Chemical and Biomolecular engineering unit of study descriptions

CHNG – Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering unit of study descriptions

CHNG1103 Conservation of Mass and Energy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The students should develop an understanding of and competence in the formulation and solution of material and energy balance problems in engineering; develop competence in using basic flowsheet analysis and appropriate computational tools; improve their group work and problem solving skills; gain an ability to extract a simplified version of a problem from a complex situation.
Mass conservation related topics include: unit systems and unit conversions; properties of solids, fluids and gases; mass balance calculations on batch and flow systems; balances on multiple units processes, balances on reactive systems, recycle, bypass and purge calculations; equilibrium compositions of reacting systems; vapour pressure and humidity. Energy conservation includes the following topics: apply the first law of thermodynamics to flow and batch systems in process industries; understand thermodynamic properties such as internal energy, enthalpy and heat capacity; conduct energy balances for sensible heat changes, phase transformations and reactive processes for practical industrial systems; understand the applications of psychrometry, refrigeration, heat of formation and combustion in industry.
CHNG1108 Introduction to Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ENGG1800 OR CIVL1900 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and Chemistry Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit will introduce students to the profession of chemical engineering. It will give students an appreciation of the variety of the chemical and process industries, their history, the economic importance and the scale of their operations both in Australia and globally.
The unit will make use of virtual process plants and industrial leaders as guest speakers.
CHNG2801 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Presentation Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Corequisites: CHNG2802 OR AMME2960 Assumed knowledge: Calculus, Computations (Matlab, Excel), Mass and Energy Balances. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This course covers the principal concepts and methods of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. The topics covered include dimensional analysis, fluid properties, conservation of mass and momentum, measurement of flow, and flow in pipes. The course provides an introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics for the solution of flow regimes.
CHNG2802 Applied Maths for Chemical Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1005 OR MATH1015 OR MATH1905) AND CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core science and engineering UoS in first-year have been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit consists of two core modules: MODULE A: Applied Statistics for Chemical Engineers and MODULE B: Applied Numerical Methods for Chemical Engineers. These modules aim at furthering your education by extending your skills in statistical analysis and Chemical Engineering computations. This unit will also enable you to develop a systematic approach to solving mathematically oriented Chemical Engineering problems, helping you to make sound engineering decisions. The modules will provide sufficient theoretical knowledge and computational training to progress in subsequent engineering analyses including Process Dynamics and Control and Chemical Engineering Design. This unit will provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle real-life multi-disciplinary chemical engineering problems.
CHNG2803 Heat and Mass Transfer

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) AND (MATH1005 OR MATH1905) AND CHNG1103 AND ENGG1801 Corequisites: (CHNG2802 OR AMME2960) AND CHNG2801 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature, and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on qualitative and quantitative information. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study teaches principles of heat and mass transfer required for chemical and biomolecular engineering. It covers steady and transient conduction and diffusion, convective transport of heat and mass, and radiative heat transfer.
It runs concurrently with CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics) to provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle engineering problems related to transport phenomena.
It includes project-based study components including a research project on heat transfer in food processing, a heat exchanger design project using engineering design software and a lab session on operation of a heat exchanger.
The integrated course structure helps students to develop a physical understanding of the underlying transport phenomena and gain the ability to solve real heat and mass transfer problems of engineering significance.
CHNG2804 Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: CHNG1103 AND (CHEM1101 OR CHEM1111) AND (CHEM1102 OR CHEM1112) Corequisites: (CHNG2805 AND CHNG2806) OR MECH2901 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and to carry out computations with Matlab and MS-Excel. Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This is a core unit within the curriculum. Chemical Engineering requires an understanding of material and energy transformations and how these are driven by molecular interactions. The rate of such transformations is dependent on driving forces and resistances, and these need to be defined in terms of fundamental physical and chemical properties of systems. This course seeks to provide students with a sound basis of the thermodynamics of chemical systems, and how these, in turn, define limits of behaviour for such real systems. The thermodynamic basis for rate processes is explored, and the role of energy transfer processes in these highlighted, along with criteria for equilibrium and stability. Emphasis is placed on the prediction of physical properties of chemicalsystems in terms of state variables. The course delivery mechanism is problem-based, and examples from thermal and chemical processes will be considered, covering molecular to macro-systems scale. The course builds naturally from the second year first semester course in heat and mass transfer, and prepares students fundamentally for the third year course in design of chemical and biological processes, which deals fundamentally with reaction/separation systems, and considers phase and chemical equilibria.
