Unit of Study Descriptions

Bachelor of Project Management

Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Project Management are required to gain credit points for the core units of study set out below. Any additional credit necessary to satisfy the degree requirement of not less than 144 credit points shall be gained by completing additional elective units of study, as recommended by the School (as set out below).
Students in BPM must complete the requirements of one of the three streams; Civil Engineering Science; Built Environment; Software. Requirements for each stream are shown below.

Core units of study

First year: all streams

MATH1021 Calculus Of One Variable

Credit points: 3 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or MATH1111 or ENVX1001 or MATH1001 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1. Students who have not completed HSC Extension 1 Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Extension 1 Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: exam, quizzes, assignments Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook.
MATH1002 Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1014 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: One 1.5 hour examination, assignments and quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MATH1002 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering.
This unit of study introduces vectors and vector algebra, linear algebra including solutions of linear systems, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1023 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling

Credit points: 3 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: MATH1013 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1003 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1. Students who have not completed HSC Extension 1 Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Extension 1 Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: exam, quizzes, assignments Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1005 Statistical Thinking with Data

Credit points: 3 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/week; Practical 1 hr/week Prohibitions: MATH1015 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or STAT1022 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: One 1.5 hour examination, assignments and quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a data-rich world, global citizens need to problem solve with data, and evidence based decision-making is essential is every field of research and work.
This unit equips you with the foundational statistical thinking to become a critical consumer of data. You will learn to think analytically about data and to evaluate the validity and accuracy of any conclusions drawn. Focusing on statistical literacy, the unit covers foundational statistical concepts, including the design of experiments, exploratory data analysis, sampling and tests of significance.
Textbooks
Freedman, Pisani and Purves, Statistics, Norton, 2007
ENGG1850 Introduction to Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL3805 or QBUS2350 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Organisations today are heavily reliant on projects as part of their daily operations. A project is a temporary endeavour undertaken with limited resources to achieve organisational goals that are linked to broader organisational strategies and missions. Project management is therefore the process of planning, scheduling, resourcing, budgeting and monitoring the various phases of a project.
"Introduction to Project Management" is an introductory course that teaches students essential principles and concepts of project management, its application and related technologies. Students will learn about the project organisation, its structure, and role of the project manager, project sponsor and project committee. In addition, students will also learn how to identify business problems that require project-based solutions, how to select and evaluate projects, develop a business case, and manage the project at a basic level.
At completion of the course, students will have a high-level understanding of project management concepts, which equips them with basic technical and managerial skills required for project-based organisations.
ENGG1801 Engineering Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to solving engineering problems using computers. Students learn how to organise data to present and understand it better using a spreadsheet (Excel), and also how to instruct the computer exactly what to do to solve complex problems using programming (Matlab). Real engineering examples, applications and case-studies are given, and students are required to think creatively and solve problems using computer tools.
Matlab will cover three-quarters of the unit. The remaining one-quarter will be devoted to the use of Excel in engineering scenarios. Furthermore, cross integration between Matlab and Excel will also be highlighted.
No programming experience is required or assumed. Students are assumed to have a basic understanding of mathematics and logic, and very elementary computing skills.
BUSS1040 Economics for Business Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ECON1001 OR ECON1040 Assessment: written assignment (15%), on-line quizzes (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), and final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Economics underlies all business decisions, from pricing to product development, to negotiations, to understanding the general economic environment. This unit provides an introduction to economic analysis with a particular focus on concepts and applications relevant to business. This unit addresses how individual consumers and firms make decisions and how they interact in markets. It also introduces a framework for understanding and analysing the broader economic and public policy environment in which a business competes. This unit provides a rigorous platform for further study and a major in economics as well as providing valuable tools of analysis that complement a student's general business training, regardless of their area of specialisation.
PMGT1852 Communications and Stakeholder Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: ENGG1850 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%) and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective stakeholder management and communication play a vital role in the success of projects. Project managers and leaders often express that stakeholder management, leadership and communication are often the most sought-after competencies. This unit of study focuses on the process of stakeholder identification; defining their roles and responsibilities; understanding their organisation mission, vision and overall strategic objectives; alignment and prioritisation of specific project needs and requirements; with emphasis on stakeholder engagement/analytic methodologies such as analysing stakeholder influence, reliance, collaboration and communication networks. The unit of study will also cover aspects of psychology, emotional intelligence, communication techniques and leadership qualities required for effective performance in project management roles.

First year: Civil Engineering Science stream

CIVL1802 Statics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1802 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Unit will focus on Engineering Statics, covering topics such as resolution of forces and moments, free body diagrams, support reactions, equilibrium in rigid bodies, trusses frames and machines, method of sections, method of joints, centroids, distributed forces, vibrations and friction. There will be extensive use of both 2D and 3D examples and solution methods by either resolution in the principle axes or by using vectors. Its main aim is to prepare students for 2nd year civil units such as Structural Mechanics.
CIVL1900 Introduction to Civil Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1800 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of this unit of study is to introduce students to the field of civil engineering and its areas of specialisation: structural engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, construction management, transportation engineering, and humanitarian engineering. The unit will cover basic physics concepts relevant to civil engineering. The unit will equip students with knowledge of foundational civil engineering tools and techniques such as the identification and calculation of loads on structures, structural systems, and load paths in structures. The unit covers design and construction issues related to the use of standard materials such as steel, concrete, and timber. The unit includes several design tasks and a design project with an emphasis on issues associated with the impact of civil infrastructure on the natural environment, the economy, and social and humanitarian outcomes. The topics will provide a sound foundation for the further study of civil infrastructure design, analysis, construction, and maintenance.

First Year: Built Environment stream

DAAE1001 Living Cities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dallas Rogers Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk (Weeks 1-6), 1 hr/wk (Weeks 7-13); tutorial 1 hr/wk (Weeks 1-6), 2 hrs/wk (Weeks 7-13) Assumed knowledge: DECO1006 and DECO1012 and BDES1011 and AWSS1001 Assessment: Assessment 1 (30%); Assessment 2 (30%); Assessment 3 (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study reviews the challenges involved in planning the contemporary urban environment. It covers a range of perspectives, including urban planning, urban design and heritage. Students will examine the evolution of towns and cities from the first settlements to the modern metropolis, and explore the cultural, economic, political and digital drivers that shape the urban environment. It asks, 'why did cities evolve?', 'what purpose do cities serve?', 'who is the city for?', and 'how are decisions made about cities?' The contemporary urban environment is explored as a dynamic and continually evolving 'living city' that is co-created by architects, planners, urban designers and other public and private stakeholders. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated an understanding of the importance of planning in shaping our towns and cities through time. They will have a basic knowledge of the key ideas that are needed for formulating planning and urban design proposals.
Textbooks
Course material, announcements and assessment submission will be available at https://elearning.sydney.edu.au/
DAAE2001 Australian Architecture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Andrew Leach Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: DESA2305 Assessment: One process development presentation and one 3,000-word essay (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce students to the history of Australian architecture in its various contexts. Lectures and seminars will cover key architects, projects and building types and their relation to Australian history. Students will become familiar with a range of architectural styles and movements and their characteristics. They will undertake individual self-directed research and learn how to record and present the results of this research. Students will also acquire an appreciation of the factors that shape architectural design and thought in Australia and how these relate to wider social and cultural circumstances. Tutorials will introduce students to key books, essays and journals concerned with Australian architecture. On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: demonstrate a familiarity with a range of Australian architects, buildings and types; research, record and present a specific project in Sydney; connect specific works to other works of a similar style, period or cultural context. This will be assessed in the submitted essay.

