Power Engineering

Master of Engineering majoring in Power Engineering

To qualify for the award of the Master of Engineering in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 72 credit points, including core and elective units of study as listed below.
Candidates with a Bachelor of Engineering Honours or equivalent in the relevant discipline, and who have reached the required level of academic achievement in their prior degree, may be eligible for a reduction of volume in learning of up to 24 credit points.

Core units

Candidates must complete 24 credit points of Core units.
Where Reduced Volume Learning has been granted candidates must complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Core units.
ENGG5102 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5701 Assumed knowledge: Some limited industry experience is preferred but not essential. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce graduate engineering students from all disciplines to the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial thinking. Introduction to Entrepreneurship will offer the foundation for leaders of tomorrow's high-tech companies, by providing the knowledge and skills important to the creation and leadership of entrepreneurial ventures. The focus of the unit of study is on how to launch, lead and manage a viable business starting with concept validation to commercialisation and successful business formation.
The following topics are covered: Entrepreneurship: Turning Ideas into Reality, Building the Business Plan, Creating a Successful Financial Plan, Project planning and resource management, Budgeting and managing cash flow, Marketing and advertising strategies, E-Commerce and Entrepreneurship, Procurement Management Strategies, The Legal Environment: Business Law and Government Regulation, Intellectual property: inventions, patents and copyright, Workplace, workforce and employment topics, Conflict resolution and working relationships, Ethics and Social Responsibility.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online, Block mode
Project Management processes are what moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. This course takes the project manager from a detailed understanding of process modelling through to the development and implementation of management processes applicable to various project types and industries and covers approaches to reviewing, monitoring and improving these processes. Specifically, the UoS aims to develop understanding of the nature and purpose of project management in the context of economic enterprise; develop knowledge of various models and frameworks for the practical application of project management; and explore core elements of effective project management with particular focus on technological development and innovation

Specialist units

Candidates must complete 24 credit points of Specialist units, but may take additional units as Electives.
Where Reduced Volume Learning has been granted candidates must complete a minimum of 24 credit points of Specialist units.
Exchange units may be taken as Specialist units with the approval of the Program Director.
ELEC5203 Topics in Power Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 Power Engineering and ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Drives.Familiarity with basic mathematics and physics; competence with basic circuit theory and understanding of electricity grid equipment such as transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling; and fundamentals of power electronic technologies. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an in depth understanding of modern power electronic equipment supporting the intelligent grid of the future and the associated electronic control. Electronic power systems rely on a complex system of methods and equipment for controlling the voltage levels and for maintaining the stability and security of the supply. It covers recent findings in the fundamental theory and the massive change of modern power electronic equipment and methods supporting the electricity grids. It also looks at the huge influence of computer-aided analysis of electric power systems and the effects of the deregulation of the industry.
The specific topics covered are as follows: Introduction to power electronic systems and applications in the electrical grid, power semiconductors, reactive power control in power systems, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), high-voltage direct-current transmission (HVDC), static reactive power compensator, dynamic voltage restorer, unified-power flow controller, line-commutated converters, thyristor-controlled equipment, phase-angle regulators, voltage-source converter based power electronic equipment, harmonics, power quality, passive and active filters, distributed generation, grid-interconnection of renewable energy sources, intelligent grid technologies.
ELEC5204 Power Systems Analysis and Protection