CHNG2805 Engineering for a Sustainable Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: CHNG1103 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This course involves the study of the fundamental concepts which underpin sustainable development, including technical and economic efficiency, environmental stewardship and social responsibility.
The course examines both the material and non-material economies from an engineering perspective. Tools such as life-cycle assessment, input-output analysis and multi-criteria decision analysis are examined and implications for resource and energy consumption, pollution and waste generation are analysed.
A number of governing sustainability frameworks are discussed to determine their suitability within the context of chemical and biomolecular engineering. A range of approaches and tools for determining the environmental impact of human activities on small and large scale are introduced as part of a sustainability framework. Energy production and use, and product design are investigated from a sustainability perspective.
CHNG2806 Separation Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Practicals Prerequisites: CHNG1103 AND CHNG2803 Corequisites: CHNG2804 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature, and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on qualitative and quantitative information Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit will cover the general principles and the development of quantitative models of separation processes based on equilibrium and rate processes. Concepts of phase equilibria, transport phenomena and mass and energy balance will be used to model the separation units. Understanding of these principles will provide the basis for analysis and preliminary design calculations of large scale separation units of importance to manufacturing industries. The principles will be applied to units operations of distillation (binary, multicomponent), solvent extraction, absorption, adsorption and membrane processes
CHNG3041 Exchange Program 3A

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: 96 credit points in Chemical Engineering stream Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required. Enrolment requires completion of all Year 1 and 2 core units of study in Chemical Engineering, and at least 96 credit points towards the degree plus Head of School approval from Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Sydney and the host institution.
Year 3 elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical Engineering. Objectives/Outcomes: The objective of this (single semester) Exchange Program is to provide students with the opportunity to live and learn in a foreign culture while completing the academic and professional requirements of the University of Sydney degree program. Upon completion of the full year-long exchange (i.e. both CHNG3041 and CHNG3042), students will have completed work at least equivalent to Year 3 in the Chemical Engineering degree, including in particular all Year 3 core units of study.
CHNG3042 Exchange Program 3B

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: 96 credit points in Chemical Engineering stream Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required. Enrolment requires completion of all Year 1 and 2 core units of study in Chemical Engineering, and at least 96 credit points towards the degree plus Head of School approval from Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Sydney and the host institution.
Year 3 elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical Engineering. Objectives/Outcomes: The objective of this (single semester) Exchange Program is to provide students with the opportunity to live and learn in a foreign culture while completing the academic and professional requirements of the University of Sydney degree program. Upon completion of the full year-long exchange (ie both CHNG3041 and CHNG3042), students will have completed work at least equivalent to Year 3 in the Chemical Engineering degree, including in particular all Year 3 core units of study.
CHNG3043 Exchange Program 3C

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Enrolment requires completion of all Year 1 and 2 core units of study in Chemical Engineering, and at least 96 credit points towards the degree plus Head of School approval from Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Sydney and the host institution.
The unit is a Year 3 elective unit of study for the Bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering. The unit enables Chemical Engineering undergraduates to undertake an overseas learning activity during the university's winter break while completing the academic and professional requirements of the University of Sydney degree program. The learning activity may comprise either a short project under academic or industry supervision or summer or winter unit of study at an approved overseas institution. The learning activity should demonstrate outcomes and workload equivalent to a 6 credit point senior unit in the student's current award program.
CHNG3044 Exchange Program 3D

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Enrolment requires completion of all Year 1 and 2 core units of study in Chemical Engineering, and at least 96 credit points towards the degree plus Head of School approval from Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Sydney and the host institution.
The unit is a Year 3 elective unit of study for the Bachelor degree in Chemical Engineering. The unit enables Chemical Engineering undergraduates to undertake an overseas learning activity during the university's summer or winter break while completing the academic and professional requirements of the University of Sydney degree program. The learning activity may comprise either a short project under academic or industry supervision or summer or winter school unit of study at an approved overseas institution. The learning activity should demonstrate outcomes and workload equivalent to a 6 credit point senior unit in the student's current award program.
CHNG3801 Process Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND CHNG2805 AND CHNG2806) OR (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND AMME2960) Corequisites: CHNG3803, CHNG3802 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering UoS in second year have been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study teaches principles of particle technology and solid separation process required for chemical and biomolecular engineering.
