AMME unit of study descriptions

AMME – AMME unit of study descriptions

AMME0011 International Exchange B

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program.
AMME0012 International Exchange C

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program.
AMME0013 International Exchange D

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department Permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program
AMME0014 International Exchange E

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department Permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program
AMME0015 International Exchange F

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department Permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program
AMME0016 International Exchange G

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department Permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program
AMME0017 International Exchange H

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Departmental Permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program
AMME0018 International Exchange I

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment.
An exchange component unit for students going on an International Exchange Program
AMME1362 Materials 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: CIVL2110 or AMME2302 Assessment: Through semester assessment (51%) and Final Exam (49%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AMME1362 is an introductory course in engineering materials. The unit aims to develop students' understanding of the structures, mechanical properties and manufacture of a range of engineering materials as well as how the mechanical properties relate to microstructure and forming and treatment methods. The unit has no prerequisite subject and is therefore intended for those with little or no previous background in engineering materials. However the unit does require students to take a significant degree of independent responsibility for developing their own background knowledge of materials and their properties. The electrical, magnetic, thermal and optical properties of materials are a critical need-to-know area where students are expected to do most of their learning by independent study.
AMME1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Workshops Prohibitions: ENGG1960 or ENGG1800 or CIVL1900 or CHNG1108 or AERO1560 or MECH1560 or MTRX1701 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (3 Unit) Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biomedical Engineering 1A introduces students to the biomedical engineering discipline of study and profession.
Initial lectures will introduce the various Biomedical Technologies in the global market, and currently under development, as well as the Biomedical Engineering Sector itself. It will address the question: "what is biomedical engineering and what are the career opportunities?".
The healthcare sector will be outlined, including the roles of hospitals and clinics and how these are anticipated to evolve in the future. A virtual tour of a hospital with a focus on engineering-relevant areas will be provided. Students will be required to research and present a short overview of the background, capabilities, facilities, and specializations for a select hospital or clinic in the Sydney region.
Biomed design projects will be set up to provide students the opportunity to get hands-on experience in "lean start-up" teams. The semester-long projects will provide students with the opportunity to learn and practice how to effectively develop then propose innovative biomedical engineering solutions that address defined health needs and market opportunity. Succinct project reports and presentations with technical basis and specifications will be generated to be accessible to broad audiences. The projects will be presented by the teams at an innovation competition with industry guests at the end of semester.
Subsequent lecture content will introduce biomedical engineering design background to support teams in their project objectives:
- The approach to developing the innovation case to address specific health needs.
- The ISO standard background to designing and developing medical devices and technologies.
- Defining design requirements, specifying risks, and managing design risk.
- Generating engineering specifications including drawing and CAD methods.
- Materials selection accounting for design constraints and manufacturing specifications.
- Prototyping and manufacturing guidelines along with medical device regulatory constraints
Lectures will be reviewed and assessed in tutorials to provide opportunity for regular feedback.
A Manufacturing Technology Workshop (worth 40% of this unit's assessment mark) provides an overview of a range of processes related to the design and manufacture of components through hands-on experience.
Manufacturing Technology practical work is undertaken in:
(a) Hand tools, Machining. Students will gain an understanding of manufacturing processes used to fabricate engineering hardware, systems and solutions. Safety requirements: All students are required to provide their own personal protective equipment (PPE eg safety glasses, safety boots, hair net) and comply with the workshop safety rules provided in class. Students who fail to do this will not be permitted to enter the workshops. Approved industrial footwear must be worn, and long hair must be protected by a hair net. Safety glasses must be worn at all times.
(b) Solid Modelling - the use of computer aided design (CAD) tools to model geometry and create engineering drawings of engineering components.
(c) Microcontrollers - ubiquitous in modern engineered products - will be introduced through experiential learning with development kits.
(d) Biomedical Manufacturing - 3D anatomic scans, 3D Printing and Templating, Biomedical Textiles, Clean processes, Packaging and Sterilization
A map of subsequent course units, and areas of specialisation and majors available through the biomedical engineering program will be provided.
The rationale and outcomes for each pathway will be discussed. Opportunities to address questions relating to program selection and ensuing career paths will be provided.
AMME1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials/ Lab Classes Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology and HSC Chemistry. Summer bridging courses are available for students who did not complete HSC Biology or Chemistry Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Note: CHEM1101 is scheduled for semester 1 Year 1 and AMME1961 for Semester 2 Year 1. Students should ideally ensure that they follow this schedule.
