Unit of study descriptions

Master of Professional Engineering (Power)

To qualify for the award of the Master of Professional Engineering in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 144 credit points, including:
(a) 60 credit points of Core units as listed below
(b) ENGG5217 Practical Experience
(c) 24 credit points of Foundation units
(d) 36 credit points of Specialist units
(e) 12 credit points from Electrical Elective units or Management Elective units
(f) A minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research Pathway units as detailed below
(g) Candidates undertaking the Research Pathway, replace 12 credit points of elective units with Research Pathway units

Core units

Year One

COMP9001 Introduction to Programming

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Stavrakakis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, laboratories, seminars Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an essential starting point for software developers, IT consultants, and computer scientists to build their understanding of principle computer operation. Students will obtain knowledge and skills with procedural programming. Crucial concepts include defining data types, control flow, iteration, functions, recursion, the model of addressable memory. Students will be able to reinterpret a general problem into a computer problem, and use their understanding of the computer model to develop source code. This unit trains students with software development process, including skills of testing and debugging. It is a prerequisite for more advanced programming languages, systems programming, computer security and high performance computing.
COMP9123 Data Structures and Algorithms

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Andreas Van Renssen Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: INFO1105 OR INFO1905 OR COMP2123 OR COMP2823 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will teach some powerful ideas that are central to solving algorithmic problems in ways that are more efficient than naive approaches. In particular, students will learn how data collections can support efficient access, for example, how a dictionary or map can allow key-based lookup that does not slow down linearly as the collection grows in size. The data structures covered in this unit include lists, stacks, queues, priority queues, search trees, hash tables, and graphs. Students will also learn efficient techniques for classic tasks such as sorting a collection. The concept of asymptotic notation will be introduced, and used to describe the costs of various data access operations and algorithms.
ELEC9602 Digital Logic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Xiaoke Yi Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ELEC5722 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes some knowledge of digital data representation and basic computer organisation. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to equip students with the skills to design simple digital logic circuits which comprise modules of larger digital systems.
The following topics are covered: logic operations, theorems and Boolean algebra, number systems (integer and floating point), combinational logic analysis and synthesis, sequential logic, registers, counters, bus systems, state machines, simple CAD tools for logic design, and the design of a simple computer.
ELEC9703 Fundamentals of Elec and Electronic Eng

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5710 OR ELEC1103 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation & integration, and HSC Physics Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to develop knowledge of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. This is a foundation unit in circuit theory. Circuit theory is the electrical engineer's fundamental tool.
The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of electronics, instrumentation, electrical machines, power systems, communication systems, and signal processing.
Topics: a) Basic electrical and electronic circuit concepts: Circuits, circuit elements, circuit laws, node and mesh analysis, circuit theorems, energy storage, capacitors and inductors, circuits with switches, transient response, sine waves and complex analysis, phasors, impedance, ac power. ; b) Project management, teamwork, ethics; c) Safety issues
ELEC9103 Simulations and Numerical Solutions in Eng