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734) Assumed knowledge: The unit assumes basic knowledge of circuits, familiarity with basic mathematics, competence with basic circuit theory and an understanding of three phase systems, transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling and operation of such equipment. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the basis for the analysis of electricity grids using symmetrical components theory. Such analysis theory is the basis for the understanding of electrical faults and the design of protection strategies to safeguard the electrical equipment, and maintain safety of the plant at the highest possible level.
The following specific topics are covered: The types and causes of power system faults; balanced faults and short circuit levels; an introduction to fault current transients in machines; symmetric components, sequence impedances and networks; the analysis of unsymmetrical faults. Review of the impact of faults on power system behaviour; issues affecting protection scheme characteristics and clearance times; the security and reliability of protection schemes; the need for protection redundancy and its implementation as local or remote backup; zones of protection and the need for zones to overlap; the analysis and application of over-current and distance relay protection schemes with particular reference to the protection of transmission lines.
ELEC5205 High Voltage Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734) Assumed knowledge: The following previous knowledge is assumed for this unit. Circuit analysis techniques, electricity networks, power system fundamentals. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides advanced knowledge associated with high voltage engineering methods, techniques and equipment. It is divided into two sections. The first section presents fundamentals of the failure mechanisms of solid, liquid and gaseous insulation at high voltages. It also discusses consequent design principles for high-voltage equipment; of the generation of high direct, alternating and impulse voltages for testing high-voltage equipment; and of methods for monitoring and assessing the condition of high-voltage equipment such as dissolved gas analysis for oil-filled transformers and partial discharge in cables. The second section presents in detail all the high-voltage equipment and in particular underground cables, overhead transmission lines, transformers, bushings and switchgear. It finally offers asset management solutions for modern transmission and distribution electricity networks.
ELEC5206 Sustainable Energy Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit of study: familiarity with transformers, ac power, capacitors and inductors, electric circuits such as three-phase circuits and circuits with switches, and basic electronic circuit theory. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit builds upon the knowledge of engineering mathematics, electronic devices and circuit theory and simulation techniques. It deals with both technical and business aspects of sustainable electrical energy systems. In technical aspect, it focuses on energy conversion and electrical characteristics of different renewable energy sources and integration of multiple energy sources into power system both at distribution and transmission levels. In business aspect, it focuses on economical, marketing and political aspects of installing and managing sustainable electrical energy systems in present and future society. It lays a solid foundation of practical and managerial skills on electronics and electrical (power) engineering and later studies such as intelligent electricity networks and advanced energy conversion and power systems. The following topics are covered: modern power systems; distributed generation; co-generation; tri-generation; microturbines; fuel cells; renewable energy sources: solar, wind, hydro, biomass, wind turbines; photovoltaic; grid-connected power systems; stand-alone power systems.
ELEC5207 Advanced Power Conversion Technologies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorias, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: ELEC3204 Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to cover advanced topics in power electronics and it applications. In particular, the power electronics interface design and implementation for microgrid, smart grids and modern power systems which have received tremendous attention in recent years. Many countries including Australia are developing different power electronics technologies such as integrating renewable energy sources into the grid, managing charging and discharging of high power energy storage system, controlling the reactive power of power electronics interfaces for grid stability, and adding communication capability to power electronics interfaces for smart meter implementation. The unit assumes prior fundamental knowledge of power electronics systems and applications, including the ability to analyse basic power converters for all four conversions (ac-ac, ac-dc, dc-ac, and ac-dc), and design and implement various applications, such as motor drive and battery charger, with the consideration of electrical characteristics of semiconductors and passive elements. This unit will cover advanced technologies on power electronics interfaces for smart grids and microgrid implementation, which include dynamic voltage restorer, active power filter, reactive power compensation, energy storage management, hybrid energy sources optimisation, multilevel inverter and control, D-STATCOM, etc. To analyse these advanced power conversion systems, some analytical techniques will be introduced. This includes resonant converters, soft-switching technique, ac equivalent circuit modeling, converter control and input/output filter design.
