Other faculty units

Other Faculties – unit of study descriptions

ASNS2665 Understanding Southeast Asia

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26hr online instruction and activities/semester . Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points Assessment: 5x200wd content quizzes (15%), 1x1000wd briefing paper (25%), 1x1500wd case study exercise (30%), 1x2500wd essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
This Unit of Study introduces Southeast Asia. It emphasises the importance of geographical, political, economic, social and cultural context to our understanding of complex real-world problems. Having gained insight into these aspects of contemporary Southeast Asia, students learn to apply an interdisciplinary approach to the analysis of challenges faced by the region such as economic and social inequality, environmental management, food security and urbanisation.
BDES1011 Architectural History/Theory 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michael Tawa Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: DESA1102 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics and HSC English Standard Assessment: building analysis and tutorial participation (70%), exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architectural History/Theory 1 introduces students to the discourse of architectural history and theory. It includes a concise chronological survey of key periods of architectural history from antiquity to the mid-nineteenth century, as well as closer investigation of some particular architectural themes and ideas across history. Students will interrogate these themes through intense study of significant buildings, which they will research, document, and analyse. They will be introduced to fundamental principles and skills of scholarly research in the discipline, including locating and evaluating sources, and constructing arguments.
BDES1023 Architectural Technologies 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Muir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prohibitions: DESA1102 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architectural Technologies 1 introduces students to the roles that environmental considerations, structures and construction play in architecture. The fundamental concepts underpinning each of these key areas are presented and students demonstrate their developing knowledge of them via project-based assignments. These progressively complex tasks initiate students to the knowledge required to successfully analyse and synthesise construction and technical systems in basic buildings.
BDES1026 Architecture Studio 1A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Chris Fox Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, lab and studio contact plus self-directed preparation and assignments; minimum student commitment of 12-18 hours per week Corequisites: BDES1011 Prohibitions: DESA1001 or BDES1010 or BDES1024 Assessment: assessment 1 + 2 (40%); assessment 3 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course aims at providing students with the conceptual and technical skills required to creatively explore dynamic transactions between art and architecture. Throughout the semester, students will extend their ability to work with complex ideas while drawing on interdisciplinary practices related to structure, form and site. This course provides a space for architecture students to establish parameters and territories for exploration beyond the concerns of conventional architectural projects. From generative form making to performative action, the crossover between art and architecture has always been present within architectural design. This unit looks at developing conceptual and practical disciplines through experimentation with materials. Essential design sensitivities and skills will be developed through different modes of working including lectures, tutorials, presentations and writing as well as the physical engagement with new materials and building processes.
BDES1027 Architecture Studio 1B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simon Weir Session: Semester 2 Prerequisites: BDES1026 or BDES1010 or DESA1001 Corequisites: BDES1023 Prohibitions: BDES1020 or DESA1002 or BDES1012 Assessment: Phase 1 Assessment: Online Studio Tasks and Peer Critiques (20%); Final Design Presentation (30%). Phase 2 Assessment: Interim Design Presentation (10%); Final Design Presentation (10%); Design Book (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This studio capitalises on the skills and processes gained in the first semester studio to engage with increasingly complex programmatic and contextual issues within the built environment.Fundamental modes of representation in a variety of media will be deployed as a means to comprehend and articulate architecture from multiple integrated perspectives.Designing a small building will be the final project yet based on a series of introductory exercises that will engage with concepts of iteration in a range of scales and media.Students will continue to learn new software and other related techniques while also developing their familiarity with the technical skills necessary to realise a final design presentation including various media.The design projects will explore the necessity of experimentation as a means to communicate fundamental ideas about space, structure and form.
BDES2013 Architectural Technologies 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1023 Prohibitions: DESA2111 or BDES2613 Assessment: Assignments (60%), Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architectural Technologies 2 explores the roles that environmental considerations, structure and construction play in moderately complex small-scale buildings. Emphasis is placed on developing in students an active awareness of the impact that technical and constructional decisions have on architectural design. Through project-based learning, students develop an active awareness of the important role that appropriate technical and constructional decisions play in terms of fulfilling conceptual ambitions in tangible works of architecture. Students develop and demonstrate their developing appreciation of these issues via case study analysis, a group project, individual technical drawings and a final examination.
BDES2024 Art Processes

