Risk Management

Master of Engineering majoring in Risk Management

To qualify for the award of the Master of Engineering in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 72 credit points, including:
1. 24 credit points of Core units
2. 24 credit points of Specialist units
3. A minimum of 12 credit points of Research units
4. A maximum of 12 credit points of Elective units
Candidates who have been granted 24 credit points of Reduced Volume Learning (RVL), must complete 48 credit points including:
1. A minimum of 12 credit points of Core units
2. A minimum of 24 credit points of Specialist units
3. A minimum of 12 credit points of Research units
-- Elective units are not available for candidates with RVL

Core units

ENGG5102 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5701 Assumed knowledge: Some limited industry experience is preferred but not essential. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce graduate engineering students from all disciplines to the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial thinking. Introduction to Entrepreneurship will offer the foundation for leaders of tomorrow's high-tech companies, by providing the knowledge and skills important to the creation and leadership of entrepreneurial ventures. The focus of the unit of study is on how to launch, lead and manage a viable business starting with concept validation to commercialisation and successful business formation.
The following topics are covered: Entrepreneurship: Turning Ideas into Reality, Building the Business Plan, Creating a Successful Financial Plan, Project planning and resource management, Budgeting and managing cash flow, Marketing and advertising strategies, E-Commerce and Entrepreneurship, Procurement Management Strategies, The Legal Environment: Business Law and Government Regulation, Intellectual property: inventions, patents and copyright, Workplace, workforce and employment topics, Conflict resolution and working relationships, Ethics and Social Responsibility.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Maria Tomc Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prohibitions: PMGT6871 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Project Management processes are what moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. This course takes the project manager from a detailed understanding of process modelling through to the development and implementation of management processes applicable to various project types and industries and covers approaches to reviewing, monitoring and improving these processes. Specifically, the UoS aims to develop understanding of the nature and purpose of project management in the context of economic enterprise; develop knowledge of various models and frameworks for the practical application of project management; and explore core elements of effective project management with particular focus on technological development and innovation

Specialist units

AMME5104 Applied Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning Prerequisites: ENGG5103. Knowledge of basic safety systems. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
AMME5104 aims to extend the knowledge and skills of students who have completed the prerequisite unit of study, "ENGG5103 - Safety Systems and Risk Analysis"; building on the foundation material introduced in that unit of study. The effective management of workplace safety systems using Australian/New Zealand standards AS/NZS 4801/4804 is discussed and applied to typical engineering scenarios; some common international approaches and systems are also covered, though to a smaller extent. Processes and procedures related to the creation of risk assessments and analyses are explored, as related to common engineering disciplines. Systems and processes used to perform Hazard and Operability (Hazop) studies are introduced, alongside computational probability based risk quantification procedures. Methods to audit and monitor the performance of safety management systems are discussed, with a focus on the use of lead indicators. Various incident investigation techniques are examined, in conjunction with safety auditing systems. The classification and management of hazardous materials is addressed, with reference to legislative requirements. The importance of a positive workplace safety culture, and issues related to human factors in safety management are also studied and techniques to promote a strong safety culture explored. The unit of study incorporates the use of various real world case studies, from a variety of different engineering disciplines.
AMME5105 Risk Management Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workgroup Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Syllabus covers methods involved in quantifying and measuring risk. Risk measurement techniques; Risk factors; Linear and nonlinear risks; Volatility; Scenario analysis; Stress testing; Value at risk (VAR) frameworks and their limitations. Comparison will be made to real word outcomes using case studies. The handling of "unknown unknowns" and how to incorporate these into a risk analysis will be investigated. An introduction to common financial instruments will be presented.
CHNG9306 Risk Management for Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Wang Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: CHNG3806 OR CHNG5806 Assumed knowledge: CHNG9201 and CHNG9202 and CHNG9203 and CHNG9204and CHNG9206. Mass and energy balances, physical chemistry, physics. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop an appreciation of project and risk management practice of process systems for chemical and process engineering. It employs a holistic approach to management covering vital concepts in project management, technical risk assessment and decision making, economic evaluation and financial risk assessment, and project design optimization.
It provides students with the experience and working knowledge to solve real world engineering problems in process-led and product-driven industries.
By the end of this unit of study a student should be competent in: preparing a resume for use in employment applications; developing project work plans in conjunction with project management schedules; performing economic evaluations of projects, plans and processes; performing qualitative and quantitative risk assessments of projects, plans and processes; exploring optimization of complex processes under risk and uncertainty, covering unit operations, business units, enterprises and value chains.
PMGT5891 Project Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Gerard Mcgarry; Gerard Mcgarry Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6891 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit is delivered in multiple modes (online and weekly). Please ensure that the correct mode is selected before checking the detailed content. The aims of this course are to develop students' understanding and ability in applying project risk management skills in project environments. The course enables the students to apply best practice techniques and methods commonly used by industry in project risk management. The competencies developed through this unit cover and go beyond the competencies in Risk areas as outlined in the competency standards by the Australian Institute of Project Management and Project Management Institute in the USA, respectively. The unit aims to develop students ability to understand and conceptualise risk management issues, and analyse and apply risk management techniques using concepts and frameworks from the underpinning literature. - Ability to establish risk management plans, policies and integrate them with other project plans, organisation and align them to the business case - Ability to understand the sources of potential risks (including but not limited to political, organisational, psychological and technical risks) and to use risk management tools and techniques to identify, assess, evaluate, and prioritise risks - Ability to simulate the potential effects of risks on schedule, cost and other performance dimensions using sensitivity analysis, decision tree analysis and simulation techniques. - Ability to track, monitor and control risks and actions to achieve project objectives and the business case - Ability to close risks for an optimal outcome
Exchange units may be taken as Specialist units with the approval of the Program Director.

Research units

AMME5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR AMME5010 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 96 credit points from the MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 credit points from the ME degree program (including any credit for prior study) Prohibitions: AMME5022 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR AMME5010 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70 or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: AMME5021 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have acieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.
AMME5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have acieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.
With permission from the Program Director students progressing with distinction (75%) average or higher results may replace AMME5020, AMME5021 and 12 credit points of electives with AMME5222 & AMME5223 Dissertation A & B.
A candidate who has been granted RVL and who is eligible to undertake the extended capstone project or dissertation may be granted exemption of up to 12 credit points of specialist units.

Elective units

Specialist units may also be taken as Elective units. Other Postgraduate units in the Faculty may be taken as Elective units with the approval of the Program Director.
AERO5200 Advanced Aerodynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gareth Vio Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AERO9260 or AERO8260 or AERO3260 Assumed knowledge: BE in the area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering field. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Objectives/Expected Outcomes: To develop a specialist knowledge in the fields of computational, non-linear and unsteady aerodynamics. The develop familiarity with the techniques for predicting airflow/structure interactions for aerospace vehicles.
Syllabus Summary: Advanced two and three dimensional panel method techniques; calculation of oscillatory flow results; prediction of aerodynamic derivatives. Pressure distributions for complete aircraft configuration. Unsteady subsonic flow analysis of aircraft; calculation of structural modes. Structural response to gusts; aeroelasticity; flutter and divergence. Solution of aerospace flow problems using finite element methods. Unsteady supersonic one-dimensional flow. Hypersonic flow; real gas effects. Introduction to the use of CFD for transonic flow.
AERO5400 Advanced Aircraft Design Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kc Wong Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Lectures, Meetings Prerequisites: AERO3460 or AERO9460 or AERO8460 Prohibitions: AERO4491 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate level 1, 2 and 3 or Foundation Masters units in Aerospace Design are expected to have been completed before undertaking this unit. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide familiarity and understanding with practical aircraft design processes expected in industry, including the evaluation and case studies of existing aircraft designs. Students will gain a better understanding of relevant issues particularly related to the design of aircraft with a level of confidence to lead them to develop new designs or modifications, having a good balance between theory and real-world applications. Good familiarity with unique and stringent international aviation regulations and certification processes will be expected with respect to the design of aircraft. Topics covered by the lectures will include aircraft specifications; aircraft selection and evaluation; aircraft configuration design; design considerations for aerodynamics, structures, systems, manufacture, testing, certification, life-cycle-cost, operations; the use of computational aircraft design tools, in particular DARcorp's Advanced Aircraft Analysis (AAA); and introduction to multidisciplinary design optimisation methods. Projects will be based on case study analyses and evaluation of aircraft types to operational specifications and requirements.
AERO5500 Flight Mechanics Test and Evaluation Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AERO5510 OR AERO9560 OR AERO3560 Assumed knowledge: BE in area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering Field. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to develop an understanding of aircraft flight test, validation and verification, and the development of modern flight control, guidance, and navigation systems. Students will gain skills in analysis, problem solving and systems design in the areas of aircraft dynamic system identification and control.
At the end of this unit students will be able to understand elements of the following: the principles of stability augmentation systems and autopilot control systems in aircraft operation, their functions and purposes; the characteristics of closed loop system responses; advanced feedback control systems and state-space design techniques; the concepts of parameter and state estimation; the design of observers in the state space and the implementation of a Kalman Filter; multi-loop control and guidance systems and the reasons for their structures; flight test principles and procedures and the implementation a flight test programme.
AERO9301 Applied Finite Element Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Liyong Tong Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AERO9360 or AERO8360 or MECH9361 or MECH8361 Assumed knowledge: BE in area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering field. Assessment: Through semester assessment (55%) and Final Exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach fundamentals of modern numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating stresses, strains, deformations and strengths of representative aerospace structures. In particular the focus is on developing an understanding of: Fundamental concepts and formulations of the finite element methods for basic structural analysis; Elements for typical aerospace structures- such as beams/frames, plates/shells, and their applications and limitations; Finite element techniques for various types of problems pertinent to aerospace structures; and developing hands-on experience of using selected commercial finite element analysis program.
At the end of this unit of study the following will have been covered: Introduction to Finite Element Method for modern structural and stress analysis; One-dimensional rod elements; Generalization of FEM for elasticity; Two- and three-dimensional trusses; FEA for beams and frames in 2D and 3D; Two-dimensional problems using constant strain triangular elements; The two-dimensional isoparametric elements; Plates and shells elements and their applications; FEA for axisymmetric shells and pressure vessels, shells of revolution; FEA for axisymmetric solids subjected to axi-symmetric loading; FEA for structural dynamics, eigenvalue analysis, modal response, transient response; Finite element analysis for stress stiffening and buckling of beams, plates and shells; Three-dimensional problems in stress analysis; Extensions to the element library, higher order elements, special elements; Constraints; FEA modeling strategy; FEA for heat conduction; FEA for non-linear material and geometric analysis.
AERO9760 Spacecraft and Satellite Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaofeng Wu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project work - in class Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course aims to introduce the students to the engineering aspects of spacecraft and mission design, covering the space environment and spacecraft sub-systems, including thermal control, power systems, attitude decision and control system, tracking, telemetry and telecommand, and on-board data handling.
AFNR5512 Water Management and Variable Climate