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mahyar Shirvanimoghaddam Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: ELEC5723 OR ELEC2103 OR COSC1001 OR COSC1901 Assumed knowledge: ELEC9703. Understanding of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits and aspects of professional project management, teamwork, and ethics. Assessment: Through semester assessment (25%) and Final Exam (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Objectives: How to apply the software package Matlab to achieve engineering solutions; Critical assessment of various computer numerical techniques; Professional project management, teamwork, ethics.
This unit assumes an understanding of the fundamental concepts and building blocks of electrical and electronics circuits. As well as covering the specific topics described in the following paragraphs, it aims to develop skills in professional project management and teamwork and promote an understanding of ethics.
Basic features of Matlab. The Matlab desktop. Interactive use with the command window. Performing arithmetic, using complex numbers and mathematical functions. Writing script and function m-files. Matrix manipulations. Control flow. Two dimensional graphics. Application of Matlab to simple problems from circuit theory, electronics, signals and systems and control. Investigation of the steady state and transient behaviour of LCR circuits.
Matlab based numerical solutions applicable to numerical optimisation, ordinary differential equations, and data fitting. Introduction to symbolic mathematics in Matlab. Applications, including the derivation of network functions for simple problems in circuit analysis. Introduction to the use of Simulink for system modelling and simulation.
ELEC9302 Signals and Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Liwei Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials, E-Learning Prohibitions: ELEC5721 Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge of differentiation & integration, differential equations, and linear algebra. Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach some of the basic properties of many engineering signals and systems and the necessary mathematical tools that aid in this process. The particular emphasis is on the time and frequency domain modeling of linear time invariant systems. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in many units of study (in later years) in the areas of communication, control, power systems and signal processing. A basic knowledge of differentiation and integration, differential equations, and linear algebra is assumed.
ELEC9601 Computer Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Boland Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5711 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics extension 1 or 2 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the fundamental digital concepts upon which the design and operation of modern digital computers are based. A prime aim of the unit is to develop a professional view of, and a capacity for inquiry into, the field of computing.
Topics covered include: data representation, basic computer organisation, the CPU, elementary gates and logic, machine language, assembly language and high level programming constructs.
ELEC9704 Electronic Devices and Circuits

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Craig Jin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ELEC5720 OR ELEC2104 Assumed knowledge: Ohm's Law and Kirchhoff's Laws; action of Current and Voltage sources; network analysis and the superposition theorem; Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits; inductors and capacitors, transient response of RL, RC and RLC circuits; the ability to use power supplies, oscilloscopes, function generators, meters, etc. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern Electronics has come to be known as microelectronics which refers to the Integrated Circuits (ICs) containing millions of discrete devices. This course introduces some of the basic electronic devices like diodes and different types of transistors. It also aims to introduce students the analysis and design techniques of circuits involving these discrete devices as well as the integrated circuits.
Completion of this course is essential to specialize in Electrical, Telecommunication or Computer Engineering stream.

Year Two

ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Maria Tomc Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ENGG5204 Engineering Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Currie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Assumed knowledge: Competences and experience in engineering obtained during an accepted engineering degree Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide graduate engineers studying for a Master of Professional Engineering degree with an introduction to the professional engineering skills necessary to practice as an engineer.
These include the various elements of engineering practice, an understanding of the role of the engineer in industry, basic knowledge of the law of contracts and legal responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, an understanding of the professional responsibilities of engineers, competence in verbal communication and presentations and in reading and writing reports, and an understanding of ethical considerations. The material, learning and assessment is tailored for graduates from Australian and overseas universities.

Year Three

ENGG5217 Practical Experience

Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Lowe Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Practical Experience Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG5205 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed one year of their MPE program before enrolling in this unit.
The 3 year MPE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students can undertake their work experience in the final year of the MPE program (Year 3). Students may have prior work in an Engineering field carried out on completion of their undergraduate degree accepted as meeting the requirements of this component.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to inform the Faculty of any work arrangements by emailing the Graduate School of Engineering and Information Technologies. Assessment in this unit is by the submission of a portfolio containing written reports on the involvement with industry. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience portfolio web site http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml

Foundation units

Candidates must complete 24 credit points from the following Foundation units of study.
ELEC9203 Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ELEC3203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes a competence in first year mathematics (in particular, the ability to work with complex numbers), in elementary circuit theory and in basic electromagnetics. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to electrical power engineering and lays the groundwork for more specialised units. It assumes a competence in first year mathematics (in particular, the ability to work with complex numbers), in elementary circuit theory and in elements of introductory physics. A revision will be carried out of the use of phasors in steady state ac circuit analysis and of power factor and complex power. The unit comprises an overview of modern electric power system with particular emphasis on generation and transmission. The following specific topics are covered. The use of three phase systems and their analysis under balanced conditions. Transmission lines: calculation of parameters, modelling, analysis. Transformers: construction, equivalent circuits. Generators: construction, modelling for steady state operation. The use of per unit system. The analysis of systems with a number of voltage levels. The load flow problem: bus and impedance matrices, solution methods. Power system transient stability. The control of active and reactive power. Electricity markets, market structures and economic dispatch. Types of electricity grids, radial, mesh, networks. Distribution systems and smart grids.
ELEC9204 Power Electronics and Applications