It runs after CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics), CHNG2803 (Heat and Mass Transfer) and CHNG2806 (Separation Processes) to provide students with the tools and know-how to tackle unit operation tasks related to chemical engineering.
It also includes project-based study components including a research project on fluidisation of solid particles, a dyer design project and a lab session on chromatograph.
The integrated course structure helps students to develop a physical understanding of particle technology and solid separation process and gain the ability to solve problems of engineering significance.
CHNG3802 Control and Reaction Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND CHNG2805 AND CHNG2806) OR (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND AMME2960) Corequisites: CHNG3801; CHNG3803 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering UoS in second year have been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The scope and importance of process control technology expands continuously with the growth of industrial automation. For this reason, knowledge of process control tools and theory is vital for chemical engineers involved in plant operation or design. This unit covers the development of linear models, control system analysis, the design and performance of feedback control systems, and the use of control related software. Skills developed in the unit include:
- Designing a feedback control system.
- Analysing the system's performance for a range of process applications using both traditional and software-based techniques.
- Designing common control enhancements.
- Appreciating the role, possibilities and limitations of process control tools and methods.
CHNG3803 Chemical/Biological Process Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND CHNG2805 AND CHNG2806) OR (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND AMME2960) Corequisites: CHNG3801 and CHNG3802 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature, and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on qualitative and quantitative information. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This is a project based unit of study where students will work in small teams through three project-driven case studies covering a range of design scenarios, from the domain of chemical and biological processes. This course runs in parallel with CHNG3801 and CHNG3802, and the projects allow the students to demonstrate their knowledge of process modelling, the design of rate and equilibrium processes, the control of chemical processes and the practical and commercial aspects of design. Projects include designing equipment such as fermenters, reactors, distillation columns and heat exchangers, determining the optimal operating conditions for individual items of equipment, estimating the operating costs of processes, designing small flowsheets and designing simple control systems. By the end of this unit students will be proficient in estimating the feasibility of processes, designing individual items of equipment and designing small flowsheets.
CHNG3804 Biochemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Laboratories Prerequisites: (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND CHNG2805 AND CHNG2806) OR (CHNG2801 AND CHNG2803 AND CHNG2804 AND AMME2960) Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering units of study in second year have been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Biochemical engineering is increasingly playing an important role in technology to modern society. The engineers with knowledge of various aspects of biochemical processes are tremendously valuable. The course will examine cutting edge examples of biochemical technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical engineering. The specific objectives of this course are to understand the history and scope of the biotechnology industry; examine the role of biochemical engineering in the industrial application of biotechnology and its development. We will provide an understanding of the major fundamental aspects of biochemical engineering and implementing the knowledge acquired to some selected industrial applications.
At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of biochemical engineering and the ability to apply these skills to new and novel situations. The students will be able to critically analyse different types of biochemical engineering processes and to improve these processes consistent with the principles of biochemical engineering.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information and develop problem-solving skills for successfully handling challenging engineering situations. This course will be assessed by quizzes, assignments and exams.
CHNG3805 Product Formulation and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: CHNG2801; CHNG2802; CHNG2803; CHNG2804; CHNG2805; CHNG2806 Corequisites: CHNG3806; CHNG3807 Assumed knowledge: Mass and Energy Balances Conservation and Transport Phenomena Applied Mathematics (for Chemical Engineering) Process Design Concepts Process Control and Optimisation Concepts Assessment: Through semester assessment (55%) and Final Exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Product design is one of the new frontiers of chemical and biomolecular engineering. Many products emerge from their processing not as a continuous stream, but as discrete entities. There are many examples of discrete systems in chemical and biomolecular engineering; these include particulate systems (e. g. powders or solid particles in fluids), as well as polymeric and biological systems (e. g. emulsions and cells, respectively). This unit of study is an introduction to the basic concepts in discrete systems necessary for a chemical engineer to be able to formulate and design discrete products with desired properties. In essence it is a course on product formulation and design.
The unit of study will provide students with a working knowledge of the types of discrete systems available, the ways in which particulate systems can be characterized and their applications in industry. These aspects will form the foundation for an introduction to the common techniques used to model discrete systems. By the end of the unit of study students should be proficient at understanding the types of discrete systems available, and the techniques used to characterise particulate systems, understanding the basic principles of particle-fluid systems, applying these principles and solving simple problems in product design and particulate engineering.
