Film Studies

Film Studies

ENGL1011 Introduction to Film Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Hardie Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical introduction to elements of film making and viewing, moving through an exploration of formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early cinema to youtube, and introduce a series of "case studies" to explore historical, cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.
ARHT2652 From Silent to Sound Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laleen Jayamanne Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ARHT2052 Assessment: 1x1500wd film analysis (30%), 1x2500wd essay (70%)
Note: Film Studies Core Unit. This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit for students who are already enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program.
Examining cinema as a manifestation of modernity, this unit of study contextualizes film as commodity, industry, institution and mass production of the senses. These concepts will be explored through a study of early American cinema and the Weimar cinema of Germany. The focus is on the aesthetics of the genres of Slapstick, Melodrama, and Horror/Fantasy, studied within an understanding of the historical and industrial context of each national cinema.
ARHT2653 Memory of the World: Key Films

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laleen Jayamanne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) or (6 Senior credit points from ICLS) Prohibitions: ARHT2053 Assessment: 1x1500wd film analysis (30%), 1x2500wd essay (70%)
1. A historical study of independent cinema, or New Wave movements in post-World War II Europe, including Italian Neo- Realism, the French New Wave and New German Cinema among others. 2. The study of Gilles Deleuze's thesis about these cinematic movements and concepts. 3. A study of the idea of Epic cinema cross-culturally so as to understand how memory is erased, sustained and created anew by film.
ARHT2655 Modern Cinema: Modes of Viewing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Keith Broadfoot Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ARHT2055 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2000wd tutorial paper (50%)
This unit of study will give an introduction to how film studies has analysed the meaning of a film in relation to how the film incorporates or addresses the spectator (what is known as theories of spectatorship). Commencing with debates around classical Hollywood cinema and the functioning of the point of view shot, the unit will examine how theories of spectatorship have understood the significance of different genres.
ARHT2656 Film Genres and National Cinemas

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ARHT2056 Assessment: 1x1000wd classification exercise (20%), 1x1000wd discussion paper (20%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%)
Nations are like movies: they are the result of complex imaginings. To what extent have nations been imagined through movies, and have movies been affected by national imaginings? This unit of study takes Hollywood as a starting point to examine the evolving relation of national cinemas and film genres. A national case study - for instance, Australian cinema - will be studied to identify and analyse some of the complexities of the relation of film genres and national audiences.
ARHT2657 Contemporary Hollywood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Isaacs Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ARHT1001 and ARHT1002) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Prohibitions: ARHT2057 Assessment: 1x3000wd research essay (60%) 1x1500wd review essay (30%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit of study will investigate the last two decades of the cinema of the USA, including Hollywood. Students will be introduced to the work of a number of established and emerging American filmmakers, to the work of a number of important film critics, and to issues concerning the theory and practice of film criticism. Critical and analytical focus will centre on the changing relation of subjectivity and time in independent cinema. Films that explore questions of subjectivity and that experiment with narrative structure will be featured.
ARIN2630 Digital Arts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kathy Cleland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (18 junior credit points from (Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender and Culture Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Media and Communication, Psychology or Sociology)) or (18 Junior credit points from GCST, SCLG, ANTH, ENGL1011, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: ARIN2300 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x1500wd art review (30%), 1x1000wd tutorial activity (15%), tutorial participation (15%)
Digital Arts explores the ways digital and new media technologies are being used to transform cultural production, distribution and reception in the visual and performing arts, film and popular culture. Students will learn about the changing aesthetic, cultural and technical dimensions of new digital technologies and will develop the critical and analytical tools with which to
discuss and evaluate digital art works and the ways that audiences interact with them.
ASLT2616 Australian Stage and Screen

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Kirkpatrick Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (18 junior credit points including 12 junior credit points from English) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ASLT2006, ASLT2016 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x oral presentation, 1x500wd written summary (20%)
Australian theatre and cinema have lively, at times intersecting, histories, and have played significant roles at both national and international levels, from the depiction of various local 'types' on stage and screen, to the work of Australian actors, directors and cinematographers overseas. This unit examines selected plays and films over the last century or so through a number of thematic focuses, including: race, gender and national identity; comic traditions; Australia and the world; modernity and innovation.
CAEL2039 Screen Arts: an Introduction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hour studio class/week Prerequisites: CASF1001 or 18 junior credit points from undergraduate table A for Arts and Social Sciences students including ENGL1011 Assessment: small group presentation (10%) and project proposal (20%) and major self-directed project (70%)
This unit of study introduces you to the conceptual frameworks and technologies that shape the making of screen-based media and contemporary art practices. Through a series of lectures, seminars, tutorials and screenings you will explore the evolution of experimental film, video art and independent filmmaking from the 1960s to the present. You will engage in the production of a self-directed digital film that may be realized in any style or genre. The unit is supported by a technical program that provides you with the applied skills and competencies needed for the use of studio facilities and equipment.
ENGL2617 Postmodernism