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Weidong Xiao Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: ELEC9704 Prohibitions: ELEC5733 Assumed knowledge: Differential equations, linear algebra, complex variables, analysis of linear circuits. Fourier theory applied to periodic and non-periodic signals. Software such as MATLAB to perform signal analysis and filter design. Familiarity with the use of basic laboratory equipment such as oscilloscope, function generator, power supply, etc. Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to teach the fundamentals of advanced energy conversion systems based on power electronics. It provides description of the operation principles and control of these blocks. Through analysis and design methodologies, it delivers an in depth understanding of modern enabling technologies associated with energy conversion. Through laboratory hands-on experience on actual industrial systems, such electrical motor drives, robotic arms, and power supplies, it enhances the link between the theory and the "real" engineering world. The unit clarifies unambiguously the role these imperative technologies play in every human activity; from mobile telephone chargers to energy electricity grids; from electric vehicles and industrial automation to wind energy conversion to name just few. The following topics are covered: Introduction to power electronic converters and systems; applications of power electronic converters; power semiconductor devices; uncontrolled rectifiers: single- and three-phase; non-isolated dc-dc converters: buck, boost and buck-boost; isolated dc-dc converters; inverters: single- and three-phase; uninterruptible power supplies; battery chargers and renewable energy systems; electric and hybrid electric vehicles technologies, design of converters and systems.
ELEC9206 Electrical Energy Conversion Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jing Qiu Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: ELEC5734 Assumed knowledge: ELEC9203. Following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit of study: familiarity with circuit theory, electronic devices, AC power, capacitors and inductors, and electric circuits such as three-phase circuits and circuits with switches, the use of basic laboratory equipment such as oscilloscope and power supply. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students a good understanding of electrical energy conversion techniques and equipment.
Students who successfully complete this unit will: Have a broad view of electrical energy conversion systems including transformers, DC machines, induction machines and synchronous machines; Be able to analyse and solve problems in transformers and electric machines; Have gained confidence in their ability to undertake more advanced study in the power area.
The following specific topics are covered: magnetic circuits, inductance, sinusoidal excitation, hysteresis and eddy current loss, permanent magnets, electromechanical energy conversion, singly-excited and doubly-excited systems, transformers, single-phase, equivalent circuit parameters, three-phase transformers, autotransformers, DC machines, separate excitation, shunt excitation, series excitation, and compound excitation, efficiency, armature reaction, induction machines, revolving field, equivalent circuit, squirrel cage machines, measurements of the parameters, DC resistance test, no-load test, blocked-rotor test, synchronous machines, field relationships, power-angle relationships, salient pole machines.
ELEC9304 Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ELEC5735 Assumed knowledge: Specifically the following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit: familiarity with basic Algebra, Differential and Integral Calculus, Physics; solution of linear differential equations, Matrix Theory, eigenvalues and eigenvectors; linear electrical circuits, ideal op-amps; continuous linear time-invariant systems and their time and frequency domain representations, Laplace transform, Fourier transform. Assessment: Through semester assessment (43%) and Final Exam (57%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is mainly concerned with the application of feedback control to continuous-time, linear time-invariant systems. It aims to give the students an appreciation of the possibilities in the design of control and automation in a range of application areas. The concepts learnt in this unit will be made use of heavily in many units of study in the areas of communication, control, electronics, and signal processing.
The following specific topics are covered: Modelling of physical systems using state space, differential equations, and transfer functions, dynamic response of linear time invariant systems and the role of system poles and zeros on it, simplification of complex systems, stability of feedback systems and their steady state performance, Routh-Hurwitz stability criterion, sketching of root locus and controller design using the root locus, Proportional, integral and derivative control, lead and lag compensators, frequency response techniques, Nyquist stability criterion, gain and phase margins, compensator design in the frequency domain, state space design for single input single-output systems, pole placement state variable feedback control and observer design.

