Project Management

PMGT – Project Management unit of study descriptions

PMGT1711 Systems Thinking in Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects exist as and within complex systems of human activity. Systems thinking enables us to understand the patterns of interconnection both within projects and their dependencies to contextual forces. This Unit introduces students to a variety of systems thinking techniques which will help in responding to the interconnectedness of all things and taking action in face of uncertainty and ambiguity. Upon completion of the course, the students will learn to think and question critically, while building skills to deliver projects that align with organisational strategic objectives. This unit will help student understand how to manage change while exercising empathy and learn to listen effectively.
PMGT1852 Facilitation and Stakeholder Engagement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung; Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assumed knowledge: ENGG1850 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective stakeholder management and communication play a vital role in the success of projects. Project managers and leaders often express that stakeholder management, leadership and communication are often the most sought-after competencies. This unit of study focuses on the process of stakeholder identification; defining their roles and responsibilities; understanding their organisation mission, vision and overall strategic objectives; alignment and prioritisation of specific project needs and requirements; with emphasis on stakeholder engagement/analytic methodologies such as analysing stakeholder influence, reliance, collaboration and communication networks. The unit of study will also cover aspects of psychology, emotional intelligence, communication techniques and leadership qualities required for effective performance in project management roles.
PMGT2711 Critical Thinking for Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1 Classes: Tutorials, workshops, and E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Critical questioning is important in all project communication and action. This unit explores ways of testing assumptions, and challenging the logical validity of arguments. The ability to critically question is a fundamental competency for effective project management, whether that be exploring the finer points of contracts, constructing an argument to win a bid or challenging project decisions.
PMGT2800 Project Placement A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practical experience, workshops, meetings Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND ENGG1860 AND ENGG1863 AND PMGT1852 AND ENGG1865 AND PMGT1711 AND [12cp of 1000 level units of study] Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to students who have a credit average or above and who have obtained approval from the program director. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study provides student with internship and/or work placement opportunities in the field of project management. It allows student to translate their learning from their junior and intermediate units of study within Bachelor of Project Management degree into experiential learning in a real world context. Students will be required to work with the supporting/host organisation for a minimum of 120 hours or 20 working days and this arrangement needs to be endorsed by both the academic director of the program or equivalent and the supervisor of the host organisation prior to the beginning of the placement. Students will gain valuable industry and professional experience from this unit of study including communication and key aspects of project management skills such as planning, scheduling, costing, coordinating, resourcing, budgeting, monitoring and reporting. It is anticipated that this unit of study would enrich the learning experience as well as enhance future business development or job employment opportunities in the project management context.
PMGT2801 Project Placement B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: practical experience, workshops, meetings Prerequisites: ENGG1850 AND ENGG1860 AND ENGG1863 AND PMGT1852 AND ENGG1865 AND PMGT1711 AND [12cp of 1000 level units of study] Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is only available to students who have a credit average or above and who have obtained approval from the program director. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study provides student with internship and/or work placement opportunities in the field of project management. It allows student to translate their learning from their junior and intermediate units of study within Bachelor of Project Management degree into experiential learning in a real world context. Students will be required to work with the supporting/host organisation for a minimum of 120 hours or 20 working days and this arrangement needs to be endorsed by both the academic director of the program or equivalent and the supervisor of the host organisation prior to the beginning of the placement. Students will gain valuable industry and professional experience from this unit of study including communication and key aspects of project management skills such as planning, scheduling, costing, coordinating, resourcing, budgeting, monitoring and reporting. It is anticipated that this unit of study would enrich the learning experience as well as enhance future business development or job employment opportunities in the project management context. This unit of study is only available to students who have a credit average or above and who have obtained approval from the program director.