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Kate Lilley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1076 or HSTY1023) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ENGL2017 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd equivalent tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%)
This unit will explore some of the most interesting and innovative theoretical, literary and multimedia texts of the last half century. Some of the topics to be explored include the relationship between modernism and postmodernism; movements, communities and subcultures; experimentalism and activism; small press publishing and independent cinema; politics, history and cultural value; genre, style and intertextuality; auteurism and the 'death of the author'.
ENGL2638 Literature and Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Kelly Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ((12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001)) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: ENGL2038 Assessment: 1x500wd oral presentation (10%), 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (40%)
This unit will examine issues arising from a comparative study of literature and cinema, including: the continuities and discontinuities between the two mediums; the cultural and historical contexts of literary and cinematic texts; authorship, auteurism and aesthetic authority; adaptation and intertextuality; the figurative styles of literature and cinema; narrative and narration in literature and cinema; genre study.
ENGL3616 Reading Contemporary America

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Hardie Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (18 senior credit points from English or Australian Literature) or (ARHT2656 and 6 credit points from (ARHT2652, ARHT2653, ARHT2655, ARHT2567, ENGL2627, ENGL2638, ENGL3604, FILM2601, HSTY2608, ICLS2637 or MUSC2663)) Prohibitions: ENGL2635 Assessment: 1x1000wd presentation (20%), 1x1000wd critical reflection (20%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%)
In this unit we will investigate aesthetic production in the United States since 9/11. Students will explore the most interesting and engaging cultural work done in the US over the last decade, focusing on diverse communities beset by war, poverty, decline, debt, and crisis. We will look at literature, film, television, radio, photography and art. Our centrepiece is a sustained consideration of the television series The Wire.
EUST2020 Screening Europe: After 1989

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Walsh Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points from European Studies or European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies or Asian Studies, English; Government, History, Ancient History, Philosophy, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communications) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) Assessment: 1x1000wd assignment (30%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd exam (20%)
Cinema was born on the eve of a century of conflict in Europe. Celebrated as an avant-garde art form, it was also used for political propaganda and popular entertainment during the 20th century. Most recently European cinema has taken on another function, contributing to the creation of modern European identities through critical self-representation. This unit focuses on a range of recent films in order to study social and cultural change in the new Europe of the past two decades.
FRNC3690 French Political Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Royer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week and film screenings Prerequisites: FRNC2633 and 12 credit points from (FRNC2644, FRNC2651, FRNC2655, FRNC2656, FRNC2657, FRNC2671, FRNC2675, FRNC2680, FRNC2681, FRNC2688, FRNC2691, FRNC2692, FRNC2693) Assessment: 1x1hr class test (equivalent to 800wds) (20%), 1xtutorial presentation (equivalent to 1200wds) (30%), 1xessay (equivalent to 4000wds) (50%)
This unit will focus on a type of filmmaking that shows political and social awareness by depicting socio-political events, contemporary social realities in France and issues of marginality and difference. It will consider the contexts in which various trends of political films have emerged, the influence of post-war film history and contemporary events. The unit will explore issues of cinematic representation of marginality, ethnicity, sexuality and difference. Film screenings are an integral part of the course.
HSTY2608 European Film and History