CHNG3806 Management of Industrial Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: CHNG2801; CHNG2802; CHNG2803; CHNG2804; CHNG2805; CHNG2806 Corequisites: CHNG3805; CHNG3807 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature, and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on qualitative information. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Aims and Objectives: To develop an appreciation of management practice in process-led and product-driven industries; considering approaches to project management, economic evaluation of processes, risk assessment and decision making; to develop the requisite tools to support above; to consider approaches to innovation and entrepreneurship; to consider all this in the context of different scales of operation - from single process, to business unit, to enterprise, and across supply and value chains; to support this analysis through real-problem case studies and projects.
By the end of this unit of study a student should be competent in: preparing a resume for use in employment applications; developing project work plans in conjunction with project management schedules; performing economic evaluations of projects, plans and processes; performing qualitative risk assessments of projects, plans and processes; exploring optimisation of complex processes under risk and uncertainty, covering unit operations, business units, enterprises and value chains.
CHNG3807 Products and Value Chains

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workgroups, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: CHNG2801; CHNG2802; CHNG2803; CHNG2804; CHNG2805; CHNG2806 Corequisites: CHNG3805; CHNG3806 Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve real chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use mathematics of calculus (including vector calculus) and linear algebra, and carry out computations with MATLAB and MS EXCEL. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature, and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on qualitative and quantitative information. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study is designed to give students experience at solving complex, interesting, real world engineering problems, by applying theoretical and experimental principles learnt during their studies. During the unit of study students will be required to work on three project-driven case studies covering a range of design scenarios, from the domain of particulate products, entrepreneurial ventures (business "start ups", ethics and product value chains. This unit of study is a concurrent requirement for the concept and enabling technology courses running in parallel in the same semester. By the end of the unit of study students should be proficient at developing a strategy for taking a product development idea from concept to commercial artefact - with a comprehensive appreciation of economic arguments, underlying uncertainties (and how to mitigate these), and consideration of trade-offs inherent in this development. They should also be able to apply design and analysis tools for the synthesis of particulate products leading to the manufacture of a preferred product at pilot scale and be able to develop a strategy for the design and analysis of extended business enterprises. A key aspect of the unit of study is that students demonstrate these outcomes in project mode. The three projects in the unit of study address "issues of scale" of chemical and biomolecular engineering, from molecular to macro-systems levels.
CHNG3808 Engineering Macromolecules and Nanocomposites

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: CHNG2801 AND CHNG2806 Corequisites: CHNG3802 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of reaction engineering, fluid flow, heat transfer and mass transfer. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Macromolecules and composite materials find a wide range of applications from construction, food to biomedical engineering. A significant number of engineers are employed by the related industries. This unit of study will facilitate engagement with a broad spectrum of modern engineering principles that range from the synthesis of such materials to design of products and processes for a range of industries with an innovative approach. The unit will also enable an understanding of developing sustainable technologies with the materials for producing goods used within industries or by consumers. The industrial applications will range from chemical, biomedical to electronics and nanotechnology. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through workshops, seminars, class work and project-based learning.
At the completion of this Unit of Study students should have developed: An appreciation of the underlying principles of engineering macromolecules and composites; The ability to apply these skills to new and novel situations; The ability to critically analyse the methods of manufacture of different products and processes and to improve these processes; The development of an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle new engineering applications; An ability to independently research and be critical of the findings; An ability to analyze experimental data; An ability to carry out process and product design through critical thinking; Interpersonal, group and teamwork skills including the ability to communicate clearly and concisely; Professionalism in terms of taking responsibility for the results of their calculations and recommendations; Self-directed learning skills including the ability to critically assess one's own performance in a constructive manner.
CHNG3809 Laboratory and Industrial Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Tutorials, Report Writing Prerequisites: CHNG1103, CHNG2801, CHNG2802, CHNG2803, CHNG2804, CHNG2805 AND CHNG2806 Corequisites: CHNG3801, CHNG3802, CHNG3803 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study provides an opportunity for students to gain experience in the operation of process plants and pilot plants. In particular students will have the opportunity to apply chemical and biomolecular engineering fundamentals to real world problems including distillation, heat transfer, fermentation, filtration, crystallisation and reverse osmosis. The unit will give students experience with examples drawn from the petrochemical, minerals, biotech, pharmaceutical and water industries.