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Chris Fox Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture and studio contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES1026 or BDES1024 Assessment: assessment 1 + 2 (50%); assessment 3 (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Drawing upon the processes developed in Architecture Studio 1A, students will extend their ability to work with complex ideas while drawing on interdisciplinary practices. Conceptual and technical skills are further devloped in this unit to creatively explore dynamic transactions between art and architecture. A range of studios and labs will host the production and critical discussions of work in conjunction with a series of lectures and independent research. By treating art as a field of open-ended experimentation with direct consequences for architecture, this course encourages architecture students to undertake a self-directed and research-based approach to their studies, working across multiple streams of information specific to contemporary art.
BDES2026 Architecture Studio 2A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ross Anderson Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, lab and studio contact plus self-directed preparation and assignments; minimum student commitment of 18 hours per week Prerequisites: BDES1027 or BDES1020 or DESA1002 Corequisites: BDES2013 Prohibitions: BDES2010 or DESA2001 or BDES2012 Assessment: Assignment 1: Design Analysis (20%); Assignment 2: Mapping and Design Studies (20%); Assignment 3: Design Project and Portfolio (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architecture Studio 2A requires the design of a small-scale building or space in an urban context. An architectural study of the house is coupled with an intensive process that prioritises communication techniques for articulating a design from a schematic stage through its development to final presentation drawings and models.
Exploration of multiple design communication techniques is promoted, including digital drawing, modelling and making, combined with support for engagement with multiple tools and machinery in the DMaF workshops. The design process fostered throughout the semester explores the creative tension between intuition and prescription, building skills via techniques and strategies that are also intended to assist in eliciting unexpected solutions.
Through this process, students are expected to become increasingly familiar with the complexities of architectural design and gain skill in incorporating a widening range of considerations into their projects. Examples of these aspects extend from the interpretation of programmatic requirements with respect to the opportunities and limits of site conditions to material articulation and the spatial and geometric implications of strategic decisions. They will be required to precisely and imaginatively negotiate the internal logic of a design approach and an urban strategy, searching for an overall coherence.
BDES2027 Architecture Studio 2B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Muir Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorial and Studio contact plus self-directed preparation and assignments. Minimum student commitment 18 hours per week. Prerequisites: (BDES2026 and BDES1011) or BDES2010 or DESA2001 or BDES2622 Corequisites: BDES2024 or CIVL2410 or BDES2623 Prohibitions: BDES2624 Assessment: interim submission (30%), final submission and portfolio (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architecture Studio 2B requires the design of a moderately complex building. Students develop an increased awareness of the broader social, cultural and environmental consequences of architectural decisions. Participatory and collaborative work processes are promoted and students are required to sensitively and imaginatively negotiate between the internal logic of the design approach and the context. They become increasingly attentive to the complexities of architectural design, from the interpretation of programmatic requirements in respect to the opportunities and limitations of particular site conditions to the spatial and tectonic implications of design decisions.
BDES3011 Architectural History/Theory 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Chris L. Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES2027 or BDES2021 or DESA2111 or BDES2616 Prohibitions: DAAP3001 or BDES3611 Assessment: Concept exploration (20%), Essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of the Architectural Theory unit is to equip students with a critical understanding of key Western architectural theories and philosophy from the Enlightenment to the present. Emphasis is placed on the specific historical situations and cultural and philosophical contexts in which those theories arose, and ultimately how they were represented within the domain of architectural embodiment. It is organized to clearly identify particular trains of thought. Students will become generally conversant in the principles of central theories, and will understand their terms and references. Through readings, lectures, and tutorial sessions, students will acquire the literacy required to perceive and articulate contemporary theoretical standpoints, and will refine their research and writing skills through independent research into a particular aspect of recent architectural theory and philosophy related to their concurrent studio design project. Close attention will be paid to the exchange between practice and theory and the relevance of the discussed theories to the formation of current circumstances, and to the place of architecture within contemporary culture as a whole.
BDES3025 Architectural Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Mossman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture and tutorial contact, plus self-directed preparation and assignments, for a minimum total student commitment averaging 9 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES3023 or BDES3026 or BDES3616 Assessment: Analysis Exercises (30%), Assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architectural Professional Practice introduces students in the final semester of their undergraduate degree to the professional practice of architecture, focusing on design development within regulatory and practice management frameworks. Students are introduced to the fundamental principles of key regulatory requirements and critically deploy their understandings by investigating local practice case studies. They further develop a capacity to apply their knowledge in a particular context through an architectural design project that they take to Development Application level using current best practice.