First Year: Software stream

INFO1110 Introduction to Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.
INFO1113 Object-Oriented Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Prerequisites: INFO1110 Prohibitions: INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Object-oriented (OO) programming is a technique that arranges code into classes, each encapsulating in one place related data and the operations on that data. Inheritance is used to reuse code from a more general class, in specialised situations. Most modern programming languages provide OO features. Understanding and using these are an essential skill to software developers in industry. This unit provides the student with the concepts and individual programming skills in OO programming, starting from their previous mastery of procedural programming.

Second year: All streams

ENGG2850 Introduction to Project Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL3812 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a theory and case study based unit providing students with a unified approach to the analysis of project value, supported by explicit methods for ranking and selection of projects on the basis of returns and sensitivity. The unit uses "Project Finance" as a vehicle for descibing the fundamentals of project management financing and contrasts it with "Direct Financing", a more traditional approach to funding projects.
ENGG2851 Data Analytics for Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND (MATH1011 OR MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1013 OR MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1015 OR MATH1005 OR MATH1905) Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Management Data analytics (DA) provides extensive coverage related to examining raw data with the purpose of drawing conclusions about that information. It is used in many industries to allow companies and organisation to make better business decisions and in the sciences to verify or disprove existing models or theories. Here, we focus our effort on providing in-depth knowledge and skills to students focusing on inference, process of deriving a conclusion based solely on what is already known by the project manager.
ENGG2852 Project Based Organisational Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND (PSYC1002 OR PMGT1852) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project based organisational behaviour focuses on human behaviour in organisational and project based context, with a focus on individual and group processes and actions. It involves an exploration of organisational and managerial processes in the dynamic context of organisation and is primarily concerned with human implications of project based activity. In this unit, we offer a succinct, lively and robust introduction to the subject of organisational behaviour. It aims to encourage critical examination of the theory of organisational behaviour whilst also enabling students to interpret and deal with real organisational problems in project management and combines relative brevity with thorough coverage and plentiful real-world examples.
ENGG2855 Project Quality Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project Quality Management offers a specific, succinct, step-by-step project quality management process. It offers an immediate hands-on capability to improve project implementation and customer satisfaction in any project domain and will help maintain cost and schedule constraints to ensure a quality project. This unit introduces tools and techniques that implement the general methods defined in A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge-Third Edition (PMBOK) published by the Project Management Institute (PMI), and augment those methods with more detailed, hands-on procedures that have been proven through actual practice. This unit is aimed at providing students an explicit step-by-step quality management process, along with a coherent set of quality tools organised and explained according to their application within this process that can be applied immediately in any project context. It further introduces a Wheel of Quality that codifies in one complete image the contributing elements of contemporary quality management. It also help in understanding the process for establishing a new quality tool, the pillar diagram, that provides a needed capability to identify root causes of undesirable effects.

Second Year: Civil Engineering Science stream

CIVL2201 Structural Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1802 OR CIVL1802 Prohibitions: AMME2301 Assumed knowledge: From (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802), students should be competent in the following areas. 1. The concept of force and momentum equilibrium in two and three dimensions. 2. Drawing free body diagrams. 3. Establishing and solving the equations of equilibrium from the FBD. 4. Setting out solutions logically, clearly and neatly. Students should be competent in certain mathematical skills. 1. Solving algebraic equations. 2. Differentiation and integration (including double integrals). 3. Drawing graphs of polynomials (especially) and other mathematical function. 4. Trigonometry. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The primary objective of this unit is to understand internal actions (forces and moments) in structures (deformable objects) under loads in three key areas: how structures resist external loads by internal actions; the distribution of internal actions within structures; and the deformations, stresses and strains associated with the internal actions. At the end of this unit, students should be able to understand the basic methods of load transfer in structures - tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion (internal actions); apply the equations of equilibrium to determine the distribution of internal actions in a simple structure by drawing BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; understand the significance and methods of calculation of the geometric properties of structural sections (I, Z, S, J, etc.); understand the effect of internal forces and deformations of bodies through the concept and calculation of strains and stresses; appreciate the behaviour of structures by analysing structures without numerical calculations; display a knowledge of basic material properties, combined stresses and failure criteria; and demonstrate their hands-on experience of the behaviour of structural members via experiments and the ability to prepare written reports on those experiments. Emphasis in the assessment scheme will be placed on understanding structural behaviour and solving problems, rather than remembering formulae or performing complex calculations. The course seeks to utilise and improve the generic skills of students, in areas such as problem solving, neat and logical setting out of solutions, report writing, and team work. The syllabus comprises introduction; equilibrium; internal actions: BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; elasticity, stress and strain, and basic material properties; axial forces: tension and compression; elastic bending of beams; shear force and shear stresses in beams; torsion; deflection of beams; pipes and pressure vessels; trusses; material properties, combined stresses and yield criteria; advanced bending; introduction to buckling and instability.
CIVL1810 Engineering Construction and Surveying

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workgroups, Lectures Prohibitions: CIVL2810 Assumed knowledge: CIVL1900. Some statistical awareness is an advantage and co-enrolment in MATH1005 Statistics is advised. HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or completion of (MATH1001 or MATH1021) and MATH1002 are sufficient for non-statistical maths preparation Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%), Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: In recent years - the course has included a 1.5 day camp at Webbs Creek (about 80km from Sydney). The camp is located in a bushland setting. It aims to provide valuable practice in practical field survey and has a secondary aim of providing a basis for social gathering (this aspect being requested in student feedback over recent years)
Construction: Fundamental understanding of construction materials and techniques underpins Civil design and complements a rigorous analysis covered in other units such as Structural Mechanics and Soil Mechanics. In this unit students will be introduced to the realities of on-site civil construction. For many students this comes as a completely foreign experience and the methods they need to use to succeed in this unit rely on the student building his or her own awareness of the construction world and how it operates. This will be guided by the lectures and on-line material, but will not be spoon-fed to the students.
This unit presents concepts introducing students to engineering construction including:
- design, control, management, measurement and construction methods for excavation, embankments and other earthworks, hauling and associated operations;
- conceptual and formative exposure to building construction methods and materials, including reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber;
- drilling and blasting.
Surveying: The unit also introduces Engineering Survey topics, where the aims are:
- give an overall view of the functions of surveying and it's service role in Civil construction;
- become acquainted with selected specific surveying techniques, such as: (a) to provide basic analogue methods of distance, angle and height measurement and, (b) to provide an understanding of three dimensional mapping using basic total station electronic field equipment with associated data capture ability, and;
- to give an insight into future trends in the use of GPS and GIS systems.
Students should develop basic competency in earthwork engineering and awareness of costing issues in formulating building proposals (through simplified examples). Economic optimisation is investigated, and how this impinges on decisions of construction, including proposing and analysing systems and methods, estimation of probable output, unit cost and productivity evaluation. Students should have a basic knowledge of vertical construction in reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber. Students should also develop proficiency in the design and implementation of mapping systems in Civil Engineering, using analogue and electronic field equipment and associated software packages.
The tutorial exercises give practise for students to implement what they have learned from lectures and their own research about the framework under which construction projects are formulated and analysed; construction engineering fundamentals; construction systems related to excavation, hauling and embankment construction, including selection and evaluation of plant and methods as well as the expected output and cost; introduction to construction operations management, introduction to engineering surveying, distance measurement, angle measurement, levelling, traversing, topographic surveys, electronic surveying equipment, future surveying technologies.
While prior exposure to an actual construction site would be beneficial, in any case the key for success in this unit is for the student to develop a hungry curiosity for the world of construction and the professionals and personalities which form the intricate patchwork of talent which sees complex projects through to successful completion.