In addition the unit will also give students an additional opportunity to apply the knowledge of experimental design, data analysis and statistics.
CHNG4041 Exchange Program 4A

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: 144 credit points in Chemical Engineering stream Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required. Enrolment requires completion of all Year 1, 2 and 3 core units of study in Chemical Engineering, and at least 144 credit points towards the degree plus Head of School approval from Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the University of Sydney and the participating exchange institution. Assessment: Students spend either one academic year or semester at the host institution where they take a normal load. Their specific course choices are approved by the Heads of Department of the two institutions. Individual approved subjects at the host institution are assessed according to their standard procedures and a grade of "R" satisfied requirements will be recorded on their academic transcript from this institution.
Year 4 elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical Engineering. Objectives/Outcomes: The objective of this (single semester) Exchange Program is to provide students with the opportunity to live and learn in a foreign culture while completing the academic and professional requirements of the University of Sydney degree program. Upon completion of the full year-long exchange (i.e. both CHNG4041 and CHNG4042), students will have completed work at least equivalent to Year 4 in the Chemical Engineering degree, including in particular the Year 4 core units of study, and will have fulfilled all the requirements of their degree from the University of Sydney.
CHNG4042 Exchange Program 4B

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Completion of all Year 1, 2 and 3 core units of study in Chemical Engineering stream, and at least 144 credit points towards the degree. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment in sessions 1 and 2 Assessment: Students spend either one academic year or semester at the host institution where they take a normal load. Their specific course choices are approved by the Heads of Department of the two institutions. Individual approved subjects at the host institution are assessed according to their standard procedures and a grade of "R" (satisfied requirements) is recorded on their academic transcript at this institution.
Year 4 elective unit of study for the degree in Chemical Engineering. Objectives/Outcomes: The objective of this (single semester) Exchange Program is to provide students with the opportunity to live and learn in a foreign culture while completing the academic and professional requirements of the University of Sydney degree program. Upon completion of the full year-long exchange (i.e. both CHNG4041 and CHNG4042), students will have completed work at least equivalent to Year 4 in the Chemical Engineering degree, including in particular the Year 4 core units of study, and will have fulfilled all the requirements of their degree from the University of Sydney.
CHNG4203 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Practical Experience Prerequisites: 144 CP prior study with >65% WAM Prohibitions: CHNG4811 OR CHNG4812 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG4802 Assumed knowledge: Passed at least 144 credit points. Students wishing to do this unit of study are required to discuss the matter with the Head of School prior to enrolment. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrollment by permission only. The candidate will be selected by interview and at the discretion of the Head of School.
This unit of study will give students a rich experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision and extends over several months, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site. Previous students have been placed with industries in areas including the mining industry, oil and gas processing, plastic and paint manufacture, food production, manufacturing and so on. Students will learn from this experience the following essential engineering skills: how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organise a program of work, and analyse results and evaluate these in relation to existing knowledge. Presentation skills will also be developed, which are highly relevant to many branches of engineering activity.
CHNG4802 Chemical Engineering Design A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Site Visit Prerequisites: CHNG3801,CHNG3802, CHNG3803, CHNG3805, CHNG3806, CHNG3807 Prohibitions: CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering unit of study in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
In the overall design process, chemical engineers must clearly understand the (often complex) interactions and trade-offs that occur between technical, economic, social and environmental considerations. This units of study builds on concepts in each of these areas introduced in previous years but with an emphasis on their successful integration within a comprehensive design activity. This design activity is spread over two unit of study (Chemical Engineering Design A and B) run in first and second semester. The primary aim in the first unit of study is to consider the technical issues- with an emphasis on creating and evaluating a range of alternative options that exist at both the unit operation and complete flowsheet levels. The primary emphasis in the subsequent unit of study is on evaluating how non-technical considerations affect the final process design and its operation.
By the end of both units of study a student should be able to develop a wide range of alternative conceptual designs for a given product specification and market analysis, have an appreciation of how to evaluate process alternatives at the conceptual level with a view to creating a 'short-list' worthy of more detailed technical investigation, be familiar with the use of process flowsheeting software to compare alternative designs , appreciate the fact that technical considerations are only one component in an overall successful design project and be able to clearly present the results from both individual and group work in oral/written formats. This unit of study is part of an integrated (two semester) fourth year program in chemical engineering design whose overarching aim is to complete the 'vertical integration' of knowledge- one of the pillars on which this degree program is based.
