; various research strategies; observation, documents, questionnaires and assessments. The assessment in this unit is developed around students' own research interests and by the end of the unit students will have developed their own research proposal document.

Capstone units

EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several meetings/discussions with supervisor Corequisites: EDPZ6725 Assessment: satisfactory progress during semester; students then must enrol in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 the following semester. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part one of the Dissertation which runs over two semesters; therefore, students must also enroll in EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2 in the following semester.
EDPZ6725 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several meetings/discussions with supervisor Prerequisites: EDPZ6724 Assessment: 1x12000wd report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Methods unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development. This unit is part two of the Dissertation which runs over two semester; therefore, students must have also enrolled in EDPZ6724 Dissertation Part 1 in the previous semester.
EDPZ6720 Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several meetings/discussions with supervisor. Assessment: 1x12000wd report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Dissertation is a piece of academic writing of approximately 12,000 words and represents a substantial original work. The Dissertation serves two different purposes in a student's progress through a Masters degree program, being a way for a student to study an area of interest in depth, or as a path to further research. Students seeking progress into a research higher degree, such as a doctoral program, are required to complete an empirical study, drawing on primary data. Note that for direct entry into a doctoral degree, an average of at least 80% across the Masters degree is needed. Students not intending to progress to a higher research degree may choose from a range of types of study. The Dissertation must incorporate an appropriate form of critical analysis and have as its basis a clearly structured conceptual framework. It is recommended that students complete a Research Method unit of study prior to undertaking the Dissertation, which will support the proposal development.
EDPZ6730 Special Project 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Hirsh Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: several sessions with supervisor Prerequisites: 24 credit points Assessment: 1x6000wd report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Special Project is a capstone unit, semester length independent investigation of a personally chosen topic in an educational context, the result of which is a 'product' of approximately 6,000 words such as a written report, review, account of the development of a resource, analysis of action or critique of research. All 'products' should be demonstrably informed by relevant theory and research. The satisfactory completion of this unit provides an alternative to the regular face-to-face classroom unit of study for candidates enrolled in a graduate coursework award.
SCWK6908 Authorised Independent Study and Report

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Margaret Spencer Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: independent study - meet with supervisor 3 times Assessment: 1x1000wd proposal (20%) and 1x5000wd research essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit of study is designed to provide students with the opportunity to integrate their learning over their degree working with a supervisor. This unit forms the capstone for social work masters level students. Students must initially develop a short proposal and discuss this with the unit coordinator, who will organise a suitable supervisor. It must be taken in the final semester of study.

Elective units from other faculties

Master of Policy Studies students may select up to two units of study from the following selected units of policy orientated study. Students in the Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies may select up to one unit of study from this list.
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
SCLG6903 New Debates in Social Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x2400wd Research essay (40%), 1x1200wd equivalent online presentations and discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores a series of issues of controversy and debate in social theory. These include debates over: the information age; new information and communication technologies; the new capitalism and changing work practices; the cultural sphere; new forms of power and surveillance; shifting claims to insight in knowledge societies; the role of education in social inequality; the bases of making knowledge claims; and globalisation. The unit involves both face-to-face seminars and online discussions.
Faculty of Law
LAWS6257 Public Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Patricia Apps Session: Intensive September Classes: Sep 3, 4 & 10, 11 (10-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6042, LAWS6139, LAWS6113 Assessment: problem-based assignment and class presentation of a case study (10%) and 5000wd essay (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Core unit for MALP students.
The aim of the unit is to provide an understanding of the role of government policy within the analytical framework of welfare economics. Questions of central interest include: What are the conditions that justify government intervention? How can policies be designed to support basic principles of social justice? What kinds of reforms promote economic efficiency? Applications will range from taxation and social security to environmental regulation and protection, and will cover the following specific topics: The structure of the Australian tax-benefit system; Uncertainty and social insurance; Unemployment, health and retirement income insurance; Externalities, environmental taxes and tradeable permits; Monopoly and environmental regulation; Utility pricing and access problems; Cost benefit analysis, intergenerational equity and growth. The unit will provide an overview of the main empirical methodologies used in evaluating policy reforms in these areas. Students may select to specialise in one or more of the policy areas.
Faculty of Medicine, School of Public Health
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, Professor Stephen Leeder Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (50%), 1x3000 word assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit develops skills for the effective critical appraisal of health policy. It familiarizes students with the principles, and limitations, of evidence-based health policy and how this is shaped by the health and political systems.
Learning objectives:
- to develop critical appraisal skills to critique the research that underpins policy
- to identify and analyse the main influences on policy development
- to evaluate existing policy frameworks and processes in relation to evidence, political context and broader community values
Content:
This unit builds policy analysis and analytical skills by exploring policy design, implementation and evaluation. It looks at the methods and limitations of evidence-based health policy and the problems of integrating equity concerns when developing and applying health policy. The workshops focus on the critical use of epidemiological and public policy analysis to build the evidence base for policy, taking into account political and social contexts.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning

 

Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies

Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies

Master of Policy Studies


These resolutions must be read in conjunction with applicable University By-laws, Rules and policies including (but not limited to) the University of Sydney (Coursework) Rule 2000 (the 'Coursework Rule'), the Resolutions of the Faculty, the University of Sydney (Student Appeals against Academic Decisions) Rule 2006 (as amended) and the Academic Board policies on Academic Dishonesty and Plagiarism.