PMGT2821 Project Conflict Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: PMGT1852 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All projects exist in the context of conflicting priorities. Conflict can start from the point of inception when there may be different ideas about what should be achieved in a project. It can continue through negotiation of contracts to deliver the work, to robust discussion as to what counts as acceptable upon delivery. This Unit develops students' ability to anticipate, understand and ameliorate conflict, reaching negotiated agreements that are acceptable to all parties. Unexpected conflict crises also arise requiring project managers to mediate an outcome that allows the project to move forward. This unit helps students understand multiple perspectives of stakeholders, build interpersonal skills and integrity to resolve conflicts in a constructive manner.
PMGT2822 Reframing Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: ENGG1863 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The possibilities inherent in any project are constrained by the assumptions that we, and other stakeholders, bring to it. This Unit of Study focuses on techniques, such as design thinking, for reframing our understanding of what is possible in any given project in order to enhance value. Upon the completion of this course, students will develop skills to think diversely, take action in ambiguity and ensure projects deliver value to all stakeholders.
PMGT2854 Executing Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Duro Kolar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: ENGG1860 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What is concurrent engineering? What are the different components? Why do we need to get products to market fast? What really matters? Starting with a vision, creating great teams that work and creating processes that work effectively around the teams. Teams need to complement processes, and processes need to complement teams. Individuals and teams also evolve processes. In fact great systems are those that can evolve and adapt without a centralised management. The artist that creates a great system is the one that can make a sustainable design.
PMGT3611 Projects in Controlled Environments

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Intensive June Classes: Tutorials, workshops, and E-learning Prerequisites: 30cp 1000 level of any UoS Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
PRINCE2, developed by the UK Government initially for use in IT projects is now adapted for and widely used across many project types. It provides a robust framework for managing project governance and risk escalation. PRINCE2 is one of the most prevalent professional certifications in demand by employers. In this Unit students will develop a thorough understanding of the PRINCE2 methodology leading to the opportunity to gain certification.
PMGT3612 Agile Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack Session: Intensive July Classes: Tutorials, workshops, and E-learning Prerequisites: PMGT1711 and [30cp 1000 level of any UoS] Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Agile project methodologies, were initially developed for small IT projects and gained popularity following the publication of the Agile Manifesto. With the demand for shorter delivery timescales and organisational agility, the popularity of agile approaches has rapidly increased across industries and project scales. This Unit provides students with a grounding in the SCRUM methodology, one of the most widely recognised approaches to Agile, leading to an option for industry certification.
PMGT3623 Scheduling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, E-learning Prerequisites: [24 cp of BPM core 2000 level units] or [30 cp of any 2000 level units of study] Assessment: Through semester assessments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects typically need to be delivered within a defined timescale. Providing robust estimates, monitoring and controlling project duration are crucial to understand the ongoing viability of the investment made in a project. This Unit provides students with a background in advanced scheduling and estimation techniques, supported by project management software.
PMGT3624 Change and Transformation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, E-learning Prerequisites: PMGT1711 and ([24 cp of BPM core 2000 level units] or [30 cp of any 2000 level units of study]) Assessment: Through semester assessments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All projects contain some element of organisational or behavioural change, from small aspects of retraining to complete transformation of organisational values and behaviours. Change management can be required at the strategic or operational level. It may be required to assist in achieving project outcomes or the primary focus of the project may be the implementation of change. This Unit covers the fundamentals of change management including consideration of the psychological impacts of change, change competencies and leading change methodologies.
PMGT3850 Project Management Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Duro Kolar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: [24 cp of 2000 or 3000 level units of study] Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of the course coordinator and School`s Director of Learning and Teaching and will only be allowed where there are good reasons for doing so. Students considering this option should discuss it with the the course coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
In this intensive PM capstone project, students are required to apply all of the skills necessary to successfully initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project. Working as part of a team mid-sized, high-priority project, student will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables, including the project charter, project plan, change control process, status reports and post-project reviews. Students will facilitate meetings, update the project plan with actuals and changes, present status to management, justify decisions to key stakeholders and determine the impacts of their actions on the project. Under the guidance of a project professional and their academic supervisor, students will be given direct feedback towards achieving project goals.
