Civil Engineering

CIVL – Civil Engineering unit of study descriptions

CIVL0011 Civil Exchange A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0012 Civil Exchange B

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0013 Civil Exchange C

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0014 Civil Exchange D

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0015 Civil Exchange E

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0016 Civil Exchange F

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0017 Civil Exchange G

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL0018 Civil Exchange H

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Departmental permission required. Students must have a WAM >65 and to have completed one full year of study, that is 48 credit points.
Students undertaking overseas exchange programs enrol in exchange units in place of a normal semester enrolment. Successful completion of the subjects at the external institution will be the criteria for the award or pass or fail in this unit.
CIVL1802 Statics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1802 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Unit will focus on Engineering Statics, covering topics such as resolution of forces and moments, free body diagrams, support reactions, equilibrium in rigid bodies, trusses frames and machines, method of sections, method of joints, centroids, distributed forces, vibrations and friction. There will be extensive use of both 2D and 3D examples and solution methods by either resolution in the principle axes or by using vectors. Its main aim is to prepare students for 2nd year civil units such as Structural Mechanics.
CIVL1810 Engineering Construction and Surveying

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workgroups, Lectures Prohibitions: CIVL2810 Assumed knowledge: CIVL1900. Some statistical awareness is an advantage and co-enrolment in MATH1005 Statistics is advised. HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or completion of (MATH1001 or MATH1021) and MATH1002 are sufficient for non-statistical maths preparation Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%), Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: In recent years - the course has included a 1.5 day camp at Webbs Creek (about 80km from Sydney). The camp is located in a bushland setting. It aims to provide valuable practice in practical field survey and has a secondary aim of providing a basis for social gathering (this aspect being requested in student feedback over recent years)
Construction: Fundamental understanding of construction materials and techniques underpins Civil design and complements a rigorous analysis covered in other units such as Structural Mechanics and Soil Mechanics. In this unit students will be introduced to the realities of on-site civil construction. For many students this comes as a completely foreign experience and the methods they need to use to succeed in this unit rely on the student building his or her own awareness of the construction world and how it operates. This will be guided by the lectures and on-line material, but will not be spoon-fed to the students.
This unit presents concepts introducing students to engineering construction including:
- design, control, management, measurement and construction methods for excavation, embankments and other earthworks, hauling and associated operations;
- conceptual and formative exposure to building construction methods and materials, including reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber;
- drilling and blasting.
Surveying: The unit also introduces Engineering Survey topics, where the aims are:
- give an overall view of the functions of surveying and it's service role in Civil construction;
- become acquainted with selected specific surveying techniques, such as: (a) to provide basic analogue methods of distance, angle and height measurement and, (b) to provide an understanding of three dimensional mapping using basic total station electronic field equipment with associated data capture ability, and;
- to give an insight into future trends in the use of GPS and GIS systems.
Students should develop basic competency in earthwork engineering and awareness of costing issues in formulating building proposals (through simplified examples). Economic optimisation is investigated, and how this impinges on decisions of construction, including proposing and analysing systems and methods, estimation of probable output, unit cost and productivity evaluation. Students should have a basic knowledge of vertical construction in reinforced concrete, masonry, steel and timber. Students should also develop proficiency in the design and implementation of mapping systems in Civil Engineering, using analogue and electronic field equipment and associated software packages.
The tutorial exercises give practise for students to implement what they have learned from lectures and their own research about the framework under which construction projects are formulated and analysed; construction engineering fundamentals; construction systems related to excavation, hauling and embankment construction, including selection and evaluation of plant and methods as well as the expected output and cost; introduction to construction operations management, introduction to engineering surveying, distance measurement, angle measurement, levelling, traversing, topographic surveys, electronic surveying equipment, future surveying technologies.
While prior exposure to an actual construction site would be beneficial, in any case the key for success in this unit is for the student to develop a hungry curiosity for the world of construction and the professionals and personalities which form the intricate patchwork of talent which sees complex projects through to successful completion.
CIVL1900 Introduction to Civil Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG1800 OR CHNG1108 OR MECH1560 OR AERO1560 OR AMME1960 OR BMET1960 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1960 Assumed knowledge: AK: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objective of this unit of study is to introduce students to the field of civil engineering and its areas of specialisation: structural engineering, environmental engineering, geotechnical engineering, construction management, transportation engineering, and humanitarian engineering. The unit will cover basic physics concepts relevant to civil engineering. The unit will equip students with knowledge of foundational civil engineering tools and techniques such as the identification and calculation of loads on structures, structural systems, and load paths in structures. The unit covers design and construction issues related to the use of standard materials such as steel, concrete, and timber. The unit includes several design tasks and a design project with an emphasis on issues associated with the impact of civil infrastructure on the natural environment, the economy, and social and humanitarian outcomes. The topics will provide a sound foundation for the further study of civil infrastructure design, analysis, construction, and maintenance.
CIVL2010 Environmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project work Prohibitions: CIVL3010 Assumed knowledge: MATH1023 AND ENGG1801. Strong calculus knowledge from 1000 level MATH, as well as the ability to program in MATLAB. Basic understanding of structural mechanics (CIVL2201) is also an advantage. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit introduces students to the role of civil engineers and the historical development of the profession, and relates this to the Code of Ethics - Engineers Australia; impact of engineering on the human and natural environment; energy consumption, resourcing and renewal, dealing with variability in climate; definitions and practice of sustainability; environmental assessment tools and life-cycle analyses. As graduates, students may expect to find themselves in a position which touches upon a wide variety of Engineering fields (including legal, institutional, and environmental considerations). In both small and large firms they could be acting as agents and managers of technology-driven change which has social and environmental impact. Engineering decision-making and problem-solving are made more complex by technical, economic, environmental, social and ethical constraints. The goals of this unit are to introduce students to major problems of environmental deterioration and engage students in active reflection on the role of civil engineers in addressing these issues; to develop the students skills at quantifying the impact of engineering decisions within the broader economic, environmental and socio-cultural contexts; to develop communication skills through participation in group discussions, oral presentations, video production and written report writing. Lectures, group discussions, case problems and projects are all used in teaching and learning in this unit of study.
