Sustainability and Environmental Engineering

Master of Engineering majoring in Sustainability and Environmental Engineering

To qualify for the award of the Master of Engineering in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 72 credit points, including core and elective units of study as listed below.
Candidates with a Bachelor of Engineering Honours or equivalent in the relevant discipline, and who have reached the required level of academic achievement in their prior degree, may be eligible for a reduction of volume in learning of up to 24 credit points.

Core units

Candidates must complete 24 credit points of Core units.
Where Reduced Volume Learning has been granted candidates must complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Core units.
ENGG5102 Entrepreneurship for Engineers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5701 Assumed knowledge: Some limited industry experience is preferred but not essential. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce graduate engineering students from all disciplines to the concepts and practices of entrepreneurial thinking. Introduction to Entrepreneurship will offer the foundation for leaders of tomorrow's high-tech companies, by providing the knowledge and skills important to the creation and leadership of entrepreneurial ventures. The focus of the unit of study is on how to launch, lead and manage a viable business starting with concept validation to commercialisation and successful business formation.
The following topics are covered: Entrepreneurship: Turning Ideas into Reality, Building the Business Plan, Creating a Successful Financial Plan, Project planning and resource management, Budgeting and managing cash flow, Marketing and advertising strategies, E-Commerce and Entrepreneurship, Procurement Management Strategies, The Legal Environment: Business Law and Government Regulation, Intellectual property: inventions, patents and copyright, Workplace, workforce and employment topics, Conflict resolution and working relationships, Ethics and Social Responsibility.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online, Block mode
Project Management processes are what moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. This course takes the project manager from a detailed understanding of process modelling through to the development and implementation of management processes applicable to various project types and industries and covers approaches to reviewing, monitoring and improving these processes. Specifically, the UoS aims to develop understanding of the nature and purpose of project management in the context of economic enterprise; develop knowledge of various models and frameworks for the practical application of project management; and explore core elements of effective project management with particular focus on technological development and innovation