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hour workshop per week, practical work, project work during workshops Assumed knowledge: UG Maths or Physics or Hydrology. Assessment: 3 assignments (50%), 2-hour exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on knowledge gained in undergraduate science units to develop an understanding of how climate variability affects water resources. Particular focus will be on the effect of climate variability and drought and how this affects plant production and water storage. At the completion of this unit student would be able to: Quantify drought and understand the different dimensions of drought; understand how climate variability impacts plant production and what stages; understand the memory of drought and the impact on resilience; understand how climate change can impact water availability in the future. Open source software packages such as R will be used for most analysis.
AMME5060 Advanced Computational Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Williamson Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: UG students are required to complete AMME3060 before enrolling in this unit. Assumed knowledge: Linear algebra, calculus and partial differential equations, Taylor series, the finite difference and finite element methods, numerical stability, accuracy, direct and iterative linear solvers and be able to write Matlab Scripts to solve problems using these methods. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will cover advanced numerical and computational methods within an engineering context. The context will include parallel coding using MPI, computational architecture, advanced numerical methods including spectral methods, compact finite difference schemes, numerical dispersion and diffusion and efficient linear solvers. Students will develop to skills and confidence to write their own computational software. Applications in fluid and solid mechanics will be covered.
AMME5101 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Cleary Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH3260 OR MECH9260 or MECH8260 OR AERO3261 OR AERO9261 or AERO8261 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is suitable for any engineering discipline student who is interested in developing an understanding of analysis and design in energy, power generation, environment and relevant economic issues. The aim is to acquaint students with the methods engineers use to design and evaluate the processes used for the conversion of energy into useful work. This course concentrates on thermal energy conversion. It also assesses and deals with the environmental consequences of energy conversion. At the end of this unit students will be able to critically analyse technical, economic and societal impacts of energy conversion systems.
A series of topics, each containing a series of lectures, will be covered in relation to energy. The course content will include: The Status of Energy Today; Energy for Electricity Generation; Nuclear Energy; Energy for Transportation; Future Energy Usage.
AMME5202 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Steven Armfield Session: Semester 1 Classes: Laboratories, Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Partial differential equations; Finite difference methods; Taylor series; Basic fluid mechanics including pressure, velocity, boundary layers, separated and recirculating flows. Basic computer programming skills. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives: To provide students with the necessary skills to use commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics packages and to carry out research in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics. Expected outcomes: Students will have a good understanding of the basic theory of Computational Fluid Dynamics, including discretisation, accuracy and stability. They will be capable of writing a simple solver and using a sophisticated commercial CFD package.
Syllabus summary: A course of lectures, tutorials and laboratories designed to provide the student with the necessary tools for using a sophisticated commercial CFD package. A set of laboratory tasks will take the student through a series of increasingly complex flow simulations, requiring an understanding of the basic theory of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The laboratory tasks will be complemented by a series of lectures in which the basic theory is covered, including: governing equations; finite difference methods, accuracy and stability for the advection/diffusion equation; direct and iterative solution techniques; solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations; turbulent flow; Cartesian tensors; turbulence models.
AMME5271 Computational Nanotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ahmad Jabbarzadeh Khoei Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Understanding of basic principles of Newtonian mechanics, physics and chemistry, fluid mechanics and solid mechanics. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course introduces atomistic computational techniques used in modern engineering to understand phenomena and predict material properties, behaviour, structure and interactions at nano-scale. The advancement of nanotechnology and manipulation of matter at the molecular level have provided ways for developing new materials with desired properties. The miniaturisation at the nanometre scale requires an understanding of material behaviour which could be much different from that of the bulk. Computational nanotechnology plays a growingly important role in understanding mechanical properties at such a small scale. The aim is to demonstrate how atomistic level simulations can be used to predict the properties of matter under various conditions of load, deformation and flow. The course covers areas mainly related to fluid as well as solid properties, whereas, the methodologies learned can be applied to diverse areas in nanotechnology such as, liquid-solid interfaces, surface engineering, nanorheology, nanotribology and biological systems. This is a course with a modern perspective for engineers who wish to keep abreast with advanced computational tools for material characterisation at the atomic scale.
AMME5292 Advanced Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Agisilaos Kourmatzis Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: MECH3261 OR MECH9261 OR CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612 OR AERO3260 OR AERO9260 Assessment: through semester assessment (65%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to cover advanced concepts in fluid dynamics, focusing particularly on turbulent flows, optical and laser based experimentation, and applied fluid dynamics in the context of engineering design. Specific topics to be covered will be: instability and turbulence, Reynolds decomposition, the Kolmogorov hypotheses, laser-based fluid flow measurement, and applied concepts such as multiphase flows, environmental flows, and biomedical flows. The project component of the unit will give students the opportunity to work on an advanced topical research or practical problem in fluid dynamics.
AMME5310 Engineering Tribology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ahmad Jabbarzadeh Khoei Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials, Seminars Assumed knowledge: (AMME2302 OR AMME9302) AND (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (MECH3261 OR MECH9261 or MECH8261) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim is to teach students in the undergraduate and postgraduate levels basic concepts about friction, lubrication and wear applicable to design and operation of mechanical systems used in engineering, industrial, and modern applications. Examples of these systems are lubrication of internal combustion engines, gearboxes, artificial hip/knee joints, and micro/nano electromechanical systems.
AMME5510 Vibration and Acoustics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gareth Vio Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (AMME2200 OR AMME2261 OR AMME9261) AND (AMME2500 OR AMME9500) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study should prepare the student to be able to undertake vibration and acoustic measurement calculations for industry design situations.
The unit aims to introduce a number of new concepts required for analysis of vibrations and acoustics. The response of structure under different dynamic forces, including human and aerodynamic, will be investigated. A number of hands-on experiments will be performed to allow an understanding of the concepts and applicability.
The acoustics component will include: basic acoustics theory, sound generation and propagation, impedance, absorbing materials, industrial noise sources, isolation methods of noise control, enclosures, instrumentation and measurement, frequency analysis, noise regulations and computational acoustics.
AMME5520 Advanced Control and Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Manchester Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Research Prerequisites: AMME3500 OR AMME9501 or AMME8501 Assumed knowledge: Strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces engineering design via optimisation, i. e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilise and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion. The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimisation frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with Dijkstra's algorithm, A*, and probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs), state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.
AMME5902 Computer Aided Manufacturing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Paul Briozzo Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Seminar Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this course is to enhance the student's manufacturing engineering skills in the CAD/CAM area. The course focuses on CNC milling as a manufacturing automation process applied to a project. The management, planning and marketing of a typical engineering project are also discussed.
Through integrated project-based learning and hands-on-machine training, you will learn: How to successfully complete a CAD/CAM and CNC mill based project; Manufacturing management and system skills, such as product planning, manufacturing sequence, time and cost; The science in designing and selecting a manufacturing method; How to effectively present your ideas and outcomes using oral and report based methods.
It is expected that through your hard work in the semester, you will find: Enhanced learning by real-world problems; Improved comprehensive skill in manufacturing design.
AMME5912 Crash Analysis and Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Paul Briozzo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Computer Aided Drafting, Basic FEA principles and Solid Mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The objective of the course is to give students skills in the area of highly non-linear finite element analysis. Major topics covered include CAD, Implicit / explicit codes, Wire frame geometry, Elemental Theory, Materials, Pre-processing using ETA-PreSys, Contact, LS-Dyna, using NCAC FEM models, Modeling fasteners and the interaction between solids and fluids. Material covered in lectures is reinforced through independent research, assignments, quizzes and a major capstone project. The capstone project involves the development of an approved crash scenario.
BMET5958 Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Lilach Bareket Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, presentations Prohibitions: AMME5958 Assumed knowledge: (MECH3921 OR BMET3921 OR AMME5921 OR BMET5921) Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Nanotechnology in Biomedical Engineering will have a broad nanotechnology focus and a particular focus on the biophysics and electrical aspects of nanotechnology, as it relates to nanobiosensors and nanobioelectronics which represents a rapidly growing field in Biomedical Engineering that combines nanotechnology, electronics and biology with promising applications in bionics and biosensors. Nanodimensionality and biomimetics holds the potential for significant improvements in the sensitivity and biocompatibility and thereby open up new routes in clinical diagnostics, personalized health monitoring and therapeutic biomedical devices.
BMET5995 Advanced Bionics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Gregg Suaning Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prohibitions: AMME5995 OR AMME5951 OR BMET5951 Assumed knowledge: AMME5921 OR BMET5921 OR MECH3921 OR BMET3921 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The field of 'bionics' is one of the primary embodiments of biomedical engineering. In the context of this unit, bionics is defined as a collection of therapeutic devices implanted into the body to restore or enhance functions lost through disease, developmental anomaly, or injury. Most typically, bionic devices intervene with the nervous system and aim to control neural activity through the delivery of electrical impulses. An example of this is a cochlear implant which delivers electrical impulses to physiologically excite surviving neurons of the auditory system, providing the capacity to elicit the psychological perception of sound. This unit primarily focuses upon the replacement of human senses, the nature and transduction of signals acquired, and how these ultimately effect neural activity.
BMET9961 Biomechanics and Biomaterials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Young No Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures Prohibitions: AMME5961 OR AMME9961 OR MECH4961 OR BMET4961 Assumed knowledge: AMME9901 or BMET9901 or 6 credit points of junior biology, 6 credit points of junior chemistry, 6 credit points of junior materials science, 6 credit points of engineering design, Chemistry, biology, materials engineering, and engineering design at least at the Junior level. Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is divided into two parts: biomechanics and biomaterials: Biomechanics is the study of the body from the point of view of it being an engineering structure. There are many aspects to this since the human body contains soft tissues, hard tissues (skeletal system), and articulating joints. We will begin with a general introduction to biomechanics, modelling the human body from the macroscopic level to the microscopic level. We will then study soft tissue mechanics, with respect to both non-linear and viscoelastic descriptions, with a significant focus on the mathematical methods used in relation to the mechanics of the system. We will then look at specific aspects of biomechanics: muscle mechanics, joint mechanics, kinematics and dynamics of human gait (gait analysis), biomechanics of cells, physiological fluid flow, biomechanics of injury, functional and mechanical response of tissues to mechanical loading. Biomaterials This course will involve the study of biomaterials from two perspectives: firstly, the response of the body towards the biomaterial - an immune response and foreign body reaction; secondly, the response of the biomaterial to the body - corrosion, biodegradation, and mechanical failure. Our study will begin with the response of the body towards the biomaterial. We will begin by looking at the immune system itself and then move on to look at the normal inflammatory response. We will then study in detail the foreign body reaction caused by biomaterials. The final part of this section is the study of protein adsorption onto biomaterials, with a strong focus on the Vroman effect. Then we will move onto the response of the biomaterial to the body. We will begin by a review of biomaterials, their applications, and compositions, and mechanical properties. We will then look at key problems such as corrosion, stress shielding, static fatigue, and mechanical failure. Finally, we will take a practical look at the materials themselves. Beginning with metals, then polymers (thermoplastic, thermosetting, and biodegradable), and finally ceramics (bioinert, biodegradable, and bioactive).
BMET9971 Tissue Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Hala Zreiqat Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: (AMME5921 or BMET5921 OR BMET9921) Prohibitions: AMME5971 OR AMME9971 OR AMME4971 OR BMET4971 Assumed knowledge: AMME9901 or BMET9901 or [6 credit points of 1000-level biology and 6 credit points of 1000-level chemistry] Assessment: through semester assessment (65%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
With the severe worldwide shortage of donor organs and the ubiquitous problem of donor organ rejection, there is a strong need for developing technologies for engineering replacement organs and other body parts. Recent developments in engineering and the life sciences have begun to make this possible, and as a consequence, the very new and multidisciplinary field of tissue engineering has been making dramatic progress in the last few years. This unit will provide an introduction to the principles of tissue engineering, as well as an up to date overview of recent progress and future outlook in the field of tissue engineering. This unit assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of tissue engineering. The objectives are: To gain a basic understanding of the major areas of interest in tissue engineering; To learn to apply basic engineering principles to tissue engineering systems; To understand the promises and limitations of tissue engineering; To understand the advances and challenges of stem cell applications; Enable students to access web-based resources in tissue engineering; Enable students to develop basic skills in tissue engineering research.
BMET9981 Applied Biomedical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Qing Li Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials, meetings Prohibitions: AMME4981 or BMET4981 OR AMME5981 OR AMME9981 Assumed knowledge: AMME9301 AND AMME9302 AND AMME9500 AND MECH9361 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS will give students an understanding of CT/MRI based solid modelling, finite element methods, constitutive material models, design analysis and optimisation, experimental validation and their use in biomedical engineering. The students are expected to gain skills and experience with finite element software for the solution to sophisticated problems associated with biomedical engineering and experimentation techniques for the validation of these problems. The unit will take a holistic approach to the learning outcomes: an overview of typical biomedical design problems, an overview of finite element analysis software, a detailed look at finite element methods in biomedical applications, and a project-based learning approach to the development of a biomedical prosthesis. By the end of the unit, the students are expected to have familiarised themselves with design analysis, optimisation, and validation for biomedical engineering problems.
BMET9990 Biomedical Product Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Colin Dunstan Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AMME4990 OR BMET4990 OR AMME5990 OR AMME9990 Assumed knowledge: 1000 level chemistry, 2000 level biology, and specific knowledge of cell biology at least at the1000 level, and preferably at the 2000 level. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Product development in the biomedical area presents unique challenges that need to be addressed to efficiently satisfy strict regulatory requirements and to successfully advance products to approval for marketing. Biomedical engineers need a broad understanding of these challenges as the main components of product development are complex and interdependent. Development of good manufacturing and quality control processes, preclinical and clinical validation of product safety and efficacy, and regulatory filings, are each progressive and interdependent processes. This UoS will provide a broad understanding of regulatory requirements for biomedical product development, with particular emphasis on the dependence of each component on the development of processes and control systems that conform to Good Manufacturing Practice. This UoS assumes prior knowledge of cell biology and chemistry and builds on that foundation to elaborate on the important aspects of biomedical product development.
CHNG5001 Process Systems Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Ali Abbas Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: 1000 level physics and mathematics (differential equations). Use of mathematical and/or computer-based modelling tools and techniques. Feedback control concepts and principles as taught in CHNG3802/CHNG9302 or similar courses. Students who are unsure about meeting these requirements should contact the unit coordinator for advice. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Whatever its purpose, any process requires some level of process monitoring and control to allow it to operate satisfactorily. Once a process is under control, the option exists to further improve performance via the implementation of some level of optimisation. This unit will develop skills in integrating process modelling, simulation, design, optimisation and control concepts. The aims of this unit are (i) to demonstrate that modelling, process control and optimisation are integral concepts in the overall consideration of industrial plants, (ii) to demonstrate that a unified approach allows a diversity of application fields to be readily handled, and (iii) to allow each student to achieve and demonstrate acceptable competency over the unit material through a range of individual and group-based activities.
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Andrew Harris Session: Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Lectures Assumed knowledge: Completion of 72 cp in science, engineering or equivalent. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5004 Particles and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Marjorie Valix Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all 3000 level core chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Particles and Surfaces: Mineral Processing. Aims and Objectives: Solid-solid and solid-liquid interactions are an important aspect in mineral processing. The aim of any mineral processing operation is the efficient extraction of the valuable metals or minerals (concentrate) from the waste materials in the ore (gangue). The goal of this course is to understand the various key steps and the corresponding principles required to achieve metal extraction from the ores.
Syllabus summary: This course will elucidate the principles in size reduction or comminution of the ore in liberating the valuable minerals, examine the microscopic details of solid-liquid, solid-gas and solid-solid interactions in mineral processing and their roles in macroscopic phenomena such as adhesion, wetting, adsorption, and mineral reactions such as reduction roasting and leaching. The general understanding of these factors will allow manipulation and improvement of performance in mineral beneficiation, dewatering of mineral slurries and extractive metallurgy.
By the end of this course students should develop a proficiency in characterisation of physical, surface and chemical properties of solids and metal aqueous streams; devising strategies to achieve extraction process objectives, within the constraints imposed by social, economic and physical environments, developing management strategies for treating liquid and solid effluents and becoming familiar with computer software packages in modelling aqueous and solid systems. This unit is an advanced Chemical Engineering elective.
CHNG5005 Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Emer Prof Geoffrey Barton Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Group assignment Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit assumes that the studenthas successfully completed CHNG1103 (Mass and Energy Balances), CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics), CHNG2802 (Applied Mathematics), CHNG3803 (Chemical and Biological Process Design), CHNG3804 (Biochemical Engineering) and CHNG3805 (Particle Mechanics) or equivalent. Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Key learning objectives are to provide students with an overview of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used.
The key issues considered are: wastewater characterisation; the cost of wastewater treatment and disposal; the (Australian) regulatory framework; primary, secondary and tertiary treatment options; solids management and water reuse; pro-cess integration; an introduction to process simulation.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Emer Prof Geoffrey Barton Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CHNG5005 OR CHNG3804. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jun Huang Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Lectures Assumed knowledge: 12cp CHEM2xxx Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5601 Membrane Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Terry Chilcott Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Membrane Science" provides background in the physics and electrochemistry of a variety of synthetic membranes used in industry as well as cellular membranes.
The course aims to develop students' understanding of:
- membrane self-assembly and manufacture;
- membrane separation processes such as filtration, desalination, ion exchange and water-splitting;
- and techniques for membrane characterisation and monitoring.
CHNG5603 Advanced Process Modelling and Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Fariba Dehghani Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students have a general knowledge of: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND (CHNG2802 OR MATH2XXX) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This course is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective course for fourth year students. Some lectures my be given by a guest lecturer.
This course will give students an insight into the use of (computer-based) statistical techniques in extracting information from experimental data obtained from real life bio-physical systems. The issues and techniques required for mathematical modeling as well as monitoring and/or control scheme for bio-physical systems will be discussed and implemented in diverse range of bioprocesses, including biomaterials and fermentation products.
We will review statistical distribution; tests based on z, t, F variables; calculation of confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; linear and nonlinear regression; analysis of variance; principal component analysis; and use of computer-based statistical tools. The issues associated with dynamic response of bio-physical processes; inferred or estimated variables; control system design and implementation; introduction to model-based control; use of computer-based control system design and analysis tools will be elaborated.
When this course is successfully completed you will acquire knowledge to choose the appropriate statistical techniques within a computer based environment, such as Excel or MATLAB, for a given situation. The students will also obtain potential for monitoring/control scheme based on the key dynamic features of the process. Such information would be beneficial for any future career in Bio-manufacturing companies. Students are encouraged to promote an interactive environment for exchange of information.
CHNG5604 Advanced Membrane Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Terry Chilcott Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CHNG5601 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a practical unit of study where students apply the theoretical concepts of membrane science to engineering practice via a series of laboratory experiments. The students will gain practical insights into mass transport processes through various membranes. Students will understand the construction and functional properties of synthetic separation membranes and also will explore experimentally the various factors affecting the performance of membranes.
CHNG5605 Bio-Products: Laboratory to Marketplace