The learning objectives of this unit are that students will be able to: (a) identify and analyse ecological, social and ethical issues deriving from technology-driven change, and evaluating these in the benefit model of the project (dealing with issues of long-range air and water pollution, energy use and finite resources); (b) write environmental impact statements for engineering projects and identify and analyse the impacts of infrastructure projects on the social and natural environments; (c) use design and analysis tools such as a Life-Cycle Analysis to develop better engineering design solutions; (d) understand the influence of organisational, ethical and legal factors on engineering practice.
The secondary objectives of the unit are to: (a) improve students team-work ability; (b) improve students communication skills, through verbal and written media; (c) improve students skills in research and use of library resources.
CIVL2110 Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: AMME1362 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1802 or CIVL1802 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Materials are an important part of the civil engineers' work. Indeed, civil engineers who are concerned with the design, construction, and maintenance of facilities need to understand the behaviour and performance of the materials used. And as it happens, mechanical properties- which are essential and basic for civil engineers- are highly dependent on the structure of materials at various scales. Therefore, it is important that a student in Civil Engineering possesses a fundamental knowledge in materials science.
This unit of study aims to provide students with the tools necessary to select the adequate material for a particular application and to assess its mechanical behaviour while in use. This course will focus mainly on materials for civil engineering and construction applications, i. e. metals, concrete and soils.
CIVL2201 Structural Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ENGG1802 OR CIVL1802 Prohibitions: AMME2301 Assumed knowledge: From (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802), students should be competent in the following areas. 1. The concept of force and momentum equilibrium in two and three dimensions. 2. Drawing free body diagrams. 3. Establishing and solving the equations of equilibrium from the FBD. 4. Setting out solutions logically, clearly and neatly. Students should be competent in certain mathematical skills. 1. Solving algebraic equations. 2. Differentiation and integration (including double integrals). 3. Drawing graphs of polynomials (especially) and other mathematical function. 4. Trigonometry. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The primary objective of this unit is to understand internal actions (forces and moments) in structures (deformable objects) under loads in three key areas: how structures resist external loads by internal actions; the distribution of internal actions within structures; and the deformations, stresses and strains associated with the internal actions. At the end of this unit, students should be able to understand the basic methods of load transfer in structures - tension, compression, bending, shear and torsion (internal actions); apply the equations of equilibrium to determine the distribution of internal actions in a simple structure by drawing BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; understand the significance and methods of calculation of the geometric properties of structural sections (I, Z, S, J, etc.); understand the effect of internal forces and deformations of bodies through the concept and calculation of strains and stresses; appreciate the behaviour of structures by analysing structures without numerical calculations; display a knowledge of basic material properties, combined stresses and failure criteria; and demonstrate their hands-on experience of the behaviour of structural members via experiments and the ability to prepare written reports on those experiments. Emphasis in the assessment scheme will be placed on understanding structural behaviour and solving problems, rather than remembering formulae or performing complex calculations. The course seeks to utilise and improve the generic skills of students, in areas such as problem solving, neat and logical setting out of solutions, report writing, and team work. The syllabus comprises introduction; equilibrium; internal actions: BMDs, SFDs, AFDs, and TMDs; elasticity, stress and strain, and basic material properties; axial forces: tension and compression; elastic bending of beams; shear force and shear stresses in beams; torsion; deflection of beams; pipes and pressure vessels; trusses; material properties, combined stresses and yield criteria; advanced bending; introduction to buckling and instability.
CIVL2410 Soil Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND GEOL1501 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802). An understanding of simple statics, equilibrium, forces and bending moments, and of stress and strain and the relationship between them. This is covered by University of Sydney courses CIVL1802 Statics (or ENGG1802 Engineering Mechanics), CIVL2201 Structural Mechanics. Familiarity with the use of spreadsheets (Excel, Mathcad) to obtain solutions to engineering problems, and with the graphical presentation of this data. Familiarity with word processing packages for report presentation. Familiarity with partial differential equations, and their analytical and numerical solution. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This course provides an elementary introduction to Geotechnical Engineering, and provides the basic mechanics necessary for the detailed study of Geotechnical Engineering. This course aims to provide an understanding of: the nature of soils as engineering materials; common soil classification schemes; the importance of water in the soil and the effects of water movement; methods of predicting soil settlements, the stress-strain-strength response of soils, and earth pressures.
CIVL2611 Introductory Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2201 AND (CIVL1802 or ENGG1802) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021). Students are expected to have a strong understanding of fundamental physics, statics, equilibrium, forces, and dimensional analysis. Familiarity with simple calculus, partial differential equations, and the analytical and numerical solutions. Assessment: Through semester assessment (44%) and Final Exam (56%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objective of this unit of study is to develop an understanding of basic fluid concepts for inviscid and incompressible fluids. Topics to be covered will include: basic fluid properties, hydrostatics, buoyancy, stability, pressure distribution in a fluid with rigid body motion, fluid dynamics, conservation of mass and momentum, dimensional analysis, open channel flow, and pipe flow.
This core unit of study together with CIVL3612 forms the basis for further studies in the applied areas of ocean, coastal and wind engineering and other elective fluid mechanics units which may be offered.
CIVL2700 Transport Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND MATH1005 AND ENGG1801. Basic statistics through regression analysis, differential and integral calculus, computer programming. Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to transport systems and is assumed knowledge for fourth year units on traffic engineering, transport planning, and city logistics. Topics include: the role of accessibility as the reason for transport; the history of transport technologies in Australia and globally; the characteristics of the principle modes of transport; factors behind the demand for mobility; qualitative choice modeling; agent-based modeling; predicting travel demands; the mechanics of queueing and traffic flow; intelligent transport systems; the microscopic and macroscopic fundamental diagrams; highway capacity and level of service; the design of transport junctions.
CIVL2812 Project Appraisal