BDES3026 Architecture Studio 3A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Michael Muir Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures; Studio contact plus self-directed preparation and assignments. Minimum student commitment of 18 hours per week. Prerequisites: (BDES2027 or BDES2020 or BDES2624) and (BDES2013 or BDES2613) Corequisites: BDES3011 or MATH2061 Prohibitions: BDES3010 or DESA3001 or BDES3023 or BDES3616 Assessment: interim presentation and submission (30%), final submission and portfolio (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Architecture Studio 3A is oriented towards the technical dimensions of architecture, whilst remaining attentive to the deeper cultural and historical context in which such technical knowledge, particularly in regards to structures and sustainability, has arisen and is currently situated. It imparts knowledge and skills that will stimulate compelling architectural projects that are conceptually rigorous, structurally innovating and technically adept. Structural knowledge is developed through a suite of lectures and accompanying practical exercises, and is assessed through technical reports and a final examination. They are required to integrate multiple criteria, including thematic, conceptual, programmatic and technical concerns into a persuasive architectural proposition.
BDES3027 Architecture Studio 3B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Catherine Lassen Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures; Lab; Studio contact plus self-directed preparation and assignments - minimum student commitment of 18 hours per week. Prerequisites: BDES3026 or BDES3010 or DESA3001 or BDES3616 Prohibitions: BDES3020 or DESA3002 or BDES3012 Assessment: Assessment 1: Phase 1 Design Presentation (20%); Assessment 2: Phase 2 and Communications Submission (20%); Assessment 3: Design Project and Portfolio (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
As the culminating design studio for the degree, students are presented with the opportunity to develop an architectural position within their projects. Architecture Studio 3B continues themes from Architecture Studio 3A, extending design understanding with respect to programmatic ambition and situating a symbolic public building proposal within a specific urban site.
Particular attention is paid to the conventions of architectural representation as 'Communications' to doubly generate as well as conceptually clarify design opportunities.
Computational modes of modelling are a particular focus. Structural, technical and material thinking is encouraged in coherent relation to students' strategic design intent and through studied historical and cultural awareness. The studio consolidates students' abilities in communicating and translating architecture using advanced modes of graphic visualisation through 3D modelling software and associated fabrication potentials. Hybrid techniques for moving between computational and actual realms are promoted in parallel with clarifying attitudes toward contemporary built and un-built environments.
Depth of design development is promoted via a dual emphasis: early analysis of exemplary architectural thinking coupled with intensive speculative and projective exploration. Students aim to produce conceptually challenging, integrated and compelling pre-professional architectural design projects confronting a variety of spatial contexts.
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BUSS1030 Accounting, Business and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prohibitions: ACCT1001 or ACCT1002 or ACCT1003 or ACCT1004 or ACCT1005 Assessment: tutorial contribution (10%), assignment (15%), mid-semester examination (25%), final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit investigates the fundamentals of accounting and aims to provide a broad understanding of the role of accounting in the context of business and society. The format of the unit is designed to show that there are many uses of accounting data. The focus moves from accountability to decision making; both functions are explained through examples such as the 'double entry equation', and from an output (financial statements) perspective. Some more technical aspects of accounting are outlined, including the elements of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses within simple, familiar scenarios. Besides developing an understanding of the role of accounting via conventional financial reports, recent developments including the discharge of accountability by companies through the release of corporate social and environmental reports and the global financial crisis, are explored through an accounting lens.
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM2401 Molecular Reactivity and Spectroscopy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2001 or CHEM2101 or CHEM2301 or CHEM2311 or CHEM2502 or CHEM2901 or CHEM2903 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a required chemistry unit of study for students intending to major in chemistry.
This is one of the two core units of study for students considering majoring in chemistry, and for students of other disciplines who wish to acquire a good general background in chemistry. The unit considers fundamental questions of molecular structure, chemical reactivity, and molecular spectroscopy: What are chemical reactions and what makes them happen? How can we follow and understand them? How can we exploit them to make useful molecules? This course includes the organic and medicinal chemistry of aromatic and carbonyl compounds, organic reaction mechanisms, molecular spectroscopy, quantum chemistry, and molecular orbital theory.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2402 Chemical Structure and Stability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, seven 1-hour tutorials per semester, eight 4-hour practicals per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2202 or CHEM2302 or CHEM2902 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This is a required chemistry unit of study for students intending to major in chemistry.
This is the second core unit of study for students considering majoring in chemistry, and for students seeking a good general background in chemistry. The unit continues the consideration of molecular structure and chemical reactivity. Topics include the structure and bonding of inorganic compounds, the properties of metal complexes, materials chemistry and nanotechnology, thermodynamics and kinetics.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2403 Chemistry of Biological Molecules