Second Year: Built Environment stream

BADP2002 City Form and Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 2 hrs/wk, tutorials 1 hr/wk Prerequisites: DAAE1001 or (DAAE2002 and ENGG1850) Assessment: Assessment 1 (individual) (30%), Assessment 2 (40%), Assessment 3 (group) (20%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the content of Living Cities and introduces students to the modern formal domains of planning, urban design and heritage conservation. The focus will be on two main areas of debate, namely, city form and structure, and secondly, the planning and development processes on which the formal planned city is made. The unit will establish the context in which the role of planners, architects and urban designers in the process of building the 'incremental' city is understood, from the site to precinct, neighbourhood and city wide levels. Elements of city form and structure are analysed, as well as mobility, transport, land use, infrastructure and current policy responses at a metropolitan and local level in meeting urban growth needs. The unit will also overview the development process including the framework in which architects, planners and property developers must work. Using a contemporary planning framework, the nature of development assessment, strategic planning and the community's role within this framework are explored. Criticisms and reform agendas around frameworks will be examined. Informal urbanism is also introduced in this unit to address development that occurs outside the domain of formal western regulated planning and design systems.
DESA3011 Introduction to Building Construction

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Damien Madell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hr lecture/tutorial/week Assessment: Two assignments (40%) and (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides a comprehensive overview of standard domestic scaled construction in Australia. It begins by introducing a number of recurrent themes in construction including the idea of building culture, the various modes of delivery and variety of classifications of buildings and building elements, rational construction and construction detailing from first principles. There follows a review of construction techniques of well-documented and/or accessible exemplars. Finally, the unit will review current issues related to key attributes of buildings which make them sustainable, particularly with regard to material selection, appropriate detailing and energy and resources conservation.

Second Year: Software stream

ISYS2110 Analysis and Design of Web Info Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO2110 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organisations use to determine how they should conduct their business, with a particular focus on how web-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way business is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analysing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, web-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.
ISYS2120 Data and Information Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1003 OR INFO1903 OR DECO1012 Prohibitions: INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR COMP5138 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ubiquitous use of information technology leaves us facing a tsunami of data produced by users, IT systems and mobile devices. The proper management of data is hence essential for all applications and for effective decision making within organizations.
This unit of study will introduce the basic concepts of database designs at the conceptual, logical and physical levels. We will place particular emphasis on introducing integrity constraints and the concept of data normalization which prevents data from being corrupted or duplicated in different parts of the database. This in turn helps in the data remaining consistent during its lifetime. Once a database design is in place, the emphasis shifts towards querying the data in order to extract useful information. The unit will introduce the SQL database query languages, which is industry standard. Other topics covered will include the important concept of transaction management, application development with a backend database, and an overview of data warehousing and OLAP.

Third year: All streams

ENGG3853 Project Risk Management Tools and Techniques

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG2851. Prohibitions: CIVL4810 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing risk is an essential skill to be a successful project manager. This course will provide students with an understanding of what is risk and the key principles of risk management as described in AS/NZS ISO 31000: 2009. The course will show how these principles can be applied to project management both through the project development phase and the project delivery phase. This will include skills on how to measure and value risk and assess the potential impacts it may have on a project outcomes using qualitative and quantitative risk assessment techniques. Using case studies students will learn ways to treat risk to minimise the potential impact. The course will also cover techniques for establishing levels of risk appetite and risk tolerance. It will overview risk reporting tools and templates and conclude with a session on human behaviour and how this impacts on risk acceptance and risk aversion in a project context.
On successful completion of this course students will have a good understanding of the basic principles of risk and risk management, be able to apply risk assessment and treatment techniques, be able to quantify potential risk impacts and to establish a prioritised project risk register.
ENGG3854 Negotiating and Contracting

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND ENGG2850 AND ENGG2852. Prohibitions: CIVL3813 or CIVL4813 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, we draw on examples on project negotiation and contracting from "real-life" business situations and provide practical information on what to do and what not to do. Student would be exposed to the complexity involved in negotiation and contracting from initiation to formalization of final form of contract which is agreed upon and executed by all parties. Students will be taught how to understand each party's interests and then working towards reaching a common goal. In particular, dealing with complex characters including situations will be covered.
We will provide a basic understanding of commercial contracts and all their ramifications every step of the way. This unit also explains the basics of commercial contract law, highlights how to spot potential issues before they become a problem and then how to work with a lawyer more effectively if things go wrong which is intended for corporate managers rather than lawyers. This unit further contains coverage on forming contracts, restitution, contract interpretation, modification and dispute resolution. We also discuss remedies, performance, and third-party beneficiaries.
PMGT3850 Project Management Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 30 credits of 2nd or 3rd year units of study Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of the course coordinator and School`s Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the the course coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
In this intensive PM capstone project, students are required to apply all of the skills necessary to successfully initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project. Working as part of a team mid-sized, high-priority project, student will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables, including the project charter, project plan, change control process, status reports and post-project reviews. Students will facilitate meetings, update the project plan with actuals and changes, present status to management, justify decisions to key stakeholders and determine the impacts of their actions on the project. Under the guidance of a project professional and their academic supervisor, students will be given direct feedback towards achieving project goals.
PM Capstone Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to project management. Students will generally work in groups, although assessment components such as reflective reports and participation are marked individually. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of PM Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
PM Capstone Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, PM Capstone Project A (PMGT3850) and PM Capstone Project B (PMGT3851). This particular unit of study, which must precede PMGT3851 PM Capstone Project B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete 'final year' project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT3851 Project Management Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Practical Work Prerequisites: 30 credits of 2nd year units of study, and PMGT3850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this intensive PM capstone project, students are required to apply all of the skills necessary to successfully initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project. Working as part of a team on a simulated four-month, mid-sized, high-priority project, student will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables, including the project charter, project plan, change control process, status reports and post-project reviews. Students will facilitate meetings, update the project plan with actuals and changes, present status to management, justify your decisions to key stakeholders and determine the impacts of your actions on multiple projects. Under the guidance of a senior project manager and their academic supervisor, students will be given direct feedback and techniques to increase efficiency and effectiveness.
PM Capstone Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to civil engineering. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of reports will be done individually; i. e. , a separate report must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of PM Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
PM Capstone Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, PM Capstone Project A (PMGT3850) and PM Capstone Project B (PMGT3851). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by PMGT3850 PM Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the required project work. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT3850 PM Capstone Project A.
PMGT3855 Project Variance Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG2851 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project variance analysis uniquely shows project managers how to effectively integrate technical, schedule, and cost objectives by improving earned value management (EVM) practices. Providing innovative guidelines, methods, examples, and templates consistent with capability models and standards, this unit approaches EVM from a practical level with understandable techniques that are applicable to the management of any project. It also explains how to incorporate EVM with key systems engineering, software engineering, and project management processes such as establishing the technical or quality baseline, requirements management, using product metrics, and meeting success criteria for technical reviews. Detailed information is included on linking product requirements, project work products, the project plan, and the Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB), as well as correlating technical performance measures (TPM) with EVM.
PMGT3858 Complex Project Coordination

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND ENGG2852. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Complex projects have always existed, but their frequency and importance are increasing in a complex, intertwined world. 'Complex' is qualitatively different from 'complicated. ' Complex projects are characterised by a web of interactions between their elements that lead to non-linearity, emergence, adaptiveness and other novel features. That is to say, they behave as Complex Adaptive Systems, and they should be managed as such. The majority of projects demonstrate some degree of complexity. The traditional model of projects is expressed in standard methodologies such as PMBoK, Prince2, and MS Project. While absolutely necessary as a basis for effective project management, the limitations of these methodologies become evident when uncertainty - structural, technical, directional or temporal - begins to intrude on a project. In these situations, a systemic pluralist approach is to be preferred. Project management then becomes less like painting by numbers, and more like selecting from a rich and broad palette of methods, tools and techniques. Such competencies can make a substantial difference, in a complex world with an unacceptably high rate of project failure.
Students undertaking a combined BE(Hons)/BPM which includes an Honours Thesis are not required to complete PMGT3850 or PMGT3851 Project Management Capstone units.