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Prohibitions: ENGG2850 OR CIVL3812 Assumed knowledge: MATH1005 Assessment: through semester assessment (45%) and final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit aims to introduce students to project valuations using present-value cash flow theory, taxation and probabilities, and the role of these valuations in the decision-making process. Students are taught techniques for making an analysis of issues involved in project appraisal by various methods and these are applied to businesses, non-profit organisations, and governments. At the end of this unit, students should be able to comprehend and relate to real-life examples the fundamental concepts in project appraisal (e. g. the meaning of time value for money, equivalence); calculate common financial indicators for a given project and explain the relevance of each to the appraisal of the project; rank projects by combining both financial and non-financial indicators (e. g. environmental and social); understand how risks and uncertainties affect evaluation outcomes and be able to deal with uncertainties and risks in analysis; apply techniques to account for the effects of inflation/deflation and exchange rates in analysis; understand the concept and mechanisms for depreciation and carry out pre-tax as well as post-tax analysis; understand the assumptions, pros and cons of each evaluation method and be able to explain why a particular method is appropriate/not appropriate for a given project. The syllabus covers the following concepts: time value of money, cost of capital, simple/compound interest, nominal/effective interest, cost/benefit analysis of projects; equivalence, net present worth (value), future worth (value), annual worth (value), internal rate of return, external rate of return, payback period; cost-benefit analysis, cost-utility analysis, identifying and quantifying non-financial benefits/externalities; Other influencing factors: price changes and exchange rates, depreciation, taxation; Capitalisation and valuation studies, replacement of assets, real option, project risk analysis, decision-tree analysis, WACC, MARR, equity capital, debt. This unit of study is a second-year core unit for students enrolled in Civil Engineering (any major), and is a possible elective in other schools of engineering.
CIVL3205 Concrete Structures 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Assignments Assumed knowledge: CIVL2110 AND CIVL2201 AND (CIVL2230 OR CIVL1900). Basic concepts of solid mechanics and structural mechanics, including: compatability of strains; stress-strain relationships; equilibrium; flexure, shear and torsion; statically determinate load effects (reactions, bending moments, shear forces); elastic beam theory (strains, stresses and beam deflections). Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this unit are to provide a basic understanding of the behaviour of reinforced concrete members and structures; to provide a basic understanding of standard methods of analysis and design of reinforced concrete structures (including an understanding of capabilities and limitations); and to provide basic design training in a simulated professional engineering environment. At the end of this unit students will gain proficiency in basic methods of reinforced concrete analysis and design.
The syllabus covers the behaviour of reinforced concrete members and structures, including: material properties, 'elastic' analysis (stresses/deformations/time-dependence), ultimate strength of beams (flexure), ultimate strength of columns (short and slender), behaviour or reinforced concrete slabs, the reinforced concrete truss analogy (shear and detailing implications), design criteria (for durability, fire- resistance, serviceability and strength), design calculation procedures, reinforcement detailing and structural drawings.
CIVL3206 Steel Structures 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2110 AND CIVL2201 AND (CIVL2230 or CIVL1900) Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: It is assumed that students are competent in the following areas: the methods of load transfer in structures - tension, compression, bending, shear, torsion, and bearing; an appreciation of stress and strain, and being able to determine stresses and strains in simple sections under axial force, bending moments, shear and torsion; calculating and understanding the physical significance of geometric section properties - centroid, Ix, Iy, Zx, Zy, Sx, Sy, rx, ry, J, Ag; knowledge of the basic elastic-plastic material properties of steel, E, G, fy, fu; and knowledge of loading of structures. A special "assumed knowledge" lecture will be given in Week 1 to refresh the knowledge of students.
This unit of study is concerned with the behaviour and design of steel structures. Statics provided the fundamentals of equilibrium upon which most structural engineering is based. Structural Concepts and Structural Analysis provided information on the loads (actions) on a structure and how structures resist these actions with a resulting distribution of internal actions (bending moments, shear forces, axial forces; BMDs, SFDs and AFDs). Structural Mechanics considered how these internal actions resulted in stresses and strains in members. Materials considered the microscopic and molecular structure of metals to determine its inherent mechanical properties such as yield stress. This unit of study will then combine the knowledge of stresses, material properties of steel, structural analysis, and loading, and consider new concepts and modes of failure, such as local and flexural torsional buckling, combined actions and second-order effects to understand the behaviour of steel members and frames, and how this behaviour is accounted for in the design standard AS 4100.
Both the units of study "Steel Structures 1" and "Concrete Structures 1" can be considered the culmination of the various elements of structural engineering begun in "Engineering Mechanics" in first year, and is further developed in "Civil Engineering Design" in final year. More advanced topics, such as plate behaviour, advanced buckling and connection design, are considered in the final year elective subject "Steel Structures 2".
It is recognised that not all students intend to become consulting structural engineers. The unit of study is designed so that students who make an effort to understand the concepts are most capable of passing. Students who are planning a career in the consulting structural engineering profession should be aiming at achieving a Distinction grade or higher.
CIVL3235 Structural Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: CIVL2110 AND (CIVL2230 or CIVL1900) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this unit are to provide an understanding of the principles of structural analysis by introducing the strain-displacement, stress-strain and equilibrium relationships for beam members; applying the relationships to the matrix displacement analysis of frame structures; and using computer software to conduct the linear-elastic and buckling analyses of frame structures. At the end of this unit, students will be able to deduce appropriate structural models for frame structures; and use computer methods and simple hand methods to obtain internal forces and displacements as well as buckling loads for frame structures. The syllabus comprises theoretical background (strain-displacement, stress-strain and equilibrium relationships), structural analysis software, matrix displacement method, beam theory, introduction to nonlinear analysis, buckling analysis.
CIVL3310 Humanitarian Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: through semester assessment (70%) and final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Humanitarian Engineering is the application of engineering to meet the needs of communities globally; while maintaining a focus on sustainability and appropriateness. This unit will give an introduction to engineers from all disciplines about the unique skills and knowledge needed to tackle challenges in; developing countries, during all stages of disasters and indigenous communities. Achieving global sustainability is a consistent theme through-out the subject. The unit will develop skills in intra-disciplinary teamwork and cross-cultural competence. The subject is taught through a series of lectures based on real case studies and engaging guest seminars. Seminars presenters are all people who are currently working in the field of humanitarian engineering with representatives from industry, government, multi-lateral organisations and non-government organisations. This unit of study is the first lecture based subject in the Humanitarian Engineering major. The unit aligns as a 3rd year elective and is a prerequisite for 4th year subject in the Humanitarian Engineering major CIVL5320 Engineering for Sustainable Development.
CIVL3411 Geotechnical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: CIVL2410 Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this unit are to provide an understanding of the factors influencing soil strength, and to give practice in the application of this understanding by exploring the stability of slopes, retaining walls and foundations. At the end of this unit students will be able to: determine the strength parameters appropriate to a range of stability problems, and understand the difference between total and effective stress approaches; evaluate strength parameters from laboratory data; critically analyse foundation stability and slope stability problems; use spreadsheets to perform parametric studies and produce design charts for simple geotechnical design problems; and communicate the results of experiments and analyses using written methods appropriate for professional geotechnical engineers. The syllabus comprises; methods of analysis for gravity and sheet pile retaining walls; reinforced soil; slope stability, including modes of failure, analysis and computer methods; bearing capacity of shallow foundations under general loading, and axial and lateral capacities of deep pile foundations; the mechanical behaviour of sands and clays; and Critical State models.
CIVL3612 Fluid Mechanics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CIVL2611 Assessment: Through semester assessment (65%) and Final Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the conservation of mass and momentum in differential forms for viscous fluid flows. It provides the foundation for advanced study of turbulence, flow around immersed bodies, open channel flow, pipe flow and pump design.
CIVL3614 Hydrology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Site Visit, Laboratories Prerequisites: CIVL2611 Assumed knowledge: (ENGG1802 OR CIVL1802) AND CIVL3612 AND MATH2061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: The unit of study builds on the theory and concepts learnt in CIVL2611 Introductory Fluid Mechanics and CIVL3612 Fluid Mechanics.
The overall objective of this unit of study is to give a general introduction to water resources, how these are linked the hydrological processes, and how engineering plays a role in the management of water resources. The aim of this unit is to provide a detailed understanding of: the hydrologic cycle of water as a whole and its specific components including: geophysical flows of water throughout the environment, dynamics of precipitation formations, transformations into runoff, reservoir and lake dynamics, stream flow discharge, surface runoff assessment, calculation of peak flows, the hydrograph theory, ground water flows, aquifers dynamics, concept of water quality and water treatment methods and units. The topics mentioned above will be covered in both qualitative and quantitative aspects. Use will be made of essential concepts of energy, mass and momentum conservation. An intermediate level of integral and differential calculus is required as well as knowledge and use of calculation software such as Excel and Matlab.
CIVL3704 Transport Informatics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: ENGG2851 Assumed knowledge: MATH1005 AND CIVL2700. Understanding of statistical inference. Familiarity with the urban transport network and basic concepts in transport studies. Assessment: through semester assessment (70%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Data analytics: that is the examining raw data with the purpose of drawing conclusions about that information. The unit will cover the techniques and methods of collecting data, designing data structures, analysis of data and science-based inference from data. These will be developed through real-world transport operations using available data bases and case studies of urban transport situations. Students will be introduced to relational databases - enabling them to store, manage and retrieve data. Subsequently, they will study the tools to create algorithms to process raw data, retrieve data from APIs and merge datasets to make them useable for a variety of transport analyses including statistical modelling and spatial analysis.
CIVL3805 Project Scope, Time and Cost Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Assessments Prohibitions: ENGG1865 OR QBUS2350 Assumed knowledge: CIVL2810 or CIVL1810 Assessment: Through semester assessment (65%) and Final Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The general aim of this unit of study is to offer the student the opportunity to develop an understanding of the scope, time and cost management in project environments. Students will engage with some of the key concepts and various activities which underpin project scope, time and cost management. At the end of this unit, students will be able to: develop Work Breakdown Structure (WBS), develop network diagrams, and undertake Critical Path Analysis (CPA) and Earned Value Analysis (EVA) using the given project information; explain in depth why scope, time and cost management are important to project management; analyse a project situation that involves scope, time and cost management issues; and explain how the components of scope, time and cost management interrelate in project environments. The syllabus comprises the project planning cycle, working with the project sponsor, scope initiation and definition, project scope definition tools, WBS, network scheduling techniques, CPA, Just-in-Time philosophy, estimating and budgeting, cash flow management, EVA and application of project management software.
CIVL3811 Engineering Design and Construction