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, six 1-hour tutorials per semester, five 4-hour practical sessions per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: CHEM2001 or CHEM2101 or CHEM2301 or CHEM2311 or CHEM2502 or CHEM2901 or CHEM2903 or CHEM2913 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: To enrol in Senior Chemistry, students are required to have completed (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916).
Life is chemistry, and this unit of study examines the key chemical processes that underlie all living systems. Lectures cover the chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids and DNA, the mechanisms of organic and biochemical reactions that occur in biological systems, chemical analysis of biological systems, the inorganic chemistry of metalloproteins, biomineralisation, biopolymers and biocolloids, and the application of spectroscopic techniques to biological systems. The practical course includes the chemical characterisation of biopolymers, experimental investigations of iron binding proteins, organic and inorganic chemical analysis, and the characterisation of anti-inflammatory drugs.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
CHEM2404 Forensic and Environmental Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Siegbert Schmid Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures per week, six 1-hour tutorials and five 4-hour practical sessions per semester Prerequisites: (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) and (CHEM1XX2 or CHEM1904) Prohibitions: AGCH3033 Assumed knowledge: 6cp MATH1XXX Assessment: Quizzes, lab reports and final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: To enrol in Senior Chemistry students are required to have completed (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) and (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916).
The identification of chemical species and quantitative determination of how much of each species is present are the essential first steps in solving all chemical puzzles. In this course students learn analytical techniques and chemical problem solving in the context of forensic and environmental chemistry. The lectures on environmental chemistry cover atmospheric chemistry (including air pollution, global warming and ozone depletion), and water/soil chemistry (including bio-geochemical cycling, chemical speciation, catalysis and green chemistry). The forensic component of the course examines the gathering and analysis of evidence, using a variety of chemical techniques, and the development of specialised forensic techniques in the analysis of trace evidence. Students will also study forensic analyses of inorganic, organic and biological materials (dust, soil, inks, paints, documents, etc) in police, customs and insurance investigations and learn how a wide range of techniques are used to examine forensic evidence.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/intermediate-chemistry.shtml
EDUF3026 Global Perspectives, Poverty and Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alexandra McCormick and Dr Matthew Thomas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 9 wks, 1x1-hr online tutorial/wk for 9 wks, 1x2 hour workshop for 9 wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: Online tutorial postings (25%), 500wd essay plan (10%) and 2000wd major essay (20%), 2000wd critical review of an education program (25%), Workshop group presentation with group handout (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study explores relationships between education, poverty and international development in multi-level contexts. It acknowledges the importance of a broad-ranging view of international development, including its economic, political, and cultural dimensions. The unit examines key indicators related to poverty and education, and explores the educational implications of global social policies like Education for all, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We investigate the roles of multilateral, bilateral and non-state agencies in educational development to discuss the multiple actors in global development and the politics of aid. Using case studies of educational development processes in specific countries and regions, we contextualise the key issues explored in the unit and provide students with an understanding of how international development reforms are experienced and contested at local, regional, and national levels. The unit is especially designed for those who have an interest in international and global dynamics, particularly those identified as 'developing' countries, who may be teaching or writing about international development issues, or who may be interested in careers in international and development education, whether in Australia or overseas.
Textbooks
McCowan, T. and E. Unterhalter (2014) Education and International Development: An Introduction, Bloomsbury (available as an ebook)
FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim-Yen Phan-Thien Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/week (4 replaced by tutorials); practical 3 hrs/week Prerequisites: Completion of 72 credit points of units of study Prohibitions: AGEN3004 Assumed knowledge: 6cp of (BIOL1XXX or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XXX Assessment: Structure and food quality lab report (10%), QC investigation lab report (20%), Processingcase study report (20%), Processing case study presentation (10%), Final exam(40%) Practical field work: A few optional site visits Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit needs to be available as a non-award course so that students seeking admission to the MND have an option to fulfil the 6 cp Food Science prerequisite, if their previous study does not fulfil theis requirement already.
All of the food that we produce and consume is processed in some way. The manufacture of composite food products, which have distinct properties to their constituent ingredients, requires a complex series of processing operations. However, even ready-to-eat fresh foods undergo processing to facilitate distribution to consumers, maximise shelf-life, and ensure food safety. This unit will examine the biochemical and physicochemical transformations that occur in food materials during processing and how processing parameters affect the fulfilment of food quality, shelf-life, and safety objectives. The unit is divided into modules on (1) processing to modify food structure; (2) processing for preservation; and value-adding, focused on (3) healthier food and (4) fermentation as interesting case studies in food processing. You will learn methods of food analysis and apply a scientific approach to investigating the relationships between food composition, functionality, processing conditions, and end-product properties. By doing this unit, you will develop a sound understanding of the scientific principles underpinning food processing decisions and outcomes. This is well-regarded in the food industry, particularly FMCG and manufacturing, as the ability to systematically characterise, analyse, and troubleshoot processes can be applied to a wide range of industrial situations.
GEOL1501 Engineering Geology 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Tom Hubble Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 2 hour lectures per week and 24 hours laboratory classes. Prohibitions: GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or GEOS1003 or GEOS1903 Assessment: Practical laboratory work, Assignments, Tests and Quizzes, and a combined theory and practical exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Course objectives: To introduce basic geology and the principles of site investigation to civil engineering students. Expected outcomes: Students should develop an appreciation of geologic processes and their influence civil engineering works, acquire knowledge of the most important rocks and minerals and be able to identify them, and interpret geological maps with an emphasis on making construction decisions. Syllabus summary: Geological concepts relevant to civil engineering and the building environment. Introduction to minerals; igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks, their occurrence, formation and significance. General introduction to physical geology and geomorphology, structural geology, plate tectonics, hydrogeology, rock core logging site investigation techniques for construction. Associated laboratory work on minerals, rocks and mapping.
Textbooks
Portrait of A Planet by Stephen Marshak, Published by H.H. Norton and Company and readings provided via Blackboard
HSBH3009 International Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zakia Hossain Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hour lecture/week, 1x1-hr face-to-face/on-line tutorial/week Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Prohibitions: BACH3128 Assessment: Online activities (20%); tutorial attendance and presentation (20%); and briefing paper 2500wd (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines theoretical and practical issues confronting global health professionals and practitioners, especially in low-resource settings. It provides students with opportunities to apply their disciplinary expertise in the interdisciplinary, international health setting. The unit introduces students to: a) historical, political and economic forces that influence the health of populations around the world and contribute to international health inequities; b) global health crises (emerging infectious disease, chronic disease and disability) facing both developed and developing countries and their impact; and, c) international health practices, including key actors and initiatives, as well as challenges and strategies for working in cross-cultural contexts. The unit provides students with an understanding of health determinants and interventions in international contexts, with a particular emphasis on low-resource settings. Examples of topics covered include health, poverty and inequality, foreign aid and development assistance, globalisation, technology and health. The unit also provides an introductory overview of contemporary international health challenges such as food security, humanitarian crises and climate change. Students will undertake an in-depth study of a global health issue, exploring the context in which it emerged and the forces that propel it, and advocate for actions to improve the issue in a specific local context and population group.
ITLS6007 Disaster Relief Operations