Specialist units

Candidates must complete 36 credit points from the following Specialist units of study.
ELEC5203 Topics in Power Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3203 Power Engineering and ELEC3204 Power Electronics and Drives. Familiarity with basic mathematics and physics; competence with basic circuit theory and understanding of electricity grid equipment such as transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling; and fundamentals of power electronic technologies. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to give students an in depth understanding of modern power electronic equipment supporting the intelligent grid of the future and the associated electronic control. Electronic power systems rely on a complex system of methods and equipment for controlling the voltage levels and for maintaining the stability and security of the supply. It covers recent findings in the fundamental theory and the massive change of modern power electronic equipment and methods supporting the electricity grids. It also looks at the huge influence of computer-aided analysis of electric power systems and the effects of the deregulation of the industry.
The specific topics covered are as follows: Introduction to power electronic systems and applications in the electrical grid, power semiconductors, reactive power control in power systems, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), high-voltage direct-current transmission (HVDC), static reactive power compensator, dynamic voltage restorer, unified-power flow controller, line-commutated converters, thyristor-controlled equipment, phase-angle regulators, voltage-source converter based power electronic equipment, harmonics, power quality, passive and active filters, distributed generation, grid-interconnection of renewable energy sources, intelligent grid technologies.
ELEC5204 Power Systems Analysis and Protection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Swamidoss Sathiakumar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734). The unit assumes basic knowledge of circuits, familiarity with basic mathematics, competence with basic circuit theory and an understanding of three phase systems, transformers, transmission lines and associated modeling and operation of such equipment. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the basis for the analysis of electricity grids using symmetrical components theory. Such analysis theory is the basis for the understanding of electrical faults and the design of protection strategies to safeguard the electrical equipment, and maintain safety of the plant at the highest possible level.
The following specific topics are covered: The types and causes of power system faults; balanced faults and short circuit levels; an introduction to fault current transients in machines; symmetric components, sequence impedances and networks; the analysis of unsymmetrical faults. Review of the impact of faults on power system behaviour; issues affecting protection scheme characteristics and clearance times; the security and reliability of protection schemes; the need for protection redundancy and its implementation as local or remote backup; zones of protection and the need for zones to overlap; the analysis and application of over-current and distance relay protection schemes with particular reference to the protection of transmission lines.
ELEC5205 High Voltage Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Swamidoss Sathiakumar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class Prerequisites: (ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732) AND (ELEC3206 OR ELEC9206 OR ELEC5734) Assumed knowledge: The following previous knowledge is assumed for this unit. Circuit analysis techniques, electricity networks, power system fundamentals. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides advanced knowledge associated with high voltage engineering methods, techniques and equipment. It is divided into two sections. The first section presents fundamentals of the failure mechanisms of solid, liquid and gaseous insulation at high voltages. It also discusses consequent design principles for high-voltage equipment; of the generation of high direct, alternating and impulse voltages for testing high-voltage equipment; and of methods for monitoring and assessing the condition of high-voltage equipment such as dissolved gas analysis for oil-filled transformers and partial discharge in cables. The second section presents in detail all the high-voltage equipment and in particular underground cables, overhead transmission lines, transformers, bushings and switchgear. It finally offers asset management solutions for modern transmission and distribution electricity networks.
ELEC5206 Sustainable Energy Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gregor Verbic Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit of study: familiarity with transformers, ac power, capacitors and inductors, electric circuits such as three-phase circuits and circuits with switches, and basic electronic circuit theory. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit builds upon the knowledge of engineering mathematics, electronic devices and circuit theory and simulation techniques. It deals with both technical and business aspects of sustainable electrical energy systems. In technical aspect, it focuses on energy conversion and electrical characteristics of different renewable energy sources and integration of multiple energy sources into power system both at distribution and transmission levels. In business aspect, it focuses on economical, marketing and political aspects of installing and managing sustainable electrical energy systems in present and future society. It lays a solid foundation of practical and managerial skills on electronics and electrical (power) engineering and later studies such as intelligent electricity networks and advanced energy conversion and power systems. The following topics are covered: modern power systems; distributed generation; co-generation; tri-generation; microturbines; fuel cells; renewable energy sources: solar, wind, hydro, biomass, wind turbines; photovoltaic; grid-connected power systems; stand-alone power systems.