PM Capstone Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to project management. Students will generally work in groups, although assessment components such as reflective reports and participation are marked individually. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of PM Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
PM Capstone Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, PM Capstone Project A (PMGT3850) and PM Capstone Project B (PMGT3851). This particular unit of study, which must precede PMGT3851 PM Capstone Project B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete 'final year' project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT3851 Project Management Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Duro Kolar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: [30 cp of 2000 or 3000 level units of study] AND PMGT3850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this intensive PM capstone project, students are required to apply all of the skills necessary to successfully initiate, plan, execute, control and close a project. Working as part of a team on a simulated four-month, mid-sized, high-priority project, student will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables, including the project charter, project plan, change control process, status reports and post-project reviews. Students will facilitate meetings, update the project plan with actuals and changes, present status to management, justify your decisions to key stakeholders and determine the impacts of your actions on multiple projects. Under the guidance of a senior project manager and their academic supervisor, students will be given direct feedback and techniques to increase efficiency and effectiveness.
PM Capstone Project A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to civil engineering. Students will generally work in groups, although planning and writing of reports will be done individually; i. e. , a separate report must be submitted by each student. Only in exceptional circumstances and by approval of PM Capstone Project course coordinator and the relevant academic supervisor concerned will a student be permitted to undertake a project individually.
PM Capstone Project is spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, PM Capstone Project A (PMGT3850) and PM Capstone Project B (PMGT3851). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by PMGT3850 PM Capstone Project A, should cover the second half of the required project work. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT3850 PM Capstone Project A.
PMGT3855 Project Variance Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: ENGG2851 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Project variance analysis uniquely shows project managers how to effectively integrate technical, schedule, and cost objectives by improving earned value management (EVM) practices. Providing innovative guidelines, methods, examples, and templates consistent with capability models and standards, this unit approaches EVM from a practical level with understandable techniques that are applicable to the management of any project. It also explains how to incorporate EVM with key systems engineering, software engineering, and project management processes such as establishing the technical or quality baseline, requirements management, using product metrics, and meeting success criteria for technical reviews. Detailed information is included on linking product requirements, project work products, the project plan, and the Performance Measurement Baseline (PMB), as well as correlating technical performance measures (TPM) with EVM.
PMGT3856 Sustainability and Knowledge Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Semester 1 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility are gaining importance in our globalised economy. They have been increasingly influencing business and project objectives and it is becoming imperative that they are incorporated into the practice of project management.
This unit of study embraces this new reality by providing students with an expanded understanding of value creation and how this is delivered through projects. The emphasis is on using projects to deliver value not only in terms of economic capital but also developing social capital and preserving natural capital. These will be underpinned by an appreciation of the standards, principles and frameworks that exist, both in Australia and internationally, to govern the preservation of the environment and increase the development of social capital.
Case studies will be used to create learning processes as students consider and confront the dilemmas that project managers face as they strive to deliver shareholder value, whilst considering social and environmental impacts these projects may have. Cases discussed in this unit will allow students to explore both the opportunities and pitfalls companies and non-government organisations face in targeting sustainability issues and how their values and core assumptions impact their business strategies.
Concepts such as corporate responsibility, the triple bottom line, the business case for sustainability, supply chain management and responsible purchasing and knowledge management will be discussed and students will consider how these influence project delivery.
PMGT3857 International Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: 30cp of 1000 level units of study Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides specific guidelines for achieving greater international project success. It addresses the need for modern techniques in project management geared and suited to international projects. It provides opportunity to students to have orientation towards lessons learned from failures and problems in international projects, and suggest alternative solutions for project issues. The critical success factors for managing international projects together with management issues related to vendors and outsourcing across national boundaries are also discussed. It further deals with managing businesses effectively address cross- cultural, social, and political issues.