Specialist units

Candidates must complete 24 credit points of Specialist units, but may take additional units as Electives.
Where Reduced Volume Learning has been granted candidates must complete a minimum of 24 credit points of Specialist units.
Exchange units may be taken as Specialist units with the approval of the Program Director.
AMME5101 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: MECH3260 OR MECH9260 or MECH8260 OR AERO3261 OR AERO9261 or AERO8261 Assumed knowledge: Students are expected to be familiar with the basic laws of thermodynamics, fluid mechanics and heat transfer Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is suitable for any engineering discipline student who is interested in developing an understanding of analysis and design in energy, power generation, environment and relevant economic issues. The aim is to acquaint students with the methods engineers use to design and evaluate the processes used for the conversion of energy into useful work. This course concentrates on thermal energy conversion. It also assesses and deals with the environmental consequences of energy conversion. At the end of this unit students will be able to critically analyse technical, economic and societal impacts of energy conversion systems.
A series of topics, each containing a series of lectures, will be covered in relation to energy. The course content will include: The Status of Energy Today; Energy for Electricity Generation; Nuclear Energy; Energy for Transportation; Future Energy Usage.
CHNG5003 Green Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Lectures Assumed knowledge: CHNG3801 AND CHNG3802 AND CHNG3803 AND CHNG3805 AND CHNG3806 AND CHNG3807. All core 3000 level chemical engineering units of study. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Green engineering, eco-technology and sustainable technology are all interchangeable terms for the design of products and processes that maximise resource and energy efficiency, minimise (or preferably eliminate) waste and cause no harm to the environment. In modern society, engineers equipped with the skills to develop sustainable technologies are tremendously valuable. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of sustainable technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. The delivery of teaching and learning material will be exclusively in project mode. Students will be expected to critically analyse modern engineering processes and improve them, from the ground up if necessary, so that they satisfy the criteria of eco-design. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying principles of green engineering and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5004 Particles and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that all 3000 level core chemical engineering units have been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Particles and Surfaces: Mineral Processing. Aims and Objectives: Solid-solid and solid-liquid interactions are an important aspect in mineral processing. The aim of any mineral processing operation is the efficient extraction of the valuable metals or minerals (concentrate) from the waste materials in the ore (gangue). The goal of this course is to understand the various key steps and the corresponding principles required to achieve metal extraction from the ores.
Syllabus summary: This course will elucidate the principles in size reduction or comminution of the ore in liberating the valuable minerals, examine the microscopic details of solid-liquid, solid-gas and solid-solid interactions in mineral processing and their roles in macroscopic phenomena such as adhesion, wetting, adsorption, and mineral reactions such as reduction roasting and leaching. The general understanding of these factors will allow manipulation and improvement of performance in mineral beneficiation, dewatering of mineral slurries and extractive metallurgy.
By the end of this course students should develop a proficiency in characterisation of physical, surface and chemical properties of solids and metal aqueous streams; devising strategies to achieve extraction process objectives, within the constraints imposed by social, economic and physical environments, developing management strategies for treating liquid and solid effluents and becoming familiar with computer software packages in modelling aqueous and solid systems. This unit is an advanced Chemical Engineering elective.
CHNG5005 Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Group assignment Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit assumes that the student has successfully completed CHNG1103 (Mass and Energy Balances), CHNG2801 (Fluid Mechanics), CHNG2802 (Applied Mathematics), CHNG3803 (Chemical and Biological Process Design), CHNG3804 (Biochemical Engineering) and CHNG3805 (Particle Mechanics) or equivalent. Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Key learning objectives are to provide students with an overview of wastewater treatment and the range of technologies currently used.
The key issues considered are: wastewater characterisation; the cost of wastewater treatment and disposal; the (Australian) regulatory framework; primary, secondary and tertiary treatment options; solids management and water reuse; pro-cess integration; an introduction to process simulation.
CHNG5006 Advanced Wastewater Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CHNG5005 OR CHNG3804. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study addresses inter-related issues relevant to wastewater treatment including: the diverse nature of wastewater and its characteristics; an overview of conventional wastewater treatment options; the use of commercial software in designing and evaluating a range of advanced wastewater treatment options including biological nutrient removal; the potential role of constructed wetlands in domestic and industrial wastewater treatment; wastewater management in the food processing, resources, and coal seam gas production industries; researching advanced wastewater treatment options.
CHNG5008 Nanotechnology in Chemical Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Lectures Assumed knowledge: 12cp CHEM2xxx Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will give students insights into advanced concepts in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, which are essential for the design of efficient processes and green products for the sustainable development and minimise or preferably eliminate waste for a clean world. This unit of study will examine cutting edge examples of nano-technology, renewable energy, bio-technology, and other advanced technologies across a broad range of applications relevant to chemical and biomolecular engineering. At the completion of this unit of study students should have developed an appreciation of the underlying concepts and be able to demonstrate they can apply these skills to new and novel situations. Students are expected to develop an integrated suite of problem-solving skills needed to successfully handle novel (and previously unseen) engineering situations, coupled with an ability to independently research new areas and be critical of what is found, and an ability to cope with experimental data, change and uncertainty through critical thinking.
CHNG5601 Membrane Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
"Membrane Science" provides background in the physics and electrochemistry of a variety of synthetic membranes used in industry as well as cellular membranes.
The course aims to develop students' understanding of:
- membrane self-assembly and manufacture;
- membrane separation processes such as filtration, desalination, ion exchange and water-splitting;
- and techniques for membrane characterisation and monitoring.
CHNG5604 Advanced Membrane Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: CHNG5601 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a practical unit of study where students apply the theoretical concepts of membrane science to engineering practice via a series of laboratory experiments. The students will gain practical insights into mass transport processes through various membranes. Students will understand the construction and functional properties of synthetic separation membranes and also will explore experimentally the various factors affecting the performance of membranes.
ELEC5206 Sustainable Energy Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit of study: familiarity with transformers, ac power, capacitors and inductors, electric circuits such as three-phase circuits and circuits with switches, and basic electronic circuit theory. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit builds upon the knowledge of engineering mathematics, electronic devices and circuit theory and simulation techniques. It deals with both technical and business aspects of sustainable electrical energy systems. In technical aspect, it focuses on energy conversion and electrical characteristics of different renewable energy sources and integration of multiple energy sources into power system both at distribution and transmission levels. In business aspect, it focuses on economical, marketing and political aspects of installing and managing sustainable electrical energy systems in present and future society. It lays a solid foundation of practical and managerial skills on electronics and electrical (power) engineering and later studies such as intelligent electricity networks and advanced energy conversion and power systems. The following topics are covered: modern power systems; distributed generation; co-generation; tri-generation; microturbines; fuel cells; renewable energy sources: solar, wind, hydro, biomass, wind turbines; photovoltaic; grid-connected power systems; stand-alone power systems.
MECH5275 Renewable Energy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MECH3260 AND MECH3261) OR (AERO3260 AND AERO3261) OR (MECH9260 AND MECH9261) OR (MECH8260 and MECH8261) OR (AERO9260 AND AERO9261) OR (AERO8260 and AERO8261). Students claiming to have prerequisite knowledge based on study at other institutions must contact the unit of study coordinator before enrolling in this unit and may be required to sit a pre-exam to demonstrate that they have the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake this advanced level unit. Assumed knowledge: The student will need a sound background in advanced level fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. In particular, students should be able to analyse fluid flow in turbomachinery; perform first and second law thermodynamic analysis of energy conversion systems, including chemically reacting systems; and perform advanced level calculations of conductive and convective and radiative heat transfer, including radiative spectral analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to develop understanding of the engineering design and analysis of different devices and technologies for generating power from renewable sources including: solar, wind, wave, tidal, ocean thermal, geothermal, hydro-electric, and biofuels; to understand the environmental, operational and economic issues associated with each of these technologies. At the end of this unit students will be able to perform in depth technical analysis of different types of renewable energy generation devices using the principles of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students will be able to describe the environmental, economic and operational issues associated with these devices.