ELEC5207 Advanced Power Conversion Technologies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Weidong Xiao Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorias, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: ELEC3204 Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to cover advanced topics in power electronics and it applications. In particular, the power electronics interface design and implementation for microgrid, smart grids and modern power systems which have received tremendous attention in recent years. Many countries including Australia are developing different power electronics technologies such as integrating renewable energy sources into the grid, managing charging and discharging of high power energy storage system, controlling the reactive power of power electronics interfaces for grid stability, and adding communication capability to power electronics interfaces for smart meter implementation. The unit assumes prior fundamental knowledge of power electronics systems and applications, including the ability to analyse basic power converters for all four conversions (ac-ac, ac-dc, dc-ac, and ac-dc), and design and implement various applications, such as motor drive and battery charger, with the consideration of electrical characteristics of semiconductors and passive elements. This unit will cover advanced technologies on power electronics interfaces for smart grids and microgrid implementation, which include dynamic voltage restorer, active power filter, reactive power compensation, energy storage management, hybrid energy sources optimisation, multilevel inverter and control, D-STATCOM, etc. To analyse these advanced power conversion systems, some analytical techniques will be introduced. This includes resonant converters, soft-switching technique, ac equivalent circuit modeling, converter control and input/output filter design.
ELEC5208 Intelligent Electricity Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Jing Qiu Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: Fundamentals of Electricity Networks, Control Systems and Telecommunications Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students an introduction to the planning and operation of modern electricity grids, also known as "smart" grids. Traditional power networks featured a small number of large base-load plants sending power out over transmission lines to be distributed in radial lower voltage networks to loads. In response to the need to reduce carbon impact, future networks will feature diverse generation scattered all over the network including at distribution levels. Also there will be new loads such as electric vehicles and technologies including energy storage and lower voltage power flow control devices. The operation of these new networks will be possible by much greater use of information and communication technology (ICT) and control over the information networks.
The unit will cover recent relevant developments in energy technologies as well as important components of 'smart grids' such as supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), substation automation, remote terminal units (RTU), sensors and intelligent electronic devices (IED). Operation of these electricity grids requires a huge amount of data gathering, communication and information processing. The unit will discuss many emerging technologies for such data, information, knowledge and decision processes including communication protocols and network layouts, networking middleware and coordinated control. Information systems and data gathering will be used to assess key performance and security indicators associated with the operation of such grids including stability, reliability and power quality.
ELEC5211 Power System Dynamics and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Ma Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC3203 OR ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is a deep understanding on circuit analysis and its applications in power system steady state analysis. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit deals with power systems modelling, analysis and simulation under dynamic conditions.
The unit will cover the following topics: The links between power system steady state analysis and transient analysis; Basics of dynamic system in general and stability analysis methods; Analysis of power systems subject to electromagnetic and electromechanical transients. Power system modelling for stability analysis and electromagnetic transients analysis: Synchronous machine modelling using Park's transformation; Modelling of excitation systems and turbine governors; Modelling of the transmission system; Load modelling. Simulation of interconnected multi-machine systems; Stability analysis- Transient stability, Small signal stability, Voltage stability; Power system control: Voltage control, Power system transient stability control, Power system dynamic stability control, Emergency control; The unit is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power and Electrical) and ME (Power and Electrical). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power).
ELEC5212 Power System Planning and Markets