Third Year: Civil Engineering Science stream

CIVL2700 Transport Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND MATH1005 AND ENGG1801. Basic statistics through regression analysis, differential and integral calculus, computer programming. Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to transport systems and is assumed knowledge for fourth year units on traffic engineering, transport planning, and city logistics. Topics include: the role of accessibility as the reason for transport; the history of transport technologies in Australia and globally; the characteristics of the principle modes of transport; factors behind the demand for mobility; qualitative choice modeling; agent-based modeling; predicting travel demands; the mechanics of queueing and traffic flow; intelligent transport systems; the microscopic and macroscopic fundamental diagrams; highway capacity and level of service; the design of transport junctions.
Select one of the following units:
CIVL2410 Soil Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND GEOL1501 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802). An understanding of simple statics, equilibrium, forces and bending moments, and of stress and strain and the relationship between them. This is covered by University of Sydney courses CIVL1802 Statics (or ENGG1802 Engineering Mechanics), CIVL2201 Structural Mechanics. Familiarity with the use of spreadsheets (Excel, Mathcad) to obtain solutions to engineering problems, and with the graphical presentation of this data. Familiarity with word processing packages for report presentation. Familiarity with partial differential equations, and their analytical and numerical solution. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course provides an elementary introduction to Geotechnical Engineering, and provides the basic mechanics necessary for the detailed study of Geotechnical Engineering. This course aims to provide an understanding of: the nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes; the importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement; methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.
CIVL2611 Introductory Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021). Students are expected to have a strong understanding of fundamental physics, statics, equilibrium, forces, and dimensional analysis. Familiarity with simple calculus, partial differential equations, and the analytical and numerical solutions. Assessment: Through semester assessment (44%) and Final Exam (56%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of this unit of study is to develop an understanding of basic fluid concepts for inviscid and incompressible fluids. Topics to be covered will include: basic fluid properties, hydrostatics, buoyancy, stability, pressure distribution in a fluid with rigid body motion, fluid dynamics, conservation of mass and momentum, dimensional analysis, open channel flow, and pipe flow.
This core unit of study together with CIVL3612 forms the basis for further studies in the applied areas of ocean, coastal and wind engineering and other elective fluid mechanics units which may be offered.
CIVL3811 Engineering Design and Construction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: workshops, project work - own time, presentation Prohibitions: CIVL4811 Assumed knowledge: CIVL1810 OR CIVL2810 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The twin foci of this unit are: to enable students to participate as design engineers by developing an understanding of the design principles and techniques involved in the planning of a range of construction activities; and to assist students in preparing themselves for the role of a site engineer in a construction project wherein they will become familiar with the planning and execution of those activities, albeit with supervision and guidance from experienced professionals. Construction topics include hard rock tunnelling and general rock excavation; soft ground tunnelling; underground construction; micro tunnelling; cut and cover tunnelling; earth retaining systems; piling; formwork and falsework; dewatering; pavement design and construction - rigid and flexible; stormwater drainage design and construction; marine construction; civil construction in environmentally sensitive areas; contract administration for construction engineers; general engineering in remote localities (project based); construction methods in bridge engineering; QA documentation on a typical project; insurance in the construction industry, OHandS issues in the construction industry; timber engineering; post-tensioned/prestressed concrete construction.

Third Year: Built Environment stream

DAAE3001 Sustainable Architectural Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Ryan Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/wk, tutorial/lab 2 hrs/wk for weeks 1 to 12 Prerequisites: BDES1023 or (DAAE1001 and DESA3011) or (DAAE2002 and DESP1001) Assessment: Case Studies (30%), Design Exercise (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The unit of study begins by exploring the concept of ecologically sustainable design as it applies to architectural practice and defines those key attributes of buildings which make them sustainable. It discusses the implication of applying sustainable design principles upon contemporary architectural practice. This unit will cover the fundamentals of passive solar design, the environmental impact of building materials, water sensitive design and the environmental certification of buildings. Through the use of case studies and project work students will learn about how to design environmentally sustainable buildings by understanding contemporary trends in sustainable architectural practice, methods to critically evaluate environmental claims about buildings and will develop a personal position on applying sustainable design principles to architecture. This unit is an Architecture Elective in the Bachelor of Design in Architecture and elective in other courses.
BADP3002 Property and the Built Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adrienne Keane Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 2hrs/week; tutorial 1hr/week Prerequisites: BAEN3001 or (DAAE1001 and DESA3011) or (DAAE2002 and DESP1001) Corequisites: BAEN3002 or ENGG3854 Assessment: Assessment 1 (25%), Assessment 2 (25%) and Assessment 3 (50%). One or more of these assessments may be group tasks. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the Property Development (PD) process with the aim of imparting an understanding of the professional's role, delivered through a review of the stages involved in PD, an overview of the different sectors, project types and stakeholders. The unit will introduce the broad objectives of financial feasibility preparation and give insights to the feasibility aspects that accompany design criteria, to determine which projects are developed. It will present an overview of risk factors, which may be encountered in the process, including risk assessment/management, the risk matrix and possible counter measures. The unit introduces basic construction types, preparation of costings from industry publications, an overview of the construction industry, project stakeholders and the hierarchy of a construction project. On completion it is envisaged students will be able to identify major stakeholders, prepare initial construction costings and project feasibility reports outlining risks with mitigation measures. Students will have developed an understanding of PD, its effects on cities, its role in the economy, the processes and stakeholders involved. Students will also have gained an insight into construction, initial project cost planning, risk management and feasibility for a property development project.

Third Year: Software stream

ELEC3609 Internet Software Platforms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: (INFO1103 OR INFO1110) AND (INFO2110 OR ISYS2110) AND (INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR ISYS2120) Prohibitions: EBUS4001 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the design, the architecture and the development of web applications using technologies currently popular in the marketplace including Java and . NET environments. There are three key themes examined in the unit: Presentation layer, Persistence layer, and Interoperability. The unit will examine practical technologies such as JSP and Servlets, the model-view-controller (MVC) architecture, database programming with ADO. NET and JDBC, advanced persistence using ORM, XML for interoperability, and XML-based SOAP services and Ajax, in support of the theoretical themes identified.
On completion the students should be able to: Compare Java/J2EE web application development with Microsoft . NET web application development; Exposure to relevant developer tools (e. g. Eclipse and VS. NET); Be able to develop a real application on one of those environments; Use XML to implement simple web services and AJAX applications.
ELEC3610 E-Business Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials Prohibitions: EBUS3003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the essential pre-production stages of designing successful internet websites and services. It focuses on the aspects of analysis, project specification, design, and prototype that lead up to the actual build of a website or application. Topics include, B2C, B2B and B2E systems, business models, methodologies, modeling with use cases / UML and WebML, the Project Proposal and Project Specification Document, Information Architecture and User-Centred Design, legal issues, and standards-based web development. Students build a simple use-case based e-business website prototype with web standards. A final presentation of the analysis, design and prototype are presented in a role play environment where students try to win funding from a venture capitalist. An understanding of these pre-production fundamentals is critical for future IT and Software Engineering Consultants, Project Managers, Analysts and CTOs.