ELEC5208 Intelligent Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Electricity Networks, Control Systems and Telecommunications Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an introduction to the planning and operation of modern electricity grids, also known as "smart" grids. Traditional power networks featured a small number of large base-load plants sending power out over transmission lines to be distributed in radial lower voltage networks to loads. In response to the need to reduce carbon impact, future networks will feature diverse generation scattered all over the network including at distribution levels. Also there will be new loads such as electric vehicles and technologies including energy storage and lower voltage power flow control devices. The operation of these new networks will be possible by much greater use of information and communication technology (ICT) and control over the information networks.
The unit will cover recent relevant developments in energy technologies as well as important components of 'smart grids' such as supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), substation automation, remote terminal units (RTU), sensors and intelligent electronic devices (IED). Operation of these electricity grids requires a huge amount of data gathering, communication and information processing. The unit will discuss many emerging technologies for such data, information, knowledge and decision processes including communication protocols and network layouts, networking middleware and coordinated control. Information systems and data gathering will be used to assess key performance and security indicators associated with the operation of such grids including stability, reliability and power quality.
ELEC5211 Power System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is a deep understanding on circuit analysis and its applications in power system steady state analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit deals with power systems modelling, analysis and simulation under dynamic conditions.
The unit will cover the following topics: The links between power system steady state analysis and transient analysis; Basics of dynamic system in general and stability analysis methods; Analysis of power systems subject to electromagnetic and electromechanical transients. Power system modelling for stability analysis and electromagnetic transients analysis: Synchronous machine modelling using Park's transformation; Modelling of excitation systems and turbine governors; Modelling of the transmission system; Load modelling. Simulation of interconnected multi-machine systems; Stability analysis- Transient stability, Small signal stability, Voltage stability; Power system control: Voltage control, Power system transient stability control, Power system dynamic stability control, Emergency control; The unit is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power and Electrical) and ME (Power and Electrical). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power).
ELEC5212 Power System Planning and Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC3203 or ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is power system steady state analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Deregulation of the electricity industry has fundamentally changed the power systems operation paradigm. The focus has shifted from central planning of vertically integrated utilities to market driven operation. Traditional electric energy producers and consumers play new roles in a power market environment and their behaviors are affected by the economic incentives to a large extent. Nevertheless, electric energy is a special commodity and cannot be traded as the other common goods. So a power market design has many special considerations compared with a conventional commercial market design. Knowledge of the power market mechanisms has become a necessary part in fully understanding the whole power system operations. To equip students with necessary skills to address the challenges of modern power systems, the unit will cover the following topics:
-Overview of the traditional electricity industry structure and operation: Economic dispatch, Power system operation states and respective reliability requirements.
-Drivers for the restructuring of the electricity industry.
-Electricity market design: Market structures (spot, bilateral, hybrid); Energy market; Ancillary services market; Key components in an electricity market.
-Electricity market participants and their roles in a market.
-Electricity economics: Power market from suppliers' view (Supply curve) and from demands' view (Demand curve); Market mechanism; Price and its elasticity; Cost and supply; Market power and monopoly.
-Cost of capital: Time value of money; Project evaluation methods from investments' point of view; Risk and return.
-Operation mechanisms of various designs of power markets.
-Power market practices around the world.
-Power system expansion planning: Fundamental knowledge of power system planning considerations, procedures and methods; Transmission planning; Generation planning; Power system adequacy assessment.
ELEC5212 is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power) and ME (Electrical and Power). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power). This unit focuses on the power market principles and practices. Based on the knowledge of the power market operation, the power system planning procedures and methods will also be discussed.