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Ma Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC3203 or ELEC9203 OR ELEC5732 Assumed knowledge: The assumed knowledge for learning this UoS is power system steady state analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Deregulation of the electricity industry has fundamentally changed the power systems operation paradigm. The focus has shifted from central planning of vertically integrated utilities to market driven operation. Traditional electric energy producers and consumers play new roles in a power market environment and their behaviors are affected by the economic incentives to a large extent. Nevertheless, electric energy is a special commodity and cannot be traded as the other common goods. So a power market design has many special considerations compared with a conventional commercial market design. Knowledge of the power market mechanisms has become a necessary part in fully understanding the whole power system operations. To equip students with necessary skills to address the challenges of modern power systems, the unit will cover the following topics:
-Overview of the traditional electricity industry structure and operation: Economic dispatch, Power system operation states and respective reliability requirements.
-Drivers for the restructuring of the electricity industry.
-Electricity market design: Market structures (spot, bilateral, hybrid); Energy market; Ancillary services market; Key components in an electricity market.
-Electricity market participants and their roles in a market.
-Electricity economics: Power market from suppliers' view (Supply curve) and from demands' view (Demand curve); Market mechanism; Price and its elasticity; Cost and supply; Market power and monopoly.
-Cost of capital: Time value of money; Project evaluation methods from investments' point of view; Risk and return.
-Operation mechanisms of various designs of power markets.
-Power market practices around the world.
-Power system expansion planning: Fundamental knowledge of power system planning considerations, procedures and methods; Transmission planning; Generation planning; Power system adequacy assessment.
ELEC5212 is a specialist Unit for MPE (Power) and ME (Electrical and Power). It is also available as a recommended elective for BE Electrical (Power). This unit focuses on the power market principles and practices. Based on the knowledge of the power market operation, the power system planning procedures and methods will also be discussed.