This biomedical engineering core junior unit of study provides an introduction to the relatively recent, and rapidly growing, biotechnology industry, with a focus on the current key commercial applications. In the 1990s, the word "biotech" entered our lexicon as a synonym for overnight investment wealth. The biotechnology acronym GM (genetically modified) also entered our lexicon in the 1990s. Biotechnology can be broadly defined as the commercial exploitation of biological processes for industrial and other purposes. A significant focus for commercial activities has been GM technology: GM microorganisms, plants, animals, and even humans (gene therapy). The "biotech industry" arose rapidly in the late 20th century, and is now one of the largest industries in the world, and is one of the cornerstones of the global biomedical industry which comprises three main sectors: Medical Devices, Pharmaceuticals, and Biotechnology. Significant global commercial biotechnology activity concerns the manufacture of therapeutic compounds from GM microorganisms using bioreactors, for example insulin. Another significant sector is agricultural: "agri-biotech" which concerns GM higher lifeforms (plants and animals) primarily for the food industry, and also other industries such as the energy industry (biofuels). The third sector concerns therapeutic GM of humans, known as "gene-therapy". Some other important biotechnologies will also be explored including monoclonal antibodies, genome sequencing and personalised medicine, and RNA-interference technology (RNAi).
This unit of study begins with an industry focus, overviewing the rise of the biotechnology industry, the key corporations, and their products. It then moves to a historical and technological overview of the developments on which the biotechnology industry is based: fermentation, bioreactors, process analysis and automation, genome sequencing, GM (genetic modification) technology, monoclonal antibodies. The unit then explores some important case studies:
1. Insulin manufacture in bioreactors using GM microorganisms.
2. Monoclonal antibodies, the foundation of the diagnostics industry, and their interaction with antibodies.
3. Green biotechnology. The use of biotechnology for developing alternative environmentally-friendly processes and products.
4. Bioremediation. The use of biotechnology for waste processing.
5. Gene therapy, with insights from the retrovirus, the transposon, and the plasmid.
6. RNAi (RNA-interference). How suppression of messenger RNA is opening up new research and commercial directions in biomedical engineering.
7. DNA sequencing and personalised medicine.
8. Bioethics. Human genetic screening, community perceptions of GM products, and patenting of genetic information.
Note: Biotechnology is an industrial discipline. It has areas of commonality with the related disciplines of Chemical Engineering, Molecular Biology, and Bioinformatics. AMME1961 is not a study of Bioinformatics, nor is it a study of Molecular Biology. For Molecular Biology, biomedical engineering students are referred to the recommended elective MBLG1001. For Bioinformatics, biomedical engineering students are referred to the recommended elective COMP5424.
AMME2000 Engineering Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) AND (ENGG1801 OR INFO1103 OR INFO1903 OR INFO1110 OR DATA1002) Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems including; Conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The focus will be on real problems, deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables; Fourier series and Fourier transforms; Laplace transforms; scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches.
AMME2200 Introductory Thermofluids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: AMME2261 OR AMME2262 Assumed knowledge: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933). Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit of Study is a shorter version of content in AMME2261 + AMME2262 and suits Biomedical (Mechanical Major) and Mechatronics students.
Students will get a practical, introductory course in Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer and Thermodynamics. Basic principles and applications in these areas are covered. The emphasis is on learning how to tackle the variety of problems which engineers encounter in these fields.
Fluid Mechanics
Properties: viscosity, surface tension, cavitation, capillarity. Hydrostatics: manometers, forces and moments on submerged surfaces, centre of pressure, buoyancy, vessel stability. Flow: Streamlines, turbulence, continuity, Bernoulli, venturi meter, pitot tube, head, loss coefficients, pumps, turbines, power, efficiency. Fluid momentum, drag, thrust, propulsive efficiency, wind turbines, turbomachinery, torque, power, head, Francis, Pelton, Kaplan turbines. Dimensional analysis, similarity, scale modelling, Reynolds No. , pipe flow, pressure drop, Moody chart.
Heat Transfer
Conduction: thermal circuits, plane, cylindrical, conduction equation, fins. Heat Exchangers: LMTD and NTU methods. Unsteady Conduction: lumped capacity, Bi, Fo, Heissler charts. Convection (forced), analytical Nu, Pr correlations. Convection (natural) Ra, Gr. Radiation spectrum, blackbody, emissivity, absorptivity, transmissivity, Stefan-Boltzmann, Kirchhoff Laws, selective surfaces, environmental radiation.