CHNG4806 Chemical Engineering Design B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: CHNG4802 or CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all core chemical engineering units of study in third-year have been successfully completed, as well as the related first semester UoS CHNG4802 or CHNG4203 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment prior to CHNG4802 in the case of Mid-Year Entry students.
In the overall design process, chemical engineers must clearly understand the (often complex) interactions and trade-offs that occur between technical, economic, social and environmental considerations. This unit of study builds on concepts in each of these areas introduced in previous years but with an emphasis on their successful integration within a comprehensive design activity.
This design activity is spread over two units (Chemical Engineering Design A and B) run in first and second semester. The primary aim in the first unit is to consider the technical issues- with an emphasis on creating and evaluating a range of alternative options that exist at both the unit operation and complete flowsheet levels. The primary emphasis in this unit is on evaluating how non-technical considerations affect the final process design and its operation. Students joining this course from the Major Industrial Placement Project (MIPPs CHNG 4203) or as overseas students (with approval) do the same assignment but on a different schedule.
CHNG4811 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: CHNG3801, CHNG3802, CHNG3803, CHNG3805, CHNG3806, CHNG3807. Prohibitions: CHNG4813 OR CHNG4814 OR CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering unit of study in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is available to only those students who have gained an entry to the Honours degree. School permission required for enrolment in semester 2.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CHNG4812 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Corequisites: CHNG4811 Prohibitions: CHNG4813 OR CHNG4814 OR CHNG4203 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that Honours Thesis A and all (six) core chemical engineering units of study in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is available to only those students who have gained an entry to the Honours degree. School permission required for enrolment in semester 1.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, the Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B. While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CHNG4813 Engineering Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: CHNG3801, CHNG3802, CHNG3803, CHNG3805, CHNG3806, CHNG3807 Prohibitions: CHNG4811 or CHNG4812 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering UoS in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: School permission required for enrolment in semester 2.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Chemical Engineering Project A and B) run in first and second semester. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Engineering Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion - typically 1 hour per week.
CHNG4814 Engineering Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Corequisites: CHNG4813 Prohibitions: CHNG4811 OR CHNG4812 Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all (six) core chemical engineering UoS in third year have been successfully completed Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: School permission required for enrolment in semester 1.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Chemical Engineering Project A and B) run in first and second semester. In this unit of study, the primary emphasis is on the execution of a comprehensive and systemic series of investigations, and the reporting of the study in a major thesis document and an oral presentation. Students will acquire skills in developing a plan for a series of studies to illuminate an area of research, in evaluating alternatives at the conceptual level with a view to creating a 'short-list' worthy of more detailed technical investigation, and in searching the literature for guidance of the studies. Further, communication skills will be developed, such as the ability to clearly present the background and results in a written format and in an oral presentation to a general engineering audience. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week.
CHNG5001 Process Systems Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: First year undergraduate physics and mathematics (differential equations). Use of mathematical and/or computer-based modelling tools and techniques. Feedback control concepts and principles as taught in CHNG3802/CHNG5802 or similar courses. Students who are unsure about meeting these requirements should contact the unit coordinator for advice. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Whatever its purpose, any process requires some level of process monitoring and control to allow it to operate satisfactorily. Once a process is under control, the option exists to further improve performance via the implementation of some level of optimisation. This unit will develop skills in integrating process modelling, simulation, design, optimisation and control concepts. The aims of this unit are (i) to demonstrate that modelling, process control and optimisation are integral concepts in the overall consideration of industrial plants, (ii) to demonstrate that a unified approach allows a diversity of application fields to be readily handled, and (iii) to allow each student to achieve and demonstrate acceptable competency over the unit material through a range of individual and group-based activities.
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Lectures Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. All core third year chemical engineering. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5004 Particles and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
CHNG5005 Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Group assignment Assumed knowledge: Ability to conduct mass and energy balances, and the integration of these concepts to solve 'real' chemical engineering problems. Ability to understand basic principles of physical chemistry, physics and mechanics. Ability to use basic calculus and linear algebra, and carry out such computations using Matlab and MS Excel. Ability to read widely outside of the technical literature and to synthesise arguments based on such literature. Ability to write coherent reports and essays based on information from diverse sources. Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Key learning objectives are to provide students with an overview of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used.