PMGT3858 Adapting to Project Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prerequisites: PMGT2854 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Complex projects have always existed, but their frequency and importance are increasing in a complex, intertwined world. 'Complex' is qualitatively different from 'complicated. ' Complex projects are characterised by a web of interactions between their elements that lead to non-linearity, emergence, adaptiveness and other novel features. That is to say, they behave as Complex Adaptive Systems, and they should be managed as such. The majority of projects demonstrate some degree of complexity. The traditional model of projects is expressed in standard methodologies such as PMBoK, Prince2, and MS Project. While absolutely necessary as a basis for effective project management, the limitations of these methodologies become evident when uncertainty - structural, technical, directional or temporal - begins to intrude on a project. In these situations, a systemic pluralist approach is to be preferred. Project management then becomes less like painting by numbers, and more like selecting from a rich and broad palette of methods, tools and techniques. Such competencies can make a substantial difference, in a complex world with an unacceptably high rate of project failure.
PMGT4850 Project Management Honours Project A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research, Meetings Prerequisites: Students are required to achieve a minimum 65% average mark in the 2000-level and 3000-level or higher units of the normal BPM program to be eligible for entry to Honours. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator (who may consult the Undergraduate or Program Director)
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for Project Managers. The most important deliverable in PMGT4850 and PMGT4851 is a formally written, academic-based research thesis. This is a major task that is to be conducted over the year in two successive units of study of 12 credit points each. Students will build on technical competencies previously obtained from years 1, 2 and 3 of the BPM course, as well as make use of the academic writing and communication skills they have developed.
In PMGT4850, students are required to plan and begin work on a research project, in consultation and close supervision by an academic staff member. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, through close supervision and independent research, students will learn how to examine published and experimental literature and data, write reviews of literature, set down specific and achievable research objectives, organise a program of work and devise an experimental, developmental, or exploratory program of research using specific research methods or a combination of them (e. g. qualitative interviews, surveys, statistical analysis, mixed-method, etc. ).
In PMGT4851, students are required to have completed most of their literature review and be in the "execution" phase of their research. This is where the bulk of the investigative work and data collection/analyses/validation takes place and much of the writing of the final thesis begins to eventuate.
From both units, the skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking project management work as it broadens their repertoire of skills including critical thinking, ability to ask good questions, ability to think "outside the box", critical review of existing literature, research and analytical skills and written and oral presentation. Students are expected to take the initiative and learn to be independent thinkers when pursuing their research project.
PMGT4851 Project Management Honours Project B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kon Chung Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Research Prerequisites: Students are required to achieve a minimum 65% average mark in the 2000 and 3000 level units of study in the normal BPM program to be eligible for entry to Honours. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the Thesis will be conducted over two consecutive semesters and that the majority of students will start in Semester 1. Commencement in Semester 2 requires permission of Thesis coordinator (who may consult the Undergraduate or Program)
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for Project Managers. The most important deliverable in PMGT4850 and PMGT4851 is a formally written, academic-based research thesis. This is a major task that is to be conducted over the year in two successive units of study of 12 credit points each. Students will build on technical competencies previously obtained from years 1, 2 and 3 of the BPM course, as well as make use of the academic writing and communication skills they have developed.
In PMGT4850, students are required to plan and begin work on a research project, in consultation and close supervision by an academic staff member. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, through close supervision and independent research, students will learn how to examine published and experimental literature and data, write reviews of literature, set down specific and achievable research objectives, organise a program of work and devise an experimental, developmental, or exploratory program of research using specific research methods or a combination of them (e. g. qualitative interviews, surveys, statistical analysis, mixed-method, etc. ).
In PMGT4851, students are required to have completed most of their literature review and be in the "execution" phase of their research. This is where the bulk of the investigative work and data collection/analyses/validation takes place and much of the writing of the final thesis begins to eventuate.
From both units, the skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking project management work as it broadens their repertoire of skills including critical thinking, ability to ask good questions, ability to think "outside the box", critical review of existing literature, research and analytical skills and written and oral presentation. Students are expected to take the initiative and learn to be independent thinkers when pursuing their research project.