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: workshops, project work - own time, presentation Prerequisites: CIVL1810 or CIVL2810 Prohibitions: CIVL4811 Assessment: through semester assessment (40%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The twin foci of this unit are: to enable students to participate as design engineers by developing an understanding of the design principles and techniques involved in the planning of a range of construction activities; and to assist students in preparing themselves for the role of a site engineer in a construction project wherein they will become familiar with the planning and execution of those activities, albeit with supervision and guidance from experienced professionals. Construction topics include hard rock tunnelling and general rock excavation; soft ground tunnelling; underground construction; micro tunnelling; cut and cover tunnelling; earth retaining systems; piling; formwork and falsework; dewatering; pavement design and construction - rigid and flexible; stormwater drainage design and construction; marine construction; civil construction in environmentally sensitive areas; contract administration for construction engineers; general engineering in remote localities (project based); construction methods in bridge engineering; QA documentation on a typical project; insurance in the construction industry, OHandS issues in the construction industry; timber engineering; post-tensioned/prestressed concrete construction.
CIVL4022 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Research, Meeting Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator and School's Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CIVL4023 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research, Meeting Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
CIVL4024 Engineering Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time, Meeting Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Engineering Project course coordinator and School's Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Engineering Project course coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
Engineering Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to civil engineering. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of reports will be done individually; i. e. , a separate report must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of Engineering Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
Engineering Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Engineering Project A (CIVL4024) and Engineering Project B (CIVL4025). This particular unit of study, which must precede CIVL4025 Engineering Project B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete 'final year' thesis project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
CIVL4025 Engineering Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 30 credit points of any 3000- or higher level units of study. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Engineering Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to civil engineering. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of reports will be done individually; i. e. , a separate report must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of Engineering Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
Engineering Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Engineering Project A (CIVL4024) and Engineering Project B (CIVL4025). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with CIVL4024 Engineering Project A, should cover the second half of the required project work. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in CIVL4024 Engineering Project A.
CIVL4810 Mgmnt of People, Quality and Risk in PE