Thermodynamics:
1st Law of Thermodynamics, Properties, State postulate. Ideal gases, 2-phase properties, steam quality. Turbines, compressors. thermal efficiency and COP for refrigerators. 2nd Law of Thermodynamics, Kelvin-Planck, Clausius statements. Carnot engine. Entropy; increase of entropy principle, entropy and irreversibility. Isentropic processes, T-s diagrams, isentropic efficiency. Some power and refrigeration cycle analysis, characteristics of main power cycles. Psychrometry, air-conditioning, thermal comfort basics.
AMME2261 Fluid Mechanics 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the fundamentals of fluid statics and fluid dynamics. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic equations governing the statics and dynamics of fluids; the ability to analyze and determine the forces applied by a static fluid; the ability to analyse fluids in motion. The course will cover both inviscid and viscous fluid flow. The course will introduce the relevant parameters for fluid flow in internal engineering systems such as pipes and pumps and external systems such as flow over wings and airfoils. Course content will cover the basic concepts such as viscosity, density, continuum, pressure, force, buoyancy and acceleration; and more detailed methods including continuity, conservation of momentum, streamlines and potential flow theory, Bernoulli equation, Euler equation, Navier-Stokes equation. Experiments will introduce flow measuring devices and flow observation.
AMME2262 Thermal Engineering 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: AMME2200 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with basic, first year, integral calculus, differential calculus and linear algebra. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer. At the end of this unit students will have: an understanding of the basic laws of thermodynamics and heat transfer; The ability to analyze the thermodynamics of a simple open or closed engineering system. The basic knowledge to analyse and design 1D thermal circuits. Course content will include concepts of heat and work, properties of substances, first law of thermodynamics, control mass and control volume analysis, thermal efficiency, entropy, second law of thermodynamics, reversible and irreversible processes, isentropic efficiency, power and refrigeration cycles, heat transfer by conduction, convection and radiation, 1D thermal circuits and transient heat transfer.
AMME2301 Mechanics of Solids

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG1802 AND (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) Prohibitions: CIVL2201 Assessment: Through semester assessment (35%) and Final Exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Equilibrium of deformable structures; basic concept of deformation compatibility; stress and strain in bars, beams and their structures subjected to tension, compression, bending, torsion and combined loading; statically determinate and indeterminate structures; energy methods for bar and beam structures; simple buckling; simple vibration; deformation of simple frames and cell box beams; simple two-dimensional stress and Morh's circle; problem-based applications in aerospace, mechanical and biomedical engineering.
AMME2500 Engineering Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921 OR MATH1906 OR MATH1931) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923 OR MATH1907 OR MATH1933) AND ENGG1802 Assumed knowledge: Familiarity with the MATLAB programming environment Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the principles governing the state of motion or rest of bodies under the influence of applied force and torque, according to classical mechanics. The course aims to teach students the fundamental principles of the kinematics and kinetics of systems of particles, rigid bodies, planar mechanisms and three-dimensional mechanisms, covering topics including kinematics in various coordinate systems, Newton's laws of motion, work and energy principles, impulse and momentum (linear and angular), gyroscopic motion and vibration. Students will develop skills in analysing and modelling dynamical systems, using both analytical methods and computer-based solutions using MATLAB. Students will develop skills in approximating the dynamic behaviour of real systems in engineering applications and an appreciation and understanding of the effect of approximations in the development and design of systems in real-world engineering tasks.
AMME2700 Instrumentation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: AERO1560 OR MECH1560 OR MTRX1701 OR ENGG1800 Assumed knowledge: Programming skills, 1st year maths skills, familiarity with fundamental Engineering concepts. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop in students an understanding of the engineering measurements and instrumentation systems. The students will acquire an ability to make accurate and meaningful measurements. It will cover the general areas of electrical circuits and mechanical/electronic instrumentation for strain, force, pressure, moment, torque, displacement, velocity, acceleration, temperature and so on.
AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021 OR MATH1901 OR MATH1921) AND (MATH1002 OR MATH1902) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023 OR MATH1903 OR MATH1923) Assumed knowledge: AMME1960 AND AMME1961 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2 is the third of the four Biomedical Engineering foundational units. The first (AMME1960 Biomedical Engineering 1A) introduces students to the discipline of biomedical engineering, introducing the key concepts of biomedical technology, design, biomechanics, and the key systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective. The second (AMME1961 Biomedical Engineering 1B) is an introduction to Biotechnology. The fourth (MECH2901 Anatomy and Physiology for Engineers) provides a hands-on anatomy and physiology study of the key systems of the human body from a biomedical engineering perspective, and includes cadaver laboratories. This unit (AMME2960 Biomedical Engineering 2) is designed to provide students with the necessary tools for mathematically modelling and solving problems in engineering. Engineering methods will be considered for a range of canonical problems, including conduction heat transfer in one and two dimensions, vibration, stress and deflection analysis, convection and stability problems. The lectures will address real problems: deriving analytical solutions via separation of variables, Fourier series and Fourier transforms, Laplace transforms, scaling and solving numerically using finite differences, finite element and finite volume approaches. The emphasis in the tutorials will be on applying these mathematical methods to Biomedical Engineering problems involving electrical, mechanical, thermal and chemical mechanisms in the human body. Specific examples include heat regulation, vibrations in biological systems, and the analysis of physiological signals such as ECG and EEG.