PMGT5850 Project Management Capstone Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Louis Taborda; Louis Taborda Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project work - own time, Meetings, Workshops, Presentation Prerequisites: ENGG5205 AND ENGG5811 AND PMGT6867 AND ENGG5820 AND (PMGT5871 OR PMGT6871) AND (PMGT5872 OR PMGT6872) AND (ENGG5812 OR PMGT6812) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
The capstone project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of workplace related research and assessment in a way that fosters the development of practical and research skills relevant to project management. Students will work in small, randomly selected groups on an assigned project for the semester. The concepts covered depend on the nature of the project.
The project outcomes will be presented in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The project will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's contribution to original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others, in understanding the business or organisational context and needs. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors either face to face or by production of a video or other recorded presentation.
The skills acquired will be invaluable to students progressing their careers in project management work.
PMGT5851 Project Management Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: (ENGG5205 AND ENGG5811 AND PMGT6867 AND ENGG5820) Prohibitions: PMGT5883 OR PMGT5884 OR PMGT5850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: All students wishing to enrol in Dissertation A and B must submit a research proposal and obtain the approval of the Program Director in order to enrol in these units. Under normal circumstances students will be expected to have a 75% average WAM. Where a student has been granted 24 cp credit on entry and wishes to start the dissertation in their first semester, permission to enrol will be based on the research proposal.
The dissertation is available to students who have a strong research interest and who are deemed capable of completing an extensive research project. The aim of the dissertation is to complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate research methods, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. It is expected that the dissertation will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 12 credit point units PMGT5851 and PMGT5852 may, with permission, be undertaken concurrently.
This unit of study, which must precede PMGT5852 Project Management Dissertation B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete dissertation project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT5852 Project Management Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: ENGG5205 AND ENGG5811 AND PMGT6867 AND ENGG5820 AND PMGT5851 Prohibitions: PMGT5883 OR PMGT5884 OR PMGT5850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: All students wishing to enrol in Dissertation A and B must submit a research proposal and obtain the approval of the Program Director in order to enrol in these units. Under normal circumstances students will be expected to have a 75% average WAM. Where a student has been granted 24 cp credit on entry and wishes to start the dissertation in their first semester, permission to enrol will be based on the research proposal.
The dissertation is available to students who have a strong research interest and who are deemed capable of completing an extensive research project. The aim of the dissertation is to complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate research methods, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. It is expected that the dissertation will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 12 credit point units PMGT5851 and PMGT5852 may, with permission, be undertaken concurrently.
This unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with PMGT5851 Project Management Dissertation A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete dissertation project. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT5851 Project Management Dissertation B.
PMGT5860 Project Leadership Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Meeting Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 6 credit point units PMGT5860 and PMGT5861 may be undertaken concurrently.
Project Leadership Thesis A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to Project Leadership. Students will work individually to plan and write reports. Project Leadership Thesis can be spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Project Leadership Thesis A (PMGT5860) and Project Leadership Thesis B (PMGT5861). This particular unit of study, which must precede PMGT5861 Project Leadership Thesis B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete thesis project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
Project Management Leadership Thesis A and B is aimed at providing candidates with an opportunity to develop deeper understanding of issues related to different aspects of leadership in managing projects in complex settings. This is an independent study guided by regular academic supervision as well as feedback from industry experts or advisors who would be serving on the thesis panel. Candidates would be required to bring a real world problem from their current work environment and develop rigorous analysis of the problem by summarising the existing literature and practices. Most of the work would comprise using case study, interpretative study and or action research as a methodological approach to investigate and analyse the phenomenon under investigation.
PMGT5861 Project Leadership Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Meeting Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 6 credit point units PMGT5860 and PMGT5861 may be undertaken concurrently.
Project Leadership Thesis A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to Project Leadership. Students will work individually to plan and write reports. Project Leadership Thesis can be spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Project Leadership Thesis A (PMGT5860) and Project Leadership Thesis B (PMGT5861). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with PMGT5860 Project Leadership Thesis A, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete thesis project. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT5860 Project Leadership Thesis A.