Notes

1. For core units of study offered by faculties other than the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies, any assumed knowledge, prerequisite and corequisite requirements will be as prescribed by the faculty which offers the unit.
2. Candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Project Management are expected to complete all the core units of study listed above. They are also required to gain additional 12 credit points from a choice of free elective units offered by the University of Sydney.
3. Most Mathematics, Chemistry, Physics and Computer Science units of study offered by the Faculty of Science can be replaced by equivalent advanced level units of study subject to prerequisite conditions (as required by the Faculty of Science) being met. Students considering doing advanced options should seek advice from the relevant School before enrolling.

Recommended Electives

In addition to the core units in the above table candidates for the single degree must complete electives to gain a total of 144 credit points as required for the degree. The following are recommended elective units of study.

Project Management Electives

Candidates enrolled in a combined degree must complete a minimum of 18 credit points of Project Management Electives
PMGT2800 Project Placement A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: practical experience, workshops, meetings Assumed knowledge: ENGG1850 AND MATH1005 AND BUSS1040 AND PMGT1852. This unit of study is only available to students who have a credit average or above and who have obtained approval from the program director. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study provides student with internship and/or work placement opportunities in the field of project management. It allows student to translate their learning from their junior and intermediate units of study within Bachelor of Project Management degree into experiential learning in a real world context. Students will be required to work with the supporting/host organisation for a minimum of 120 hours or 20 working days and this arrangement needs to be endorsed by both the academic director of the program or equivalent and the supervisor of the host organisation prior to the beginning of the placement. Students will gain valuable industry and professional experience from this unit of study including communication and key aspects of project management skills such as planning, scheduling, costing, coordinating, resourcing, budgeting, monitoring and reporting. It is anticipated that this unit of study would enrich the learning experience as well as enhance future business development or job employment opportunities in the project management context.
PMGT2801 Project Placement B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: practical experience, workshops, meetings Assumed knowledge: ENGG1850 AND MATH1005 AND BUSS1040 AND PMGT1852 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study provides student with internship and/or work placement opportunities in the field of project management. It allows student to translate their learning from their junior and intermediate units of study within Bachelor of Project Management degree into experiential learning in a real world context. Students will be required to work with the supporting/host organisation for a minimum of 120 hours or 20 working days and this arrangement needs to be endorsed by both the academic director of the program or equivalent and the supervisor of the host organisation prior to the beginning of the placement. Students will gain valuable industry and professional experience from this unit of study including communication and key aspects of project management skills such as planning, scheduling, costing, coordinating, resourcing, budgeting, monitoring and reporting. It is anticipated that this unit of study would enrich the learning experience as well as enhance future business development or job employment opportunities in the project management context. This unit of study is only available to students who have a credit average or above and who have obtained approval from the program director.
PMGT2854 Implementing Concurrent Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1850 and ENGG2850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is concurrent engineering? What are the different components? Why do we need to get products to market fast? What really matters? Starting with a vision, creating great teams that work and creating processes that work effectively around the teams. Teams need to complement processes, and processes need to complement teams. Individuals and teams also evolve processes. In fact great systems are those that can evolve and adapt without a centralised management. The artist that creates a great system is the one that can make a sustainable design.
PMGT3856 Sustainable Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility are gaining importance in our globalised economy. They have been increasingly influencing business and project objectives and it is becoming imperative that they are incorporated into the practice of project management.
This unit of study embraces this new reality by providing students with an expanded understanding of value creation and how this is delivered through projects. The emphasis is on using projects to deliver value not only in terms of economic capital but also developing social capital and preserving natural capital. These will be underpinned by an appreciation of the standards, principles and frameworks that exist, both in Australia and internationally, to govern the preservation of the environment and increase the development of social capital.
Case studies will be used to create learning processes as students consider and confront the dilemmas that project managers face as they strive to deliver shareholder value, whilst considering social and environmental impacts these projects may have. Cases discussed in this unit will allow students to explore both the opportunities and pitfalls companies and non-government organisations face in targeting sustainability issues and how their values and core assumptions impact their business strategies.
Concepts such as corporate responsibility, the triple bottom line, the business case for sustainability, supply chain management and responsible purchasing and knowledge management will be discussed and students will consider how these influence project delivery.
PMGT3857 International Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides specific guidelines for achieving greater international project success. It addresses the need for modern techniques in project management geared and suited to international projects. It provides opportunity to students to have orientation towards lessons learned from failures and problems in international projects, and suggest alternative solutions for project issues. The critical success factors for managing international projects together with management issues related to vendors and outsourcing across national boundaries are also discussed. It further deals with managing businesses effectively address cross- cultural, social, and political issues.

Other Recommended Electives

CIVL2110 Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: AMME1362 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1802 or CIVL1802 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Materials are an important part of the civil engineers' work. Indeed, civil engineers who are concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of facilities need to understand the behaviour and performance of the materials used. And as it happens, mechanical properties- which are essential and basic for civil engineers- are highly dependent on the structure of materials at various scales. Therefore, it is important that a student in Civil Engineering possesses a fundamental knowledge in materials science.
This unit of study aims to provide students with the tools necessary to select the adequate material for a particular application and to assess its mechanical behaviour while in use. This course will focus mainly on materials for civil engineering and construction applications, i. e. metals, concrete and soils.
CIVL2611 Introductory Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021). Students are expected to have a strong understanding of fundamental physics, statics, equilibrium, forces, and dimensional analysis. Familiarity with simple calculus, partial differential equations, and the analytical and numerical solutions. Assessment: Through semester assessment (44%) and Final Exam (56%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of this unit of study is to develop an understanding of basic fluid concepts for inviscid and incompressible fluids. Topics to be covered will include: basic fluid properties, hydrostatics, buoyancy, stability, pressure distribution in a fluid with rigid body motion, fluid dynamics, conservation of mass and momentum, dimensional analysis, open channel flow, and pipe flow.
This core unit of study together with CIVL3612 forms the basis for further studies in the applied areas of ocean, coastal and wind engineering and other elective fluid mechanics units which may be offered.
COMP2017 Systems Programming

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1103 Corequisites: COMP2123 OR COMP2823 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: COMP2129 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit of study, elementary methods for developing robust, efficient, and re-usable software will be covered. The unit is taught in C, in a Unix environment. Specific coding topics include memory management, the pragmatic aspects of implementing data structures such as lists and hash tables and managing concurrent threads. Debugging tools and techniques are discussed and common programming errors are considered along with defensive programming techniques to avoid such errors. Emphasis is placed on using common Unix tools to manage aspects of the software construction process, such as version control and regression testing. The subject is taught from a practical viewpoint and it includes a considerable amount of programming practice.
COMP2022 Programming Languages, Logic and Models

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Prohibitions: COMP2922 Assumed knowledge: MATH1004 OR MATH1904 OR MATH1064 OR MATH2069 OR MATH2969 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the foundations of computational models, and their connection to programming languages/tools. The unit covers various abstract models for computation including Lambda Calculus, and Logic calculi (e. g. concept of formal proofs in propositional, predicate, and temporal logic). For each abstract model, we introduce programming languages/tools that are built on the introduced abstract computational models. We will discuss functional languages including Scheme/Haskell, and Prolog/Datalog.
COMP2123 Data Structures and Algorithms

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1110 OR INFO1113 OR DATA1002 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2823 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
DAAE2002 Architecture, Place and Society

