Unit of study descriptions

Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Software)

To qualify for the award of the Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 96 credit points, including:
(a) 54 credit points of Core units as listed below
(b) ENGG5217 Practical Experience
(c) 18 credit points of Specialist Elective units
(d) 12 credit points of Management Elective units
(e) A minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research Pathway units as detailed below
(f) Candidates undertaking the Research Pathway, replace 12 credit points of elective units with Research Pathway units

Core units

COMP5047 Pervasive Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Anusha Withanghe Don Session: Semester 2 Classes: Studio class Assumed knowledge: ELEC1601 AND (COMP2129 OR COMP2017). Background in programming and operating systems that is sufficient for the student to independently learn new programming tools from standard online technical materials. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This is an advanced course on Pervasive Computing, with a focus on the "Internet of Things" (IoT). It introduces the key aspects of the IoT and explores these in terms of the new research towards creating user interfaces that disappear into the environment and are available pervasively, for example in homes, workplaces, cars and carried.
COMP5348 Enterprise Scale Software Architecture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Basem Suleiman Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratory Assumed knowledge: Programming competence in Java or similar OO language. Capacity to master novel technologies (especially to program against novel APIs) using manuals, tutorial examples, etc. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit covers topics on software architecture for large-scale enterprises. Computer systems for large-scale enterprises handle critical business processes, interact with computer systems of other organisations, and have to be highly reliable, available and scalable. This class of systems are built up from several application components, incorporating existing "legacy" code and data stores as well as linking these through middleware technologies, such as distributed transaction processing, remote objects, message-queuing, publish-subscribe, and clustering. The choice of middleware can decide whether the system achieves essential non- functional requirements such as performance and availability. The objective of this unit of study is to educate students for their later professional career and it covers Software Architecture topics of the ACM/IEEE Software Engineering curriculum. Objective: The objective of this unit of study is to educate students for their later professional career and it covers topics of the ACM/IEEE Software Engineering curriculum.
COMP5615 Software Engineering Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Hamzah Osop Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work, Meetings, Site Visit Prohibitions: COMP3615 OR INFO3600 OR SOFT3413 OR COMP3600 OR COMP3888 OR COMP3988 OR SOFT3888 Assumed knowledge: INFO6007 or equivalent project management knowledge Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide students an opportunity to apply the knowledge and practise the skills acquired in the prerequisite and qualifying units, in the context of designing and building a substantial software development system in diverse application domains including life sciences. Working in groups for an external client combined with academic supervision, students will need to carry out the full range of activities including requirements capture, analysis and design, coding, testing and documentation. Students will use the XP methodology and make use of professional tools for the management of their project.
COMP9202 Software Construction and Design 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bernhard Scholz Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prohibitions: SOFT3202 Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is a sequel of Software Construction and Design I (COMP9201). It introduces advanced concepts which build on the topics of COMP9201. COMP9202 covers topics including software validation and verification, the theory of testing, and advanced design patterns. The unit has a strong focus on the theoretical underpinning of software design. I the labs the theory is applied with contemporary tools with concrete examples.
ELEC9609 Internet Software Platforms

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Wanli Ouyang Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: ELEC5742 Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will focus on the design, the architecture and the development of web applications using technologies currently popular in the marketplace including Java and . NET environments. There are three key themes examined in the unit: Presentation layer, Persistence layer, and Interoperability. The unit will examine practical technologies such as JSP and Servlets, the model-view-controller (MVC) architecture, database programming with ADO. NET and JDBC, advanced persistence using ORM, XML for interoperability, and XML-based SOAP services and Ajax, in support of the theoretical themes identified.
On completion the students should be able to: Compare Java/J2EE web application development with Microsoft . NET web application development; Exposure to relevant developer tools (e. g. Eclipse and VS. NET); Be able to develop a real application on one of those environments; Use XML to implement simple web services and AJAX applications.
INFO5990 Professional Practice in IT

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Masahiro Takatsuka Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in INFO5990 are assumed to have previously completed a Bachelor's degree in some area of IT, or have completed a Graduate Diploma in some area of IT, or have many years experience as a practising IT professional. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: The main focus of the subject is to provide students with the necessary tools, basic skills, experience and adequate knowledge so they develop an awareness and an understanding of the responsibilities and issues associated with professional conduct and practice in the information technology sector. This unit is for MIT, MITM, MIT/MITM students only.
This Unit of Study introduces the students to some of the concepts, standards and techniques associated with the current professional practice in information technology in the business environment.
Students will encounter a range of concepts, techniques and professional issues including interpersonal and organisational communication, human resources and conflict resolution, globalisation, professional ethics, social impacts of IT, data security, data quality assurance, system audit, investigative research and project management practice. Practical and real world case studies will be used as part of the learning to enhance the in-class teachings to the needs of industry.
ELEC5618 Software Quality Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Writing programs with multiple functions or methods in multiple files; design of complex data structures and combination in non trivial algorithms; use of an integrated development environment; software version control systems. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will cover software quality planning, validation and verification methods and techniques, risk analysis, software review techniques, software standards and software process improvement and software reliability.
Students who successfully complete this unit will understand the fundamental concepts of software quality engineering and be able to define software quality requirements, assess the quality of a software design, explain specific methods of building software quality, understand software reliability models and metrics, develop a software quality plan, understand quality assurance and control activities and techniques, understand various testing techniques including being able to verify and test a unit of code and comprehend ISO standards, SPICE, CMM and CMMI.
ELEC5619 Object Oriented Application Frameworks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Java programming, and some web development experience are essential. Databases strongly recommended Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing large Internet systems by using and building application frameworks. Frameworks allow great reuse so developers do not have to design and implement applications from scratch, as students have done in ELEC3610 The unit lays down the basic concepts and hands on experience on the design and development of enterprise systems, emphasizing the development of systems using design patterns and application frameworks.
A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. A project-based approach will introduce the problems often found when building such systems, and will require students to take control of their learning. Several development Java frameworks will be used, including Spring, Hibernate, and others. Principles of design patterns will also be studied.
ELEC5620 Model Based Software Engineering

