Unit of study descriptions

Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Aerospace)

To qualify for the award of the Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 96 credit points, including:
(a) 60 credit points of Core units as listed below
(b) ENGG5217 Practical Experience
(c) 24 credit points of Elective units
(d) A minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research Pathway units as detailed below
(e) Candidates undertaking the Research Pathway, replace 12 credit points of elective units with Research Pathway units

Core units

AERO8261 Propulsion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dries Verstraete Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AERO9261 Assumed knowledge: Mathematics and Physics to a level of Bachelor of Science or equivalent. Good knowledge of fluid dynamics and thermodynamics. Assessment: through semester assessment (55%) and final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop and understanding of aircraft propulsion systems. Students will learn to solve problems related to the analysis and selection of various propulsion systems in use- propellers, gas turbines, etc. The topics covered include: Propulsion unit requirements for subsonic and supersonic flight; thrust components, efficiencies, additive drag of intakes; Piston engine components and operation; Propeller theory; Operation, components and cycle analysis of gas turbine engines, turbojets, turbofans, turboprops, ramjets; Components: compressor, fan, burner, turbine, nozzle; Efficiency of components: Off-design considerations; Future directions: minimisation of noise and pollution, scram-jets, hybrid engines.
AERO8360 Aerospace Structures 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Liyong Tong Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AERO9360 Assumed knowledge: AMME9301 Mechanics of Solids Assessment: through semester assessment (45%) and final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop a student's understanding of the theoretical basis of advanced aerospace structural analysis; and introduce students to the solution of real-world aircraft structural problems. This unit of study will develop the following attributes: An understanding of the derivation of the fundamental equations of elasticity and their application in certain analytical problems; An understanding of plate theory and the ability to use this to obtain analytical solutions for plate bending and buckling problems; An understanding of energy-method to develop a deeper appreciation for the complexities of designing solution techniques for structural problems; An understanding of the basic principals behind stressed-skin aircraft construction and the practical analysis of typical aircraft components, including the limitations of such techniques. At the end of this unit students will have an understanding of: 2-D and 3-D elasticity: general equations and solution techniques; Energy methods in structural analysis, including the principles of virtual work and total potential and complimentary energies; Fundamental theory of plates, including in-plane and bending loads as well as buckling and shear instabilities; Solution techniques for plate problems including: Navier solutions for rectangular plates; Combined bending and in-plane loading problems; Energy methods for plate-bending; and Plate buckling for compression and shear loadings; Bending of beams with unsymmetrical cross-sections; Basic principles and theory of stressed-skin structural analysis; Determination of direct stresses and shear flows in arbitrary thin-walled beams under arbitrary loading conditions including: Unsymmetrical sections, Open and closed sections, Single and multi-cell closed sections, Tapered sections, Continuous and idealised sections; The analysis of common aircraft components including fuselages, wings, skin-panels, stringers, ribs, frames and cut-outs; The effects of end constraints and shear-lag on the solutions developed as well as an overall appreciation of the limitations of the solution methods presented.
AERO8460 Aerospace Design 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kc Wong Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, project work - in class, project work - own time Prohibitions: AERO9460 Assumed knowledge: Mathematics, Physics and Solid Mechanics at the level of Bachelor of Engineering, Science or equivalent Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the theory and practice of aircraft component design. In doing so it will emphasise all the considerations, trade-offs and decisions inherent in this process and thus enable students to gain an understanding of why aircraft structures are designed in the way they are with respect to aircraft operational, certification, manufacturing and cost considerations. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand the design process, especially as it applies to aircraft individual component design; Have a familiarity with some of the standard industry practices for component design; An increasing familiarity with typical aerospace analysis techniques along with the primary failure modes that need to be considered; An understanding of the importance of different failure modes for different components and how these relate to load-conditions; a farmilarity with the operating environment that must be considered when designing components; and understanding of some off the legal and ethical requirements of aircraft design engineers to give a basic understanding of the regulatory framework in which aircraft design is conducted.