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Akin Sevinc Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: DESA2211 Assessment: Graphic and Written Pressentation on Research (40%); Final Research Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to investigate the relationship between architecture, place and society and to explore the meaning of cultural and social sustainability in architectural design. The unit assumes that designers will increasingly work in places where cultures are unfamiliar at home or in a global context, and that an ability to understand, and interpret, diverse cultures, and the way design occurs in diverse locations, is an important area of knowledge for designers. A key aspect of social sustainability is the practice of social responsibility, and the unit explores how this may occur, including involving people in the design process. On completion of this unit students will be able to demonstrate: an ability to better understand the connections between architecture place and society, and the social, cultural, political and economic factors affecting sustainable environments; skills and knowledge in participatory processes necessary for effective communication about environmental design issues; increased critical awareness about social responsibility in relation to the practice of architecture and the design of the built environment, and an ability to exercise this awareness. This unit will provide architecture students with knowledge of the relationship between culture and architecture, as well as practical knowledge of the social aspects of design practice. It is intended that students from other disciplines will develop a critical awareness of the built environment as a form of cultural production, and the possibilities for their participation in its production.
DAAE2008 Innovative Building Structures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Muir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2 hrs/wk; tutorial 1 hr/wk Prerequisites: BDES1023 Prohibitions: DESA2206 Assessment: Group Report (40%); Physical Test (20%);Individual Report (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to engage students in detailed studies of innovative building structures, covering the three aspects of innovation in architectural and structural design (modeling, materials and technology). The main topics covered are: architectural form and structural function; interpretation of basic (arch, beam, column, space and spatial portal) and advanced (truss, vault, dome, shell) structural principles with an intuitive graphical method (Load Path Method - LPM). Examples of significant case studies will be shown and interpreted (works by A. Gaudi, B. Fuller, F. Otto, N. Grimshaw, S. Calatrava, N. Foster, R. Piano and others); biomimetics; bioinspired structures as a way to increase structural efficiency. Innovative structural materials: the use of glass as structural material, innovative reinforcements for composite structures, smart and nanostructured materials; kinetic architecture: structural movement as the 4th architectural dimension. A case study assignment will be used to assess student's competence in investigating and presenting case studies and being able to identify and evaluate issues and factors contributing to innovative structural solutions.
DAAE2011 Intro to Visual Communication Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Nathaniel Fay Session: Semester 1,Summer Main,Winter Main Classes: Online: expected total workload is approximately 35 hours online, plus independent study and preparation. Prohibitions: DAAE2009 or DECO1015 or DECO2101 Assessment: Visual Design Assignments (85%), Quiz (15%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study introduces students to the principles and practices of visual communication design for non-designers. Visual communication is an essential skill in today¿s complex world, for effectively communicating ideas, information, perspectives and proposals to diverse audiences in a variety of contexts. Students will learn about the theories of visual perception and psychology underlying visual design principles, and strategies for the composition of visual elements to produce effective and compelling visual presentations. On the successful completion of this unit of study, students will have demonstrated knowledge and skills in the understanding and application of visual design to produce and evaluate effective visual communication materials for a range of audiences.
DATA1001 Foundations of Data Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Di Warren Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lecture 3 hrs/week; computer tutorial 2 hr/week Prohibitions: MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or MATH1115 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 or STAT1021 Assessment: assignments, quizzes, presentation, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
DATA1001 is a foundational unit in the Data Science major. The unit focuses on developing critical and statistical thinking skills for all students. Does mobile phone usage increase the incidence of brain tumours? What is the public's attitude to shark baiting following a fatal attack? Statistics is the science of decision making, essential in every industry and undergirds all research which relies on data. Students will use problems and data from the physical, health, life and social sciences to develop adaptive problem solving skills in a team setting. Taught interactively with embedded technology, DATA1001 develops critical thinking and skills to problem-solve with data. It is the prerequisite for DATA2002.
Textbooks
Statistics, Fourth Edition, Freedman Pisani Purves
DATA1002 Informatics: Data and Computation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO1903 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers computation and data handling, integrating sophisticated use of existing productivity software, e.g. spreadsheets, with the development of custom software using the general-purpose Python language. It will focus on skills directly applicable to data-driven decision-making. Students will see examples from many domains, and be able to write code to automate the common processes of data science, such as data ingestion, format conversion, cleaning, summarization, creation and application of a predictive model.
DATA2001 Data Science: Big Data and Data Diversity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: DATA1002 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1103 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course focuses on methods and techniques to efficiently explore and analyse large data collections. Where are hot spots of pedestrian accidents across a city? What are the most popular travel locations according to user postings on a travel website? The ability to combine and analyse data from various sources and from databases is essential for informed decision making in both research and industry.
Students will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects, such as relational, semi-structured, time series, geospatial, image, text. As well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with relevant Python libraries, this course will also introduce students to the concept of declarative data processing with SQL, and to analyse data in relational databases. Students will be given data sets from, eg. , social media, transport, health and social sciences, and be taught basic explorative data analysis and mining techniques in the context of small use cases. The course will further give students an understanding of the challenges involved with analysing large data volumes, such as the idea to partition and distribute data and computation among multiple computers for processing of 'Big Data'.
DATA2002 Data Analytics: Learning from Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jean Yang Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 3 hrs/week; computer tutorial 2 hr/week Prerequisites: [DATA1001 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002] or [MATH10X5 and MATH1115] or [MATH10X5 and STAT2011] or [MATH1905 and MATH1XXX (except MATH1XX5)] or [BUSS1020 or ECMT1010 or STAT1021] Prohibitions: STAT2012 or STAT2912 Assumed knowledge: (Basic Linear Algebra and some coding) or QBUS1040 Assessment: written assignment, presentation, exams Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Technological advances in science, business, engineering has given rise to a proliferation of data from all aspects of our life. Understanding the information presented in these data is critical as it enables informed decision making into many areas including market intelligence and science. DATA2002 is an intermediate course in statistics and data sciences, focusing on learning data analytic skills for a wide range of problems and data. How should the Australian government measure and report employment and unemployment? Can we tell the difference between decaffeinated and regular coffee ? In this course, you will learn how to ingest, combine and summarise data from a variety of data models which are typically encountered in data science projects as well as reinforcing their programming skills through experience with statistical programming language. You will also be exposed to the concept of statistical machine learning and develop the skill to analyze various types of data in order to answer a scientific question. From this unit, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to embrace data analytic challenges stemming from everyday problems.
DECO2103 Architectural Modelling and Prototyping

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rizal Muslimin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture 1 hr/wk, tutorial 2 hrs/wk Prerequisites: DESA1555 and completion of at least 36 credit points Assumed knowledge: Basic understanding of design principles and design processes and how to apply them in practical design projects Assessment: Assessment 1 (25%), Assessment 2 (35%), Assessment 3 (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit teaches students basic understanding of digital modelling and architectural prototyping. Students will develop skills in creating and using 3D modelling software for various design tasks. The unit further introduces students to rapid prototyping fabrication techniques, such as 3D printing and laser cutting with the aim to understand how to prepare a digital model for physical fabrication. Students will learn how physical objects are represented in 3D digital models by modelling various 3D geometric entities. Key concepts covered in this unit include: joinery, composite material and solid modelling.
ISYS2110 Analysis and Design of Web Info Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO2110 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course discusses the processes, methods, techniques and tools that organisations use to determine how they should conduct their business, with a particular focus on how web-based technologies can most effectively contribute to the way business is organized. The course covers a systematic methodology for analysing a business problem or opportunity, determining what role, if any, web-based technologies can play in addressing the business need, articulating business requirements for the technology solution, specifying alternative approaches to acquiring the technology capabilities needed to address the business requirements, and specifying the requirements for the information systems solution in particular, in-house development, development from third-party providers, or purchased commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) packages.
ISYS2120 Data and Information Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR INFO1003 OR INFO1903 OR DECO1012 Prohibitions: INFO2120 OR INFO2820 OR COMP5138 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ubiquitous use of information technology leaves us facing a tsunami of data produced by users, IT systems and mobile devices. The proper management of data is hence essential for all applications and for effective decision making within organizations.
This unit of study will introduce the basic concepts of database designs at the conceptual, logical and physical levels. We will place particular emphasis on introducing integrity constraints and the concept of data normalization which prevents data from being corrupted or duplicated in different parts of the database. This in turn helps in the data remaining consistent during its lifetime. Once a database design is in place, the emphasis shifts towards querying the data in order to extract useful information. The unit will introduce the SQL database query languages, which is industry standard. Other topics covered will include the important concept of transaction management, application development with a backend database, and an overview of data warehousing and OLAP.
ISYS2160 Information Systems in the Internet Age