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Fariba Dehghani Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This course is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective course for fourth year students.
The objectives of the course are to provide students with an overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical industry. It will give students an insight into drug delivery systems and formulation; how therapeutic drugs work; and a general overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical marketing. The design and management of clinical trials, which are key factors for development of any new therapeutic agent will also be covered in the course. The challenges for commercialisation of innovative methods and/or biochemical and pharmaceutical products and aspects of intellectual property protection will be elaborated. Ultimately the aspects of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and international legislation for marketing pharmaceutical products will be illuminated.
Lectures in this course will be delivered by both University of Sydney staff and by a number of visiting professional representatives from industry and government agencies. We will also arrange a site visit for a bio-manufacturing company as warranted.
When you successfully complete this course you acquire knowledge about drug formulation, pharmaceutical processing including physical processes, legislation governing the bio-manufacturing and commercialisation of biochemicals and pharmaceuticals. The information would be beneficial for your future career in pharmaceutical manufacturing companies.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information. This course will be assessed by quizzes, assignments, oral presentation and final report. This unit of study is offered as an advanced elective unit of study to final year undergraduate students. Students may be required to attend lectures off-campus.
CHNG5606 Advanced Food Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Timothy Langrish Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CHNG2801 or AMME2261 or AMME2200 or CIVL2611 or CIVL3612 or CIVL9612) AND (CHNG2802 or AMME2000 or MATH2011 or MATH2061 or MATH2921) Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Working at an advanced level in the food processing industry requires an ability to independently familiarise yourself with new and emerging challenges and technologies, to recognise the potential and limitations of new tools and methods, and to devise innovative solutions. Students in this unit will critically examine a range of issues and technologies in food processing technologies particularly in the areas of energy requirements, product design and process design. New and emerging technologies will be compared with established operating models. The unit will be delivered through seminars and projects in three parts. In the first part, students will evaluate a range of processes based on their energy requirements. In the second part students will investigate particulate food processing and product design. In the third part of the course students will be tasked with devising and justifying their own optimum solution for a selected food processing challenge.
CHNG5607 Advanced Biochemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Kavanagh Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assumed knowledge: CHNG2802 AND CHNG2806 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3804. Students who have not completed the units listed as assumed knowledge should consult the coordinator before enrolling in the course. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students who have not completed the units listed as assumed knowledge should consult the coordinator before enrolling in the course.
Working in the 21st century bioeconomy requires advanced knowledge of a range of bioreactors. This course covers the modelling of bioreactors from very large to very small scale systems. The modelling of such systems will include the kinetics, transport phemonema and mixing problems that inevitably arise. Examples will be drawn from bio-commodities, bio-specialty chemicals and bio-pharmaceuticals industries. The course will develop students skills in analysing and designing such bioreactor systems.
CIVL5266 Steel Structures - Stability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cao Pham Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: There are no prerequisites for this unit of study but it is assumed that students are competent in the content covered in Structural Mechanics, Steel Structures, and Structural Analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to: provide fundamental understanding at advanced level of the behaviour and design of hot-rolled/fabricated and cold-formed steel members; to provide fundamental understanding of newly developed Direct Design Method (DDM) for analysis and design of structural systems; and to develop an understanding of the behaviour and design of steel connections in open and hollow sections. It is anticipated that at the end of this unit of study students should be familiar with the behaviour of steel structures at advanced level in selected areas, including design for local buckling and design for flexural-torsional buckling of columns and beams; have a sound knowledge of AS 4100 in the areas of section capacity determination of slender cross-sections, and flexural-torsional buckling of beams; have a sound knowledge of AS/NZS 4600 in the areas of section capacity determination of slender cross-sections, and flexural-torsional buckling of columns and beams; have knowledge of the use of FEM software in the design of structural systems; have the skills to assess the behaviour of specific connections; have an appreciation of some practical aspects of economical steel connection design. This unit will examine stability theory, Stability design to AS4100 and AS/NZS4600, Direct Design Method, Steel connection design.
CIVL5269 Advanced Concrete Structures