Course resolutions

1 Course codes

Code

Course title

GCPOLSTD-02

Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies

GNPOLSTD-02

Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies

MAPOLSTD-02

Master of Policy Studies

 

2 Attendance pattern

The attendance pattern for the Master of Policy Studies and the Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies is full time or part time according to candidate choice, and for the Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies, it is part time only.

3 Master's type

The master's degree in these resolutions is a professional master's course, as defined by the Coursework Rule.

4 Embedded courses in this sequence

(1)
The embedded courses in this sequence are:
(a)
the Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies
(b)
the Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies
(c)
the Master of Policy Studies
(2)
Providing candidates satisfy the admission requirements for each stage, a candidate may progress to the award of any of the courses in this sequence. Only the longest award completed will be conferred.

5 Admission to candidature

(1)
Available places will be offered to qualified applicants based on merit, according to the following admissions criteria. In exceptional circumstances the Dean may admit applicants without these qualifications who, in the opinion of the faculty, have qualifications and evidence of experience and achievement sufficient to successfully undertake the award.
(2)
Admission to candidature for the Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies, the Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies and the Master of Policy Studies requires:
(a)
the Bachelor of Social Work degree from the University of Sydney, or equivalent qualification recognised by the Australian Association of Social Workers; and either relevant postgraduate studies or one year's full-time professional experience in the human services field; or
(b)
the Bachelor of Education degree from the University of Sydney, or equivalent qualification and either relevant postgraduate studies or one year's full-time professional experience in the human services field; or
(c)
a bachelor's degree from the University of Sydney in a relevant discipline, or equivalent qualification, and either relevant postgraduate studies or at least two years' relevant work experience in the human services field; or
(d)
in the case of the Graduate Diploma, completion of the embedded Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies from the University of Sydney, or equivalent qualification; or
(e)
in the case of the Master's degree, completion of the embedded Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies from the University of Sydney, or equivalent qualification.

6 Requirements for award

(1)
The units of study that may be taken for the courses are set out in the in the Table of Units of Study for the Graduate Certificate/Graduate Diploma/Master of Policy Studies.
(2)
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Certificate in Policy Studies a candidate must complete 24 credit points, comprising:
(a)
12 credit points of core units of study to be chosen from the Table; and
(b)
12 credit points of elective units of study to be chosen from the Policy Studies units in the Table.
(3)
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma in Policy Studies a candidate must complete 36 credit points, comprising:
(a)
a minimum of 12 credit points of core units of study to be chosen from the Table; and
(b)
a maximum of 24 credit points of elective units of study to be chosen from the Table, including:
(i)  a minimum of 18 credit points of units of study to be chosen from Policy Studies units and
(ii)  a maximum of 6 credit points of units of study to be chosen from the list of approved units of study from another faculty.
(4)
To qualify for the award of the Master of Policy Studies a candidate must complete 48 credit points, comprising:
(a)
a minimum of 12 credit points of core units of study chosen from the Table; plus
(b)
a maximum of 12 credit points of capstone units of study; and
(c)
a minimum of 24 credit points of elective units of study to be chosen from the Table, including:
(i)  a minimum of 12 credit points of Policy Studies units of study to be chosen from Policy Studies units; and
(ii)  a maximum of 12 credit points of units of study chosen from the list of approved units of study from another faculty.

7 Course transfer

A candidate for the master's degree or graduate diploma may elect to discontinue study and graduate with a shorter award from this embedded sequence, with the approval of the Dean, and provided the requirements of the shorter award have been met.

8 Transitional provisions

(1)
These resolutions apply to students who commenced their candidature after 1 January, 2015 and students who commenced their candidature prior to 1 January, 2015 who elect to proceed under these resolutions.
(2)
Candidates who commenced prior to 1 January, 2015 may complete the requirements in accordance with the resolutions in force at the time of their commencement, provided that the requirements are completed by 1 January, 2020 and provided that there is no suspension of candidature, in which case the candidature for any period shall proceed under the by-laws and resolutions in force at the time of re-enrolment. The Faculty may specify a later date for completion or specify alternative requirements for completion of candidatures that extend beyond this time.