AMME8501 System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Guodong Shi Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AMME9501 Assumed knowledge: AMME5500 or AMME9500. Students are assumed to have a good background knowledge in ordinary differential equations, Laplace transform methods, linear algebra and mathematical modeling of mechanical systems. Assessment: through semester assessment (40%) and final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to allow students to develop an understanding of methods for modeling and controlling linear, time-invariant systems. Techniques examined will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain approaches to modeling of systems. This will allow students to examine the response of a system to changing inputs and to examine the influence of external stimuli such as disturbances on system behaviour. Students will also gain an understanding of how the responses of these mechanical systems can be altered to meet desired specifications and why this is important in many engineering problem domains. The study of control systems engineering is of fundamental importance to most engineering disciplines, including Electrical, Mechanical, Mechatronic and Aerospace Engineering. Control systems are found in a broad range of applications within these disciplines, from aircraft and spacecraft to robots, automobiles, computers and process control systems. The concepts taught in this course introduce students to the mathematical foundations behind the modelling and control of linear, time-invariant dynamic systems. In particular, topics addressed in this course will include: Techniques for modelling mechanical systems and understanding their response to control inputs and disturbances (this will include the use of differential equations and frequency domain methods as well as tools such as Root Locus and Bode plots); Representation of systems in a feedback control system as well as techniques for determining what desired system performance specifications are achievable, practical and important when the system is under control; Theoretical and practical techniques that help engineers in designing control systems, and an examination of which technique is best in solving a given problem.
AERO8260 Aerodynamics 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gareth Vio Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, laboratories Prohibitions: AERO9260 Assumed knowledge: Mathematics and Physics to the level of Bachelor of Science or equivalent. Linear Mathematics and Vector Calculus, Partial Differential Equations (Intro). Assessment: through semester assessment (50%) and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study should prepare students to be able to undertake aerodynamic performance calculations for industry design situations. The unit aims to develop a knowledge and appreciation of the complex behaviour of airflow in the case of two dimensional aerofoil sections and three dimensional wings; To encourage hands-on experimentation with wind-tunnel tests to allow an understanding of these concepts and their range of applicability. To understand the limitations of linearised theory and the effects of unsteady flow. At the end of this unit students will be able to: predict flow properties for general aircraft wing sections to obtain lift, drag and pitching moment; extrapolate section results to predict full three dimensional wing behaviour; undertake experiments and analyse data to verify theoretical predictions; construct simple computer algorithms that will allow more complex geometries to be solved; understand the limitations of theory and the effect of second order parameters (Reynolds number, Mach Number) to the primary flow properties. Course content will include: construction and designation of two dimensional aerofoil sections; point vortex model of aerofoil; Joukowski transformation theory; thin aerofoil theory; linear lift properties for sections; limiting effects such as stall; calcualtion of pitching moment coefficient; methods for estimation of boundary flow and friction drag calculations; viscous-inviscid panel method numerical solutions; modelling of three dimension wing flows; lifting line theory and vortex lattice method; effects of downwash, aspect ratio, sweep angle and asymmetry.
AERO8560 Flight Mechanics 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gareth Vio Session: Semester 2 Classes: laboratories, lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: AERO9560 Assumed knowledge: Mathematics, Physics and Dynamics assumed knowledge at the level of Bachelor of Science or equivalent. Assessment: through semester assessment (50%) and final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop an understanding of aircraft longitudinal equilibrium, static stability, dynamic stability and response. Students will develop an understanding of the importance and significance of flight stability, will gain skills in dynamic system analysis and will learn mathematical tools used for prediction of aircraft flight behaviour. Students will gain skills in problem solving in the area of flight vehicle motion, and learn the fundamentals of flight simulation. At the end of this unit students will be able to understand: aircraft flight conditions and equilibrium; the effects of aerodynamic and propulsive controls on equilibrium conditions; the significance of flight stability and its impact of aircraft operations and pilot workload; the meaning of aerodynamic stability derivatives and their sources; the effects of aerodynamic derivatives on flight stability; the impact of flight stability and trim on all atmospheric flight vehicles. Students will also be able to model aircraft flight characteristics using computational techniques and analyse the aircraft equations of rigid-body motion and to extract stability characteristics. Course content will include static longitudinal aircraft stability: origin of symmetric forces and moments; static and manoeuvring longitudinal stability, equilibrium and control of rigid aircraft; aerodynamic load effects of wings, stabilisers, fuselages and power plants; trailing edge aerodynamic controls; trimmed equilibrium condition; static margin; effect on static stability of free and reversible controls.
