Biomedical Engineering

BMET – Biomedical Engineering unit of study descriptions

BMET1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials, workshops Prohibitions: ENGG1960 OR ENGG1800 OR CIVL1900 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR MTRX1701 OR AMME1960 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (3 Unit) Assessment: through semester assessment (70%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Biomedical Engineering 1A introduces students to the biomedical engineering discipline of study and profession. Initial lectures will introduce the various Biomedical Technologies in the global market, and currently under development, as well as the Biomedical Engineering Sector itself. It will address the question: 'what is biomedical engineering and what are the career opportunities?'. The healthcare sector will be outlined, including the roles of hospitals and clinics and how these are anticipated to evolve in the future. A virtual tour of a hospital with a focus on engineering-relevant areas will be provided. Students will be required to research and present a short overview of the background, capabilities, facilities, and specializations for a select hospital or clinic in the Sydney region. Biomed design projects will be set up to provide students the opportunity to get hands-on experience in 'lean start-up' teams. The semester-long projects will provide students with the opportunity to learn and practice how to effectively develop then propose innovative biomedical engineering solutions that address defined health needs and market opportunity. Succinct project reports and presentations with technical basis and specifications will be generated to be accessible to broad audiences. The projects will be presented by the teams at an innovation competition with industry guests at the end of semester.
BMET1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AMME1961 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: HSC Biology and HSC Chemistry. Summer bridging courses are available for students who did not complete HSC Biology or Chemistry
This biomedical engineering core junior unit of study provides an introduction to the relatively recent, and rapidly growing, biotechnology industry, with a focus on the current key commercial applications. In the 1990s, the word 'biotech' entered our lexicon as a synonym for overnight investment wealth. The biotechnology acronym GM (genetically modified) also entered our lexicon in the 1990s. Biotechnology can be broadly defined as the commercial exploitation of biological processes for industrial and other purposes. A significant focus for commercial activities has been GM technology: GM microorganisms, plants, animals, and even humans (gene therapy). The 'biotech industry' arose rapidly in the late 20th century, and is now one of the largest industries in the world, and is one of the cornerstones of the global biomedical industry which comprises three main sectors: Medical Devices, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotechnology. Significant global commercial biotechnology activity concerns the manufacture of therapeutic compounds from GM microorganisms using bioreactors, for example insulin. Another significant sector is agricultural: 'agri-biotech' which concerns GM higher lifeforms (plants and animals) primarily for the food industry, and also other industries such as the energy industry (biofuels). The third sector concerns therapeutic GM of humans, known as 'gene-therapy'. Some other important biotechnologies will also be explored including monoclonal antibodies, genome sequencing and personalised medicine, and RNA-interference technology (RNAi).
BMET2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: (AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR ENGG1800 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1961 OR [BIOL1xxx]) AND [6cp 1000-level Chemistry] Prohibitions: MECH2901 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%), final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study provides the underpinning knowledge needed in biomedical engineering designs. The anatomic and physiological functional knowledge gained in this subject will enhance prototype development of biomedical designs. Students should gain familiarity with anatomical and physiological terms and their meaning, understanding of the gross anatomy of the major systems in the human body and their importance in the design of biomedical devices and understanding of the major physiological principles which govern the operation of the human body.
BMET2960 Biomedical Engineering 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) Prohibitions: AMME2960 Assumed knowledge: (AMME1960 OR BMET1960) AND (AMME1961 OR BMET1961) Assessment: through semester assessment (55%), final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2 is the third of the four Biomedical Engineering foundational units. The first (AMME1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A) introduces students to the discipline of biomedical engineering, covering the key concepts of biomedical technology, design, biomechanics, and the important systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective. The second (AMME1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B) is an introduction to Biotechnology. The fourth (MECH2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers) provides a hands-on anatomy and physiology study of the key systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective and includes cadaver laboratories. This unit (AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2) is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems, including conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The mathematical tools covered in the lectures include: deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches. There is a strong emphasis in both the lectures and tutorials on applying these mathematical methods to real biomedical engineering problems involving electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical mechanisms in the human body. Specific examples include heat regulation, vibrations in biological systems, and the analysis of physiological signals such as ECG and EEG.