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 6 x 3.5 hr lectures, 6 x 3.5 hr workshops. Prohibitions: TPTM6390 Assessment: Individual essay (25%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Large scale, sudden onset disasters strike with little or no warning. In their wake they leave shattered infrastructure, collapsed services and traumatised populations, while the number of dead, injured and homeless often reaches staggering proportions. Humanitarian aid organisations, such as the Red Cross, Doctors without Borders or Oxfam, to name just a few, are usually amongst the first responders, but depend on extremely agile supply chains to support their worldwide operations. Successful disaster relief missions are characterised by the ability of professionals to cope with time pressure, high uncertainty and unusual restrictions. This unit is designed as an introduction to the coordination and management of humanitarian aid and emergency response logistics. Case studies of real events, such as the 2004 Boxing Day tsunami and the 2010 Haiti earthquake provide the framework for analysis and research, while discussion of operational factors, simulations, workshops and group exercises offer students an interactive learning environment.
MATH1002 Linear Algebra

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1012 or MATH1014 or MATH1902 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics or MATH1111. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Online quizzes (20%); 4 x assignments (15%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
MATH1002 is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering.
This unit of study introduces vectors and vector algebra, linear algebra including solutions of linear systems, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors.
Textbooks
Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, (4th edition), David Poole
MATH1005 Statistical Thinking with Data

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr lab/wk Prohibitions: MATH1015 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or STAT1022 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics. Students who have not completed HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Mathematics Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: RQuizzes(10%); projects (25%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a data-rich world, global citizens need to problem solve with data, and evidence based decision-making is essential is every field of research and work.
This unit equips you with the foundational statistical thinking to become a critical consumer of data. You will learn to think analytically about data and to evaluate the validity and accuracy of any conclusions drawn. Focusing on statistical literacy, the unit covers foundational statistical concepts, including the design of experiments, exploratory data analysis, sampling and tests of significance.
Textbooks
Statistics, (4th Edition), Freedman Pisani Purves (2007)
MATH1021 Calculus Of One Variable

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1011 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1001 or MATH1921 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals.
Textbooks
Calculus of One Variable (Course Notes for MATH1021)
MATH1023 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1013 or MATH1903 or MATH1907 or MATH1003 or MATH1923 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X21, HSC Mathematics Extension 1 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (5%); final exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable.
Textbooks
Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Course Notes for MATH1023)
MATH1064 Discrete Mathematics for Computation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lecture/wk for 13 weeks; 1x1-hr practice class/wk for 13 weeks; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 12 wks. Prohibitions: MATH1004 or MATH1904 Assessment: Examination (60%), assignments (10%), quiz (20%), online quizzes (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to the language and key methods of the area of Discrete Mathematics. The focus is on mathematical concepts in discrete mathematics and their applications, with an emphasis on computation. For instance, to specify a computational problem precisely one needs to give an abstract formulation using mathematical objects such as sets, functions, relations, orders, and sequences. In order to prove that a proposed solution is correct, one needs to apply the principles of mathematical logic, and to use proof techniques such as induction. To reason about the efficiency of an algorithm, one often needs to estimate the growth of functions or count the size of complex mathematical objects. This unit provides the necessary mathematical background for such applications of discrete mathematics. Students will be introduced to mathematical logic and proof techniques; sets, functions, relations, orders, and sequences; counting and discrete probability; asymptotic growth; and basic graph theory.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook.
MATH1902 Linear Algebra (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1002 or MATH1012 or MATH1014 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (90 or above in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 4 x assignments (20%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering. It parallels the normal unit MATH1002 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1905 Statistical Thinking with Data (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: MATH1005 or MATH1015 or STAT1021 or STAT1022 or ECMT1010 or ENVX1001 or ENVX1002 or BUSS1020 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Assumed knowledge: (HSC Mathematics Extension 2) OR (90 or above in HSC Mathematics Extension 1) or equivalent Assessment: 2 x quizzes (20%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is designed to provide a thorough preparation for further study in mathematics and statistics. It is a core unit of study providing three of the twelve credit points required by the Faculty of Science as well as a Junior level requirement in the Faculty of Engineering. This Advanced level unit of study parallels the normal unit MATH1005 but goes more deeply into the subject matter and requires more mathematical sophistication.
Textbooks
A Primer of Statistics (4th edition), M C Phipps and M P Quine, Prentice Hall, Australia (2001)
MATH1921 Calculus Of One Variable (Advanced)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1001 or MATH1011 or MATH1906 or ENVX1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1021 or MATH1931 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (20%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates differential calculus and integral calculus of one variable and the diverse applications of this theory. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include complex numbers, functions of a single variable, limits and continuity, differentiation, optimisation, Taylor polynomials, Taylor's Theorem, Taylor series, Riemann sums, and Riemann integrals. Additional theoretical topics included in this advanced unit include the Intermediate Value Theorem, Rolle's Theorem, and the Mean Value Theorem.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH1923 Multivariable Calculus and Modelling (Adv)