AMME3060 Engineering Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AMME2000 OR MATH2067 OR (MATH2061 AND MATH2065) OR MATH2021 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will address the use of state of the art engineering software packages for the solution of advanced problems in engineering. We will cover the solution of partial differential equations in heat transfer; fluids, both inviscid and viscous, and solids, including plates, shells and membranes. While some analytical methods will be considered, the primary focus of the course will be on the use of numerical solution methods, including finite difference, finite volume and spectral methods. Commercial engineering packages will be introduced with particular attention given to the development of standards for the accuracy and representation of data.
AMME3110 Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: Project (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Supervised project on a relevant engineering discipline.
AMME3500 System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (AMME2000 OR MATH2067 OR (MATH2061 AND MATH2065) OR MATH2021) AND AMME2500 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to allow students to develop an understanding of methods for modeling and controlling linear, time-invariant systems. Techniques examined will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain approaches to modeling of systems. This will allow students to examine the response of a system to changing inputs and to examine the influence of external stimuli such as disturbances on system behaviour. Students will also gain an understanding of how the responses of these mechanical systems can be altered to meet desired specifications and why this is important in many engineering problem domains.
The study of control systems engineering is of fundamental importance to most engineering disciplines, including Mechanical, Mechatronic, Biomedical, and Aerospace Engineering. Control systems are found in a broad range of applications within these disciplines, from aircraft and spacecraft to robots, automobiles, manufacturing processes, and medical diagnostic systems. The concepts taught in this course introduce students to the mathematical foundations behind the modelling and control of linear, time-invariant dynamic systems. In particular, topics addressed in this course will include:
1. Techniques for modelling mechanical systems and understanding their response to control inputs and disturbances. This will include the derivation of differential equations and use of frequency domain (Laplace transform) methods for their solution and analysis.
2. Representation of systems in a feedback control system as well as techniques for determining what desired system performance specifications are achievable, practical and important when the system is under control
3. Techniques including Root Locus, Bode Plots, and State Space for analysis and design of feedback control systems.
4. Case studies inspired by real-world problems in control engineering.
AMME3660 Biomanufacturing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: MECH2400 OR ENGG1960 OR AMME1960 OR MECH1560 Prohibitions: MECH3660 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to teach the fundamentals of biomedical manufacturing processes, including traditional and advanced manufacturing technologies. This unit aims to develop the following attributes: to understand the fundamental principles of biomedical manufacturing approaches; to gain the ability to understand and select appropriate manufacturing processes and systems for biomedical applications; to develop ability to create innovative new manufacturing technologies for medical bionics and other applications in biomedical engineering; to develop ability to invent new manufacturing systems suitable for biomedical engineering implementation. At the end of this unit students will have a good understanding of the following: merits and advantages of individual manufacturing processes and systems used in the fabrication of medical devices and products that support human health and well-being; principles of developing new technologies for biomedical engineering applications; comprehensive applications and strategic selection of manufacturing processes and systems within the regulatory landscape of biomedical manufacturing. Unit content will include: Machining: An introduction into the use of machining, CAD and manual CNC coding. Rapid Prototyping: An introduction into the most current prototyping methods currently in use. Manufacturing Processes: Common processes and their science (machining, moulding, sintering, materials processing, joining processes) and their relative merits and limitations.
AMME4010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Practical Experience Prerequisites: 36 credits of at least 3rd year units of study with 65% average Prohibitions: AMME4111 OR AMME4112 OR AMME4121 OR AMME4122 OR ENGG4000 OR MECH4601 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to AMME4100 Practical Experience, AMME4111/4112 Thesis A and B, MECH4601 Professional Engineering 2 and a recommended elective.
This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged fulltime on the project at the industrial site.
AMME4110 Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Supervised project on a relevant engineering discipline.
