Intelligent Information Engineering

Master of Engineering majoring in Intelligent Information Engineering

To qualify for the award of the Master of Engineering in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 72 credit points, including:
1. 24 credit points of Core units
2. 36 credit points of Specialist units
3. A minimum of 12 credit points of Research units
Candidates who have been granted 24 credit points of Reduced Volume Learning (RVL), must complete 48 credit points including:
1. A minimum of 12 credit points of Core units
2. A minimum of 24 credit points of Specialist units
3. A minimum of 12 credit points of Research units

Core units

ENGG5102 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5701 Assumed knowledge: Some limited industry experience is preferred but not essential. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce graduate engineering students from all disciplines to the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial thinking. Introduction to Entrepreneurship will offer the foundation for leaders of tomorrow's high-tech companies, by providing the knowledge and skills important to the creation and leadership of entrepreneurial ventures. The focus of the unit of study is on how to launch, lead and manage a viable business starting with concept validation to commercialisation and successful business formation.
The following topics are covered: Entrepreneurship: Turning Ideas into Reality, Building the Business Plan, Creating a Successful Financial Plan, Project planning and resource management, Budgeting and managing cash flow, Marketing and advertising strategies, E-Commerce and Entrepreneurship, Procurement Management Strategies, The Legal Environment: Business Law and Government Regulation, Intellectual property: inventions, patents and copyright, Workplace, workforce and employment topics, Conflict resolution and working relationships, Ethics and Social Responsibility.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Maria Tomc Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prohibitions: PMGT6871 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Project Management processes are what moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. This course takes the project manager from a detailed understanding of process modelling through to the development and implementation of management processes applicable to various project types and industries and covers approaches to reviewing, monitoring and improving these processes. Specifically, the UoS aims to develop understanding of the nature and purpose of project management in the context of economic enterprise; develop knowledge of various models and frameworks for the practical application of project management; and explore core elements of effective project management with particular focus on technological development and innovation

Specialist Elective units

ELEC5304 Intelligent Visual Signal Understanding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wanli Ouyang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g. probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: through semester assessment (30%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces basic and advanced concepts and methodologies in image processing and computer vision. This course mainly focuses on image processing and analysis methods as well as intelligent systems for processing and understanding multidimensional signals such as images, which include basic topics like multidimensional signal processing fundamentals and advanced topics like visual feature extraction and image classification as well as their applications for face recognition and object/scene recognition. It mainly covers the following areas: multidimensional signal processing fundamentals, image enhancement in the spatial domain and frequency domain, edge processing and region processing, imaging geometry and 3D stereo vision, object recognition and face recognition.
ELEC5305 Acoustics, Speech and Signal Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Craig Jin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project work Assumed knowledge: (ELEC2302 OR ELEC9302) AND (ELEC3305 OR ELEC9305). Linear algebra, fundamental concepts of signals and systems as covered in ELEC2302/ELEC9302, fundamental concepts of digital signal processing as covered in ELEC3305/9305. It would be unwise to attempt this unit without the assumed knowledge- if you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: through semester assessment (75%) and final exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course is designed to meet the needs of the increasing demand for advanced signal processing in the areas of acoustics and speech, biology and medicine, sonar and radar, communication and networks. Modern systems typically incorporate large sensor arrays, multiple channels of information, and complex networks. The course will cover topics in compressed sensing, multiresolution analysis, array signal processing, and adaptive processing such as kernel recursive least squares. The course will develop concrete examples in areas such as microphone arrays and soundfield analyses, medical signal processing, tomography, synthetic aperture radar and speech and audio. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in sensor arrays, wearable medical systems, communication systems, and adaptive processing for complex financial, power, and network systems. The Defense, Science, and Technology Organisation will contribute to this course with teaching support and data.
ELEC5306 Video Intelligence and Compression

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wanli Ouyang Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Assumed knowledge: Basic understanding of digital signal processing (filtering, DFT) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces digital image and video compression algorithms and standards. This course mainly focuses on fundamental and advanced methods for digital video compression. It covers the following areas: digital video fundamentals, digital image and video compression standards, and video codec optimization.
ELEC5307 Advanced Signal Processing with Deep Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, laboratories Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g., probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces deep learning for a broad range of multi-dimensional signal processing applications. It covers deep learning technologies for image super-resolution and restoration, image categorization, object localization, image segmentation, face recognition, person detection and re-identification, human pose estimation, action recognition, object tracking as well as image and video captioning.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Liwei Li Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5517 Software Defined Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce an emerging networking paradigm- Software Defined Networks (SDNs). By separating the control logics from the physical networks, the software defined networks allow an automated and programmable software program to logically control and manage the network. This unit introduces the basic principles of software defined networks, its architecture, abstraction, SDN programming, programmable control plane and data plane protocols, network update, network virtualisation, traffic management as well as its applications and implementations. Student will learn and practice SDN programming, testing and debugging on SDNs platforms through experiments and group projects. It is assumed that the students have some knowledge on data communications and networks.
ELEC5622 Signals, Software and Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing systems that use sensor data, such as those from physiology and activity tracking, often combined with patients self-reports. As sensing devices become ubiquitous, data processing, storage and visualisation techniques are becoming part of all health systems, both institutionalised and individually driven.
The unit is related to, but distinct, to health informatics- an area that focuses on the the use of computing to deliver cost efficient healthcare and the area of bioinformatics, that explores the role of computing in understanding biology at the cellular level (e. g. genome). This unit focuses on the technical and non-technical problems of developing increasingly ubiquitous devices and systems that can be used for personal and clinical monitoring.
ELEC5701 Technology Venture Creation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workgroups Prohibitions: ENGG5102 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study prepares graduating students with insight and skills in how to turn a concept into a high technology startup company. The class will provide students with knowledge, practical experience and frameworks to assist in evaluating the market for a technology product or service, the design and viability of business models around it, the formulation of a funding-reading business plan and financials, capital raising options and process, venture capital, building distribution channels, intellectual property protection, putting together an A-grade management team, term sheets and funding documentation, technology sales models and going global. We will look at real world case studies of successful technology companies (and flame outs). Does Twitter have a viable business model? Will Facebook eat its lunch? Is YouTube just burning cash? Will Google rule the world?
During the period of the course, students will form teams and write a business plan around a concept they propose. Each student will assume a role in the team (CEO, CTO, CFO, VP Sales and Marketing). The plan will be judged by a panel of real world venture capitalists, entrepreneurs and angel investors to determine the final grade for the course.
Be warned that a serious commitment will be required in developing the concept into a viable business plan. The outcome, however, will be very rewarding to those students interested in starting the next Google.
This course is taught by instructors experienced in technology startups and venture capital. The course will include a number of guest lectures by industry.
Exchange units may be taken as Specialist units with the approval of the Program Director.

Research units

ELEC5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Corequisites: ELEC5020 Prohibitions: ELEC5022 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70 or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: ELEC5021 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results, and Capstone Project B extended allows the student to investigate a topic of greater depth and scope.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
ELEC5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ENGG5223 or ENGG5222 or ELEC8902 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
ELEC5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ELEC8902 or ENGG5222 or ENGG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
With permission from the Program Director students progressing with distinction (75%) average or higher results may replace ELEC5020, ELEC5021 and 12 credit points of electives with ELEC5222 & ELEC5223 Dissertation A & B.
A candidate who has been granted RVL and who is eligible to undertake the extended capstone project or dissertation may be granted exemption of up to 12 credit points of specialist units.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).