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gianluca Ranzi Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: CIVL3205 OR CIVL9205 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This Unit reviews the fundamental concepts of 'elastic' behaviour of reinforced concrete structures and introduces models of behaviour and methods of analysis related to the time-dependent effects of creep and shrinkage (at service loads). This Unit also examines the non-linear (strain-softening) behaviour of reinforced concrete and the related effects concerning the strength of statically-indeterminate reinforced concrete structures. In particular, this Unit examines the concepts of ductility, moment-redistribution and plastic design (for beams and slabs). Strut-and-tie modelling of reinforced concrete members is also described. Design guidelines will reflect requirements of the Australian Standards and Eurocodes.
This Unit will provide students with the following knowledge and skills: understanding of the fundamental concepts and theoretical models concerning the time-dependent structural effects of concrete creep and shrinkage; ability to carry out calculations to estimate 'elastic' load-effects (stresses/strains/deformations) for reinforced concrete structures (at service loads), accounting for the time-dependent effects of concrete creep and shrinkage; understanding of the fundamental concepts and theoretical models of the strain-softening behaviour of reinforced concrete (in flexure); understanding of the fundamental concepts and numerical models of ductility and moment redistribution for reinforced concrete beams; ability to quantitatively assess the ductility and moment-redistribution capacity of reinforced concrete beams; understanding of the fundamental concepts and numerical models of plastic behaviour and design for reinforced concrete beams and slabs (including yield-line analysis); ability to determine the ultimate plastic load-carrying capacity of statically-indeterminate reinforced-concrete beams and slabs; ability to use strut-and-tie models of reinforced concrete behaviour.
CIVL5277 Structural Rehabilitation and Timber Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Seyed Hadigheh Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, workshops Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2201 AND CIVL3205 AND CIVL3206) OR (CIVL9201 AND CIVL9205 AND CIVL9206) Assessment: through semester assessment (60%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will provide students broader knowledge in timber design and structural rehabilitation. In the first section of the subject, students will learn the engineering properties of timber and requirements to be met for specification of the design, installation and maintenance of timber structures. It includes grading and structural properties; design actions; design of timber columns, beams, tension members and connections; principles of limit state design and serviceability; methods of testing; quality standards and maintenance of timber structures based on AS 1720. 1-2010 timber structures-design methods, and AS NZS 4063. 1-2010 characterization of structural timber-test methods.
The second part covers monitoring, rehabilitation and strengthening techniques of existing structures (concrete/steel/timber/masonry). Students will be introduced to structural inspection and evaluation; durability and deterioration; destructive and non-destructive testing; and design of strengthening systems including advanced fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) materials, epoxy injection, steel plate bonding, and post tensioning according to relevant Australian, ACI and European guidelines.
CIVL5320 Engineering for Sustainable Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Aaron Opdyke Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Assignments Prerequisites: CIVL3310 OR CIVL9310 Assessment: through semester assessment (80%), final exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to provide students with an introduction to the knowledge and skills necessary to design and implement sustainable humanitarian engineering projects. The context for the delivery of humanitarian engineering projects are set in developing countries, disaster relief situations, indigenous communities and our societies at large. Sustainability it critical to the long term impact of any engineering project. Students will learn about how engineering fits within a range of sustainability frameworks. Systems thinking, inter-disciplinary approaches, partnerships and government policy are some of the topics that will be covered. This unit of study is the 4th year elective for Humanitarian Engineering major and is open to all undergraduate engineers who have completed the pre-requisites.
CIVL5351 Geoenvironmental Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Abbas Elzein Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Geoenvironmental Engineering is an applied science concerned with the protection of the subsurface from human activities. It can be divided into 2 main branches: waste containment and treatment of pollution sites. The former is usually a preventative activity, whereas the latter is corrective, i. e. it occurs after pollution has taken place. Geoenvironmental Engineering draws on fundamental science, especially the chemistry of low-permeability material such as clay, fluid flow in soil and contaminant migration in soil. The goal of CIVL5351 is to introduce you to the science behind Geoenvironmental Engineering and develop your skills at designing waste containment systems.
Learning Outcomes: 1. Analyse flow regime in soil using Darcy equation; 2. Analyse contaminant migration in soil using coupled flow and reactive diffusion-advection equations; 3. Design a single or double composite landfill liner satisfying groundwater quality requirements; 4. Predict the potential for methane production in a landfill and assess the feasibility of waste-to-energy conversion; 5. Conduct research on a geoenvironmental topic as part for group.
Syllabus Summary: introduction to geoenvironmental engineering; integrated waste management and life cycle assessment; soil composition and mineralogy; types and characteristics of contaminants; theory of water seepage in soil and hydraulic conductivity; theory of reactive contaminant transport in soil including molecular diffusion, mechanical dispersion and advective flow; analytical and numerical solutions of reactive diffusion advection equation; design of landfills; geosynthetics and geomembranes; defects and leakage rates; methane generation in landfills and landfill gas management.
CIVL5452 Foundation Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Airey Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures 3 hrs per week, presented in 2 sessions per week for 11 weeks of semester. Tutorials 1hr per week. Prohibitions: CIVL6452 Assumed knowledge: [CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410] AND [CIVL3411 OR CIVL9411]. Students are assumed to have a good knowledge of fundamental soil mechanics, which is covered in the courses of soil mechanics (settlement, water flow, soil strength) and foundation engineering (soil models, stability analyses; slope stability; retaining walls; foundation capacity) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit are to gain an understanding of the design process in foundation engineering, to understand the importance of site investigation and field testing, and to learn how to deal with uncertainty. To achieve these objectives students are asked to design foundations using real data. Students will develop the ability to interpret the results of a site investigation; to use laboratory and field data to design simple foundations; develop an appreciation of the interaction between the soil, foundation system and the supported structure. The syllabus is comprised of field testing, site characterisation, interpretation of field data, design of pile raft and surface footings, support of excavations, soil improvement, and geotechnical report writing.
CIVL5453 Geotechnical Hazards