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sharon Stephen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures; and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: NSW HSC 2 unit Mathematics or equivalent or a credit or above in MATH1111 Prohibitions: MATH1003 or MATH1013 or MATH1907 or MATH1903 or MATH1023 or MATH1933 Assumed knowledge: MATH1X21, HSC Mathematics Extension 2 or equivalent. Assessment: 2 x quizzes (20%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Calculus is a discipline of mathematics that finds profound applications in science, engineering, and economics. This unit investigates multivariable differential calculus and modelling. Emphasis is given both to the theoretical and foundational aspects of the subject, as well as developing the valuable skill of applying the mathematical theory to solve practical problems. Topics covered in this unit of study include mathematical modelling, first order differential equations, second order differential equations, systems of linear equations, visualisation in 2 and 3 dimensions, partial derivatives, directional derivatives, the gradient vector, and optimisation for functions of more than one variable. Additional topics covered in this advanced unit of study include the use of diagonalisation of matrices to study systems of linear equation and optimisation problems, limits of functions of two or more variables, and the derivative of a function of two or more variables.
Textbooks
As set out in the Junior Mathematics Handbook
MATH2021 Vector Calculus and Differential Equations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1XX2) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2921 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: 2 x quizzes (24%); 2 x assignments (16%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit opens with topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, through cylinders, spheres and other parametrised surfaces), Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a basic grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2022 Linear and Abstract Algebra

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: MATH1XX2 Prohibitions: MATH2922 or MATH2968 or (MATH2061 and MATH2021) or (MATH2061 and MATH2921) or (MATH2961 and MATH2021) or (MATH2961 and MATH2921) Assessment: 3 x quizzes (30%); 2 x assignments (10%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Linear and abstract algebra is one of the cornerstones of mathematics and it is at the heart of many applications of mathematics and statistics in the sciences and engineering. This unit investigates and explores properties of linear functions, developing general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, including differential equations. Linear independence is introduced as a way of understanding and solving linear systems of arbitrary dimension. Linear operators on real spaces are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, extending ideas from first year linear algebra. To better understand symmetry, matrix and permutation groups are introduced and used to motivate the study of abstract group theory.
Textbooks
Linear Algebra: A Modern Introduction, (4th edition), David Poole
MATH2023 Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and (MATH1XX2) Prohibitions: MATH2923 or MATH3068 or MATH2962 Assessment: 2 x in-class quizzes (20%); a take-home assignment (10%); and a final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Analysis grew out of calculus, which leads to the study of limits of functions, sequences and series. It is one of the fundamental topics underlying much of mathematics including differential equations, dynamical systems, differential geometry, topology and Fourier analysis. This unit introduces the field of mathematical analysis both with a careful theoretical framework as well as selected applications. It shows the utility of abstract concepts and teaches an understanding and construction of proofs in mathematics. This unit will be useful to students of mathematics, science and engineering and in particular to future school mathematics teachers, because we shall explain why common practices in the use of calculus are correct, and understanding this is important for correct applications and explanations. The unit starts with the foundations of calculus and the real numbers system. It goes on to study the limiting behaviour of sequences and series of real and complex numbers. This leads naturally to the study of functions defined as limits and to the notion of uniform convergence. Returning to the beginnings of calculus and power series expansions leads to complex variable theory: elementary functions of complex variable, the Cauchy integral theorem, Cauchy integral formula, residues and related topics with applications to real integrals.
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2061 Linear Mathematics and Vector Calculus

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Martin Wechslberger Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: (MATH1X21 or MATH1011 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and (MATH1014 or MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) Prohibitions: MATH2001 or MATH2901 or MATH2002 or MATH2902 or MATH2961 or MATH2067 or MATH2021 or MATH2921 or MATH2022 or MATH2922 Assessment: Quiz (30%); assignment (5%); tutorial preparation (5%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is only available to Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies students.
This unit starts with an investigation of linearity: linear functions, general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations (including differential equations), linear independence and the dimension of a linear space. The study of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, begun in junior level linear algebra, is extended and developed. The unit then moves on to topics from vector calculus, including vector-valued functions (parametrised curves and surfaces; vector fields; div, grad and curl; gradient fields and potential functions), line integrals (arc length; work; path-independent integrals and conservative fields; flux across a curve), iterated integrals (double and triple integrals; polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates; areas, volumes and mass; Green's Theorem), flux integrals (flow through a surface; flux integrals through a surface defined by a function of two variables, though cylinders, spheres and parametrised surfaces), Gauss' Divergence Theorem and Stokes' Theorem.
Textbooks
Course Notes for MATH2061 Vector Calculus, S Britton and K-G Choo
MATH2069 Discrete Mathematics and Graph Theory