AERO9301 Applied Finite Element Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Liyong Tong Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AERO9360 or AERO8360 or MECH9361 or MECH8361 Assumed knowledge: BE in area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering field. Assessment: Through semester assessment (55%) and Final Exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach fundamentals of modern numerical and analytical techniques for evaluating stresses, strains, deformations and strengths of representative aerospace structures. In particular the focus is on developing an understanding of: Fundamental concepts and formulations of the finite element methods for basic structural analysis; Elements for typical aerospace structures- such as beams/frames, plates/shells, and their applications and limitations; Finite element techniques for various types of problems pertinent to aerospace structures; and developing hands-on experience of using selected commercial finite element analysis program.
At the end of this unit of study the following will have been covered: Introduction to Finite Element Method for modern structural and stress analysis; One-dimensional rod elements; Generalization of FEM for elasticity; Two- and three-dimensional trusses; FEA for beams and frames in 2D and 3D; Two-dimensional problems using constant strain triangular elements; The two-dimensional isoparametric elements; Plates and shells elements and their applications; FEA for axisymmetric shells and pressure vessels, shells of revolution; FEA for axisymmetric solids subjected to axi-symmetric loading; FEA for structural dynamics, eigenvalue analysis, modal response, transient response; Finite element analysis for stress stiffening and buckling of beams, plates and shells; Three-dimensional problems in stress analysis; Extensions to the element library, higher order elements, special elements; Constraints; FEA modeling strategy; FEA for heat conduction; FEA for non-linear material and geometric analysis.
AMME9601 Professional Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof John Kent Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to create an awareness of issues surrounding the management of projects; impart knowledge resulting in a more global approach to the practice of engineering and engineering management; and provide a vehicle for improving communication skills (both written and oral). The course also aims, when taken together with other courses offered by the School, to substantially meet the requirement of the Institution of Engineers, Australia, for undergraduate training in management theory and Professional Engineering skills. On completion of this unit students should be able to: plan small projects and contribute effectively to planning of larger projects; work effectively in small teams; understand their role and expected conduct in the management of engineering projects; perform well in that role from the outset, with performance limited only by experience; prepare an interesting and relevant presentation on aspects of their work for their peers or senior managers; recognise the range of expertise they may need to call on in their role as an engineer working on a project (e.g. in safety and environmental fields); understand what the experts are saying, and be able to contribute effectively to that discussion.
AERO5400 Advanced Aircraft Design Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kc Wong Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Lectures, Meetings Prerequisites: AERO3460 or AERO9460 or AERO8460 Prohibitions: AERO4491 Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate level 1, 2 and 3 or Foundation Masters units in Aerospace Design are expected to have been completed before undertaking this unit. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide familiarity and understanding with practical aircraft design processes expected in industry, including the evaluation and case studies of existing aircraft designs. Students will gain a better understanding of relevant issues particularly related to the design of aircraft with a level of confidence to lead them to develop new designs or modifications, having a good balance between theory and real-world applications. Good familiarity with unique and stringent international aviation regulations and certification processes will be expected with respect to the design of aircraft. Topics covered by the lectures will include aircraft specifications; aircraft selection and evaluation; aircraft configuration design; design considerations for aerodynamics, structures, systems, manufacture, testing, certification, life-cycle-cost, operations; the use of computational aircraft design tools, in particular DARcorp's Advanced Aircraft Analysis (AAA); and introduction to multidisciplinary design optimisation methods. Projects will be based on case study analyses and evaluation of aircraft types to operational specifications and requirements.
ENGG5103 Safety Systems and Risk Analysis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To develop an understanding of principles of safety systems management and risk management, as applied to engineering systems. AS/NZS 4801:2001 and 4804:2001 form the foundation for teaching methods of developing, implementing, monitoring and improving a safety management system in an Engineering context.
Students will be exposed to a number of case studies related to safety systems and on completion of the course be able to develop a safety management plan for an Engineering facility that meets the requirements of NSW legislation and Australian standards for Occupational Health and Safety management systems.
Students are introduced to a variety of risk management approaches used by industry, and methods to quantify and estimate the consequences and probabilities of risks occurring, as applied to realistic industrial scenarios.
ENGG5217 Practical Experience

Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Lowe Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Practical Experience Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG5205 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed one year of their MPE program before enrolling in this unit.
The 3 year MPE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students can undertake their work experience in the final year of the MPE program (Year 3). Students may have prior work in an Engineering field carried out on completion of their undergraduate degree accepted as meeting the requirements of this component.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to inform the Faculty of any work arrangements by emailing the Graduate School of Engineering and Information Technologies. Assessment in this unit is by the submission of a portfolio containing written reports on the involvement with industry. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience portfolio web site http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml

Elective units

Candidates must complete 24 credit points from the following Aerospace elective units.
AERO5200 Advanced Aerodynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gareth Vio Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AERO9260 or AERO8260 or AERO3260 Assumed knowledge: BE in the area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering field. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Objectives/Expected Outcomes: To develop a specialist knowledge in the fields of computational, non-linear and unsteady aerodynamics. The develop familiarity with the techniques for predicting airflow/structure interactions for aerospace vehicles.
Syllabus Summary: Advanced two and three dimensional panel method techniques; calculation of oscillatory flow results; prediction of aerodynamic derivatives. Pressure distributions for complete aircraft configuration. Unsteady subsonic flow analysis of aircraft; calculation of structural modes. Structural response to gusts; aeroelasticity; flutter and divergence. Solution of aerospace flow problems using finite element methods. Unsteady supersonic one-dimensional flow. Hypersonic flow; real gas effects. Introduction to the use of CFD for transonic flow.
AERO5206 Rotary Wing Aircraft

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kc Wong Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (AERO3260 OR AERO9260 or AERO8260) AND (AERO3560 OR AERO9560 or AERO8560) Assumed knowledge: Prior Learning: concepts from 3000 level Aerodynamics and Flight Mechanics will be applied to Rotary Wing Vehicles in this unit. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop an understanding of the theory of flight, design and analysis of helicopters, auto-gyros and other rotary wing aircraft. Students will gain an appreciation of the extra difficulties involved when the vehicle flow is cyclic in nature. At the end of this unit students will be able to: Identify and predict the various flow states of a generic lift producing rotor; Use appropriate methods to determine the forces and torques associated with the rotor; Estimate values for typical stability derivatives for helicopters and be able to construct a simple set of stability analysis equations for the vehicle; become aware of the regulatory and liability requirements relating to all aspects of commercial helicopter operation and maintenance. Course content will include introduction to rotary wing aircraft; vertical flight performance; forward flight performance; blade motion and control; dynamics of rotors; rotor-craft stability; rotor blade design.
AERO5500 Flight Mechanics Test and Evaluation Adv