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: ISYS2140 Assumed knowledge: INFO1003 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1113 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide a comprehensive conceptual and practical introduction to information systems (IS) in the Internet era. Key topics covered include: system thinking and system theory, basic concepts of information systems, internet and e-commerce, e-payment and m-commerce, online marketing and social media, information systems for competitive advantage, functional and enterprise systems, business intelligence, information systems development and acquisition, information security, ethics, and privacy
MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class per week Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1XX2) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2921 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or MATH2061 or MATH2961 or MATH2067 Assessment: assessment for this unit consists of quizzes, assignments, and a final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit opens with topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, through cylinders, spheres and other parametrised surfaces), Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a basic grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2061 Linear Mathematics and Vector Calculus

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour practice class per week. Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1011 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1014 or MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2001 or MATH2901 or MATH2002 or MATH2902 or MATH2961 or MATH2067 or MATH2021 or MATH2921 or MATH2022 or MATH2922 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is only available to Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies students.
This unit starts with an investigation of linearity: linear functions, general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations (including differential equations), linear independence and the dimension of a linear space. The study of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, begun in junior level linear algebra, is extended and developed. The unit then moves on to topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, though cylinders, spheres and parametrised surfaces), Gauss' Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem.
MATH2068 Number Theory and Cryptography

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics units Prohibitions: MATH2988 or MATH3009 or MATH3024 Assumed knowledge: MATH1014 or MATH1002 or MATH1902 Assessment: 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cryptography is the branch of mathematics that provides the techniques for confidential exchange of information sent via possibly insecure channels. This unit introduces the tools from elementary number theory that are needed to understand the mathematics underlying the most commonly used modern public key cryptosystems. Topics include the Euclidean Algorithm, Fermat's Little Theorem, the Chinese Remainder Theorem, Möbius Inversion, the RSA Cryptosystem, the Elgamal Cryptosystem and the Diffie-Hellman Protocol. Issues of computational complexity are also discussed.
MATH2069 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour practice class per week. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics units Prohibitions: MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2969 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to several related areas of discrete mathematics, which serve their interests for further study in pure and applied mathematics, computer science and engineering. Topics to be covered in the first part of the unit include recursion and induction, generating functions and recurrences, combinatorics. Topics covered in the second part of the unit include Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, the theory of trees (used in the study of data structures), planar graphs, the study of chromatic polynomials (important in scheduling problems).
MATH2070 Optimisation and Financial Mathematics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour computer laboratory per week. Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1011 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1014 or MATH1X02) Prohibitions: MATH2010 or MATH2033 or MATH2933 or MATH2970 or ECMT3510 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quiz, project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students may enrol in both MATH2070 and MATH3075 in the same semester
Problems in industry and commerce often involve maximising profits or minimising costs subject to constraints arising from resource limitations. The first part of this unit looks at programming problems and their solution using the simplex algorithm; nonlinear optimisation and the Kuhn Tucker conditions.
The second part of the unit deals with utility theory and modern portfolio theory. Topics covered include: pricing under the principles of expected return and expected utility; mean-variance Markowitz portfolio theory, the Capital Asset Pricing Model, log-optimal portfolios and the Kelly criterion; dynamical programming. Some understanding of probability theory including distributions and expectations is required in this part.
Theory developed in lectures will be complemented by computer laboratory sessions using MATLAB. Minimal computing experience will be required.
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1000 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site: http://sydney.edu.au/summer/
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: neuroscience; human mental abilities; learning and motivation; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Available on-line once semester commences
QBUS3330 Methods of Decision Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905. Prohibitions: QBUS2320; ECMT2630; ENGG1850; CIVL3805 Assessment: assignment 1 (10%), assignment 2 (10%), mid-semester exam (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This introductory unit on decision analysis addresses the formal methods of decision making. These methods include measuring risk by subjective probabilities; growing decision trees; performing sensitivity analysis; using theoretical probability distributions; simulation of uncertain events; modelling risk attitudes; estimating the value of information; and combining quantitative and qualitative considerations. The primary goal of the unit is to demonstrate how to build models of real business situations that allow the decision maker to better understand the structure of decisions and to automate the decision process by using computer decision tools.
QBUS2810 Statistical Modelling for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: 2018 Commencing students: QBUS1040; 2018 continuing students: BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or STAT1021 or ((MATH1005 or MATH1015) and MATH1115) or 6 credit points of MATH units which must include MATH1905. Prohibitions: ECMT2110 Assumed knowledge: This unit relies on mathematical knowledge at the level of the Maths in Business program, including calculus and matrix algebra. Students who do not meet this requirement are strongly encouraged to acquire the needed mathematical skills prior to enrolling in this unit. Assessment: individual assignment 1 (5%); individual assignment 2 (10%); individual assignment 3 (5%); group project (25%); mid-semester exam (20%); final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Statistical analysis of quantitative data is a fundamental aspect of modern business. The pervasiveness of information technology in all aspects of business means that managers are able to use very large and rich data sets. This unit covers a range of methods to model and analyse the relationships in such data, extending the introductory methods in BUSS1020. The methods are useful for detecting, analysing and making inferences about patterns and relationships within the data so as to support business decisions. This unit offers an insight into the main statistical methodologies for modelling the relationships in both discrete and continuous business data. This provides the information requirements for a range of specific tasks that are required, e.g. in financial asset valuation and risk measurement, market research, demand and sales forecasting and financial analysis, among others. The unit emphasises real empirical applications in business, finance, accounting and marketing, using modern software tools.
QBUS2820 Predictive Analytics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: QBUS2810 or ECMT2110 or DATA2002 Assumed knowledge: This unit assumes mathematical knowledge at the level of the Maths in Business program (including calculus and matrix algebra) and basic computer programming skills at the level of QBUS2810. Assessment: assignment 1 (20%), assignment 2 (20%), mid-term exam (20%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Predictive analytics are a set of tools to enable managers to exploit the patterns found in transactional and historical data. For example major retailers invest in predictive analytics to understand, not just consumers' decisions and preferences, but also their personal habits, so as to more efficiently market to them. This unit introduces different techniques of data analysis and modelling that can be applied to traditional and non-traditional problems in a wide range of areas including stock forecasting, fund analysis, asset allocation, equity and fixed income option pricing, consumer products, as well as consumer behaviour modelling (credit, fraud, marketing). The forecasting techniques covered in this unit are useful for preparing individual business forecasts and long-range plans. The unit takes a practical approach with many up-to-date datasets used for demonstration in class and in the assignments.
SOFT2201 Software Construction and Design 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Prohibitions: INFO3220 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the foundations of software design and construction. It covers the topics of modelling software (UML, CRC, use cases), software design principles, object-oriented programming theory (inheritance, polymorphism, dynamic subtyping and generics), and simple design patterns. The unit aims to foster a strong technical understanding of the underlying software design and construction theory (delivered in the lecture) but also has a strong emphasis of the practice, where students apply the theory on practical examples.
SOFT2412 Agile Software Development Practices