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: ENGG3853 Assumed knowledge: CIVL3805. Students are expected to have understood and applied basic tools for project scope, cost and time management for projects as taught in (CIVL3805)or equivalent courses. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study is a fourth year core unit of study for the Bachelor of Project Engineering and Management. It is also an elective for other branches of engineering and faculties. The objective of this unit is to provide underpinning knowledge and skills in the application of tools to the project management environment for risk, quality and people management including leading and managing project teams. At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand and apply the tools of team building and project management leadership, as well as apply tools for design and implementation of integrated plans for risk, quality, human resource and procurement. The competency level achieved will enable application of integration tools to a range of simple generic projects as well as provide input to plans for more complex projects. The syllabus comprises team management, project leadership, modern quality management principles and techniques, quality assurance, preparation of quality plans; risk analysis, planning and risk management, as well as linking risk and quality management to human resourcing and procurement methodologies. The use of integrated planning software such as MS Project, Gantt Project and social media tools for project management will be explained and practised. The definitions and processes of Project Management will largely follow the US based Project Management Institutes, PMBOK as is used in the Australian Institution of Project Management Standards at the level of Certified Practising Project Manager, (CPPM). Other International standards such as ICPMA's, ICB3.0 standard will also be covered.
CIVL4811 Engineering Design and Construction