AMME4111 Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 36 credit points of at least third year units of study Prohibitions: AMME4010 or AMME4122 or AMME4121 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Prospective students in Thesis A are expected to have consulted with supervisors and selected a topic of interest at the end of third year, guided by the advertised list of suggested thesis topics and supervisors. Availability of topics is limited and students should undertake to speak with prospective supervisors as soon as possible. Students who are unable to secure a supervisor and topic will be allocated a supervisor by the unit coordinator. Alternatively, students may do a thesis with a supervisor in industry or in another university department. In this case, the student must also find a second supervisor within the School of AMME.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
AMME4112 Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 36 credit points of at least third year units of study Prohibitions: AMME4121 or AMME4010 or AMME4122 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major project, involving both research and design, is an important skill for professional engineers. The final year thesis units (Thesis A and Thesis B) aim to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research and design that fosters the development of engineering skills. These skills include: the capacity to define a problem; carry out systematic research in exploring how it relates to existing knowledge; identifying the tools needed to address the problem; designing a solution, product or prototype; analysing the results obtained; and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
The thesis is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment. Taken together, Thesis A covers initial research into the background of the problem being considered (formulated as a literature review), development of a detailed proposal incorporating project objectives, planning, and risk assessment, preliminary design, modelling and/or experimental work, followed by the detailed work in designing a solution, performing experiments, evaluating outcomes, analysing results, and writing up and presenting the outcomes. The final grade is based on the work done in both Thesis A and B, and will be awarded upon successful completion of Thesis B.
While recognising that some projects can be interdisciplinary in nature, it is the normal expectation that the students would do the project in their chosen area of specialisation. For student who are completing a Major within their BE degree, the thesis topic must be within the area of the Major. The theses to be undertaken by students will very often be related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation and analysis, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. All however will require students to undertake research and design relevant to the topic of their thesis. The direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself.
The thesis must be the student's individual work although it may be conducted as a component of a wider group project. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the quality of their own research and design work and their individual final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive they have been in assessing their work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their thesis to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program. Whilst thesis topics will be constrained by the available time and resources, the aim is to contribute to the creation of new engineering knowledge, techniques and/or solutions. Students should explore topics that arouse intellectual curiosity and represent an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual research and design challenges.
AMME4121 Engineering Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 30 credit points of at least third year units of study Prohibitions: AMME4111 or AMME4010 or AMME4112 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Prospective students in Engineering Project A are expected to have consulted with supervisors and selected a project topic of interest at the end of third year, guided by the advertised list of suggested project topics and supervisors. Availability of topics is limited and students should undertake to speak with prospective supervisors as soon as possible. Students who are unable to secure a supervisor and topic will be allocated a supervisor by the unit coordinator. Alternatively, students may undertake a project with a supervisor in industry or in another university department. In this case, the student must also find a second supervisor within the School of AMME.
To complete the research requirement for their engineering degree, students now have a choice of either completing Thesis A/B (AMME4111/AMME4112) or Project A/B (AMME4121/AMME4122). Project A/B is intended to be more practical in orientation while Thesis A/B demands extensive literature review and critical analysis of outcomes. Thesis is a program for individuals whereas Projects can be done by groups or by an individual. Engineering Project A/B is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Engineering Project A covers first steps of project work, starting with development of project proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the project results.
The fourth year engineering project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering design skills. These skills include the capacity to define a engineering design problem, showing how it relates to prior art, identifying appropriate tools and methods, carrying out a design in a systematic way and presenting outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
AMME4122 Engineering Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: AMME4121 AND 30 credit points of at least third year units of study Prohibitions: AMME4010 AND AMME4111 AND AMME4112 Assumed knowledge: Students will be expected to draw on their project plan, proposed outcomes and background research developed during Project A to allow them to complete the requirements for this unit of study. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
To complete the research requirement for their engineering degree, students now have a choice of either completing Thesis A/B (AMME 4111/AMME4112) or Engineering Project A/B (AMME 4121/AMME4122). Engineering Project A/B is intended to be more practical in orientation while Thesis A/B demands extensive literature review and critical analysis of outcomes. Thesis is a program for individuals whereas Projects can be done by groups or by an individual. Engineering Project A/B is undertaken across two consecutive semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Engineering Project A covers first steps of project work, starting with development of project proposal. Engineering Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the project results.
The fourth year engineering project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering design skills. These skills include the capacity to define a engineering design problem, showing how it relates to prior art, identifying appropriate tools and methods, carrying out a design in a systematic way and presenting outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured.