Research units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points from the following units:
CHNG5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 OR CHNG5205 Assumed knowledge: (CHNG9301 OR CHNG5801) AND (CHNG9302 OR CHNG5802) AND (CHNG9303 OR CHNG5803) AND (CHNG9305 OR CHNG5805) AND (CHNG9306 OR CHNG5806). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Minimum 12 A and B) run over two semesters. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Corequisites: CHNG5020 Prohibitions: CHNG5022 OR CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 OR CHNG5205 Assumed knowledge: Enrolment in this unit of study assumes that Capstone Project A has been successfully completed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9. The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Minimum 12 A and B) run over two semesters. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion- typically 1 hour per week. A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meetings, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70, or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70, or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Corequisites: CHNG5020 Prohibitions: CHNG5021 OR CHNG5222 OR CHNG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Permission required for semester 1 or 2 based on achievement in Capstone Project A and taking other program requirements into consideration.
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The ability to plan, systematically conduct and report on a major research project is an important skill for professional engineers. This unit of study builds on technical competencies introduced in previous years, as well as making use of the report writing and communications skills the students have developed. The research activity is spread over two units (Capstone Project A and B/B extended) run in first and second semester. In this unit of study, students are required to plan and begin work on a major research project, which is very often some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some of the projects will be experimental in nature, while others may involve computer-based simulation, design or literature surveys. In this unit, students will learn how to examine published and experimental data, set objectives, organize a program of work and devise an experimental or developmental program. The progress at the end of Capstone Project A will be evaluated based on a seminar presentation and a progress report. The skills acquired will be invaluable to students undertaking engineering work. Students are expected to take the initiative when pursuing their research projects. The supervisor will be available for discussion - typically 1 hour per week. Capstone Project B extended enables the student to undertake a project of greater scope and depth than capstone project B.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
CHNG5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ENGG5220 OR ENGG5221 OR CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR CHNG5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
CHNG5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: CHNG5222 Prohibitions: ENGG5220 OR ENGG5221 OR CHNG5020 OR CHNG5021 OR CHNG5022 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
With permission from the Program Director students progressing with distinction (75%) average or higher results may replace CHNG5020, CHNG5021 and 12 credit points of electives with CHNG5222 & CHNG5223, Dissertation A & B.
A candidate who has been granted RVL and who is eligible to undertake the extended capstone project or dissertation may be granted exemption of up to 12 credit points of specialist units.