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Project Work - own time, Presentation Assumed knowledge: CIVL2810 OR CIVL1810 Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: This unit aims to prepare students for employment in a broad range of engineering areas including design, planning and construction management.
The objectives of this unit are to develop an understanding of construction methods, strategies, equipment and machinery in a range of construction activities and an understanding of the principles involved in the design for those construction activities.
At the end of this unit, students will have developed a familiarity with a variety of construction methods, strategies, equipment and machinery in a range of construction activities such that they will be able, if and when the opportunity arises to participate as site engineers (or similar role) in the planning and execution of those construction activities, albeit with supervision and guidance from experienced professionals. Students will also have developed an understanding of the design principles and techniques involved in the planning for those construction activities such that they are able, if and when the opportunity arises, to participate as design engineers, in the planning and design for those construction activities, with supervision and guidance from experienced professionals. The range of topics covered in this course is such that the learning outcomes form a basis for later development of more detailed knowledge, dependent on the future career experiences of the student. The course does not prepare a student for immediate, unsupervised participation in construction and design work associated with the topics covered.
The construction topics covered in this course have not been previously addressed in CIVL2810 (Engineering Construction and Survey). The topics may vary dependent on current and planned projects in Sydney, NSW and Australia. At this stage the topics are hard rock tunnelling and general hard rock underground excavation; soft ground tunnelling; underground construction; micro tunnelling; cut and cover (cover and cut) tunnelling; earth retaining systems; piling; formwork and falsework (incl Tilt up, Ultrafloor, Sacrificial form); dewatering; pavement design and construction - rigid and flexible (incl and pavement construction materials); stormwater drainage design and construction; marine construction; civil construction in environmentally sensitive areas; contract administration for construction engineers; general engineering in remote localities (project based); construction methods in bridge engineering; QA documentation on a typical project; insurance in the construction industry occupational health and safety issues in the construction industry; timber engineering; post-tensioned/ pre-stressed concrete construction; civil engineering in a marine environment.
On day 1 of the course, a form based survey is taken to invite students to nominate specific areas of interest which may lead to adjustment in course content.
CIVL4813 Contracts Formulation and Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: CIVL3813 OR ENGG3854 Assumed knowledge: CIVL3805. Students are expected to have grasped the concepts of basic legal and management principles and the understanding of construction and engineering terminologies. As there is no any prerequisite courses for this UoS, without prior knowledge student can perform exceptionally well with regular attendance and participation in course activities. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this unit are to give students a fundamental knowledge of the legal system and contract terms under which projects are generally conducted. Initially, emphasis will be on contract negotiations and understanding what negotiation is about and how to prepare for negotiations and also how to manage the negotiation so that a suitable outcome for both parties may be achieved. Also being able to deal with difficult opponents will be something that will be considered.
Emphasis will be on the principles of contract formulation, administration and finalisation, including prevention and/or settlement of disputes in projects. The syllabus comprises brief overview of the legal system in Australia and comparison with other legal systems introduction to project delivery systems and the running of a typical project, introduction to contract law and the formation of contracts, the principles of standard form contracts as well as bespoke drafting, an understanding of the risks undertaken by the different contracting parties, a detailed review of a standard contract promoting an understanding of major project issues such as time, variations and payment; implementation and administration; potential liabilities associated with project participation; contract conditions and specifications; understanding insurances and alternate dispute resolution procedures; notification requirements including time bar, understanding the commercial significance of issues such as latent conditions, subcontracting, bank guarantees and security of payment legislation.
CIVL4814 Project Procurement and Tendering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: CIVL3805 Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study is a fourth year core unit of study for the Bachelor of Project Engineering and Management (Civil), elective for all other branches of engineering and other faculties. The general aim of this unit is to offer student the opportunity to develop an understanding of the procurement of built facilities and the methods of job allocation in project environments. Students will be engaged in a real construction case study project where key practical concepts which underpin procurement will be taught. At the end of this unit of study, students should be able to: evaluate a client's procurement situation and apply an appropriate procurement route; explain how and why a particular procurement route is chosen; undertake procurement assessment exercises; analyze a contractor's strategic responses in tendering (bidding) decision-making; discuss why a particular bidding strategy is chosen in different contexts; and evaluate a contractor's bidding performance using competitor analysis techniques. The syllabus comprises fundamentals of building procurement, assessment of procurement risks, competitive bidding, cost estimating, the competitive environment in the construction industry, contractors' competitive positioning, contractors' decision-making in bidding competition, bidding strategies and competitor analysis.
CIVL4815 Project Formulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Prerequisites: CIVL3805 AND (CIVL3812 OR CIVL2812) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The aim of this unit is to develop students' ability to formulate projects through critically assessing and developing business case and project plan for a real-life engineering project. This unit is relevant for students who intend to pursue career related to project management. The learning activities focus on the project's viability and early stage planning. Strategic needs and possible project options are identified and assessed based on potential benefits, costs and the strategic context. Suitable site/route needs to be selected for the project based on technical and business considerations. Due consideration should also be given to the project's impact on environment and communities. The project's viability can be indicated using Benefit-Cost ratio as well as non-financial indicators such as number of jobs created and the number of life saved. In deriving these indicators, it is important to take project uncertainties into consideration through using techniques such as sensitivity analysis, decision-tree analysis, probabilistic modelling and Monte Carlo simulation. The objective is to justify investment to address the business needs and recommend the most appropriate response to the business needs.
The early stage planning concentrates on defining project requirements and project delivery strategy. The objective is to seek approval/support for project delivery or to critically evaluate the current project plan, depending on the current stage of the project. The exercise is to develop a plan guide project delivery and transition to operation. The plan should cover, but not limited to, the feasibility analysis, project deliverables, plan of activities necessary to move the project to the next stages, procurement strategy, what's needed to enable delivery (e. g. stakeholder management plan, planning and other approvals, funding, time, control processes, community and environment management plan, marketing and sales plan, and risk management plan) and, what is required to complete delivery and transition to operation stages.
CIVL4860 Architectural to Structural Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Presentation, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: CIVL3235 AND (BDES3023 OR BDES3026) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: This unit is restricted to students enrolled in the Bachelor of Engineering/ Bachelor of Design in Architecture combined degree.
CIVL4860 is a core final year unit for BE/BDesArch students aimed at enhancing students' skills in bridging between the architectural and engineering disciplines. The Unit will have a particular focus on developing strategies for how best to resolve the frequently conflicting interests and preferred concept solutions for addressing architectural and structural requirements for a building with given functions. Students will work in groups on developing final building designs from scratch from project briefs. Architectural and structural designs will be detailed in group presentations and reports.
CIVL4903 Civil Engineering Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: CIVL3205 and CIVL3206 Assumed knowledge: CIVL2410 AND CIVL3612 AND (CIVL4811 OR CIVL3811) Assessment: Through semester assessment (75%) and Final Exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objective of this unit is to give students an appreciation of the role of the designer in the development of Civil Engineering projects. At the end of this unit, students will have developed an understanding of the design philosophy. They will gain this through their involvement in a number of exercises which cover the design sequence from concept to documentation.
The syllabus comprises: design sequence beginning with a 'brief' and including definition, value and criteria selection; generation of proposals; analysis of proposals; selection of design; development of details of a particular design selected; feasibility studies and examination of existing works; study of design projects by stages, including details of some aspects.
This unit is under the direction of an engineer in professional practice in cooperation with other professional practitioners and members of the academic staff. Lectures and exercises on the interaction between civil engineering and architectural design and practice are included in the unit.
CIVL5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Research, Meeting Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: CIVL5222 OR CIVL5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to conduct original research. Students will generally work individually and an individual thesis must be submitted by each student.
Capstone Project is a major task and is to be conducted with work spread over most of the year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Capstone Project A (CIVL5020) and Capstone Project B (CIVL5021). This particular unit of study, which must precede CIVL5021 Capstone Project B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete Capstone Project. In particular, it should include almost all planning of a research or investigation project, a major proportion of the necessary literature review (unless the entire project is based on a literature review and critical analysis), and a significant proportion of the investigative work required of the project.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CIVL5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research, Meeting Corequisites: CIVL5020 Prohibitions: CIVL5222 OR CIVL5223 OR CIVL5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to conduct original research. Students will generally work individually and an individual thesis must be submitted by each student.