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one 1 hour tutorial and one 1 hour practice class per week. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics units Prohibitions: MATH2011 or MATH2009 or MATH2969 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, assignments, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to several related areas of discrete mathematics, which serve their interests for further study in pure and applied mathematics, computer science and engineering. Topics to be covered in the first part of the unit include recursion and induction, generating functions and recurrences, combinatorics. Topics covered in the second part of the unit include Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, the theory of trees (used in the study of data structures), planar graphs, the study of chromatic polynomials (important in scheduling problems).
MATH2921 Vector Calculus and Differential Eqs (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: [(MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1901 or MATH1906) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] and [(MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003)] Prohibitions: MATH2021 or MATH2065 or MATH2965 or (MATH2061 and MATH2022) or (MATH2061 and MATH2922) or (MATH2961 and MATH2022) or (MATH2961 and MATH2922) or MATH2067 Assessment: Quizzes (10%), assignments (20%); final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the advanced version of MATH2021, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and mathematical rigour. The vector calculus component of the course will include: parametrised curves and surfaces, vector fields, div, grad and curl, gradient fields and potential functions, lagrange multipliers line integrals, arc length, work, path-independent integrals, and conservative fields, flux across a curve, double and triple integrals, change of variable formulas, polar, cylindrical and spherical coordinates, areas, volumes and mass, flux integrals, and Green's Gauss' and Stokes' theorems. The Differential Equations half of the course will focus on ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications with more complexity and depth. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), series solutions near a regular point, higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, matrix equations and solutions, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, elementary Sturm-Liouville theory, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series). The unit then moves to topics in solution techniques for ordinary and partial differential equations (ODEs and PDEs) with applications. It provides a more thorough grounding in these techniques to enable students to build on the concepts in their subsequent courses. The main topics are: second order ODEs (including inhomogeneous equations), higher order ODEs and systems of first order equations, solution methods (variation of parameters, undetermined coefficients) the Laplace and Fourier Transform, an introduction to PDEs, and first methods of solutions (including separation of variables, and Fourier Series).
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2922 Linear and Abstract Algebra (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial; and 1x1-hr practice class/wk Prerequisites: MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002) Prohibitions: MATH2022 or MATH2968 or (MATH2061 and MATH2021) or (MATH2061 and MATH2921) or (MATH2961 and MATH2021) or (MATH2961 and MATH2921) Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2 x assignments (20%); final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Linear and abstract algebra is one of the cornerstones of mathematics and it is at the heart of many applications of mathematics and statistics in the sciences and engineering. This unit is an advanced version of MATH2022, with more emphasis on the underlying concepts and on mathematical rigour. This unit investigates and explores properties of vector spaces, matrices and linear transformations, developing general principles relating to the solution sets of homogeneous and inhomogeneous linear equations, including differential equations. Linear independence is introduced as a way of understanding and solving linear systems of arbitrary dimension. Linear operators on real spaces are investigated, paying particular attention to the geometrical significance of eigenvalues and eigenvectors, extending ideas from first year linear algebra. To better understand symmetry, matrix and permutation groups are introduced and used to motivate the study of abstract groups theory. The unit culminates in studying inner spaces, quadratic forms and normal forms of matrices together with their applications to problems both in mathematics and in the sciences and engineering.
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MATH2923 Analysis (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hauer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr practice class and 1x1-hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: [(MATH1921 or MATH1931 or MATH1901 or MATH1906) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1021 or MATH1001)] and [MATH1902 or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1002)] and [(MATH1923 or MATH1933 or MATH1903 or MATH1907) or (a mark of 65 or above in MATH1023 or MATH1003)] Prohibitions: MATH2023 or MATH2962 or MATH3068 Assessment: 2 x quizzes (30%); an assignment (10%); and a final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Analysis grew out of calculus, which leads to the study of limits of functions, sequences and series. It is one of the fundamental topics underlying much of mathematics including differential equations, dynamical systems, differential geometry, topology and Fourier analysis. This advanced unit introduces the field of mathematical analysis both with a careful theoretical frame- work as well as selected applications.This unit will be useful to students with more mathematical maturity who study mathematics, science, or engineering. Starting off with an axiomatic description of the real numbers system, this unit concentrates on the limiting behaviour of sequences and series of real and complex numbers. This leads naturally to the study of functions defined as limits and to the notion of uniform con-vergence. Special attention is given to power series, leading into the theory of analytic functions and complex analysis. Besides a rigourous treatment of many concepts from calculus, you will learn the basic results of complex analysis such as the Cauchy integral theorem, Cauchy integral formula, the residues theorems, leading to useful techniques for evaluating real integrals. By doing this unit, you will develop solid foundations in the more formal aspects of analysis, including knowledge of abstract concepts, how to apply them and the ability to construct proofs in mathematics.
Textbooks
As set out in the Intermediate Mathematics Handbook
MKTG1001 Marketing Principles