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: AERO5510 OR AERO9560 OR AERO3560 Assumed knowledge: BE in area of Aerospace Engineering or related Engineering Field. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to develop an understanding of aircraft flight test, validation and verification, and the development of modern flight control, guidance, and navigation systems. Students will gain skills in analysis, problem solving and systems design in the areas of aircraft dynamic system identification and control.
At the end of this unit students will be able to understand elements of the following: the principles of stability augmentation systems and autopilot control systems in aircraft operation, their functions and purposes; the characteristics of closed loop system responses; advanced feedback control systems and state-space design techniques; the concepts of parameter and state estimation; the design of observers in the state space and the implementation of a Kalman Filter; multi-loop control and guidance systems and the reasons for their structures; flight test principles and procedures and the implementation a flight test programme.
AERO5700 Space Engineering (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaofeng Wu Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (AERO3760 AND AERO4701) OR AERO9760 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Estimation techniques are applied to a wide range of aerospace systems. In this subject optimal estimation techniques will be presented as a collection of algorithms and their implementation.
AERO5750 Unmanned Air Vehicle Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kc Wong Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (AERO3260 OR AERO9260) AND (AERO3460 OR AERO9460) AND (AERO3360 OR AERO9360) AND (AERO3560 OR AERO9560) Assumed knowledge: AERO1560, AERO1400, AMME2700, AERO3460, AERO3560, AERO3260, AERO3261 and AERO4460. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives/Expected Outcomes: To develop specialist knowledge and understanding of Unmanned Air Vehicle (UAV) systems. To be able to assess, evaluate and perform preliminary design analysis on complete UAV systems.
Syllabus summary: This course will focus on understanding UAVs from a system perspective. It will consider a variety of key UAV subsystems and look at how these interact to determine the overall effectiveness of a particular UAV system for a given mission. Based on this understanding it will also look at the evaluation and design of a complete UAV system for a given mission specification. Some of the primary UAV subsystems that will be considered in this course are as follows.
Airframe and Propulsion: The role of the basic airframe/propulsion subsystem of the UAV in setting operational mission bounds for different classes of UAVs, from micro UAVs, through to larger vehicles.
Flight Control and Avionics: Typical UAV primary flight control systems; Sensor requirements to support different levels of operation (eg auto-land vs remote-control landing etc. ,); Redundancy requirements.
Navigation: Navigation requirements; inertial navigation; aiding via use of GPS; strategies to combat GPS failures.
Typical Payloads: Electro-Optical (EO); Infra-Red (IR); Electronic Warfare (EW); Electronic Surveillance (ES); Radar and others. Payload stabilization and pointing accuracy requirements.
Air-Ground Communication Link: Typical Civilian and Military communication links. Range, Security, Bandwidth, Cost issues.
Ground Control Station(GCS): Air-vehicle monitoring; payload monitoring; data dissemination; control of multiple vehicles.
The course will also consider other general issues associated with modern UAV systems including multi-vehicle systems, certification of UAV systems and others. As part of the course students will spend 1 day operating a UAV system, with their own mission guidance/mission control software on board.
AERO9262 Aerodynamics 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ben Thornber Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: AMME9261 or AERO8261 Assessment: through semester assessment (30%), final exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to: elementary and advanced topics in gasdynamics (high speed flows). Course content will include review of equations of gasdynamics, one-dimensional gas flow, isentropic flows, normal shock, flow in a converging and converging-diverging nozzle, steady two-dimensional supersonic flow, shock waves (normal and oblique), method of characteristics, two-dimensional supersonic aerofoils, introduction to three dimensional effects, unsteady flows, moving shocks, shock tube flow and transonic flow and compressible boundary layers, introduction to turbulent flows. At the end of this unit the student will be able to calculate a high speed flow about an aerofoil and compressible flow through a duct of varying cross-section and will have a good appreciation of transonic and hypersonic flows.
AERO9760 Spacecraft and Satellite Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Xiaofeng Wu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project work - in class Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course aims to introduce the students to the engineering aspects of spacecraft and mission design, covering the space environment and spacecraft sub-systems, including thermal control, power systems, attitude decision and control system, tracking, telemetry and telecommand, and on-board data handling.
AMME5060 Advanced Computational Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicholas Williamson Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: UG students are required to complete AMME3060 before enrolling in this unit. Assumed knowledge: Linear algebra, calculus and partial differential equations, Taylor series, the finite difference and finite element methods, numerical stability, accuracy, direct and iterative linear solvers and be able to write Matlab Scripts to solve problems using these methods. Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will cover advanced numerical and computational methods within an engineering context. The context will include parallel coding using MPI, computational architecture, advanced numerical methods including spectral methods, compact finite difference schemes, numerical dispersion and diffusion and efficient linear solvers. Students will develop to skills and confidence to write their own computational software. Applications in fluid and solid mechanics will be covered.
AMME5202 Computational Fluid Dynamics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Steven Armfield Session: Semester 1 Classes: Laboratories, Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Partial differential equations; Finite difference methods; Taylor series; Basic fluid mechanics including pressure, velocity, boundary layers, separated and recirculating flows. Basic computer programming skills. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives: To provide students with the necessary skills to use commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics packages and to carry out research in the area of Computational Fluid Dynamics. Expected outcomes: Students will have a good understanding of the basic theory of Computational Fluid Dynamics, including discretisation, accuracy and stability. They will be capable of writing a simple solver and using a sophisticated commercial CFD package.