Capstone Project is a major task and is to be conducted with work spread over most of the year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Capstone Project A (CIVL5020) and Capstone Project B (CIVL5021). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with CIVL5020 Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete Capstone Project. In particular, it should include completion of all components of the research or investigation project planned but not undertaken or completed in CIVL5020 Capstone Project A.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CIVL5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research, Meeting Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70, or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: CIVL5021 OR CIVL5222 OR CIVL5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Capstone Project provides an opportunity for students to conduct original research. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of the thesis will be done individually; i. e. , a separate thesis must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
Capstone Project is a major task and is to be conducted with work spread over most of the year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Capstone Project A (CIVL5020) and Capstone Project B (CIVL5021) or this unit Capstone Project B extended (CIVL5022) worth 12 credit points. This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with CIVL5020 Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete Capstone Project. In particular, it should include completion of all components of the research or investigation project planned but not undertaken or completed in CIVL5020 Capstone Project A.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CIVL5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: CIVL5020 OR CIVL5021 OR CIVL5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CIVL5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: CIVL5020 OR CIVL5021 OR CIVL5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CIVL5266 Steel Structures - Stability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: There are no prerequisites for this unit of study but it is assumed that students are competent in the content covered in Structural Mechanics, Steel Structures, and Structural Analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit aims to: provide fundamental understanding at advanced level of the behaviour and design of hot-rolled/fabricated and cold-formed steel members; to provide fundamental understanding of newly developed Direct Design Method (DDM) for analysis and design of structural systems; and to develop an understanding of the behaviour and design of steel connections in open and hollow sections. It is anticipated that at the end of this unit of study students should be familiar with the behaviour of steel structures at advanced level in selected areas, including design for local buckling and design for flexural-torsional buckling of columns and beams; have a sound knowledge of AS 4100 in the areas of section capacity determination of slender cross-sections, and flexural-torsional buckling of beams; have a sound knowledge of AS/NZS 4600 in the areas of section capacity determination of slender cross-sections, and flexural-torsional buckling of columns and beams; have knowledge of the use of FEM software in the design of structural systems; have the skills to assess the behaviour of specific connections; have an appreciation of some practical aspects of economical steel connection design. This unit will examine stability theory, Stability design to AS4100 and AS/NZS4600, Direct Design Method, Steel connection design.
CIVL5269 Advanced Concrete Structures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: CIVL3205 OR CIVL9205 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This Unit reviews the fundamental concepts of 'elastic' behaviour of reinforced concrete structures and introduces models of behaviour and methods of analysis related to the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage (at service loads). This Unit also examines the non-linear (strain-softening) behaviour of reinforced concrete and the related effects concerning the strength of statically-indeterminate reinforced concrete structures. In particular, this Unit examines the concepts of ductility, moment-redistribution and plastic design (for beams and slabs). Strut-and-tie modelling of reinforced concrete members is also described. Design guidelines will reflect requirements of the Australian Standards and Eurocodes.
This Unit will provide students with the following knowledge and skills: understanding of the fundamental concepts and theoretical models concerning the time-dependent structural effects of concrete creep and shrinkage; ability to carry out calculations to estimate 'elastic' load-effects (stresses/strains/deformations) for reinforced concrete structures (at service loads), accounting for the time-dependent effects of concrete creep and shrinkage; understanding of the fundamental concepts and theoretical models of the strain-softening behaviour of reinforced concrete (in flexure); understanding of the fundamental concepts and numerical models of ductility and moment redistribution for reinforced concrete beams; ability to quantitatively assess the ductility and moment-redistribution capacity of reinforced concrete beams; understanding of the fundamental concepts and numerical models of plastic behaviour and design for reinforced concrete beams and slabs (including yield-line analysis); ability to determine the ultimate plastic load-carrying capacity of statically-indeterminate reinforced-concrete beams and slabs; ability to use strut-and-tie models of reinforced concrete behaviour.
CIVL5277 Structural Rehabilitation and Timber Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, workshops Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2201 AND CIVL3205 AND CIVL3206) OR (CIVL9201 AND CIVL9205 AND CIVL9206) Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This course will provide students broader knowledge in timber design and structural rehabilitation. In the first section of the subject, students will learn the engineering properties of timber and requirements to be met for specification of the design, installation and maintenance of timber structures. It includes grading and structural properties; design actions; design of timber columns, beams, tension members and connections; principles of limit state design and serviceability; methods of testing; quality standards and maintenance of timber structures based on AS 1720. 1-2010 timber structures-design methods, and AS NZS 4063. 1-2010 characterization of structural timber-test methods.
The second part covers monitoring, rehabilitation and strengthening techniques of existing structures (concrete/steel/timber/masonry). Students will be introduced to structural inspection and evaluation; durability and deterioration; destructive and non-destructive testing; and design of strengthening systems including advanced fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) materials, epoxy injection, steel plate bonding, and post tensioning according to relevant Australian, ACI and European guidelines.
CIVL5320 Engineering for Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Assignments Prerequisites: CIVL3310 OR CIVL9310 Assessment: through semester assessment (80%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The aim of this unit of study is to provide students with an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to design and implement sustainable humanitarian engineering projects. The context for the delivery of humanitarian engineering projects are set in developing countries, disaster relief situations, indigenous communities and our societies at large. Sustainability it critical to the long term impact of any engineering project. Students will learn about how engineering fits within a range of sustainability frameworks. Systems thinking, inter-disciplinary approaches, partnerships and government policy are some of the topics that will be covered. This unit of study is the 4th year elective for Humanitarian Engineering major and is open to all undergraduate engineers who have completed the pre-requisites.
CIVL5330 Global Engineering Field Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July Classes: Practical Experience, Presentation Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit of study is to provide fieldwork experience for undergraduate engineering students. The unit of study is one of the four subjects offered in the Humanitarian Engineering Major. The fieldwork will be between two to four weeks in either a developing country or remote communities in Australia. From this fieldwork experience, students will learn about the diversity of communities in need and how engineering can be used to address some of these problems. The fieldwork will focus on applying the human-centered design process to a student identified design challenge in the community. It is not anticipated that there will be any implemented project at the conclusion of the fieldwork. However, the fieldwork design challenge will result in student-generated ideas that the local partner organisation might wish to develop further. The fieldwork unit will require students to demonstrate an applied use of engineering skills, cross-cultural competence, effective communication, resilience and an ability to work closely in teams. Enrolment in this subject is competitive and is open to undergraduate engineering students from any stream of engineering.
CIVL5351 Geoenvironmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Geoenvironmental Engineering is an applied science concerned with the protection of the subsurface from human activities. It can be divided into 2 main branches: waste containment and treatment of pollution sites. The former is usually a preventative activity, whereas the latter is corrective, i. e. it occurs after pollution has taken place. Geoenvironmental Engineering draws on fundamental science, especially the chemistry of low-permeability material such as clay, fluid flow in soil and contaminant migration in soil. The goal of CIVL5351 is to introduce you to the science behind Geoenvironmental Engineering and develop your skills at designing waste containment systems.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Analyse flow regime in soil using Darcy equation; 2. Analyse contaminant migration in soil using coupled flow and reactive diffusion-advection equations; 3. Design a single or double composite landfill liner satisfying groundwater quality requirements; 4. Predict the potential for methane production in a landfill and assess the feasibility of waste-to-energy conversion; 5. Conduct research on a geoenvironmental topic as part for group.
Syllabus Summary: introduction to geoenvironmental engineering; integrated waste management and life cycle assessment; soil composition and mineralogy; types and characteristics of contaminants; theory of water seepage in soil and hydraulic conductivity; theory of reactive contaminant transport in soil including molecular diffusion, mechanical dispersion and advective flow; analytical and numerical solutions of reactive diffusion advection equation; design of landfills; geosynthetics and geomembranes; defects and leakage rates; methane generation in landfills and landfill gas management.
CIVL5453 Geotechnical Hazards