Project Management Leadership Thesis A and B is aimed at providing candidates with an opportunity to develop deeper understanding of issues related to different aspects of leadership in managing projects in complex setting. This is an independent study guided by regular academic supervision as well as feedback from industry experts or advisors who would be serving on thesis panel. Candidates would be required to bring real world problem from their current work environment and develop rigorous analysis of the problem by summarising the existing literature and practices. Most of the work would comprise using case study, interpretative study and or action research as a methodological approach to investigate and analyse the phenomenon under investigation.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prohibitions: PMGT6871 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit of study teaches fundamental theory and practice of project planning and control. Project planning and control are the key processes in project management, which moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. Project planning refers to planning of time, cost and resources adequately to estimate the work needed and to effectively manage risk in a project.
PMGT5872 People and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6872 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core program unit with a focus on enhancing leadership and people management capability. It covers diverse traditional and innovative theories, models and tools. It complements traditional views based on PMBoK, applying diverse approaches to contemporary project environments. Many of the unit tasks are framed in uncertain and potentially ambiguous terms as is common in many project environments.
Topic areas covered: Project context; Personal Competence; Interpersonal Competence; Team Competence.
The unit references a range of Australian and global Project Management, Management and Consulting Standards. It integrates theory and practice to optimise results.
PMGT5873 Project Economics and Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6873 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This course equips members of project management teams with information and tools to do financial appraisal and optimise decision making. It imparts basic knowledge and competencies required in project appraisal and financial management applicable to all sectors of industry and business. These include services, business investment, RandD, capital projects, local, state and national government departments and agencies.
Topics include: Review of the Fundamentals of Project Economics and Financial Techniques; Implementation of Fundamental Principles including EUAC, NPV, IRR, B/C, Valuation, Depreciation, Replacement Studies and Life Cycle Costing; Development of Project Alternatives and Application of the Analysis Techniques; Sensitivity Analysis, Risk Analysis and Management; Project Funding and Selection; Project Appraisal Report.
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, RandD units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.
PMGT5879 Strategic Portfolio and Program Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit specifically addresses the selection and prioritisation of multiple programmes and projects which have been grouped to support an organisation's strategic portfolio. The allocation of programmes of work within a multi-project environment, governing, controlling and supporting the organisation's strategy, are considered. The aim is to formulate and manage the delivery of the portfolio of strategies using programme management. Students will learn and practice the issues to be considered in selecting an effective organisation portfolio and how to implement a Portfolio Management Framework. Also they will encounter the many conflicting issues facing Program Managers as they seek to implement organisation strategy through programs and learn how to balance these to obtain desired outcomes.
PMGT5883 Project Management Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Meeting Prohibitions: PMGT5892 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 6 credit point units PMGT5883 and PMGT5884 may be undertaken concurrently. Students must have a 75% average WAM and approval from the Program Director to be eligible to enrol in this unit. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
Project Management Thesis A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to Project Management. Students will work individually to plan and write reports.
Project Management Thesis can be spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Project Management Thesis A (PMGT5883) and Project Management Thesis B (PMGT5884). This particular unit of study, which must precede PMGT5884 Project Management Thesis B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete thesis project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT5884 Project Management Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: PMGT5892 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 6 credit point units PMGT5883 and PMGT5884 may be undertaken concurrently. Students must have a 75% average WAM and approval from the Program Director to be eligible to enrol in this unit. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
Project Management Thesis A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to Project Management. Students will work individually to plan and write reports.
Project Management Thesis can be spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Project Management Thesis A (PMGT5883) and Project Management Thesis B (PMGT5884). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with PMGT5883 Project Management Thesis A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete thesis project. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT5883 Project Management Thesis A.
PMGT5886 System Dynamics Modelling for PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mikhail Prokopenko Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Students should achieve an understanding of dynamical systems methods applied to complex adaptive systems (CAS). CAS is a new approach to engineering and management that studies and models how relationships between parts give rise to collective and dynamic system-level behaviours, for example, in communication and transport networks, megaprojects, social and eco-systems. Effectively implemented, the methods can dramatically improve a manager's effectiveness in today's complex and interconnected business world, by helping to predict and evaluate indirect effects of actions and policies. This course provides managers with many practical quantitative tools to enhance individual, team, and organisational learning, change, and performance.