Elective units

Candidates may complete a maximum of 12 credit points from the following units:
Specialist units may also be taken as Elective units. Other Postgraduate units in the Faculty may be taken as Elective units with the approval of the Program Director.
Electives may be approved for candidates who have been granted RVL with the approval of the Program Director.
CHNG5001 Process Systems Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: 1000 level physics and mathematics (differential equations). Use of mathematical and/or computer-based modelling tools and techniques. Feedback control concepts and principles as taught in CHNG3802/CHNG9302 or similar courses. Students who are unsure about meeting these requirements should contact the unit coordinator for advice. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit of study is for Masters students and can be selected as an elective by 4th year students.
Whatever its purpose, any process requires some level of process monitoring and control to allow it to operate satisfactorily. Once a process is under control, the option exists to further improve performance via the implementation of some level of optimisation. This unit will develop skills in integrating process modelling, simulation, design, optimisation and control concepts. The aims of this unit are (i) to demonstrate that modelling, process control and optimisation are integral concepts in the overall consideration of industrial plants, (ii) to demonstrate that a unified approach allows a diversity of application fields to be readily handled, and (iii) to allow each student to achieve and demonstrate acceptable competency over the unit material through a range of individual and group-based activities.
CHNG5603 Advanced Process Modelling and Simulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: It is assumed that students have a general knowledge of: (MATH1001 OR MATH1021) AND (MATH1003 OR MATH1023) AND (CHNG2802 OR MATH2XXX) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This course is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective course for fourth year students. Some lectures my be given by a guest lecturer.
This course will give students an insight into the use of (computer-based) statistical techniques in extracting information from experimental data obtained from real life bio-physical systems. The issues and techniques required for mathematical modeling as well as monitoring and/or control scheme for bio-physical systems will be discussed and implemented in diverse range of bioprocesses, including biomaterials and fermentation products.
We will review statistical distribution; tests based on z, t, F variables; calculation of confidence intervals; hypothesis testing; linear and nonlinear regression; analysis of variance; principal component analysis; and use of computer-based statistical tools. The issues associated with dynamic response of bio-physical processes; inferred or estimated variables; control system design and implementation; introduction to model-based control; use of computer-based control system design and analysis tools will be elaborated.
When this course is successfully completed you will acquire knowledge to choose the appropriate statistical techniques within a computer based environment, such as Excel or MATLAB, for a given situation. The students will also obtain potential for monitoring/control scheme based on the key dynamic features of the process. Such information would be beneficial for any future career in Bio-manufacturing companies. Students are encouraged to promote an interactive environment for exchange of information.
CHNG5605 Bio-Products: Laboratory to Marketplace

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This course is for Master degree students and also is offered as an elective course for fourth year students.
The objectives of the course are to provide students with an overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical industry. It will give students an insight into drug delivery systems and formulation; how therapeutic drugs work; and a general overview of biochemical and pharmaceutical marketing. The design and management of clinical trials, which are key factors for development of any new therapeutic agent will also be covered in the course. The challenges for commercialisation of innovative methods and/or biochemical and pharmaceutical products and aspects of intellectual property protection will be elaborated. Ultimately the aspects of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and international legislation for marketing pharmaceutical products will be illuminated.
Lectures in this course will be delivered by both University of Sydney staff and by a number of visiting professional representatives from industry and government agencies. We will also arrange a site visit for a bio-manufacturing company as warranted.
When you successfully complete this course you acquire knowledge about drug formulation, pharmaceutical processing including physical processes, legislation governing the bio-manufacturing and commercialisation of biochemicals and pharmaceuticals. The information would be beneficial for your future career in pharmaceutical manufacturing companies.
Students are encouraged to engage in an interactive environment for exchange of information. This course will be assessed by quizzes, assignments, oral presentation and final report. This unit of study is offered as an advanced elective unit of study to final year undergraduate students. Students may be required to attend lectures off-campus.
CIVL5670 Reservoir, Stream and Coastal Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (CIVL3612 OR CIVL9612) AND MATH2061 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The objectives of this unit of study are to develop an understanding of the processes occurring in lakes, reservoirs, streams and coastal seas, an introduction to transport and mixing in inland waters, and to the design the design of marine structures. The unit will cover the mass and heat budget in stored water bodies, mixing, and the implications for water quality. In streams, natural river systems will be discussed, and the principles of sediment transport and scour, monitoring and management will be introduced. The basic equations for linear and nonlinear wave theories in coastal seas will be introduced, and wave forces on structures and an introduction to design of offshore structures will be discussed.
ENGG5231 Engineering Graduate Exchange A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to enable students to undertake an overseas learning activity during the university's summer or winter break while completing a Masters degree in either Engineering, Professional Engineering, Information Technologies or Project Management. The learning activity may comprise either a short project under academic or industry supervision or summer or winter school unit of study at an approved overseas institution. The learning activity should demonstrate outcomes and workload equivalent to a 6 credit point Master's level unit in the student's current award program.
Students may enrol in this unit with permission from the school and the Sub-Dean Students for the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.
ENGG5232 Engineering Graduate Exchange B

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to enable students to undertake an overseas learning activity during the university's summer or winter break while completing a Masters degree in either Engineering, Professional Engineering, Information Technologies or Project Management. The learning activity may comprise either a short project under academic or industry supervision or summer or winter school unit of study at an approved overseas institution. The learning activity should demonstrate outcomes and workload equivalent to a 6 credit point Master's level unit in the student's current award program.
Students may enrol in this unit with permission from the school and the Sub-Dean Students for the Faculty of Engineering and Information Technologies.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).