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2410 AND CIVL3411) OR (CIVL9410 AND CIVL9411). Students are assumed to have a good knowledge of fundamental soil mechanics, which is covered in the courses of soil mechanics (settlement, water flow, soil strength) and foundation engineering (soil models, stability analyses; slope stability; retaining walls; foundation capacity). Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
Geotechnical hazards include landslides, rock falls and mud flows. They are triggered by soil/rock failure due to natural or human causes. The objective of this Unit of Study is to develop the ability to assess and mitigate the risks associated to such events.
Students will learn how to estimate when and where these events are likely to occur, how to define safety zones and how to design effective protection structures. The syllabus is comprised of (i) Landslide Risk Assessment and Management procedures (ii) post-failure and out of equilibrium soil mechanics applied to prediction of rock fall, landslide and mud flow run-out distance and impact force on structures; (iii) design of geotechnical protection structures using Finite Element modelling.
Senior geotechnical engineers from major companies will deliver some guest lectures presenting on practical case study involving geotechnical hazards throughout the semester.
CIVL5458 Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Demonstration Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objective of this unit is to provide students with fundamental knowledge of finite element analysis and how to apply this knowledge to the solution of civil engineering problems at intermediate and advanced levels.
At the end of this unit, students should acquire knowledge of methods of formulating finite element equations, basic element types, the use of finite element methods for solving problems in structural, geotechnical and continuum analysis and the use of finite element software packages. The syllabus comprises introduction to finite element theory, analysis of bars, beams and columns, and assemblages of these structural elements; analysis of elastic continua; problems of plane strain, plane stress and axial symmetry; use, testing and validation of finite element software packages; and extensions to apply this knowledge to problems encountered in engineering practice.
On completion of this unit, students will have gained the following knowledge and skills:
1. Knowledge of methods of formulating finite element equations. This will provide students with an insight into the principles at the basis of the FE elements available in commercial FE software.
2. Knowledge of basic element types. Students will be able to evaluate the adequacy of different elements in providing accurate and reliable results.
3. Knowledge of the use of finite element methods for solving problems in structural and geotechnical engineering applications. Students will be exposed to some applications to enable them to gain familiarity with FE analyses.
4. Knowledge of the use of finite element programming and modeling.
5. Extended knowledge of the application of FE to solve civil engineering problems.
CIVL5460 Particle Mechanics for Geotechnics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410) AND (CIVL3411 OR CIVL9411) Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this unit are to demonstrate how the granular structure of soil materials controls their engineering behaviour; translate particle micromechanics to improve macroscopic engineering predictions; and establish the intimate connection of geotechnical engineering to other disciplines where granular materials play a pivotal role, including mining engineering, bulk materials handling, and geophysics. Similarly, this course will cohesively connect geotechnical engineering with fluids engineering principles, as well as enhance students' background in materials science. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand and use Discrete Element Method to evaluate and solve geotechnical problems such as rockfall interactions with surrounding terrain. They will also critically analyse pile penetration and silo discharge in light of granular mechanisms; apply soil rheology to carry out parametric study of landslide flows; and understand and use dimensionless analysis principles to predict resistive forces on obstacles. Strong focus will be dedicated for communicating students' results using written methods appropriate for professional engineers.
CIVL5668 Fundamentals of Wind Engineering for Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study will introduce the fundamentals of meteorology governing wind flow, details of extreme wind events, wind structure, statistical distribution of the wind, the effect of topography and terrain changes on wind profile, investigate the fluid flow around bluff bodies, and detail the design of civil engineering structures for wind loading.
This unit will provide students with the following knowledge and skills: On completion of this course students will have an understanding of the governing principles of wind engineering, how to predict the extreme wind speed and analyse anemographs, predict the effect of terrain and topography on velocity and turbulence, understand flow patterns around bodies, how to predict the pressure distribution and wind loading on bodies and structures, dynamic response of structures, and how all the above relates to AS1170.2.
CIVL5670 Reservoir, Stream and Coastal Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
The objectives of this unit of study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, natural river systems will be discussed, and the principles of sediment transport and scour, monitoring and management will be introduced. The basic equations for linear and nonlinear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
CIVL5701 Transport Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures Assumed knowledge: CIVL2700 OR CIVL9700 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to the intersections of theory and applications in Transport Networks, Geography, and Land Use. It describes how to characterize networks, (topology, hierarchy, morphology), and how that affects the use of those networks. The course is a mix between a lecture and a student-led seminar, with students responsible for researching and presenting on a number of the topics, as well as developing a course text in a wikibook format. Students will learn the basics of networks and how transportation systems function on them.
CIVL5702 Traffic Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2700 OR CIVL9700) AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND MATH1005 AND ENGG1801. Basic statistics through regression analysis, differential and integral calculus, computer programming. Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit of study aims to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of transport models as used for traffic operations. Topics include: travel demand forecasting; choice modelling; agent-based modeling; queuing and traffic flow; intelligent transport systems; the microscopic and macroscopic fundamental diagrams; highway operation; congestion control; static, quasi-dynamic and dynamic network equilibrium; the four-step (generation, distribution, mode choice and assignment) transport model; macroscopic models vs microscopic simulation; transport data sources and survey methodology; introduction to the main transport modelling software packages; coordinated control.
CIVL5703 Transport Policy, Planning and Deployment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, seminars Prohibitions: CIVL3703 OR CIVL9703 Assumed knowledge: CIVL2700 Assessment: through semester assessment (75%), final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This subject aims to provide an environment for students to learn essential facts and develop models and frameworks to understand the development of transport policy, the making of transport plans, and the deployment of transport technologies. The unit uses a mixture of traditional lectures, and interactive learning through case studies and role playing. Both the lectures and the cases allow the students to develop an inductive understanding of transportation. The unit will be successful if at the end, the student has developed a worldview on transportation (not necessarily the same as the instructor's), and has an appreciation for merits and demerits of various perspectives on transport issues. The course seeks an integrative approach for transport, and though the stories in lecture will be told mode by mode, there are a number of opportunities to see the relationships between modes, in their structure in function, and in the learning as one mode adopts successful (and unsuccessful) attributes of others.
CIVL5999 Advanced Research and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2201 OR CIVL9201) AND (CIVL2611 OR CIVL9611) AND (CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410) Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Engineering and Information Technologies
This unit requires students to use a number of advanced experimental tools and techniques which they learn through project-based learning as well as a structured theoretical lecture program. It will be very useful as co-requisite study for students engaged in an experimental honours thesis topic. It also covers issues of basic electronic circuitry and signal processing, various analysis techniques using both simple and advanced statistics, and advanced data processing methods such as PIV and Fourier filtering. It will also prepare students for further research in industry or academia.