PMGT5887 Computer Applications in PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Computer-Aided Project Management builds a bridge from the genesis of project management principles through today's software, developing a postmodern project management systems paradigm for the twenty-first century. Adopting a unique systems perspective that emphasises project coding--an essential skill in project database management--this course demonstrates what fundamental project management principles are, what they do, and how they work in the software environment. Addressing all phases of a project, it illustrates and expands theories through the use of realistic case studies and extensive exercises running on computers.
An important feature of systems project management, the use of scope and quality is also discussed.
By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to:
- Understand application-based introduction to effective systems and methods for project planning and control
- Understand essential knowledge to manage successfully and to create, use, and communicate PC-, Server-, Web-, and Internet-based project management information.
- Understand the use of structures such as PDS (Project Definition Structure), WBS (Work Breakdown Structure), OBS (Organizational Breakdown Structure), and Masterformat project coding for areas, functions, elements, phases, stages, packages, purchase orders, contracts, and human resources planning and scheduling by CPM (Critical Path Method) and PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) communicating with Gantt and bar charts and graphics such as S curves relating estimating and cost control from order-of-magnitude numbers to appropriation grade budgets.
- Understand how to apply project concepts from knowledge areas at an operational level using project-based software applications.
PMGT5888 Global Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This course has been designed to suggest the development of best practices in communication, collaboration and management across international borders. The objectives are to: Understand the challenges faced by a global program and project teams; and, Improve the overall skills and practices of global project managers that will lead international companies to achieve maturity in global project management. Topics include: Introduction to traditional, distributed, and virtual project work; Global projects and requirements; Organisational change and organisational theory; Cross-cultural collaboration; Global project leadership; Trust building and conflict resolution; Coaching over distance; Global communication and channels; Leading a global organisation; Implementing collaborative tools; and, Implementing a Global Project Management Framework.
PMGT5889 Integrated Cost and Scheduling Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study focuses on the integrated management of project scope, time and cost for effective control and delivery of projects. The scope of the subject matter includes delivering comprehensive theoretical knowledge and application skills in integrated management and control of cost and schedule in complex projects. By successful completion of this unit of study, students should achieve a clear understanding of the time and cost management and appropriate control measures in project development environments.
Students should be able to: Discuss the project management trade-offs on balancing the triple-constraint; Explain the integrated cost and schedule control processes; Construct work breakdown structure (WBS) using given project information; Discuss scope monitoring and change control system; Produce networks diagrams for project scheduling; Apply critical path analysis (CPA) in network scheduling; Apply critical chain method in project scheduling; Estimate the project cost and duration; Apply resource scheduling techniques; Construct a timephased budget plan; Discuss cost monitoring and control processes; Undertake earned value analysis (EVA); and Undertake integrated cost and schedule control processes using project management software (Microsoft Project or Primavera)By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to: Undertake WBS exercises, CPA, EVA and tradeoff analysis using the given project information; Explain how the components of time and cost management interrelate; Explain in depth why integrated cost and schedule management are important to project management; and Analyse a project situation that involves time and cost management issues and apply a solution(s)
PMGT5891 Project Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Gerard Mcgarry; Gerard Mcgarry Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6891 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit is delivered in multiple modes (online and weekly). Please ensure that the correct mode is selected before checking the detailed content. The aims of this course are to develop students' understanding and ability in applying project risk management skills in project environments. The course enables the students to apply best practice techniques and methods commonly used by industry in project risk management. The competencies developed through this unit cover and go beyond the competencies in Risk areas as outlined in the competency standards by the Australian Institute of Project Management and Project Management Institute in the USA, respectively. The unit aims to develop students ability to understand and conceptualise risk management issues, and analyse and apply risk management techniques using concepts and frameworks from the underpinning literature. - Ability to establish risk management plans, policies and integrate them with other project plans, organisation and align them to the business case - Ability to understand the sources of potential risks (including but not limited to political, organisational, psychological and technical risks) and to use risk management tools and techniques to identify, assess, evaluate, and prioritise risks - Ability to simulate the potential effects of risks on schedule, cost and other performance dimensions using sensitivity analysis, decision tree analysis and simulation techniques. - Ability to track, monitor and control risks and actions to achieve project objectives and the business case - Ability to close risks for an optimal outcome
PMGT5895 Contracts Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Natalie Perisa Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of this unit is the understanding of fundamental contracts as it relates to project management. The aim is that students are able to understand various contracts that are available and have the ability to select the right contract for a project. The unit aims to give an understanding of contract terms and conditions that may give rise to potential issues and methods to mitigate this. Given contracts are pivotal in a project manager's role the overall aim is for students to understand contracts better and have the confidence to use contracts in their day to day activities to avoid potential risks and conflicts. In addition it will assist students to have the ability to solve complex issues by being able to think critically and analyse issues.