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Pierre Rognon Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2410 AND CIVL3411) OR (CIVL9410 AND CIVL9411). Students are assumed to have a good knowledge of fundamental soil mechanics, which is covered in the courses of soil mechanics (settlement, water flow, soil strength) and foundation engineering (soil models, stability analyses; slope stability; retaining walls; foundation capacity). Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Geotechnical hazards include landslides, rock falls and mud flows. They are triggered by soil/rock failure due to natural or human causes. The objective of this Unit of Study is to develop the ability to assess and mitigate the risks associated to such events.
Students will learn how to estimate when and where these events are likely to occur, how to define safety zones and how to design effective protection structures. The syllabus is comprised of (i) Landslide Risk Assessment and Management procedures (ii) post-failure and out of equilibrium soil mechanics applied to prediction of rock fall, landslide and mud flow run-out distance and impact force on structures; (iii) design of geotechnical protection structures using Finite Element modelling.
Senior geotechnical engineers from major companies will deliver some guest lectures presenting on practical case study involving geotechnical hazards throughout the semester.
CIVL5458 Numerical Methods in Civil Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fernando Alonso-Marroquin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Demonstration Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objective of this unit is to provide students with fundamental knowledge of finite element analysis and how to apply this knowledge to the solution of civil engineering problems at intermediate and advanced levels.
At the end of this unit, students should acquire knowledge of methods of formulating finite element equations, basic element types, the use of finite element methods for solving problems in structural, geotechnical and continuum analysis and the use of finite element software packages. The syllabus comprises introduction to finite element theory, analysis of bars, beams and columns, and assemblages of these structural elements; analysis of elastic continua; problems of plane strain, plane stress and axial symmetry; use, testing and validation of finite element software packages; and extensions to apply this knowledge to problems encountered in engineering practice.
On completion of this unit, students will have gained the following knowledge and skills:
1. Knowledge of methods of formulating finite element equations. This will provide students with an insight into the principles at the basis of the FE elements available in commercial FE software.
2. Knowledge of basic element types. Students will be able to evaluate the adequacy of different elements in providing accurate and reliable results.
3. Knowledge of the use of finite element methods for solving problems in structural and geotechnical engineering applications. Students will be exposed to some applications to enable them to gain familiarity with FE analyses.
4. Knowledge of the use of finite element programming and modeling.
5. Extended knowledge of the application of FE to solve civil engineering problems.
CIVL5460 Particle Mechanics for Geotechnics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Itai Einav Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit are to demonstrate how the granular structure of soil materials controls their engineering behaviour; translate particle micromechanics to improve macroscopic engineering predictions; and establish the intimate connection of geotechnical engineering to other disciplines where granular materials play a pivotal role, including mining engineering, bulk materials handling, and geophysics. Similarly, this course will cohesively connect geotechnical engineering with fluids engineering principles, as well as enhance students' background in materials science. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand and use Discrete Element Method to evaluate and solve geotechnical problems such as rockfall interactions with surrounding terrain. They will also critically analyse pile penetration and silo discharge in light of granular mechanisms; apply soil rheology to carry out parametric study of landslide flows; and understand and use dimensionless analysis principles to predict resistive forces on obstacles. Strong focus will be dedicated for communicating students' results using written methods appropriate for professional engineers.
CIVL5668 Fundamentals of Wind Engineering for Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kapil Chauhan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce the fundamentals of meteorology governing wind flow, details of extreme wind events, wind structure, statistical distribution of the wind, the effect of topography and terrain changes on wind profile, investigate the fluid flow around bluff bodies, and detail the design of civil engineering structures for wind loading.
This unit will provide students with the following knowledge and skills: On completion of this course students will have an understanding of the governing principles of wind engineering, how to predict the extreme wind speed and analyse anemographs, predict the effect of terrain and topography on velocity and turbulence, understand flow patterns around bodies, how to predict the pressure distribution and wind loading on bodies and structures, dynamic response of structures, and how all the above relates to AS1170.2.
CIVL5670 Reservoir, Stream and Coastal Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Amin Chabchoub Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit of study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, natural river systems will be discussed, and the principles of sediment transport and scour, monitoring and management will be introduced. The basic equations for linear and nonlinear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
CIVL5999 Advanced Research and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kapil Chauhan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: (CIVL2201 OR CIVL9201) AND (CIVL2611 OR CIVL9611) AND (CIVL2410 OR CIVL9410) Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit requires students to use a number of advanced experimental tools and techniques which they learn through project-based learning as well as a structured theoretical lecture program. It will be very useful as co-requisite study for students engaged in an experimental honours thesis topic. It also covers issues of basic electronic circuitry and signal processing, various analysis techniques using both simple and advanced statistics, and advanced data processing methods such as PIV and Fourier filtering. It will also prepare students for further research in industry or academia.
COMP5047 Pervasive Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anusha Withanghe Don Session: Semester 2 Classes: Studio class Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601 AND (COMP2129 OR COMP2017). Background in programming and operating systems that is sufficient for the student to independently learn new programming tools from standard online technical materials. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is an advanced course on Pervasive Computing, with a focus on the "Internet of Things" (IoT). It introduces the key aspects of the IoT and explores these in terms of the new research towards creating user interfaces that disappear into the environment and are available pervasively, for example in homes, workplaces, cars and carried.
COMP5347 Web Application Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Basem Suleiman; Dr Basem Suleiman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory, Project Work Prerequisites: INFO1103 or INFO1113 or COMP9103 or COMP9220 or COMP5028 Assumed knowledge: COMP9220 or COMP5028. The course assumes basic knowledge on OO design and proficiency in a programming language Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Nowadays most client facing enterprise applications are running on web or at least with a web interface. The design and implementation of a web application require totally different set of skills to those are required for traditional desktop applications. All web applications are of client/ server architecture. Requests sent to a web application are expected to go through the public Internet, which slows the responsiveness and increases the possible security threat. A typical web application is also expected to handle large number of requests coming from every corner of the Internet and sent by all sorts of client systems. This further complicates the design of such system.
This course aims at providing both conceptual understanding and hand-on experiences for the technologies used in building web applications. We will examine how data/messages are communicated between client and server; how to improve the responsiveness using rich client technology; as well as how to build a secure web application.
At the end of this course, students are expected to have a clear understanding of the structure and technologies of web applications. Students are also expected to have practical knowledge of some major web application environments and to be able to develop and deploy simple web applications. Cloud based platform are increasingly popular as the development and deployment platform. This course will incorporate the cloud aspect of web application development as well.
COMP5348 Enterprise Scale Software Architecture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Basem Suleiman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory Assumed knowledge: Programming competence in Java or similar OO language. Capacity to master novel technologies (especially to program against novel APIs) using manuals, tutorial examples, etc. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit covers topics on software architecture for large-scale enterprises. Computer systems for large-scale enterprises handle critical business processes, interact with computer systems of other organisations, and have to be highly reliable, available and scalable. This class of systems are built up from several application components, incorporating existing "legacy" code and data stores as well as linking these through middleware technologies, such as distributed transaction processing, remote objects, message-queuing, publish-subscribe, and clustering. The choice of middleware can decide whether the system achieves essential non- functional requirements such as performance and availability. The objective of this unit of study is to educate students for their later professional career and it covers Software Architecture topics of the ACM/IEEE Software Engineering curriculum. Objective: The objective of this unit of study is to educate students for their later professional career and it covers topics of the ACM/IEEE Software Engineering curriculum.
COMP5416 Advanced Network Technologies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wei Bao Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 OR ELEC5740 OR COMP5116 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The unit introduces networking concepts beyond the best effort service of the core TCP/IP protocol suite. Understanding of the fundamental issues in building an integrated multi-service network for global Internet services, taking into account service objectives, application characteristics and needs and network mechanisms will be discussed. Enables students to understand the core issues and be aware of proposed solutions so they can actively follow and participate in the development of the Internet beyond the basic bit transport service.
COMP5426 Parallel and Distributed Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bing Zhou Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is intended to introduce and motivate the study of high performance computer systems. The student will be presented with the foundational concepts pertaining to the different types and classes of high performance computers. The student will be exposed to the description of the technological context of current high performance computer systems. Students will gain skills in evaluating, experimenting with, and optimising the performance of high performance computers. The unit also provides students with the ability to undertake more advanced topics and courses on high performance computing.
CSYS5010 Introduction to Complex Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael Harre Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Globalisation, rapid technological advances, the development of integrated and distributed systems, cross-disciplinary technical collaboration, and the emergence of "evolved" (as opposed to designed) systems are some of the reasons why many systems have begun to be described as complex systems in recent times. Complex technological, biological, socio-economic and socio-ecological systems (power grids, communication and transport systems, food webs, megaprojects, and interdependent civil infrastructure) are composed of large numbers of diverse interacting parts and exhibit self-organisation and/or emergent behaviour. This unit will introduce the basic concepts of "complex systems theory", and focus on methods for the quantitative analysis and modelling of collective emergent phenomena, using diverse computational approaches such as agent-based modelling and simulation, cellular automata, bio-inspired algorithms, and game theory. Students will gain theoretical knowledge of complex adaptive systems, coupled with practical skills in computational simulation and forecasting using a range of modern toolkits.
CSYS5020 Interdependent Civil Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Richard Spinney Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Our modern day civil infrastructure includes transport networks, telecommunications, power systems, financial infrastructure and emergency services, all of which are growing more and more interconnected. Moreover, the behaviour of the modern infrastructure is not dependent only upon the behaviour of its parts: complex civil systems (such as modern power grids), communication and transport systems, megaprojects, social and eco-systems, generate rich interactions among the individual components with interdependencies across systems. This interdependent behaviour brings about significant new challenges associated with the design and management of complex systems. Cascading power failures, traffic disruptions, epidemic outbreaks, chronic diseases, financial market crashes, and ecosystem collapses are typical manifestations of these challenges, affecting the stability of modern society and civil infrastructure. This unit will develop an understanding of how interdependent systems perform under stress, how to improve resilience and how best to mitigate the effects of various kinds of component failure or human error, by more accurate analysis of interdependent cascades of failures across system boundaries. The studied topics will include dynamical analysis of complex interdependent networks, local and global measures of network structure and evolution, cascading failures, as well as predictive measures of catastrophic failure in complex adaptive systems, and the tools that enable planning for resilient infrastructure. This unit will equip future professionals with sufficient expertise and technical know-how for the design of efficient prevention and intervention policies, and robust crisis forecasting and management. This unit will equip future professionals with sufficient expertise and technical know-how for the design of efficient prevention and intervention policies, and robust crisis forecasting and management.
ELEC5101 Antennas and Propagation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Phee Yeoh Session: Semester 2 Classes: Laboratories, Lectures Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The basics of antenna radiation are introduced with emphasis on the important performance characteristics of the radiation field pattern (in 3 dimensions) and feed impedance. The omnidirectional and Hertzian dipole antennas (both hypothetical in practise but robust theoretically) provide the starting point to analyse real antenna operation. Mutual coupling between close antennas and important 'ground' imaging effects lead to the design of antenna arrays to increase gain and directivity. Aperture antennas and frequency broadbanding techniques are introduced. Ionospheric propagation is discussed and also the the reception efficiency of receiving antennas which allows consideration of a Transmitter - Receiver 'Link budget'. The important 'Pocklington' equation for a wire dipole is developed from Maxwell's equations and leads to the numerical analysis of wire antennas using 'Moment' methods. Real world applications are emphasised throughout and are reinforced by the hands on laboratory program which includes design projects.
ELEC5203 Topics in Power Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 Power Engineering and ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Drives. Familiarity with basic mathematics and physics; competence with basic circuit theory and understanding of electricity grid equipment such as transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling; and fundamentals of power electronic technologies. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an in depth understanding of modern power electronic equipment supporting the intelligent grid of the future and the associated electronic control. Electronic power systems rely on a complex system of methods and equipment for controlling the voltage levels and for maintaining the stability and security of the supply. It covers recent findings in the fundamental theory and the massive change of modern power electronic equipment and methods supporting the electricity grids. It also looks at the huge influence of computer-aided analysis of electric power systems and the effects of the deregulation of the industry.
The specific topics covered are as follows: Introduction to power electronic systems and applications in the electrical grid, power semiconductors, reactive power control in power systems, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), high-voltage direct-current transmission (HVDC), static reactive power compensator, dynamic voltage restorer, unified-power flow controller, line-commutated converters, thyristor-controlled equipment, phase-angle regulators, voltage-source converter based power electronic equipment, harmonics, power quality, passive and active filters, distributed generation, grid-interconnection of renewable energy sources, intelligent grid technologies.
ELEC5204 Power Systems Analysis and Protection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Swamidoss Sathiakumar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734). The unit assumes basic knowledge of circuits, familiarity with basic mathematics, competence with basic circuit theory and an understanding of three phase systems, transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling and operation of such equipment. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the basis for the analysis of electricity grids using symmetrical components theory. Such analysis theory is the basis for the understanding of electrical faults and the design of protection strategies to safeguard the electrical equipment, and maintain safety of the plant at the highest possible level.
The following specific topics are covered: The types and causes of power system faults; balanced faults and short circuit levels; an introduction to fault current transients in machines; symmetric components, sequence impedances and networks; the analysis of unsymmetrical faults. Review of the impact of faults on power system behaviour; issues affecting protection scheme characteristics and clearance times; the security and reliability of protection schemes; the need for protection redundancy and its implementation as local or remote backup; zones of protection and the need for zones to overlap; the analysis and application of over-current and distance relay protection schemes with particular reference to the protection of transmission lines.
ELEC5205 High Voltage Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Swamidoss Sathiakumar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734) Assumed knowledge: The following previous knowledge is assumed for this unit. Circuit analysis techniques, electricity networks, power system fundamentals. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides advanced knowledge associated with high voltage engineering methods, techniques and equipment. It is divided into two sections. The first section presents fundamentals of the failure mechanisms of solid, liquid and gaseous insulation at high voltages. It also discusses consequent design principles for high-voltage equipment; of the generation of high direct, alternating and impulse voltages for testing high-voltage equipment; and of methods for monitoring and assessing the condition of high-voltage equipment such as dissolved gas analysis for oil-filled transformers and partial discharge in cables. The second section presents in detail all the high-voltage equipment and in particular underground cables, overhead transmission lines, transformers, bushings and switchgear. It finally offers asset management solutions for modern transmission and distribution electricity networks.
ELEC5206 Sustainable Energy Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit of study: familiarity with transformers, ac power, capacitors and inductors, electric circuits such as three-phase circuits and circuits with switches, and basic electronic circuit theory. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit builds upon the knowledge of engineering mathematics, electronic devices and circuit theory and simulation techniques. It deals with both technical and business aspects of sustainable electrical energy systems. In technical aspect, it focuses on energy conversion and electrical characteristics of different renewable energy sources and integration of multiple energy sources into power system both at distribution and transmission levels. In business aspect, it focuses on economical, marketing and political aspects of installing and managing sustainable electrical energy systems in present and future society. It lays a solid foundation of practical and managerial skills on electronics and electrical (power) engineering and later studies such as intelligent electricity networks and advanced energy conversion and power systems. The following topics are covered: modern power systems; distributed generation; co-generation; tri-generation; microturbines; fuel cells; renewable energy sources: solar, wind, hydro, biomass, wind turbines; photovoltaic; grid-connected power systems; stand-alone power systems.
ELEC5207 Advanced Power Conversion Technologies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Weidong Xiao Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorias, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: ELEC3204 Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to cover advanced topics in power electronics and it applications. In particular, the power electronics interface design and implementation for microgrid, smart grids and modern power systems which have received tremendous attention in recent years. Many countries including Australia are developing different power electronics technologies such as integrating renewable energy sources into the grid, managing charging and discharging of high power energy storage system, controlling the reactive power of power electronics interfaces for grid stability, and adding communication capability to power electronics interfaces for smart meter implementation. The unit assumes prior fundamental knowledge of power electronics systems and applications, including the ability to analyse basic power converters for all four conversions (ac-ac, ac-dc, dc-ac, and ac-dc), and design and implement various applications, such as motor drive and battery charger, with the consideration of electrical characteristics of semiconductors and passive elements. This unit will cover advanced technologies on power electronics interfaces for smart grids and microgrid implementation, which include dynamic voltage restorer, active power filter, reactive power compensation, energy storage management, hybrid energy sources optimisation, multilevel inverter and control, D-STATCOM, etc. To analyse these advanced power conversion systems, some analytical techniques will be introduced. This includes resonant converters, soft-switching technique, ac equivalent circuit modeling, converter control and input/output filter design.
ELEC5208 Intelligent Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jing Qiu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Electricity Networks, Control Systems and Telecommunications Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an introduction to the planning and operation of modern electricity grids, also known as "smart" grids. Traditional power networks featured a small number of large base-load plants sending power out over transmission lines to be distributed in radial lower voltage networks to loads. In response to the need to reduce carbon impact, future networks will feature diverse generation scattered all over the network including at distribution levels. Also there will be new loads such as electric vehicles and technologies including energy storage and lower voltage power flow control devices. The operation of these new networks will be possible by much greater use of information and communication technology (ICT) and control over the information networks.
The unit will cover recent relevant developments in energy technologies as well as important components of 'smart grids' such as supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), substation automation, remote terminal units (RTU), sensors and intelligent electronic devices (IED). Operation of these electricity grids requires a huge amount of data gathering, communication and information processing. The unit will discuss many emerging technologies for such data, information, knowledge and decision processes including communication protocols and network layouts, networking middleware and coordinated control. Information systems and data gathering will be used to assess key performance and security indicators associated with the operation of such grids including stability, reliability and power quality.
ELEC5211 Power System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Ma Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is a deep understanding on circuit analysis and its applications in power system steady state analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit deals with power systems modelling, analysis and simulation under dynamic conditions.
The unit will cover the following topics: The links between power system steady state analysis and transient analysis; Basics of dynamic system in general and stability analysis methods; Analysis of power systems subject to electromagnetic and electromechanical transients. Power system modelling for stability analysis and electromagnetic transients analysis: Synchronous machine modelling using Park's transformation; Modelling of excitation systems and turbine governors; Modelling of the transmission system; Load modelling. Simulation of interconnected multi-machine systems; Stability analysis- Transient stability, Small signal stability, Voltage stability; Power system control: Voltage control, Power system transient stability control, Power system dynamic stability control, Emergency control; The unit is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power and Electrical) and ME (Power and Electrical). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power).
ELEC5212 Power System Planning and Markets