AMME4710 Computer Vision and Image Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Prerequisites: MTRX3700 OR MECH4720 OR MECH5720 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to vision sensors, computer vision analysis and digital image processing. This course will cover the following areas: fundamental principles of vision sensors such as physics laws, radiometry, CMOS/CDD imager architectures, colour reconstruction; the design of physics-based models for vision such as reflectance models, photometric invariants, radiometric calibration. This course will also present algorithms for video/image analysis, transmission and scene interpretation. Topics such as image enhancement, restoration, stereo correspondence, pattern recognition, object segmentation and motion analysis will be covered.
AMME4971 Tissue Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH2901 AND MECH3921 Assessment: Through semester assessment (65%) and Final Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With the severe worldwide shortage of donor organs and the ubiquitous problem of donor organ rejection, there is a strong need for developing technologies for engineering replacement organs and other body parts. Recent developments in engineering and the life sciences have begun to make this possible, and as a consequence, the very new and multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering has been making dramatic progress in the last few years.
This unit will provide an introduction to the principles of tissue engineering, as well as an up to date overview of recent progress and future outlook in the field of tissue engineering. This unit assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of tissue engineering.
The objectives are: To gain a basic understanding of the major areas of interest in tissue engineering; To learn to apply basic engineering principles to tissue engineering systems; To understand the promises and limitations of tissue engineering; To understand the advances and challenges of stem cell applications; Enable students to access web-based resources in tissue engineering (for example: Harvard-MIT Principles and Practice of Tissue Engineering); Enable students to develop basic skills in tissue engineering research.
AMME4981 Applied Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Research, Seminars, Lectures, Tutorials, Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: AMME2301 AND AMME2500 AND (AMME1362 OR AMME2302) Prohibitions: AMME9981 Assumed knowledge: MECH3361 AND MECH2400 AND MECH2901 AND MECH3362 AND MECH3921. Anatomy and Physiology, engineering dynamics and mechanics of solids in the second year level and knowledge of materials engineering and mechanical design in the third year level Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS will give students an understanding of CT/MRI based solid modelling, finite element methods, constitutive material models, design analysis and optimisation, experimental validation and their use in biomedical engineering. The students are expected to gain skills and experience with finite element software for the solution to sophisticated problems associated with biomedical engineering and experimentation techniques for the validation of these problems. The unit will take a holistic approach to the learning outcomes: an overview of typical biomedical design problems, an overview of finite element analysis software, a detailed look at finite element methods in biomedical applications, and a project-based learning approach to the development of a biomedical prosthesis. By the end of the unit, the students are expected to have familiarised themselves with design analysis, optimisation, and validation for biomedical engineering problems.
AMME4990 Biomedical Product Development

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH2901 AND MECH3921 Assumed knowledge: 1000-level chemistry, 2000-level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the 1000-level, and preferably at the 2000-level. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This unit will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This unit assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.
AMME5010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Project Work in Industry Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR ENGG5217 Assumed knowledge: Students must have a credit (>65%) average in prior semester enrolment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to ENGG5217 Practical Experience, AMME5020/5021 Capstone Project A and B and 12cp of specialist electives.
This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site.
AMME5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 96 credit points from the MPE degree program (incuding any credit for prior study) or 24 credit points from the ME degree program (incuding any credit for prior study). Prohibitions: AMME5022 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 42 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >70, or 66 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >70 or exemption. Prohibitions: AMME5021 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5101 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH3260 OR MECH9260 OR AERO3261 OR AERO9261 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is suitable for any engineering discipline student who is interested in developing an understanding of analysis and design in energy, power generation, environment and relevant economic issues. The aim is to acquaint students with the methods engineers use to design and evaluate the processes used for the conversion of energy into useful work. This course concentrates on thermal energy conversion. It also assesses and deals with the environmental consequences of energy conversion. At the end of this unit students will be able to critically analyse technical, economic and societal impacts of energy conversion systems.
A series of topics, each containing a series of lectures, will be covered in relation to energy. The course content will include: The Status of Energy Today; Energy for Electricity Generation; Nuclear Energy; Energy for Transportation; Future Energy Usage.
AMME5202 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Laboratories, Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Partial differential equations; Finite difference methods; Taylor series; Basic fluid mechanics including pressure, velocity, boundary layers, separated and recirculating flows. Basic computer programming skills. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Objectives: To provide students with the necessary skills to use commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics packages and to carry out research in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics. Expected outcomes: Students will have a good understanding of the basic theory of Computational Fluid Dynamics, including discretisation, accuracy and stability. They will be capable of writing a simple solver and using a sophisticated commercial CFD package.