BMET3660 Biomanufacturing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials, laboratories Prerequisites: MECH2400 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1960 OR AMME1961 OR ENGG1800 OR MECH1560 Prohibitions: MECH3660 OR AMME3660 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The unit aims to teach the fundamentals of biomedical manufacturing processes, including traditional and advanced manufacturing technologies. This unit aims to develop the following attributes: to understand the fundamental principles of biomedical manufacturing approaches; to gain the ability to understand and select appropriate manufacturing processes and systems for biomedical applications; to develop ability to create innovative new manufacturing technologies for medical bionics and other applications in biomedical engineering; to develop ability to invent new manufacturing systems suitable for biomedical engineering implementation. At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: merits and advantages of individual manufacturing processes and systems used in the fabrication of medical devices and products that support human health and well-being; principles of developing new technologies for biomedical engineering applications; comprehensive applications and strategic selection of manufacturing processes and systems within the regulatory landscape of biomedical manufacturing. Unit content will include: Materials Processing: An introduction into the use of joining, moulding, and other manufacturing processes. Rapid Prototyping: An introduction into the most current prototyping methods currently in use. Manufacturing Processes: Common processes and their science (machining, moulding, sintering, materials processing, joining processes) and their relative merits and limitations.
BMET3921 Biomedical Design and Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, presentations Prerequisites: (AMME2302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901) AND (MECH2400 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR ENGG1800) Prohibitions: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 Assumed knowledge: A basic understanding of human physiology and anatomy and an understanding of the engineering design process. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit aims to give students an understanding of the Australian and International biomedical industry and in the development, manufacture and uses of biomedical engineering products in therapeutic, rehabilitation and clinical settings. Students will gain an understanding of the process of biomedical regulation in Australia and other major international markets as well as the entire process of creating a new biomedical engineering product, from design through to marketing and monitoring of the product. Students will design a biomedical device including the preparation of a detailed design brief. This will be done as a team project. Each team will work on a specific biomedical design project following formal design protocols, including design control, regulatory considerations, and commercialisation/IP considerations.
BMET4961 Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures Prerequisites: (ENGG1960 OR ENGG1802 OR PHYS1001) AND (AMME2302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901) Prohibitions: MECH4961 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This course is divided into two parts: biomechanics and biomaterials: Biomechanics is the study of the body from the point of view of it being an engineering structure. There are many aspects to this since the human body contains soft tissues, hard tissues (skeletal system), and articulating joints. We will begin with a general introduction to biomechanics, modelling the human body from the macroscopic level to the microscopic level. We will then study soft tissue mechanics, with respect to both non-linear and viscoelastic descriptions, with a significant focus on the mathematical methods used in relation to the mechanics of the system. We will then look at specific aspects of biomechanics: muscle mechanics, joint mechanics, kinematics and dynamics of human gait (gait analysis), biomechanics of cells, physiological fluid flow, biomechanics of injury, functional and mechanical response of tissues to mechanical loading. Biomaterials This course will involve the study of biomaterials from two perspectives: firstly, the response of the body towards the biomaterial - an immune response and foreign body reaction; secondly, the response of the biomaterial to the body - corrosion, biodegradation, and mechanical failure. Our study will begin with the response of the body towards the biomaterial. We will begin by looking at the immune system itself and then move on to look at the normal inflammatory response. We will then study in detail the foreign body reaction caused by biomaterials. The final part of this section is the study of protein adsorption onto biomaterials, with a strong focus on the Vroman effect. Then we will move onto the response of the biomaterial to the body. We will begin by a review of biomaterials, their applications, and compositions, and mechanical properties. We will then look at key problems such as corrosion, stress shielding, static fatigue, and mechanical failure. Finally, we will take a practical look at the materials themselves. Beginning with metals, then polymers (thermoplastic, thermosetting, and biodegradable), and finally ceramics (bioinert, biodegradable, and bioactive).