The key issues considered are: wastewater characterisation; the cost of wastewater treatment and disposal; the (Australian) regulatory framework; primary, secondary and tertiary treatment options; solids management and water reuse; pro-cess integration; an introduction to process simulation.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CHNG5005 OR CHNG3804. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Lectures Prerequisites: (CHNG3801 OR CHNG9301 OR CHNG5801) AND (CHNG3802 OR CHNG9302 OR CHNG5802) AND (CHNG3805 OR CHNG9305 OR CHNG5805) AND (CHNG3806 OR CHNG9306 OR CHNG5806) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Note: School permission required for enrollment.
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 credit points from the MPE degree program (incuding any credit for prior study) or 24 credit points from the ME degree program (incuding any credit for prior study) Prohibitions: CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 OR CHNG5205 Assumed knowledge: (CHNG9301 OR CHNG5801) AND (CHNG9302 OR CHNG5802) AND (CHNG9303 OR CHNG5803) AND (CHNG9305 OR CHNG5805) AND (CHNG9306 OR CHNG5806). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Minimum 12 A and B) run over two semesters. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Corequisites: CHNG5020 Prohibitions: CHNG5022 OR CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 OR CHNG5205 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that Capstone Project A has been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Minimum 12 A and B) run over two semesters. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 42 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >70, or 66 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >70 or exemption Corequisites: CHNG5020 Prohibitions: CHNG5021 OR CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission required for semester 1 or 2 based on achievement in Capstone Project A and taking other program requirements into consideration.
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Capstone Project A and B/B extended) run in first and second semester. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Capstone Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion - typically 1 hour per week. Capstone Project B extended enables the student to undertake a project of greater scope and depth than capstone project B.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5205 Major Industrial Placement Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Professional Placement Prerequisites: Passed at least 48 credit points in Master of professional engineering with adequate foundation knowledge in discipline. Students wishing to do this unit of study should contact the Head of School prior to enrolment. Prohibitions: CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR ENGG5217 OR CHNG9402 OR CHNG5112 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Enrolment by permission only. The students enrolled in this subject should have completed the first year Master of Professional Engineering with specialisation in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and a minimum credit average. The candidate will be selected by interview and at the discretion of the Head of School. Students enrolled in this subject are exempted from completing Chemical Engineering Design A (CHNG9402), Capstone Project A and B (CHNG5020 and CHNG5021) and one of the electives from the Specialist Units of Study that students are expected to take in the first semester of the second year. This exemption is granted because students are exposed to the core aspects of these courses through practical exercises undertaken during the MIPPS placement. While undertaking MIPPS, students have a unique opportunity to see and experience the industrial environment around them, in a manner which is not available at University. MIPPS students are required to enroll in Chemical Engineering Design B (CHNG9406) in the following semester.
The purpose of this proposal is to introduce a new subject into the Master of Professional Engineering with specialisation in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. The new subject is designed to equip students with practical experience in the area of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering. Industrial project placement will clearly cover and widen the practical nature of curriculum base studies.
This unit of study will give students a rich experience for undertaking a major project in an industrial environment and developing skills in the preparation and presentation of technical reports. The project is performed under industry supervision supported by School staff and extends over one semester. The students will be engaged full time on the project at the industrial site. Students will be placed with industries, such as mining, oil and gas processing, plastic and paint manufacturing, food production, wastewater and water treatment. The students will learn essential engineering skills, such as how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, project management, and analysis of results and assess these with theory and existing knowledge.
CHNG5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ENGG5220 OR ENGG5221 OR CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR CHNG5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CHNG5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CHNG5222 Prohibitions: ENGG5220 OR ENGG5221 OR CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR CHNG5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CHNG5601 Membrane Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
"Membrane Science" provides background in the physics and electrochemistry of a variety of synthetic membranes used in industry as well as cellular membranes.
The course aims to develop students' understanding of:
- membrane self-assembly and manufacture;
- membrane separation processes such as filtration, desalination, ion exchange and water-splitting;
- and techniques for membrane characterisation and monitoring.