Research units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points from the following units:
ELEC5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Corequisites: ELEC5020 Prohibitions: ELEC5022 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70, or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: ELEC5021 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results, and Capstone Project B extended allows the student to investigate a topic of greater depth and scope.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
ELEC5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ENGG5223 or ENGG5222 or ELEC8902 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
ELEC5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ELEC8902 or ENGG5222 or ENGG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
With permission from the Program Director candidates progressing with distinction (75%) average or higher results may replace ELEC5020, ELEC5021 and 12 credit points of electives with ELEC5222 & ELEC5223 Dissertation A & B.
A candidate who has been granted RVL and who is eligible to undertake the extended capstone project or dissertation may be granted exemption of up to 12 credit points of specialist units.

Elective units

Candidates may complete a maximum of 12 credit points from the following units:
Specialist units may also be taken as Elective units. Other Postgraduate units in the Faculty may be taken as Elective units with the approval of the Program Director.
Electives may be approved for candidates who have been granted RVL with the approval of the Program Director.
COMP5047 Pervasive Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Studio class Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601 AND (COMP2129 OR COMP2017). Background in programming and operating systems that is sufficient for the student to independently learn new programming tools from standard online technical materials. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is an advanced course on Pervasive Computing, with a focus on the "Internet of Things" (IoT). It introduces the key aspects of the IoT and explores these in terms of the new research towards creating user interfaces that disappear into the environment and are available pervasively, for example in homes, workplaces, cars and carried.
COMP5416 Advanced Network Technologies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 OR ELEC5740 OR COMP5116 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit introduces networking concepts beyond the best effort service of the core TCP/IP protocol suite. Understanding of the fundamental issues in building an integrated multi-service network for global Internet services, taking into account service objectives, application characteristics and needs and network mechanisms will be discussed. Enables students to understand the core issues and be aware of proposed solutions so they can actively follow and participate in the development of the Internet beyond the basic bit transport service.
COMP5426 Parallel and Distributed Computing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is intended to introduce and motivate the study of high performance computer systems. The student will be presented with the foundational concepts pertaining to the different types and classes of high performance computers. The student will be exposed to the description of the technological context of current high performance computer systems. Students will gain skills in evaluating, experimenting with, and optimising the performance of high performance computers. The unit also provides students with the ability to undertake more advanced topics and courses on high performance computing.
ELEC5507 Error Control Coding