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Ma Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC3203 or ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is power system steady state analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Deregulation of the electricity industry has fundamentally changed the power systems operation paradigm. The focus has shifted from central planning of vertically integrated utilities to market driven operation. Traditional electric energy producers and consumers play new roles in a power market environment and their behaviors are affected by the economic incentives to a large extent. Nevertheless, electric energy is a special commodity and cannot be traded as the other common goods. So a power market design has many special considerations compared with a conventional commercial market design. Knowledge of the power market mechanisms has become a necessary part in fully understanding the whole power system operations. To equip students with necessary skills to address the challenges of modern power systems, the unit will cover the following topics:
-Overview of the traditional electricity industry structure and operation: Economic dispatch, Power system operation states and respective reliability requirements.
-Drivers for the restructuring of the electricity industry.
-Electricity market design: Market structures (spot, bilateral, hybrid); Energy market; Ancillary services market; Key components in an electricity market.
-Electricity market participants and their roles in a market.
-Electricity economics: Power market from suppliers' view (Supply curve) and from demands' view (Demand curve); Market mechanism; Price and its elasticity; Cost and supply; Market power and monopoly.
-Cost of capital: Time value of money; Project evaluation methods from investments' point of view; Risk and return.
-Operation mechanisms of various designs of power markets.
-Power market practices around the world.
-Power system expansion planning: Fundamental knowledge of power system planning considerations, procedures and methods; Transmission planning; Generation planning; Power system adequacy assessment.
ELEC5212 is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power) and ME (Electrical and Power). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power). This unit focuses on the power market principles and practices. Based on the knowledge of the power market operation, the power system planning procedures and methods will also be discussed.
ELEC5304 Intelligent Visual Signal Understanding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wanli Ouyang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g. probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: through semester assessment (30%) and final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces basic and advanced concepts and methodologies in image processing and computer vision. This course mainly focuses on image processing and analysis methods as well as intelligent systems for processing and understanding multidimensional signals such as images, which include basic topics like multidimensional signal processing fundamentals and advanced topics like visual feature extraction and image classification as well as their applications for face recognition and object/scene recognition. It mainly covers the following areas: multidimensional signal processing fundamentals, image enhancement in the spatial domain and frequency domain, edge processing and region processing, imaging geometry and 3D stereo vision, object recognition and face recognition.
ELEC5306 Video Intelligence and Compression

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wanli Ouyang Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Assumed knowledge: Basic understanding of digital signal processing (filtering, DFT) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces digital image and video compression algorithms and standards. This course mainly focuses on fundamental and advanced methods for digital video compression. It covers the following areas: digital video fundamentals, digital image and video compression standards, and video codec optimization.
ELEC5307 Advanced Signal Processing with Deep Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, laboratories Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g., probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces deep learning for a broad range of multi-dimensional signal processing applications. It covers deep learning technologies for image super-resolution and restoration, image categorization, object localization, image segmentation, face recognition, person detection and re-identification, human pose estimation, action recognition, object tracking as well as image and video captioning.
ELEC5507 Error Control Coding