CHNG5602 Cellular Biophysics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students will be given a good background in the physics of biological processes. Students will understand the differences between thermodynamically closed and open systems and its relevance to cells and other biological systems. Students will be provided with an introduction to the thermodynamics of irreversible and evolutionary processes of relevance to biology. Students will be introduced to the statistical mechanics of self assembly and equilibrium structures and its relevance to biology at the molecular level.
CHNG5603 Analysis, Modelling, Control: BioPhy Sys

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students have a general knowledge of: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: This course is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective course for fourth year students. Some lectures my be given by a guest lecturer.
This course will give students an insight into the use of (computer-based) statistical techniques in extracting information from experimental data obtained from real life bio-physical systems. The issues and techniques required for mathematical modeling as well as monitoring and/or control scheme for bio-physical systems will be discussed and implemented in diverse range of bioprocesses, including biomaterials and fermentation products.
We will review statistical distribution; tests based on z, t, F variables; calculation of confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; linear and nonlinear regression; analysis of variance; principal component analysis; and use of computer-based statistical tools. The issues associated with dynamic response of bio-physical processes; inferred or estimated variables; control system design and implementation; introduction to model-based control; use of computer-based control system design and analysis tools will be elaborated.
When this course is successfully completed you will acquire knowledge to choose the appropriate statistical techniques within a computer based environment, such as Excel or MATLAB, for a given situation. The students will also obtain potential for monitoring/control scheme based on the key dynamic features of the process. Such information would be beneficial for any future career in Bio-manufacturing companies. Students are encouraged to promote an interactive environment for exchange of information.
CHNG5604 Advanced Membrane Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CHNG5601 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This a practical unit of study where students apply the theoretical concepts of membrane science to engineering practice via a series of laboratory experiments. The students will gain practical insights into mass transport processes through various membranes. Students will understand the construction and functional properties of synthetic separation membranes and also will explore experimentally the various factors affecting the performance of membranes.
CHNG5605 Bio-Products: Laboratory to Marketplace

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: This course is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective course for fourth year students.
The objectives of the course are to provide students with an overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical industry. It will give students an insight into drug delivery systems and formulation; how therapeutic drugs work; and a general overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical marketing. The design and management of clinical trials, which are key factors for development of any new therapeutic agent will also be covered in the course. The challenges for commercialisation of innovative methods and/or biochemical and pharmaceutical products and aspects of intellectual property protection will be elaborated. Ultimately the aspects of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and international legislation for marketing pharmaceutical products will be illuminated.
Lectures in this course will be delivered by both University of Sydney staff and by a number of visiting professional representatives from industry and government agencies. We will also arrange a site visit for a bio-manufacturing company as warranted.
When you successfully complete this course you acquire knowledge about drug formulation, pharmaceutical processing including physical processes, legislation governing the bio-manufacturing and commercialisation of biochemicals and pharmaceuticals. The information would be beneficial for your future career in pharmaceutical manufacturing companies.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information. This course will be assessed by quizzes, assignments, oral presentation and final report. This unit of study is offered as an advanced elective unit of study to final year undergraduate students. Students may be required to attend lectures off-campus.
CHNG5606 Advanced Food Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: CHNG2801 AND CHNG2802 AND CHNG3804 AND CHNG3805 AND AGEN3004 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Working at an advanced level in the food processing industry requires an ability to independently familiarise yourself with new and emerging challenges and technologies, to recognise the potential and limitations of new tools and methods, and to devise innovative solutions. Students in this unit will critically examine a range of issues and technologies in food processing technologies particularly in the areas of energy requirements, product design and process design. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through seminars and projects in three parts. In the first part, students will evaluate a range of processes based on their energy requirements. In the second part students will investigate particulate food processing and product design. In the third part of the course students will be tasked with devising and justifying their own optimum solution for a selected food processing challenge.
CHNG5607 Advanced Biochemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: CHNG2802 AND CHNG2806 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3804 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Students who have not completed the units listed as assumed knowledge should consult the coordinator before enrolling in the course.
Working in the 21st century bioeconomy requires advanced knowledge of a range of bioreactors. This course covers the modelling of bioreactors from very large to very small scale systems. The modelling of such systems will include the kinetics, transport phemonema and mixing problems that inevitably arise. Examples will be drawn from bio-commodities, bio-specialty chemicals and bio-pharmaceuticals industries. The course will develop students skills in analysing and designing such bioreactor systems.