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Fundamental mathematics including probability theory and linear algebra. Basic knowledge on digital communications. Basic MATLAB programming skills is desired. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit deals with the principles of error control coding techniques and their applications in various communication and data storage systems. Its aim is to present the fundamentals of error control coding techniques and develop theoretical and practical skills in the design of error control encoders/decoders. Successful completion of this unit will facilitate progression to advanced study or to work in the fields of telecommunications and computer engineering. It is assumed that the students have some background in communications principles and probability theory.
The following topics are covered: Introduction to error control coding, Linear algebra, Linear block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Solomon codes, Applications of block codes in communications, Convolutional codes, Viterbi algorithm, Applications of convolutional codes in communications, Soft decision decoding of block and convolutional codes, LDPC codes, Turbo codes, MIMO and rateless codes.
ELEC5508 Wireless Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge in probability and statistics, analog and digital communications, error probability calculation in communications channels, and telecommunications network. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the key ideas in modern wireless telecommunications networks. It will address both physical layer issues such as propagation and modulation, plus network layer issues such as capacity, radio resource management and mobility management issues.
The following topics are covered. Wireless channel: Multipath fading, frequency selective fading, Doppler spread, statistical models, diversity, GSM, OFDM. Capacity and Interference: Cell types, coverage, frequency reuse, interference management, SIMO, MISO, multiuser diversity, CDMA, OFDMA, beamforming, superposition coding. MIMO: SVD, waterfilling, beamforming, V-BLAST, SIC, MMSE, Power Allocation. LTE/LTE-Advanced: Uplink-downlink channels, control signals, data transmission, spatial multiplexing, CoMP, spectrum reuse, heterogeneous networks, inter-cell interference coordination, carrier aggregation. Queueing theory: basic models, queueing systems, waiting time, delay, queue length, priority queues, wireless network virtualization (WNV) queues.
ELEC5509 Mobile Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: ELEC3505 AND ELEC3506. Basically, students need to know the concepts of data communications and mobile communications, which could be gained in one the following units of study: ELEC3505 Communications, ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet, or similar units. If you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study serves as an introduction to communications network research. The unit relies on a solid understanding of data communications and mobile networks. It introduces some of the currently most debated research topics in mobile networking and presents an overview of different technical solutions. Students are expected to critically evaluate these solutions in their context and produce an objective analysis of the advantages/disadvantages of the different research proposals. The general areas covered are wireless Internet, mobility management, quality of service in mobile and IP networks, ad hoc networks, and cellular network architectures.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to wireless and mobile Internet. Wireless cellular data networks. Cellular mobile networks. Mobile networks of the future. Quality of service in a mobile environment. Traffic modelling for wireless Internet. Traffic management for wireless Internet. Mobility management in mobile networks. Transport protocols for mobile networks. Internet protocols for mobile networks.
ELEC5510 Satellite Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Site Visit, Project Work - own time, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of error probabilities, analog and digital modulation techniques and error performance evaluation studied in ELEC3505 Communications and ELEC4505 Digital Communication Systems, is assumed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Satellite communication systems provide fixed and mobile communication services over very large areas of land, sea and air. This unit presents the fundamental knowledge and skills in the analysis and design of such systems. It introduces students to the broad spectrum of satellite communications and its position in the entire telecommunications network; helps students to develop awareness of the key factors affecting a good satellite communications system and theoretical and practical skills in the design of a satellite communications link.
Topic areas include: satellite communication link design; propagation effects and their impact on satellite performance; satellite antennas; digital modem design, speech codec design; error control for digital satellite links.
ELEC5511 Optical Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3405 OR ELEC9405) AND (ELEC3505 OR ELEC9505). Basic knowledge of communications, electronics and photonics Assessment: Through semester assessment (25%) and Final Exam (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: -
Optical telecommunications has revolutionized the way we receive information and communicate with one another. This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of optical fibre communication systems. It commences with a description of optical fibre propagation characteristics and transmission properties. We will then consider light sources and the fundamental principles of laser action in semiconductor and other lasers including quantum well lasers, tunable lasers and fibre lasers, and also the characteristics of optical transmitters based on semiconductor and electro-optic modulation techniques. The characteristics of optical amplifiers will also be discussed. On the receiver side, the principles of photodetection and optical receiver sensitivity will be presented. Other aspects such as fibre devices and multiple wavelength division multiplexing techniques will also be discussed. Finally, the complete optical fibre communication system will be studied to enable the design of data transmission optical systems, local area networks and multi-channel optical systems.
ELEC5512 Optical Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of digital communications, wave propagation, and fundamental optics Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds upon the fundamentals of optical communication introduced in ELEC3405 (Communications Electronics and Photonics). It focuses on photonic network architectures and protocols, network design, enabling technologies and the drivers for intelligent optical network.
Students will learn how to analyse and design optical networks and optical components.
Introduction, photonic network architectures: point to point, star, ring, mesh; system principles: modulation formats, link budgets, optical signal to noise ratio, dispersion, error rates, optical gain and regeneration; wavelength division multiplexed networks; WDM components: optical filters, gratings, multiplexers, demultiplexers, wavelength routers, optical crossconnects, wavelength converters, WDM transmitters and receivers; Wavelength switched/routed networks, ultra high speed TDM, dispersion managed links, soliton systems; broadcast and distribution networks, multiple access, subcarrier multiplexed lightwave video networks, optical local area and metropolitan area networks; protocols for photonic networks: IP, Gbit Ethernet, SDH/SONET, FDDI, ATM, Fibre Channel.