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Yonghui Li Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Fundamental mathematics including probability theory and linear algebra. Basic knowledge on digital communications. Basic MATLAB programming skills is desired. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit deals with the principles of error control coding techniques and their applications in various communication and data storage systems. Its aim is to present the fundamentals of error control coding techniques and develop theoretical and practical skills in the design of error control encoders/decoders. Successful completion of this unit will facilitate progression to advanced study or to work in the fields of telecommunications and computer engineering. It is assumed that the students have some background in communications principles and probability theory.
The following topics are covered: Introduction to error control coding, Linear algebra, Linear block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Solomon codes, Applications of block codes in communications, Convolutional codes, Viterbi algorithm, Applications of convolutional codes in communications, Soft decision decoding of block and convolutional codes, LDPC codes, Turbo codes, MIMO and rateless codes.
ELEC5508 Wireless Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wibowo Hardjawana Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge in probability and statistics, analog and digital communications, error probability calculation in communications channels, and telecommunications network. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the key ideas in modern wireless telecommunications networks. It will address both physical layer issues such as propagation and modulation, plus network layer issues such as capacity, radio resource management and mobility management issues.
The following topics are covered. Wireless channel: Multipath fading, frequency selective fading, Doppler spread, statistical models, diversity, GSM, OFDM. Capacity and Interference: Cell types, coverage, frequency reuse, interference management, SIMO, MISO, multiuser diversity, CDMA, OFDMA, beamforming, superposition coding. MIMO: SVD, waterfilling, beamforming, V-BLAST, SIC, MMSE, Power Allocation. LTE/LTE-Advanced: Uplink-downlink channels, control signals, data transmission, spatial multiplexing, CoMP, spectrum reuse, heterogeneous networks, inter-cell interference coordination, carrier aggregation. Queueing theory: basic models, queueing systems, waiting time, delay, queue length, priority queues, wireless network virtualization (WNV) queues.
ELEC5509 Mobile Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Abbas Jamali Pour Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: ELEC3505 AND ELEC3506. Basically, students need to know the concepts of data communications and mobile communications, which could be gained in one the following units of study: ELEC3505 Communications, ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet, or similar units. If you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study serves as an introduction to communications network research. The unit relies on a solid understanding of data communications and mobile networks. It introduces some of the currently most debated research topics in mobile networking and presents an overview of different technical solutions. Students are expected to critically evaluate these solutions in their context and produce an objective analysis of the advantages/disadvantages of the different research proposals. The general areas covered are wireless Internet, mobility management, quality of service in mobile and IP networks, ad hoc networks, and cellular network architectures.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to wireless and mobile Internet. Wireless cellular data networks. Cellular mobile networks. Mobile networks of the future. Quality of service in a mobile environment. Traffic modelling for wireless Internet. Traffic management for wireless Internet. Mobility management in mobile networks. Transport protocols for mobile networks. Internet protocols for mobile networks.
ELEC5510 Satellite Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Yonghui Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Site Visit, Project Work - own time, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of error probabilities, analog and digital modulation techniques and error performance evaluation studied in ELEC3505 Communications and ELEC4505 Digital Communication Systems, is assumed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Satellite communication systems provide fixed and mobile communication services over very large areas of land, sea and air. This unit presents the fundamental knowledge and skills in the analysis and design of such systems. It introduces students to the broad spectrum of satellite communications and its position in the entire telecommunications network; helps students to develop awareness of the key factors affecting a good satellite communications system and theoretical and practical skills in the design of a satellite communications link.
Topic areas include: satellite communication link design; propagation effects and their impact on satellite performance; satellite antennas; digital modem design, speech codec design; error control for digital satellite links.
ELEC5511 Optical Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Minasian Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3405 OR ELEC9405) AND (ELEC3505 OR ELEC9505). Basic knowledge of communications, electronics and photonics Assessment: Through semester assessment (25%) and Final Exam (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: -
Optical telecommunications has revolutionized the way we receive information and communicate with one another. This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of optical fibre communication systems. It commences with a description of optical fibre propagation characteristics and transmission properties. We will then consider light sources and the fundamental principles of laser action in semiconductor and other lasers including quantum well lasers, tunable lasers and fibre lasers, and also the characteristics of optical transmitters based on semiconductor and electro-optic modulation techniques. The characteristics of optical amplifiers will also be discussed. On the receiver side, the principles of photodetection and optical receiver sensitivity will be presented. Other aspects such as fibre devices and multiple wavelength division multiplexing techniques will also be discussed. Finally, the complete optical fibre communication system will be studied to enable the design of data transmission optical systems, local area networks and multi-channel optical systems.
ELEC5512 Optical Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Javid Atai Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of digital communications, wave propagation, and fundamental optics Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds upon the fundamentals of optical communication introduced in ELEC3405 (Communications Electronics and Photonics). It focuses on photonic network architectures and protocols, network design, enabling technologies and the drivers for intelligent optical network.
Students will learn how to analyse and design optical networks and optical components.
Introduction, photonic network architectures: point to point, star, ring, mesh; system principles: modulation formats, link budgets, optical signal to noise ratio, dispersion, error rates, optical gain and regeneration; wavelength division multiplexed networks; WDM components: optical filters, gratings, multiplexers, demultiplexers, wavelength routers, optical crossconnects, wavelength converters, WDM transmitters and receivers; Wavelength switched/routed networks, ultra high speed TDM, dispersion managed links, soliton systems; broadcast and distribution networks, multiple access, subcarrier multiplexed lightwave video networks, optical local area and metropolitan area networks; protocols for photonic networks: IP, Gbit Ethernet, SDH/SONET, FDDI, ATM, Fibre Channel.
ELEC5514 Networked Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zihuai Lin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3305 AND ELEC3506 AND ELEC3607 AND ELEC5508 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aim to teach the fundamentals concepts associated with: Networked Embedded Systems, wireless sensor networks; Wireless channel propagation and radio power consumption; Wireless networks, ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc. ; Sensor principle, data fusion, source detection and identification; Multiple source detection, multiple access communications; Network topology, routing, network information theory; Distributed source channel coding for sensor networks; Power-aware and energy-aware communication protocols; Distributed embedded systems problems such as time synchronization and node localisation; Exposure to several recently developed solutions to address problems in wireless sensor networks and ubiquitous computing giving them a well-rounded view of the state-of the-art in the networked embedded systems field.
Student involvement with projects will expose them to the usage of simulators and/or programming some types of networked embedded systems platforms.
Ability to identify the main issues and trade-offs in networked embedded systems; Understanding of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area; Based on the above understanding, ability to analyse requirements and devise first-order solutions for particular networked embedded systems problems; Familiarisation with a simulator platform and real hardware platforms for network embedded systems through the students involvement in projects.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Liwei Li Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5517 Software Defined Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce an emerging networking paradigm- Software Defined Networks (SDNs). By separating the control logics from the physical networks, the software defined networks allow an automated and programmable software program to logically control and manage the network. This unit introduces the basic principles of software defined networks, its architecture, abstraction, SDN programming, programmable control plane and data plane protocols, network update, network virtualisation, traffic management as well as its applications and implementations. Student will learn and practice SDN programming, testing and debugging on SDNs platforms through experiments and group projects. It is assumed that the students have some knowledge on data communications and networks.
ELEC5616 Computer and Network Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Boland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.
ELEC5618 Software Quality Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Writing programs with multiple functions or methods in multiple files; design of complex data structures and combination in non trivial algorithms; use of an integrated development environment; software version control systems. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover software quality planning, validation and verification methods and techniques, risk analysis, software review techniques, software standards and software process improvement and software reliability.
Students who successfully complete this unit will understand the fundamental concepts of software quality engineering and be able to define software quality requirements, assess the quality of a software design, explain specific methods of building software quality, understand software reliability models and metrics, develop a software quality plan, understand quality assurance and control activities and techniques, understand various testing techniques including being able to verify and test a unit of code and comprehend ISO standards, SPICE, CMM and CMMI.
ELEC5619 Object Oriented Application Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Java programming, and some web development experience are essential. Databases strongly recommended Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing large Internet systems by using and building application frameworks. Frameworks allow great reuse so developers do not have to design and implement applications from scratch, as students have done in ELEC3610 The unit lays down the basic concepts and hands on experience on the design and development of enterprise systems, emphasizing the development of systems using design patterns and application frameworks.
A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. Several development Java frameworks will be used, including Spring, Hibernate, and others. Principles of design patterns will also be studied.
ELEC5620 Model Based Software Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Model-Based Software Engineering focuses on modern software engineering methods, technologies, and processes used in professional development projects. It covers both the pragmatic engineering elements and the underlying theory of the model-based approach to the analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of complex software-intensive systems.
Students will participate in a group project, which will entail developing and/or evolving a software system, following a full development cycle from requirements specification through to implementation and testing using up-to-date industrial development tools and processes. At the end of the course they will provide a presentation and demonstration of their project work to the class. There is no formal teaching of a programming language in this unit, although students will be expected to demonstrate through their project work their general software engineering and architectural skills as well as their mastery of model-based methods and technologies.
Students successfully completing this unit will have a strong practical and theoretical understanding of the modern software development cycle as applied in industrial settings. In particular, they will be familiar with the latest model-based software engineering approaches necessary for successfully dealing with today's highly complex and challenging software systems.
The pedagogic grounds for this course and its focus on model-based approaches are to arm new software engineers with skills and perspectives that extend beyond the level of basic programming. Such skills are essential to success in software development nowadays, and are in great demand but very low supply. The dearth of such expertise is one of the key reasons behind the alarmingly high failure rate of industrial software projects (currently estimated at being greater than 40%). Therefore, this unit complements SQE and strengthens a key area in the program.
ELEC5622 Signals, Software and Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing systems that use sensor data, such as those from physiology and activity tracking, often combined with patients self-reports. As sensing devices become ubiquitous, data processing, storage and visualisation techniques are becoming part of all health systems, both institutionalised and individually driven.
The unit is related to, but distinct, to health informatics- an area that focuses on the the use of computing to deliver cost efficient healthcare and the area of bioinformatics, that explores the role of computing in understanding biology at the cellular level (e. g. genome). This unit focuses on the technical and non-technical problems of developing increasingly ubiquitous devices and systems that can be used for personal and clinical monitoring.
ELEC5701 Technology Venture Creation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workgroups Prohibitions: ENGG5102 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study prepares graduating students with insight and skills in how to turn a concept into a high technology startup company. The class will provide students with knowledge, practical experience and frameworks to assist in evaluating the market for a technology product or service, the design and viability of business models around it, the formulation of a funding-reading business plan and financials, capital raising options and process, venture capital, building distribution channels, intellectual property protection, putting together an A-grade management team, term sheets and funding documentation, technology sales models and going global. We will look at real world case studies of successful technology companies (and flame outs). Does Twitter have a viable business model? Will Facebook eat its lunch? Is YouTube just burning cash? Will Google rule the world?
During the period of the course, students will form teams and write a business plan around a concept they propose. Each student will assume a role in the team (CEO, CTO, CFO, VP Sales and Marketing). The plan will be judged by a panel of real world venture capitalists, entrepreneurs and angel investors to determine the final grade for the course.
Be warned that a serious commitment will be required in developing the concept into a viable business plan. The outcome, however, will be very rewarding to those students interested in starting the next Google.
This course is taught by instructors experienced in technology startups and venture capital. The course will include a number of guest lectures by industry.
INFO5010 IT Advanced Topic A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Masahiro Takatsuka Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will cover some topic of active and cutting-edge research within IT; the content of this unit may be varied depending on special opportunities such as a distinguished researcher visiting the University.
INFO6010 Advanced Topics in IT Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Muhammad Hasan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials (applied workshop), E-Learning Prerequisites: INFO6007 OR 3-5 years working experience in IT Project Management Assumed knowledge: Students are assumed to understand the role of IT projects. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit will explore the limitations of IT project management and the most promising techniques to overcome project failure. It will start by reviewing case study research showing we have reached the limits of traditional IT project management practice. The theoretical base will be completed by exploring the finding that senior management have more impact on success than traditional approaches.
Participants will be introduced to and learn to apply the most promising tools and techniques needed to govern IT projects. The topics reviewed will include: 1) Strategy; 2) Organisational change; 3) Project sponsorship; 4) Programme management; 5) Performance measurement; 6) Culture; 7) Portfolio management; 8) Relevant Australian and International Standards on IT/Project Governance and new industry methodologies around portfolio, programme and change management will be reviewed.
INFS6004 Business Transformation Projects