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr film screening/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of History or Ancient History) or (6 senior credit points of European Studies) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: HSTY2008 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x2hr formal examination (40%) and tutorial participation (10%)
Using a number of significant films from across the continent of Europe, the unit examines the way in which films can both create the past and transform existing ideas about the past. The unit examines a range of different kinds of films: "historical" films which set out self-consciously to construct a version of the past as well as those in which film-makers have confronted the contemporary problems of their own society.
ICLS2637 Watching Stars: Film and the Star System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michelle Royer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points from European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, Asian Studies, English, Government, History, Ancient History, Philosophy, Political Economy, Sociology or Media and Communication Assessment: 1x oral presentation (20%), 2x2500wd essays (80%)
This unit will investigate how film stars reflect national preoccupations and how they achieve national and transnational fame. It will examine and compare several major film stars from several cultures and will analyse their star image through, for example, their on-screen performance in film adaptations, their celebrity bodies and faces and their representations in the popular media. Students will be introduced to film star theories. Students will have to attend at least 4 film screenings.
ITLN3679 Filming Fiction: The Italian Experience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giorgia Al├╣ Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ITLN1612 or HSC Italian Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1xoral presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), written assignments (equivalent to 2000wds) (30%), 1x2500wd final essay (40%)
An examination of the relationship between Italian cinema and fiction. Do they speak a common language? Do they employ comparable techniques? Who copies whom? This unit investigates these and other questions by analysing the adaptation of selected contemporary Italian novels into film.
JPNS3675 Japanese Cinema

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mats Karlsson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: (JPNS2622) or (12 Senior intermediate credit points from Asian Studies) or (ARHT2656 and one of ARHT2652, ARHT2653, ARHT2655, ARHT2657, ENGL2627, ENGL2638, ENGL3604, FILM2601, HSTY2608, ICLS2637 or MUSC2663) or (12 Senior credit points from ICLS) Assessment: 1x1800wd essay (30%) 1x1200wd film review (20%) 1x1000wd film blog (15%) 1x1500wd semester exam (25%) tutorial participation (10%)
Note: This unit is available as a designated 'Advanced' unit to students enrolled in the BA (Advanced) degree program
Cinema is an essential part of cultural life in Japan, which has one of the richest film traditions in the world. This unit introduces the history of Japanese cinema through lectures on important films organised according to major themes and genres. Besides weekly screenings of films, lectures will be richly illustrated with film excerpts. Students will gain an overall insight into the role of cinema in Japanese society and gain the ability to analyse films critically.
PHIL2658 Philosophy in Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr David Macarthur Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week, 1x film screening/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points of Philosophy) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), 1x1500wd take-home assignment (30%), 1x2500wd essay (50%) and tutorial participation (10%)
This unit will use the screening and criticism of carefully chosen classical and contemporary films to raise important philosophical questions and to contribute to our response to them. Each film screening will be paired with a key philosophical question that is explored in the film and further investigated in class: problems of freedom, human action, democracy, crime, love, otherness, marriage, conversation, selfhood, and being human. The class will also explore some central questions in the philosophy of film.
RLST2628 Religion and Film

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Hartney Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points from Studies in Religion) or (18 junior credit points including ENGL1011) Prohibitions: RLST2028 Assessment: 1x1500wd take-home exercise (30%), 1x2500wd word essay (50%), 1x500 wd tutorial presentation (20%)
This unit analyses the position of religion in a range of films, such as the presentation of Buddhism in recent Western films (Kundun, Little Buddha, Seven Years in Tibet); the image of Christianity in 'sword and sandal' epics (Ben Hur, Quo Vadis); the role of film in familiarising Western audiences with unfamiliar religious traditions (e.g. ethnographic documentaries); and the depiction of post-modern religious concerns in science fiction (Blade Runner, The Matrix etc).
FILM4101 Film Studies Honours A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week, 4x workshops/semester Prerequisites: Credit average or better in 48 senior credit points in Film Studies. Candidates who do not have this prerequisite should contact the Honours Coordinator to determine possible waiving of the prerequisite Assessment: 1x18000-20000wd thesis (60%), 2x6000-8000wd written works from one seminar and one workshop (2x20%)
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The Honours program in Film Studies consists of: 1. a thesis written under the supervision of one or more members of academic staff, 2. a seminar (What is Cinema Studies) that meets weekly for two hours for one semester 3. a workshop (Studying Fim Festivals) that meets during one semester. The thesis should be of 18000-20000 words in length. Each seminar and the workshop require 6000-8000 words of written work or its equivalent. The thesis is worth 60% of the final Honours mark and each of the seminars and workshop is worth 20%.
FILM4102 Film Studies Honours B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FILM4101
Refer to FILM4101
FILM4103 Film Studies Honours C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FILM4102
Refer to FILM4101
FILM4104 Film Studies Honours D

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Smith Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: FILM4103
Refer to FILM4101