Syllabus summary: A course of lectures, tutorials and laboratories designed to provide the student with the necessary tools for using a sophisticated commercial CFD package. A set of laboratory tasks will take the student through a series of increasingly complex flow simulations, requiring an understanding of the basic theory of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The laboratory tasks will be complemented by a series of lectures in which the basic theory is covered, including: governing equations; finite difference methods, accuracy and stability for the advection/diffusion equation; direct and iterative solution techniques; solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations; turbulent flow; Cartesian tensors; turbulence models.
AMME5520 Advanced Control and Optimisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ian Manchester Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Research Prerequisites: AMME3500 OR AMME9501 or AMME8501 Assumed knowledge: Strong understanding of feedback control systems, specifically in the area of system modelling and control design in the frequency domain. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces engineering design via optimisation, i. e. finding the "best possible" solution to a particular problem. For example, an autonomous vehicle must find the fastest route between two locations over a road network; a biomedical sensing device must compute the most accurate estimate of important physiological parameters from noise-corrupted measurements; a feedback control system must stabilise and control a multivariable dynamical system (such as an aircraft) in an optimal fashion. The student will learn how to formulate a design in terms of a "cost function", when it is possible to find the "best" design via minimization of this "cost", and how to do so. The course will introduce widely-used optimisation frameworks including linear and quadratic programming (LP and QP), dynamic programming (DP), path planning with Dijkstra's algorithm, A*, and probabilistic roadmaps (PRMs), state estimation via Kalman filters, and control via the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) and Model Predictive Control (MPC). There will be constant emphasis on connections to real-world engineering problems in control, robotics, aerospace, biomedical engineering, and manufacturing.
AMME8510 Vibration and Acoustics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gareth Vio Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials, laboratories Prohibitions: AMME5510 Assumed knowledge: BE with background knowledge in Mechanics of Solids, Fluids, Dynamics and Control Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study should prepare the student to be able to undertake vibration and acoustic measurement calculations for industry design situations. The unit aims to introduce a number of new concepts required for analysis of vibrations and acoustics. The response of structure under different dynamic forces, including human and aerodynamic, will be investigated. A number of hands-on experiments will be performed to allow an understanding of the concepts and applicability. The acoustics component will include: basic acoustics theory, sound generation and propagation, impedance, absorbing materials, industrial noise sources, isolation methods of noise control, enclosures, instrumentation and measurement, frequency analysis, noise regulations and computational acoustics.
ENGG5011 Engineering Foundation Studies A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Annamaria Brancato Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Foundations studies covers content that may be assumed knowledge or prerequisite information for follow-on Master of Professional Engineering units. Completion of assigned project work in prescribed background material by the coordinators of the specialist programs will allow students to meet the entry requirements of the MPE degree.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Maria Tomc Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5203 Quality Engineering and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Cafe Session: Semester 2 Classes: Presentation, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: First degree in Engineering or a related discipline Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This subject is designed to support Engineers in the implementation of engineering tasks in the workplace. It addresses the use of quality control and management as well as systems assurance processes. It is designed to enable engineers entering practice from other related disciplines or with overseas qualifications to do so in a safe and effective way. The study program will include management of quality in research, design and delivery of engineering works and investigation, as well as of safe work practices and systems assurance.
MECH5275 Renewable Energy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Kirkpatrick Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Prerequisites: (MECH3260 AND MECH3261) OR (AERO3260 AND AERO3261) OR (MECH9260 AND MECH9261) OR (MECH8260 and MECH8261) OR (AERO9260 AND AERO9261) OR (AERO8260 and AERO8261). Students claiming to have prerequisite knowledge based on study at other institutions must contact the unit of study coordinator before enrolling in this unit and may be required to sit a pre-exam to demonstrate that they have the necessary knowledge and skills to undertake this advanced level unit. Assumed knowledge: The student will need a sound background in advanced level fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. In particular, students should be able to analyse fluid flow in turbomachinery; perform first and second law thermodynamic analysis of energy conversion systems, including chemically reacting systems; and perform advanced level calculations of conductive and convective and radiative heat transfer, including radiative spectral analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to develop understanding of the engineering design and analysis of different devices and technologies for generating power from renewable sources including: solar, wind, wave, tidal, ocean thermal, geothermal, hydro-electric, and biofuels; to understand the environmental, operational and economic issues associated with each of these technologies. At the end of this unit students will be able to perform in depth technical analysis of different types of renewable energy generation devices using the principles of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer. Students will be able to describe the environmental, economic and operational issues associated with these devices.
MECH5305 Smart Materials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lin Ye Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: (AMME9301 OR AMME2301) AND (AMME9302 OR AMME2302 OR AMME1362) Assumed knowledge: Fundamental knowledge in materials science and engineering: 1) atomic and crystal structures 2) metallurgy 3) structure-property relationship 4) mechanics of engineering materials 5) solid mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Develop an essential understanding of structure-property relationship of smart materials, as well as their applications in practical applications; develop student's capability to design functional structures using smart materials; and provide students an opportunity to learn the new knowledge through project approaches.
MECH5310 Advanced Engineering Materials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Marcela Bilek Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: MECH3362 OR MECH9362 or MECH8362 Prohibitions: MECH4310 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To understand (a) how to define the relationship between properties and microstructures of advanced engineering materials, (b) how to improve mechanical design with the knowledge of mechanics and properties of materials, and (c) how to conduct failure diagnosis of engineering materials.