Electrical Elective units

Candidates may complete up to 12 credit points from the following Electrical Elective units of study.
ELEC5508 Wireless Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wibowo Hardjawana Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge in probability and statistics, analog and digital communications, error probability calculation in communications channels, and telecommunications network. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the key ideas in modern wireless telecommunications networks. It will address both physical layer issues such as propagation and modulation, plus network layer issues such as capacity, radio resource management and mobility management issues.
The following topics are covered. Wireless channel: Multipath fading, frequency selective fading, Doppler spread, statistical models, diversity, GSM, OFDM. Capacity and Interference: Cell types, coverage, frequency reuse, interference management, SIMO, MISO, multiuser diversity, CDMA, OFDMA, beamforming, superposition coding. MIMO: SVD, waterfilling, beamforming, V-BLAST, SIC, MMSE, Power Allocation. LTE/LTE-Advanced: Uplink-downlink channels, control signals, data transmission, spatial multiplexing, CoMP, spectrum reuse, heterogeneous networks, inter-cell interference coordination, carrier aggregation. Queueing theory: basic models, queueing systems, waiting time, delay, queue length, priority queues, wireless network virtualization (WNV) queues.
ELEC5511 Optical Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Robert Minasian Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3405 OR ELEC9405) AND (ELEC3505 OR ELEC9505). Basic knowledge of communications, electronics and photonics Assessment: Through semester assessment (25%) and Final Exam (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: -
Optical telecommunications has revolutionized the way we receive information and communicate with one another. This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of optical fibre communication systems. It commences with a description of optical fibre propagation characteristics and transmission properties. We will then consider light sources and the fundamental principles of laser action in semiconductor and other lasers including quantum well lasers, tunable lasers and fibre lasers, and also the characteristics of optical transmitters based on semiconductor and electro-optic modulation techniques. The characteristics of optical amplifiers will also be discussed. On the receiver side, the principles of photodetection and optical receiver sensitivity will be presented. Other aspects such as fibre devices and multiple wavelength division multiplexing techniques will also be discussed. Finally, the complete optical fibre communication system will be studied to enable the design of data transmission optical systems, local area networks and multi-channel optical systems.
ELEC5512 Optical Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Javid Atai Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of digital communications, wave propagation, and fundamental optics Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds upon the fundamentals of optical communication introduced in ELEC3405 (Communications Electronics and Photonics). It focuses on photonic network architectures and protocols, network design, enabling technologies and the drivers for intelligent optical network.
Students will learn how to analyse and design optical networks and optical components.
Introduction, photonic network architectures: point to point, star, ring, mesh; system principles: modulation formats, link budgets, optical signal to noise ratio, dispersion, error rates, optical gain and regeneration; wavelength division multiplexed networks; WDM components: optical filters, gratings, multiplexers, demultiplexers, wavelength routers, optical crossconnects, wavelength converters, WDM transmitters and receivers; Wavelength switched/routed networks, ultra high speed TDM, dispersion managed links, soliton systems; broadcast and distribution networks, multiple access, subcarrier multiplexed lightwave video networks, optical local area and metropolitan area networks; protocols for photonic networks: IP, Gbit Ethernet, SDH/SONET, FDDI, ATM, Fibre Channel.
ELEC5514 Networked Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zihuai Lin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: ELEC3305 AND ELEC3506 AND ELEC3607 AND ELEC5508 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aim to teach the fundamentals concepts associated with: Networked Embedded Systems, wireless sensor networks; Wireless channel propagation and radio power consumption; Wireless networks, ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc. ; Sensor principle, data fusion, source detection and identification; Multiple source detection, multiple access communications; Network topology, routing, network information theory; Distributed source channel coding for sensor networks; Power-aware and energy-aware communication protocols; Distributed embedded systems problems such as time synchronization and node localisation; Exposure to several recently developed solutions to address problems in wireless sensor networks and ubiquitous computing giving them a well-rounded view of the state-of the-art in the networked embedded systems field.
Student involvement with projects will expose them to the usage of simulators and/or programming some types of networked embedded systems platforms.
Ability to identify the main issues and trade-offs in networked embedded systems; Understanding of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area; Based on the above understanding, ability to analyse requirements and devise first-order solutions for particular networked embedded systems problems; Familiarisation with a simulator platform and real hardware platforms for network embedded systems through the students involvement in projects.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Liwei Li Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5616 Computer and Network Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Boland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.
ELEC5620 Model Based Software Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Model-Based Software Engineering focuses on modern software engineering methods, technologies, and processes used in professional development projects. It covers both the pragmatic engineering elements and the underlying theory of the model-based approach to the analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of complex software-intensive systems.
Students will participate in a group project, which will entail developing and/or evolving a software system, following a full development cycle from requirements specification through to implementation and testing using up-to-date industrial development tools and processes. At the end of the course they will provide a presentation and demonstration of their project work to the class. There is no formal teaching of a programming language in this unit, although students will be expected to demonstrate through their project work their general software engineering and architectural skills as well as their mastery of model-based methods and technologies.
Students successfully completing this unit will have a strong practical and theoretical understanding of the modern software development cycle as applied in industrial settings. In particular, they will be familiar with the latest model-based software engineering approaches necessary for successfully dealing with today's highly complex and challenging software systems.
The pedagogic grounds for this course and its focus on model-based approaches are to arm new software engineers with skills and perspectives that extend beyond the level of basic programming. Such skills are essential to success in software development nowadays, and are in great demand but very low supply. The dearth of such expertise is one of the key reasons behind the alarmingly high failure rate of industrial software projects (currently estimated at being greater than 40%). Therefore, this unit complements SQE and strengthens a key area in the program.