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial per week Assessment: project (20%), presentation (15%), participation (7%), mid-semester exam (28%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
Note: The Intensive January and July sessions of this unit are only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in the Semester 1 and Semester 2 sessions.
This unit examines the relationships among marketing organisations and final consumers in terms of production-distribution channels or value chains. It focuses on consumer responses to various marketing decisions (product mixes, price levels, distribution channels, promotions, etc.) made by private and public organisations to create, develop, defend, and sometimes eliminate, product markets. Emphasis is placed on identifying new ways of satisfying the needs and wants, and creating value for consumers. While this unit is heavily based on theory, practical application of the concepts to "real world" situations is also essential. Specific topics of study include: market segmentation strategies; market planning; product decisions; new product development; branding strategies; channels of distribution; promotion and advertising; pricing strategies; and customer database management.
PHYS1001 Physics 1 (Regular)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1003 or PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is for students who gained 65 marks or better in HSC Physics or equivalent. The lecture series covers the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, and oscillations and waves.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1003 Physics 1 (Technological)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Intensive August,Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 10 weeks, one 1-hour tutorial per week. Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: (MATH1003 or MATH1903) and (MATH1005 or MATH1905). Prohibitions: PHYS1004 or PHYS1902 or PHYS1904 Assumed knowledge: HSC Physics or PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 or equivalent. Students who have not completed HSC Physics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Physics Bridging Course (offered in February). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907) and MATH1X05 concurrently. Assessment: 3 hour exam plus laboratories, tutorials, and assignments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended that PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or PHYS1901 be completed before this unit
This unit of study is designed for students majoring in physical and engineering sciences and emphasis is placed on applications of physical principles to the technological world. The lecture series covers the topics of fluids, electromagnetism, and quantum physics.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS1901 Physics 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures, one 3-hour laboratory per week for 9 weeks and one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: PHYS1001 or PHYS1002 or EDUH1017 or PHYS1903 Assumed knowledge: (85 or above in HSC Physics or equivalent) OR (75 or above in one of PHYS1003 or PHYS1004) OR (PHYS1902 or PHYS1904). Students are also encouraged to take (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906) and MATH1X02 concurrently. Assessment: 3-hour exam plus laboratories, assignments and mid-semester tests (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is intended for students who have a strong background in Physics and an interest in studying more advanced topics. It proceeds faster than Physics 1 (Regular), covering further and more difficult material. The lecture series contains modules on the topics of mechanics, thermal physics, oscillations and waves and chaos. The laboratory work also provides an introduction to computational physics using chaos theory as the topic of study.
Textbooks
Young and Freedman. University Physics with Modern Physics, Global Edition. 14th edition, Pearsons 2015. Course lab manual.
PHYS2213 Physics 2EE

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Iver Cairns Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures per week; one 2 hour computational laboratory per week for 10 weeks. Prerequisites: (PHYS1001 or PHYS1901) and (PHYS1003 or PHYS1902) Assumed knowledge: (MATH1X21 or MATH1931 or MATH1X01 or MATH1906 or MATH1011) and (MATH1X02) and (MATH1X23 or MATH1933 or MATH1X03 or MATH1907 or MATH1013) and (MATH1X04 or MATH1X05) Assessment: One 3 hour exam, one 1-hour computational test, assignments, computational lab work (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to build on the knowledge gained in Junior Physics, to provide Electrical Engineering students with the knowledge of relevant topics of Physics at the Intermediate level, and with associated skills. Completion of the unit provides a solid foundation for further studies in Electrical Engineering and related engineering areas. The aims of this unit are linked to the generic attributes required of graduates of the University in knowledge skills, thinking skills, personal skills and attributes, and practical skills. By the end of this unit of study, students will be able to describe and apply concepts in optics, electromagnetism and basic solid state physics and technology at the Intermediate level. They will be able to use computational techniques to analyze optics problems. The modules in this unit of study are: Optics (13 lectures): The wave nature of light, optical phenomena and the interaction of light with matter: interference and diffraction effects; fundamental limits to resolution of optical instruments; polarisation; dispersion; coherence. These are presented within the context of several key optical technologies including lasers, CD/DVD players, optical fibre communication systems, gratings and Mach Zehnder modulation. Electromagnetic Properties of Matter (12 lectures): Electric and magnetic effects in materials; the combination of electric and magnetic fields to produce light and other electromagnetic waves in vacuum and matter. Solid State and Device Physics (13 lectures): Introduction to quantum mechanics, Fermi-Dirac statistics, electronic properties of solids (metal, semiconductors and insulators), doping and the semiconductor PN junction; introduction to nanotechnology; fabrication technologies, nano-imaging technologies, nanoelectronics. Computational Physics (10 sessions of 2 hours each): In a computing laboratory students use Matlab-based simulation software to conduct virtual experiments in optics, which illustrate and extend the relevant lectures. Students also gain experience in the use of computers to solve problems in physics.
Textbooks
Notes published by the School of Physics: - Physics 2EE Computational Physics Optics Notes - Physics 2EE Electromagnetic Properties of Matter Notes - Physics 2EE Solid State and Device Physics Notes Other relevant texts: see the Unit of Study outline.