ELEC5514 Networked Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC5509 Assumed knowledge: ELEC3305 AND ELEC3506 AND ELEC3607 AND ELEC5508 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aim to teach the fundamentals concepts associated with: Networked Embedded Systems, wireless sensor networks; Wireless channel propagation and radio power consumption; Wireless networks, ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc. ; Sensor principle, data fusion, source detection and identification; Multiple source detection, multiple access communications; Network topology, routing, network information theory; Distributed source channel coding for sensor networks; Power-aware and energy-aware communication protocols; Distributed embedded systems problems such as time synchronization and node localisation; Exposure to several recently developed solutions to address problems in wireless sensor networks and ubiquitous computing giving them a well-rounded view of the state-of the-art in the networked embedded systems field.
Student involvement with projects will expose them to the usage of simulators and/or programming some types of networked embedded systems platforms.
Ability to identify the main issues and trade-offs in networked embedded systems; Understanding of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area; Based on the above understanding, ability to analyse requirements and devise first-order solutions for particular networked embedded systems problems; Familiarisation with a simulator platform and real hardware platforms for network embedded systems through the students involvement in projects.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5616 Computer and Network Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.
ELEC5618 Software Quality Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Writing programs with multiple functions or methods in multiple files; design of complex data structures and combination in non trivial algorithms; use of an integrated development environment; software version control systems. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover software quality planning, validation and verification methods and techniques, risk analysis, software review techniques, software standards and software process improvement and software reliability.
Students who successfully complete this unit will understand the fundamental concepts of software quality engineering and be able to define software quality requirements, assess the quality of a software design, explain specific methods of building software quality, understand software reliability models and metrics, develop a software quality plan, understand quality assurance and control activities and techniques, understand various testing techniques including being able to verify and test a unit of code and comprehend ISO standards, SPICE, CMM and CMMI.
ELEC5619 Object Oriented Application Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Java programming, and some web development experience are essential. Databases strongly recommended Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing large Internet systems by using and building application frameworks. Frameworks allow great reuse so developers do not have to design and implement applications from scratch, as students have done in ELEC3610 The unit lays down the basic concepts and hands on experience on the design and development of enterprise systems, emphasizing the development of systems using design patterns and application frameworks.
A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. Several development Java frameworks will be used, including Spring, Hibernate, and others. Principles of design patterns will also be studied.
ELEC5620 Model Based Software Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Model-Based Software Engineering focuses on modern software engineering methods, technologies, and processes used in professional development projects. It covers both the pragmatic engineering elements and the underlying theory of the model-based approach to the analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of complex software-intensive systems.
Students will participate in a group project, which will entail developing and/or evolving a software system, following a full development cycle from requirements specification through to implementation and testing using up-to-date industrial development tools and processes. At the end of the course they will provide a presentation and demonstration of their project work to the class. There is no formal teaching of a programming language in this unit, although students will be expected to demonstrate through their project work their general software engineering and architectural skills as well as their mastery of model-based methods and technologies.
Students successfully completing this unit will have a strong practical and theoretical understanding of the modern software development cycle as applied in industrial settings. In particular, they will be familiar with the latest model-based software engineering approaches necessary for successfully dealing with today's highly complex and challenging software systems.
The pedagogic grounds for this course and its focus on model-based approaches are to arm new software engineers with skills and perspectives that extend beyond the level of basic programming. Such skills are essential to success in software development nowadays, and are in great demand but very low supply. The dearth of such expertise is one of the key reasons behind the alarmingly high failure rate of industrial software projects (currently estimated at being greater than 40%). Therefore, this unit complements SQE and strengthens a key area in the program.
ELEC5622 Signals, Software and Health

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing systems that use sensor data, such as those from physiology and activity tracking, often combined with patients self-reports. As sensing devices become ubiquitous, data processing, storage and visualisation techniques are becoming part of all health systems, both institutionalised and individually driven.
The unit is related to, but distinct, to health informatics- an area that focuses on the the use of computing to deliver cost efficient healthcare and the area of bioinformatics, that explores the role of computing in understanding biology at the cellular level (e. g. genome). This unit focuses on the technical and non-technical problems of developing increasingly ubiquitous devices and systems that can be used for personal and clinical monitoring.
ELEC6901 Electrical Exchange Unit 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one quarter of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6902 Electrical Exchange Unit 1B

Credit points: 12 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one half of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6903 Electrical Exchange Unit 1C

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6904 Electrical Exchange Unit 2A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one quarter of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6905 Electrical Exchange Unit 2B

Credit points: 12 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one half of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6906 Electrical Exchange Unit 2C

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).