Management Elective units

Candidates may complete up to 12 credit points from the following Management Elective units of study.
ENGG5203 Quality Engineering and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Cafe Session: Semester 2 Classes: Presentation, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: First degree in Engineering or a related discipline Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This subject is designed to support Engineers in the implementation of engineering tasks in the workplace. It addresses the use of quality control and management as well as systems assurance processes. It is designed to enable engineers entering practice from other related disciplines or with overseas qualifications to do so in a safe and effective way. The study program will include management of quality in research, design and delivery of engineering works and investigation, as well as of safe work practices and systems assurance.
ENGG5205 Professional Practice in Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Louis Taborda Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (75%) and Final Exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: This is a core unit for all Master of Professional Engineering students as well as all students pursuing Project Management studies (including Master of Project Management, Graduate Certificate in Project Management and Graduate Diploma in Project Management). No prerequisite or assumed knowledge.
This unit of study teaches the fundamental knowledge on the importance, organisational context and professional practice in project management. It serves as an introduction to project management practices for non-PM students. For PM students, this unit lays the foundation to progress to advanced PM subjects. Although serving as a general introduction unit, the focus has been placed on scope, time, cost, and integration related issues.
Specifically, the unit aims to: Introduce students to the institutional, organisational and professional environment for today's project management practitioners as well as typical challenges and issues facing them; Demonstrate the importance of project management to engineering and organisations; Demonstrate the progression from strategy formulation to execution of the project; Provide a set of tools and techniques at different stages of a project's lifecycle with emphasis on scope, time, cost and integration related issues; Highlight examples of project success/failures in project management and to take lessons from these; Consider the roles of project manager in the organization and management of people; Provide a path for students seeking improvements in their project management expertise.
ENGG5214 Management of Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ron Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to develop competence in the management of technology. It will address all aspects of the management of technology, the nature and importance of technological change and innovation, within the context of the global knowledge economy, the management of the new product development process, the role of technology in manufacturing and service competitiveness, the role of IT in logistics management, supply chain strategies, and communication, and the characteristics of high technology markets.
ENGG5215 International Eng Strategy and Operations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Currie Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management and globalisation Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce students to the global context of much of contemporary engineering and the consequent strategic and operational issues. It will address the nature, characteristics and variety of risks of global businesses, the opportunities and pressures for effective strategies, and the many management challenges in international business. In particular it will focus on Australian consulting, logistics and construction engineering firms that are operating on a global basis.
ENGG5216 Management of Engineering Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ron Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Presentation, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed as enable students to grapple with the challenges of engaging in, facilitating and managing innovation and technology commercialisation. Key learning outcomes are: developing an understanding of the processes of management, and in particular of innovation, dealing with uncertain and inadequate information, how to communicate effectively to and motivate a group of people to work out what to do, and how to do it.
Content will include the challenges of modern management; understanding of the new rules of international competitiveness; effects of globalisation on Australia's economic performance; the competitiveness of Australian firms; the generation of employment and wealth; the changing requirements of the engineer; the engineer as manager and strategist; the role of innovation in business management; product innovation and commercialisation; IP recognition and management; starting a high-tech company.

Project units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research units during the final year of study.
Candidates achieving an average mark of 70% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study in the Year Two Table or equivalent are eligible for the Extended Capstone Project.
Extended Capstone Project candidates take Capstone Project units ELEC5020 and ELEC5022 (total 18 cp) in place of Capstone Project ELEC5021 and 6 credit points of elective units.
ELEC5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Corequisites: ELEC5020 Prohibitions: ELEC5022 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70 or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: ELEC5021 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results, and Capstone Project B extended allows the student to investigate a topic of greater depth and scope.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.

Research Pathway

Candidates achieving an average mark of 75% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study in the Year Two Table or equivalent are eligible for the Research Pathway.
Research pathway candidates take Dissertation units ELEC5222 and ELEC5223 (total 24 cp) in place of Capstone Project units and 12 credit points of elective units.
ELEC5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ENGG5223 or ENGG5222 or ELEC8902 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
ELEC5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ELEC8902 or ENGG5222 or ENGG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.

Exchange units

With approval of the Program Director, up to 12 credit points of Exchange units may taken in place of other units, towards the requirements of the degree.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).