Project units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research units during the final year of study.
Candidates achieving an average mark of 70% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study are eligible for the Extended Capstone Project.
Extended Capstone Project candidates take Capstone Project units AMME5020 and AMME5022 (total 18 CP) in place of Capstone Project AMME5021 and 6 credit points of elective units.
AMME5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Prohibitions: AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR AMME5010 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 96 credit points from the MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 credit points from the ME degree program (including any credit for prior study) Prohibitions: AMME5022 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR AMME5010 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.
AMME5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Research Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70 or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: AMME5021 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
Students are required to carry out a defined piece of independent research in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering research skills. These skills include the capacity to define a research question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor, however the student is expected to make a significant contribution to the direction of the project, and the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.

Research Pathway

Candidates achieving an average mark of 75% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study or equivalent are eligible for the Research Pathway.
Research pathway candidates take Dissertation units AMME5222 and AMME5223 (total 24 CP) in place of Capstone Project units and 12 credit points of elective units.
AMME5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have acieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.
AMME5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodney Fiford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a dissertation project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. Students must have acieved a WAM of 75% or greater in their prior year of study. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. The final research project should be completed and reported at a level which meets AQF level 9 outcomes and has original components as would be expected in MPhil.

Major Industrial Project

Candidates undertaking the Major Industrial Project take AMME5010 in place of ENGG5217 Practical Experience, AMME5020/5021 Capstone Project A & B and 12 credit points of Specialist Elective units of study.
AMME5010 Major Industrial Project

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ahmad Jabbarzadeh Khoei Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work in Industry Prohibitions: AMME5020 OR AMME5021 OR AMME5022 OR AMME5222 OR AMME5223 OR ENGG5217 OR BMET5020 OR BMET5021 OR BMET5022 OR BMET5222 OR BMET5223 OR BMET5010 Assumed knowledge: Students must have a credit (>65%) average in prior semester enrolment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students spend 6 months at an industrial placement working on a major engineering project relevant to their engineering stream. This is a 24 credit point unit, which may be undertaken as an alternative to ENGG5217 Practical Experience, AMME5020/5021 Capstone Project A and B and 12cp of specialist electives.
This unit of study gives students experience in carrying out a major project within an industrial environment, and in preparing and presenting detailed technical reports (both oral and written) on their work. The project is carried out under joint University/industry supervision, with the student essentially being engaged full-time on the project at the industrial site.

Exchange units

With approval of the Program Director, up to 12 credit points of Exchange units may be taken in place of other units, towards the requirements of the degree.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).