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: Understanding the major functions of a business and how those business functions interact internally and externally so the company can be competitive in a changing market. How Information Systems can be used and managed in a business. How to critically analyse a business and determine its options for transformation. Desirable Experience as a member of a project team. Assessment: assignment 1 (10%), assignment 2 (40%), assignment 3 - report (40%), assignment 3 - presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The forces that currently drive business transformation, such as globalisation, the IT revolution and environmental sustainability, require businesses to be in a constant state of change to stay competitive in turbulent markets. However, as companies need to maintain their current revenue streams, they need to progress through a series of integrated business transformation projects. In this unit, students learn how to analyse an organisation within a local and global context and develop knowledge of techniques required for managing technology-enabled business transformation projects. Topics covered include: the drivers of business transformation, managing change as a process, analysing information and processes, and planning, leading, sustaining, diffusing and learning from transformational projects.
MECH5255 Air Conditioning and Refrigeration

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Dunn Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH3260 OR MECH9260 or MECH8260 Prohibitions: MECH4255 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study develops an advanced knowledge of air conditioning systems and refrigeration applications. At the completion of this unit students will be able to determine thermal loads on structures and design an air conditioning or refrigeration system with attention to comfort, control, air distribution and energy consumption. Course content will include: applied psychrometrics, air conditioning systems, design principles, comfort in the built environment, cooling load calculations, heating load calculations, introduction and use of computer-based load estimation packages software, air distribution, fans, ducts, air conditioning controls, advanced refrigeration cycles, evaporators, condensers, cooling towers, compressors, pumps, throttling devices, piping, refrigerants, control, refrigeration equipment, simulation of refrigeration systems, food refrigeration and industrial applications; Use of CFD packages as tools to simulate flows in building and to optimise air conditioning design, energy estimation methods and software, energy evaluation and management in the built environment. Use of experimental air conditioning systems to test for thermal balances and compare with simulations.
MECH5265 Combustion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Assaad Masri Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MECH3260 AND MECH3261) OR MECH9260 or MECH8260 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to teach the basic principles of combustion highlighting the role of chemical kinetics, fluid mechanics, and molecular transport in determining the structure of flames. Students will become familiar with laminar and turbulent combustion of gaseous and liquid fuels including the formation of pollutants. They will also be briefly introduced to various applications such as internal combustion engines, gas turbines, furnaces and fires.
This unit will cover equilibrium compositions, flammability limits, simple chemically reacting systems, detailed chemical kinetics, and the basic theory underlying laminar and turbulent combustion for both premixed and non-premixed cases. There will be an introduction to droplet combustion, the concept of mixture fraction for non-premixed flames, combustion in engines and gas turbines as well as the formation of pollutants. Fire ignition, growth and spread will also be covered with respect to safety in buildings including the hazards related to the formation of smoke and toxic products.
MECH5275 Renewable Energy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kirkpatrick Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MECH3260 AND MECH3261) OR (AERO3260 AND AERO3261) OR (MECH9260 AND MECH9261) OR (MECH8260 and MECH8261) OR (AERO9260 AND AERO9261) OR (AERO8260 and AERO8261). Students claiming to have prerequisite knowledge based on study at other institutions must contact the unit of study coordinator before enrolling in this unit and may be required to sit a pre-exam to demonstrate that they have the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake this advanced level unit. Assumed knowledge: The student will need a sound background in advanced level fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. In particular, students should be able to analyse fluid flow in turbomachinery; perform first and second law thermodynamic analysis of energy conversion systems, including chemically reacting systems; and perform advanced level calculations of conductive and convective and radiative heat transfer, including radiative spectral analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to develop understanding of the engineering design and analysis of different devices and technologies for generating power from renewable sources including: solar, wind, wave, tidal, ocean thermal, geothermal, hydro-electric, and biofuels; to understand the environmental, operational and economic issues associated with each of these technologies. At the end of this unit students will be able to perform in depth technical analysis of different types of renewable energy generation devices using the principles of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students will be able to describe the environmental, economic and operational issues associated with these devices.
MECH5304 Materials Failure

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lin Ye Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Presentation Prerequisites: (MECH9361 OR MECH3361 or MECH8361) AND (MECH9362 or MECH8362 OR MECH3362) Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge in materials science and engineering: 1) atomic and crystal structures 2) metallurgy 3) structure-property relationship 4) mechanics of engineering materials 5) solid mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Develop advanced knowledge and skills in diagnostic analyses of materials failure using advanced techniques; enhance students' ability in handling complex engineering cases using interdisciplinary technologies; and provide students an opportunity to understand project research.
MECH5305 Smart Materials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lin Ye Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (AMME9301 OR AMME2301) AND (AMME9302 OR AMME2302 OR AMME1362) Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge in materials science and engineering: 1) atomic and crystal structures 2) metallurgy 3) structure-property relationship 4) mechanics of engineering materials 5) solid mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Develop an essential understanding of structure-property relationship of smart materials, as well as their applications in practical applications; develop student's capability to design functional structures using smart materials; and provide students an opportunity to learn the new knowledge through project approaches.
MECH5310 Advanced Engineering Materials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Marcela Bilek Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: MECH3362 OR MECH9362 or MECH8362 Prohibitions: MECH4310 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To understand (a) how to define the relationship between properties and microstructures of advanced engineering materials, (b) how to improve mechanical design with the knowledge of mechanics and properties of materials, and (c) how to conduct failure diagnosis of engineering materials.
MECH5311 Microscopy and Microanalysis of Materials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Xiaozhou Liao Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: AMME1362 or AMME9302 or CIVL2110. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS offers the fundamental knowledge that is essential for the microscopy and microanalysis of materials. The UoS will cover the basic fundamental concepts of materials structures and modern materials characterisation techniques that are available in the University, including X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atom probe tomography, atomic force microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.
MECH5416 Advanced Design and Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrei Lozzi Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (AMME2301 OR AMME9301) AND (AMME2500 OR AMME9500) AND (MECH2400 OR MECH9400) Prohibitions: MECH4460 Assumed knowledge: ENGG1802 or AMME1802 - Eng Mechanics; balance of forces and moments; AMME2301 - Mechanics of Solids; 2 and 3 dimensional stress and strain; AMME2500 - Engineering Dynamics - dynamic forces and moments; MECH2400 - Mechanical Design 1; approach to design problems and report writing; and preparation of engineering drawing; MECH3460 - Mechanical design 2; means of applying fatigue analysis to a wide range of machine components. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This UoS utilises assumed theoretical knowledge and skills to elucidate the stresses and strains that exit in the different categories of machine parts. It sets out to make the students familiar with the simplifications that are applied to arrive at the analytic expressions commonly used to analyse each individual categories parts. These simplifications usually begin by assuming that only particular types of loads are carried by teh parts in that category. The resulting analyses provide approximations to the actual stresses. It is possible to have different degrees of simplifications, requiring more or less work, giving better or poorer approximations. Should a part be used to carry loads that were not allowed for in the traditional method then some more appropriate method must be found or developed. An important aspect is to make the student practiced in a range of modern concepts, techniques and tools, and to be made aware of their strengths and limitations.
This UoS teaches the student how to recognise where and how their theoretical skills can be applied to the practical situations that they may encounter in this field of design.
Options may be provided in the choice of design assignments. Biomedical engineering and vehicle design problems may be provided as options to more general machine design problems.
MECH5720 Sensors and Signals

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Graham Brooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time, Laboratories, Tutorials Prerequisites: MTRX3700 Prohibitions: MECH4720 Assumed knowledge: Strong MATLAB skills Assessment: Through semester assessment (65%) and Final Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Syllabus Summary: This course starts by providing a background to the signals and transforms required to understand modern sensors. It goes on to provide an overview of the workings of typical active sensors (Radar, Lidar and Sonar). It provides insight into basic sensing methods as well as aspects of interfacing and signal processing. It includes both background material and a number of case studies.
The course covers the following topics:
a) SIGNALS: Convolution, The Fourier Transform, Modulation (FM, AM, FSK, PSK etc), Frequency shifting (mixing)
b) PASSIVE SENSORS: Infrared Radiometers, Imaging Infrared, Passive Microwave Imaging, Visible Imaging and Image Intensifiers
c) ACTIVE SENSORS THE BASICS: Operational Principles, Time of flight (TOF) Measurement and Imaging of Radar, Lidar and Sonar, Radio Tags and Transponders, Range Tacking, Doppler Measurement, Phase Measurement
d) SENSORS AND THE ENVIRONMENT: Atmospheric Effects, Target Characteristics, Clutter Characteristics, Multipath
e) ACTIVE SENSORS: ADVANCED TECHNIQUES: Probability of Detection, Angle Measurement and Tracking, Combined Range/Doppler and Angle Tracking, Frequency Modulation and the Fast Fourier Transform, High Range Resolution, Wide Aperture Methods, Synthetic Aperture Methods (SAR)
Objectives: The course aims to provide students with a good practical knowledge of a broad range of sensor technologies, operational principles and relevant signal processing techniques.
Expected Outcomes: A good understanding of active sensors, their outputs and applicable signal processing techniques. An appreciation of the basic sensors that are available to engineers and when they should be used.
MTRX5700 Experimental Robotics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stefan Williams Session: Semester 1 Classes: Laboratories, Lectures Prerequisites: (AMME3500 OR AMME9501 or AMME8501) AND MTRX3700 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of statics and dynamics, rotation matrices, programming and some electronic and mechanical design experience is assumed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to present a broad overview of the technologies associated with industrial and mobile robots. Major topics covered are sensing, mapping, navigation and control of mobile robots and kinematics and control of industrial robots. The subject consists of a series of lectures on robot fundamentals and case studies on practical robot systems. Material covered in lectures is illustrated through experimental laboratory assignments. The objective of the course is to provide students with the essential skills necessary to be able to develop robotic systems for practical applications.
At the end of this unit students will: be familiar with sensor technologies relevant to robotic systems; understand conventions used in robot kinematics and dynamics; understand the dynamics of mobile robotic systems and how they are modeled; have implemented navigation, sensing and control algorithms on a practical robotic system; apply a systematic approach to the design process for robotic systems; understand the practical application of robotic systems in manufacturing, automobile systems and assembly systems; develop the capacity to think critically and independently about new design problems; undertake independent research and analysis and to think creatively about engineering problems.
Course content will include: history and philosophy of robotics; hardware components and subsystems; robot kinematics and dynamics; sensors, measurements and perception; robotic architectures, multiple robot systems; localization, navigation and obstacle avoidance, robot planning; robot learning; robot vision and vision processing.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).