BMET4971 Tissue Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: MECH2901 OR BMET2901 Prohibitions: AMME4971 Assessment: through semester assessment (65%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
With the severe worldwide shortage of donor organs and the ubiquitous problem of donor organ rejection, there is a strong need for developing technologies for engineering replacement organs and other body parts. Recent developments in engineering and the life sciences have begun to make this possible, and as a consequence, the very new and multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering has been making dramatic progress in the last few years. This unit will provide an introduction to the principles of tissue engineering, as well as an up to date overview of recent progress and future outlook in the field of tissue engineering. This unit assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of tissue engineering. The objectives are: To gain a basic understanding of the major areas of interest in tissue engineering; To learn to apply basic engineering principles to tissue engineering systems; To understand the promises and limitations of tissue engineering; To understand the advances and challenges of stem cell applications; Enable students to access web-based resources in tissue engineering; Enable students to develop basic skills in tissue engineering research.
BMET4981 Applied Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials, seminars, meetings Prerequisites: AMME2301 AND (AMME1362 OR AMME2302) AND AMME2500 Prohibitions: AMME4981 OR AMME9981 OR BMET9981 Assumed knowledge: MECH3361 AND MECH2400 AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901) AND MECH3362 AND (MECH3921 OR BMET3921) Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This UoS will give students an understanding of CT/MRI based solid modelling, finite element methods, constitutive material models, design analysis and optimisation, experimental validation and their use in biomedical engineering. The students are expected to gain skills and experience with finite element software for the solution to sophisticated problems associated with biomedical engineering and experimentation techniques for the validation of these problems. The unit will take a holistic approach to the learning outcomes: an overview of typical biomedical design problems, an overview of finite element analysis software, a detailed look at finite element methods in biomedical applications, and a project-based learning approach to the development of a biomedical prosthesis. By the end of the unit, the students are expected to have familiarised themselves with design analysis, optimisation, and validation for biomedical engineering problems.
BMET4990 Biomedical Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: MECH2901 OR BMET2901 Prohibitions: AMME4990 Assumed knowledge: 1000-level chemistry, 2000-level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the 1000-level, and preferably at the 2000-level. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This UoS will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.
BMET5907 Orthopaedic and Surgical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures Prerequisites: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302 OR AMME1362) AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901 OR AMME9901 OR BMET9901) AND (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921) Prohibitions: MECH4902 OR MECH5907 Assumed knowledge: Basic concepts in engineering mechanics - statics, dynamics, and solid mechanics. Basic concepts in materials science, specifically with regard to types of materials and the relation between properties and microstructure. A basic understanding of human biology and anatomy. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The aims and objectives of the UoS are: 1. To introduce the student to the details and practice of orthopaedic engineering; 2. To give students an overview of the diverse knowledge necessary for the design and evaluation of implants used in orthopaedic surgery; 3. To enable students to learn the language and concepts necessary for interaction with orthopaedic surgeons and the orthopaedic implant industry; 4. To introduce the student to the details and practice of other engineering applications in surgery, particularly in the cardiovascular realm.
BMET5931 Nanomaterials in Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AMME5931 Assumed knowledge: [[(BIOL1xxx OR MBLG1xxx) AND CHEM1xxx AND PHYS1xxx] OR [(AMME1961 OR BMET1961)] AND (MECH2901 OR BMET2901)]] AND (NANO2xxx OR AMME1362) Assessment: through semester assessment (80%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The application of science and technology at the nanoscale for biomedical problems promises to revolutionise medicine. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by applying nanotechnology to medicine. This course focuses on explaining the fundamentals of nanomedicine, and highlighting the special properties and application of nanomaterials in medicine. This course also reviews the most significant biomedical applications of nanomaterials including the recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, medical imaging, gene therapy, biosensors and cancer treatment.