Syllabus summary: A course of lectures, tutorials and laboratories designed to provide the student with the necessary tools for using a sophisticated commercial CFD package. A set of laboratory tasks will take the student through a series of increasingly complex flow simulations, requiring an understanding of the basic theory of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The laboratory tasks will be complemented by a series of lectures in which the basic theory is covered, including: governing equations; finite difference methods, accuracy and stability for the advection/diffusion equation; direct and iterative solution techniques; solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations; turbulent flow; Cartesian tensors; turbulence models.
AMME5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have acieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.
AMME5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have acieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.
AMME5271 Computational Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Understanding of basic principles of Newtonian mechanics, physics and chemistry, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. General knowledge of how to operate a computer and work with different software is also required. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course introduces atomistic computational techniques used in modern engineering to understand phenomena and predict material properties, behaviour, structure and interactions at nano-scale. The advancement of nanotechnology and manipulation of matter at the molecular level have provided ways for developing new materials with desired properties. The miniaturisation at the nanometre scale requires an understanding of material behaviour which could be much different from that of the bulk. Computational nanotechnology plays a growingly important role in understanding mechanical properties at such a small scale. The aim is to demonstrate how atomistic level simulations can be used to predict the properties of matter under various conditions of load, deformation and flow. The course covers areas mainly related to fluid as well as solid properties, whereas, the methodologies learned can be applied to diverse areas in nanotechnology such as, liquid-solid interfaces, surface engineering, nanorheology, nanotribology and biological systems. This is a course with a modern perspective for engineers who wish to keep abreast with advanced computational tools for material characterisation at the atomic scale.
AMME5310 Engineering Tribology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials, Seminars Assumed knowledge: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302) AND (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (MECH3261 OR MECH9261) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim is to teach students in the undergraduate and postgraduate levels basic concepts about friction, lubrication and wear applicable to design and operation of mechanical systems used in engineering, industrial, and modern applications. Examples of these systems are lubrication of internal combustion engines, gearboxes, artificial hip/knee joints, and micro/nano electromechanical systems.
AMME5510 Vibration and Acoustics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (AMME2200 OR AMME2261 OR AMME9261) AND (AMME2500 OR AMME9500) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study should prepare the student to be able to undertake vibration and acoustic measurement calculations for industry design situations.
The unit aims to introduce a number of new concepts required for analysis of vibrations and acoustics. The response of structure under different dynamic forces, including human and aerodynamic, will be investigated. A number of hands-on experiments will be performed to allow an understanding of the concepts and applicability.
The acoustics component will include: basic acoustics theory, sound generation and propagation, impedance, absorbing materials, industrial noise sources, isolation methods of noise control, enclosures, instrumentation and measurement, frequency analysis, noise regulations and computational acoustics.
AMME5520 Advanced Control and Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Research Prerequisites: AMME3500 OR AMME5501 OR AMME9501 Assumed knowledge: Strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces engineering design via optimisation, i. e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilise and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion. The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimisation frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with Dijkstra's algorithm, A*, and probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs), state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.
AMME5790 Introduction to Biomechatronics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project work - own time, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH3921 OR MTRX3700 OR AMME5921 Prohibitions: AMME4790 Assumed knowledge: A good practical knowledge in mechanical and electronic engineering; adequate maths and applied maths skills; background knowledge of physics, chemistry and biology; Some programming capability, MATLAB, C, C++; able to use common software tools used by engineers including CAD and EDA packages. Assessment: through semester assessment (65%) and final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: AMME5790 is the last in a series of practical Mechatronic and Electrical courses taken over three years. It takes these engineering concepts, along with the associated mathematical, electronic and mechanical theory and applies this knowledge to a series of practical, albeit specialised biomechatronic applications that will be encountered by Mechatronic Engineers who enter this broad field on graduation.
Biomechatronics is the application of mechatronic engineering to human biology, and as such it forms an important subset of the overall biomedical engineering discipline. This course focusses on a number of areas of interest including auditory and optical prostheses, artificial hearts and active and passive prosthetic limbs and examines the biomechatronic systems (hardware and signal processing) that underpin their operation.
AMME5902 Computer Aided Manufacturing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Seminar Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this course is to enhance the student's manufacturing engineering skills in the CAD/CAM area. The course focuses on CNC milling as a manufacturing automation process applied to a project. The management, planning and marketing of a typical engineering project are also discussed.
Through integrated project-based learning and hands-on-machine training, you will learn: How to successfully complete a CAD/CAM and CNC mill based project; Manufacturing management and system skills, such as product planning, manufacturing sequence, time and cost; The science in designing and selecting a manufacturing method; How to effectively present your ideas and outcomes using oral and report based methods.