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: INFO1113 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1105 OR INFO1905 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds students skills to follow defined processes in software development, in particular, working in small teams in an agile approach. Content covers the underlying concepts and principles of software processes, their analysis, measurement and improvement. Students will practice with a variety of professional-strength tool support for the practices that ensure quality outcomes. The unit requires students to enter already skilled in individual programming; instead this unit focuses on the complexities in a team setting.
WORK1004 Foundations of Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2201 Assessment: practice quiz (5%), main quiz (15%), group presentation and facilitation (15%), individual analysis and reflection (15%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a foundational unit in the Management and IR&HRM subject areas. An introductory overview of management methods and approaches is provided which forms the basis of study for an advanced specialisation in management. The unit examines management as a process of planning, organising, leading and controlling the efforts of organisational members and discusses how recent trends such as globalisation, economic change and the effects of new technology have led to profound changes in how organisations are managed. The unit explores these issues with respect to both large and small, public and private, and domestic and foreign organisations.
WORK2210 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures and 1x 1hr lab time Prerequisites: 40 credit points worth of units of study Assessment: case simulation (40%), case study report (25%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores how strategy is formulated, implemented and evaluated. Strategic management concepts, frameworks and tools are applied to organizational case studies. Current debates in strategic management are evaluated for their relevance to strategists in a range of organizational contexts.
WORK2218 Managing Organisational Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: 24 Junior credit points Assessment: quiz 1 (5%), quiz 2 (15%), written assignment (part 1)(15%), written assignment (part 2)(15%), group presentation (10%), group report (10%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students the ability to understand how organisations operate. As an introductory organisational behaviour unit, it covers key debates across a range of social science disciplines including business, management, psychology, sociology, and communication studies. Key topics explored include power, control, networks, and organisational culture.
WORK3205 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2221 Assessment: tutorial attendance and participation (10%), communication analysis report (30%), team case analysis report (15%), team case analysis presentation (10%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
Communication is integral to many organisational processes; for instance, effective planning, decision-making, negotiation, conflict management, change management and leadership all rely upon effective communication by organisational actors. At the same time, organisational communication has become more complex due to increasing levels of diversity in the workplace and an increasing reliance on emergent and rapidly changing communication technologies. Drawing on communication research models, theories and case studies, this unit provides students with insight into how to manage the complexities of contemporary organisational communication. The unit focuses primarily on internal organisational communication and examines communication processes at various levels: interpersonal (dyadic), group and organisation.
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: group assessment (30%), reflective essays (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and also examines the practice of leadership in diverse organisational contexts. Practitioner perspectives, experiences and case studies of business leaders are also presented.
Alternative elective units may be taken with approval of the Head of School.

Project Management Honours

A candidate for Honours in Project Management must enrol in the following Honours Project units:
PMGT4850 Project Management Honours Project A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research, Lectures, Meetings Prerequisites: Students are required to achieve a minimum 65% average mark in the 2000-level and 3000-level or higher units of the normal BPM program to be eligible for entry to Honours. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator (who may consult the Undergraduate or Program Director)
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for Project Managers. The most important deliverable in PMGT4850 and PMGT4851 is a formally written, academic-based research thesis. This is a major task that is to be conducted over the year in two successive units of study of 12 credit points each. Students will build on technical competencies previously obtained from years 1, 2 and 3 of the BPM course, as well as make use of the academic writing and communication skills they have developed.
In PMGT4850, students are required to plan and begin work on a research project, in consultation and close supervision by an academic staff member. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, through close supervision and independent research, students will learn how to examine published and experimental literature and data, write reviews of literature, set down specific and achievable research objectives, organise a program of work and devise an experimental, developmental, or exploratory program of research using specific research methods or a combination of them (e. g. qualitative interviews, surveys, statistical analysis, mixed-method, etc. ).
In PMGT4851, students are required to have completed most of their literature review and be in the "execution" phase of their research. This is where the bulk of the investigative work and data collection/analyses/validation takes place and much of the writing of the final thesis begins to eventuate.
From both units, the skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking project management work as it broadens their repertoire of skills including critical thinking, ability to ask good questions, ability to think "outside the box", critical review of existing literature, research and analytical skills and written and oral presentation. Students are expected to take the initiative and learn to be independent thinkers when pursuing their research project.
PMGT4851 Project Management Honours Project B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Meeting, Research Prerequisites: Students are required to achieve a minimum 65% average mark in the 2000-level and 3000-level or higher units of the normal BPM program to be eligible for entry to Honours. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator (who may consult the Undergraduate or Program)
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for Project Managers. The most important deliverable in PMGT4850 and PMGT4851 is a formally written, academic-based research thesis. This is a major task that is to be conducted over the year in two successive units of study of 12 credit points each. Students will build on technical competencies previously obtained from years 1, 2 and 3 of the BPM course, as well as make use of the academic writing and communication skills they have developed.
In PMGT4850, students are required to plan and begin work on a research project, in consultation and close supervision by an academic staff member. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, through close supervision and independent research, students will learn how to examine published and experimental literature and data, write reviews of literature, set down specific and achievable research objectives, organise a program of work and devise an experimental, developmental, or exploratory program of research using specific research methods or a combination of them (e. g. qualitative interviews, surveys, statistical analysis, mixed-method, etc. ).
In PMGT4851, students are required to have completed most of their literature review and be in the "execution" phase of their research. This is where the bulk of the investigative work and data collection/analyses/validation takes place and much of the writing of the final thesis begins to eventuate.
From both units, the skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking project management work as it broadens their repertoire of skills including critical thinking, ability to ask good questions, ability to think "outside the box", critical review of existing literature, research and analytical skills and written and oral presentation. Students are expected to take the initiative and learn to be independent thinkers when pursuing their research project.
Candidates for Honours in Project Management must select 24 credit points from the following list of electives.
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
PMGT5879 Strategic Portfolio and Program Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit specifically addresses the selection and prioritisation of multiple programmes and projects which have been grouped to support an organisation's strategic portfolio. The allocation of programmes of work within a multi-project environment, governing, controlling and supporting the organisation's strategy, are considered. The aim is to formulate and manage the delivery of the portfolio of strategies using programme management. Students will learn and practice the issues to be considered in selecting an effective organisation portfolio and how to implement a Portfolio Management Framework. Also they will encounter the many conflicting issues facing Program Managers as they seek to implement organisation strategy through programs and learn how to balance these to obtain desired outcomes.
PMGT5886 System Dynamics Modelling for PM

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students should achieve an understanding of dynamical systems methods applied to complex adaptive systems (CAS). CAS is a new approach to engineering and management that studies and models how relationships between parts give rise to collective and dynamic system-level behaviours, for example, in communication and transport networks, megaprojects, social and eco-systems. Effectively implemented, the methods can dramatically improve a manager's effectiveness in today's complex and interconnected business world, by helping to predict and evaluate indirect effects of actions and policies. This course provides managers with many practical quantitative tools to enhance individual, team, and organisational learning, change, and performance.
PMGT6867 Quantitative Methods: Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Assumed knowledge: Expect the basic understanding of the organisational context of projects and limited experience of working in a project team. Also, familiarity of different quantitative methods applied in the context of different project environments. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Methods studied in this unit are used in a wide range of project management tasks and problems. The unit explains why and where particular methods are used and provides examples and opportunities to apply these methods in practice. This unit will also facilitate the understanding of the mechanics of these methods and their underlying theory.

Notes

1. The Honours program is completed as an additional year. Students are required to achieve a minimum 65% average mark in the 2000-level and 3000-level or higher units of the above program to be eligible for entry to Honours.
2. Students undertaking the Honours program may enrol in alternative postgraduate Project Management units with permission of the Program Director.


For a standard enrolment plans for the various Project Management streams visit CUSP https://cusp.sydney.edu.au