Outcomes: Understanding the basis of contract management-including traditional and contemporary theories; Being able to identify contract terms that expose the project manager to risk; Gain confidence to be able to raise contract issues and negotiate terms.
PMGT5896 Sustainability and Intelligence in PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
In order to run projects successfully, project managers need to master more than the requisite technical knowledge. The more complex the project, the more significant interpersonal skills become to achieving a successful outcome. Without the people skills necessary to lead effectively, even the most carefully orchestrated project can quickly fall apart. Also, the concepts of sustainability and corporate responsibility are also gaining importance in our globalised economy and are having and increasing influence business and project objectives and it is becoming imperative that they are incorporated into the practice of project management.
This unit of study embraces this new reality by providing students with an expanded understanding of value creation and how this is delivered through projects. The emphasis is on using projects to deliver value in terms of economic capital whilst also developing social capital and preserving natural capital via the incorporation of sustainability principles into the practice of project management.
Students will be introduced to the sophisticated concepts of emotional intelligence, sustainability and knowledge management and apply these concepts via developing diagnostic frameworks; the preparation of recommendation reports; developing tailored project management deliverables; conducting research and analysis; and presenting on related topics.
Students will learn how to: Set the tone and direction for the project, communicate more effectively, improve listening skills, create a positive work environment, motivate, coach and mentor team members and productively handle stress, criticism and blame. And will also be given the opportunity to undertake a detailed self-development exercise with the aid of an assessment instrument and a professional coach
PMGT5897 Disaster Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack Session: Intensive July Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit identifies the causes of some well-known disasters (natural, man-made and projects) and reveals what can be learned by being able to think critically and analyse the issues. The aim of this unit is to outline traditional and contemporary theories in emergency response planning; to provide an overall scope of comprehensive emergency planning and the major elements that must be addressed in an Emergency Response Plan. Student outcomes from this unit include: Developing and implementing an Emergency Response Plan; Specific recommendations for the health and safety of emergency response personnel and provides concise information on learning objectives and a review of important concepts.
PMGT5898 Complex Project Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1 Classes: E-Learning, Workgroups Prohibitions: WORK6130 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit offers students an innovative way of looking at projects and programs and treating them as complex adaptive systems. Applying the principles of complexity and systems thinking assists project and program managers and leadership teams in formulating approaches to leadership of challenging and large-scale initiatives. The expected outcomes of this unit include development of: ability to diagnose complexity on a wide range of projects types; understanding of how systems thinking and complexity theories can be used to find new, creative ways to think about and lead complex projects and programs; ability to select and apply a range of systems thinking and management modelling tools and techniques to understanding, management and leadership of complex business problems; ability to reflect upon your own practice and develop self awareness as a key to leadership in the face of complexity.
PMGT6867 Quantitative Methods: Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Methods studied in this unit are used in a wide range of project management tasks and problems. The unit explains why and where particular methods are used and provides examples and opportunities to apply these methods in practice. This unit will also facilitate the understanding of the mechanics of these methods and their underlying theory.