BMET5951 Fundamentals of Neuromodulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures Prohibitions: AMME5951 Assumed knowledge: ELEC1103 or equivalent, (MECH2901 OR BMET2901 OR AMME9901 OR BMET9901), and (MECH3921 or BMET3921 or AMME5921 OR BMET5921) Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Implantable microelectronic devices functioning either as nerve stimulators or nerve blockers comprise one of the largest markets in the global medical device industry. The aim of this unit of study is to give students a complete overview of the underlying technology (microelectronics, encapsulation biomaterials, electrode biomaterials, electrode-neural interactions, inductive power systems and data links, signal processing) and an expert review of the major technological applications on the market, which include Cochlear implants, pacemakers and implantable defibrillators, deep brain stimulators, pain control nerve blockers, bionic eye implants, functional electrical stimulation systems. The unit will also review emerging applications such as gastrointestinal disorders, obesity; vagal nerve stimulation - epilepsy, depression, carotid artery stimulation - hypertension, spinal cord stimulation - ischemic disorders, angina, peripheral vascular disease, incontinence, erectile dysfunction. The unit will conclude with a snapshot of the future: 'brain on a chip' progress, nerve regrowth, neurotropins, drug/device combinations. This is a Master of Professional Engineering Unit of Study intended for biomedical engineering students with an interest in working in the medical device industry in the large market sector area of implantable electronic devices.
BMET5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, presentations Prerequisites: (96 cp of 2000 level or higher BE units) or AMME5921 or BMET5921 Prohibitions: AMME5958 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
BMET5962 Introduction to Mechanobiology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AMME5962 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of 1000-level biology, 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry and 6 credit points of 2000-level physiology or equivalent Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Mechanobiology has emerged as a new field of science that integrates biology and engineering and is now considered to have significant influence on the development of technologies for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. It is well known that tissues and cells are sensitive to their mechanical environment and changes to this environment can affect the physiological and pathophysiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms by which biological cells sense and respond to mechanical signals can lead to the development of novel treatments and therapies for a variety of diseases.
BMET5992 Regulatory Affairs in the Medical Industry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures Prerequisites: (96 cp of 2000 level or higher BE units) or AMME5921 or BMET5921 Prohibitions: AMME4992 OR AMME5992 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of 1000-level Chemistry, and 6cp of Biology units Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Supply of medical devices, diagnostics and related therapeutic products is regulated in most jurisdictions, with sophisticated and complex regulatory regimes in all large economies. These regulations are applied both to manufacturers and designers and to biomedical engineers undertaking device custom manufacture or maintenance in clinical environments. This UoS will explore the different regulatory frameworks in the 'Global Harmonisation Task Force' group of jurisdictions (US, EU, Canada, Japan, Australia), as well as emerging regulatory practices in Asia and South America. Emphasis will be on the commonality of the underlying technical standards and the importance of sophisticated risk management approaches to compliance.
BMET5995 Advanced Bionics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: (96 cp of 2000 level or higher BE units) or AMME5921 or BMET5921 Prohibitions: AMME5995 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The field of 'bionics' is one of the primary embodiments of biomedical engineering. In the context of this unit, bionics is defined as a collection of therapeutic devices implanted into the body to restore or enhance functions lost through disease, developmental anomaly, or injury. Most typically, bionic devices intervene with the nervous system and aim to control neural activity through the delivery of electrical impulses. An example of this is a cochlear implant which delivers electrical impulses to physiologically excite surviving neurons of the auditory system, providing the capacity to elicit the psychological perception of sound. This unit primarily focuses upon the replacement of human senses, the nature and transduction of signals acquired, and how these ultimately effect neural activity.