It is expected that through your hard work in the semester, you will find: Enhanced learning by real-world problems; Improved comprehensive skill in manufacturing design.
AMME5912 Crash Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Computer Aided Drafting, Basic FEA principles and Solid Mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The objective of the course is to give students skills in the area of highly non-linear finite element analysis. Major topics covered include CAD, Implicit / explicit codes, Wire frame geometry, Elemental Theory, Materials, Pre-processing using ETA-PreSys, Contact, LS-Dyna, using NCAC FEM models, Modeling fasteners and the interaction between solids and fluids. Material covered in lectures is reinforced through independent research, assignments, quizzes and a major capstone project. The capstone project involves the development of an approved crash scenario.
AMME5921 Biomedical Engineering Technology 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures Prohibitions: MECH3921 Assumed knowledge: Junior biology, junior materials science and some engineering design Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to the field of biomedical engineering, from the point of view of the engineering and the global biomedical industry itself. After completion of this unit, students will have a clear understanding of what biomedical engineering is, both from the engineering perspective and the commercial/industry perspective.
AMME5931 Nanomaterials in Medicine

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: 1000-level Biology and Chemistry; 3000-level or higher Engineering Design Practice and Biomedical Engineering; AMME1362 or 6cp 1000-level Materials Science; MECH2901 or 6cp 2000-level Anatomy and Physiology. Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The application of science and technology at the nanoscale for biomedical problems promises to revolutionise medicine. Recent years have witnessed unprecedented advances in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases by applying nanotechnology to medicine. This course focuses on explaining the fundamentals of nanomedicine, and highlighting the special properties and application of nanomaterials in medicine. This course also reviews the most significant biomedical applications of nanomaterials including the recent breakthroughs in drug delivery, medical imaging, gene therapy, biosensors and cancer treatment.
The aims and objectives of this unit of study are:
to introduce the student to the application of nanotechnology in medicine and diverse range of nanomaterials used in this field; to give the student an overview of basic principles on synthesis and characterisation of nanomaterials in medicine; to enable students to understand the current challenges and difficulties in nanomedicine and give them ideas to engineer and design new materials to address the current challenges; to introduce students to the future impact of nanomedicine on healthcare practice.
AMME5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Prerequisites: (AMME1362 OR AMME9302) AND (MECH3921 OR AMME5921) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
AMME5962 Introduction to Mechanobiology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of 1000-level biology, 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry and 6 credit points of 2000-level physiology or equivalent Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Mechanobiology has emerged as a new field of science that integrates biology and engineering and is now considered to have significant influence on the development of technologies for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. It is well known that tissues and cells are sensitive to their mechanical environment and changes to this environment can affect the physiological and pathophysiological processes. Understanding the mechanisms by which biological cells sense and respond to mechanical signals can lead to the development of novel treatments and therapies for a variety of diseases.
The objectives are:
a) To understand the basic principles of cell biology.
b) Learn to apply and integrate engineering principles to biological processes.
c) To understand the basic principles of mechanobiology and its importance in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
d) Understand the challenges and difficulties involved in the field of mechanobiology
e) Develop basic research skills in mechanobiology.
AMME5992 Regulatory Affairs in the Medical Industry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures Prerequisites: (AMME9901 OR MECH2901) AND (MECH3921 OR AMME5921) Prohibitions: AMME4992 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of 1000-level Chemistry, and 6cp of Biology units Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Supply of medical devices, diagnostics and related therapeutic products is regulated in most jurisdictions, with sophisticated and complex regulatory regimes in all large economies. These regulations are applied both to manufacturers and designers and to biomedical engineers undertaking device custom manufacture or maintenance in clinical environments. This unit will explore the different regulatory frameworks in the "Global Harmonisation Task Force" group of jurisdictions (US, EU, Canada, Japan, Australia), as well as emerging regulatory practices in Asia and South America. Emphasis will be on the commonality of the underlying technical standards and the importance of sophisticated risk management approaches to compliance.
AMME5995 Advanced Bionics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: AMME5921 OR MECH3921 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The field of 'bionics' is one of the primary embodiments of biomedical engineering. In the context of this unit, bionics is defined as a collection of therapeutic devices implanted into the body to restore or enhance functions lost through disease, developmental anomaly, or injury. Most typically, bionic devices intervene with the nervous system and aim to control neural activity through the delivery of electrical impulses. An example of this is a cochlear implant which delivers electrical impulses to physiologically excite surviving neurons of the auditory system, providing the capacity to elicit the psychological perception of sound.
This unit primarily focuses upon the replacement of human senses, the nature and transduction of signals acquired, and how these ultimately effect neural activity.