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (80%) and Final Exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Model-Based Software Engineering focuses on modern software engineering methods, technologies, and processes used in professional development projects. It covers both the pragmatic engineering elements and the underlying theory of the model-based approach to the analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of complex software-intensive systems.
Students will participate in a group project, which will entail developing and/or evolving a software system, following a full development cycle from requirements specification through to implementation and testing using up-to-date industrial development tools and processes. At the end of the course they will provide a presentation and demonstration of their project work to the class. There is no formal teaching of a programming language in this unit, although students will be expected to demonstrate through their project work their general software engineering and architectural skills as well as their mastery of model-based methods and technologies.
Students successfully completing this unit will have a strong practical and theoretical understanding of the modern software development cycle as applied in industrial settings. In particular, they will be familiar with the latest model-based software engineering approaches necessary for successfully dealing with today's highly complex and challenging software systems.
The pedagogic grounds for this course and its focus on model-based approaches are to arm new software engineers with skills and perspectives that extend beyond the level of basic programming. Such skills are essential to success in software development nowadays, and are in great demand but very low supply. The dearth of such expertise is one of the key reasons behind the alarmingly high failure rate of industrial software projects (currently estimated at being greater than 40%). Therefore, this unit complements SQE and strengthens a key area in the program.
ENGG5217 Practical Experience

Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Lowe Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Practical Experience Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG5205 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed one year of their MPE program before enrolling in this unit.
The 3 year MPE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students can undertake their work experience in the final year of the MPE program (Year 3). Students may have prior work in an Engineering field carried out on completion of their undergraduate degree accepted as meeting the requirements of this component.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to inform the Faculty of any work arrangements by emailing the Graduate School of Engineering and Information Technologies. Assessment in this unit is by the submission of a portfolio containing written reports on the involvement with industry. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience portfolio web site http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml

Specialist Elective units

Candidates must complete 18 credit points from the following table of Specialist Elective units of study.
COMP5338 Advanced Data Models

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ying Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Lectures Assumed knowledge: This unit of study assumes foundational knowledge of relational database systems as taught in COMP5138/COMP9120 (Database Management Systems) or INFO2120/INFO2820/ISYS2120 (Database Systems 1). Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study gives a comprehensive overview of post-relational data models and of latest developments in data storage technology.
Particular emphasis is put on spatial, temporal, and NoSQL data storage. This unit extensively covers the advanced features of SQL:2003, as well as a few dominant NoSQL storage technologies. Besides in lectures, the advanced topics will be also studied with prescribed readings of database research publications.
COMP5426 Parallel and Distributed Computing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bing Zhou Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit is intended to introduce and motivate the study of high performance computer systems. The student will be presented with the foundational concepts pertaining to the different types and classes of high performance computers. The student will be exposed to the description of the technological context of current high performance computer systems. Students will gain skills in evaluating, experimenting with, and optimising the performance of high performance computers. The unit also provides students with the ability to undertake more advanced topics and courses on high performance computing.
ELEC5307 Advanced Signal Processing with Deep Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, laboratories Assumed knowledge: Mathematics (e.g., probability and linear algebra) and programming skills (e.g. Matlab/Java/Python/C++) Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%), Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces deep learning for a broad range of multi-dimensional signal processing applications. It covers deep learning technologies for image super-resolution and restoration, image categorization, object localization, image segmentation, face recognition, person detection and re-identification, human pose estimation, action recognition, object tracking as well as image and video captioning.
ELEC5517 Software Defined Networks

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dong Yuan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce an emerging networking paradigm- Software Defined Networks (SDNs). By separating the control logics from the physical networks, the software defined networks allow an automated and programmable software program to logically control and manage the network. This unit introduces the basic principles of software defined networks, its architecture, abstraction, SDN programming, programmable control plane and data plane protocols, network update, network virtualisation, traffic management as well as its applications and implementations. Student will learn and practice SDN programming, testing and debugging on SDNs platforms through experiments and group projects. It is assumed that the students have some knowledge on data communications and networks.
ELEC5616 Computer and Network Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: David Boland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.
ELEC5622 Signals, Software and Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Luping Zhou Session: Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time, Presentation, Tutorials, Laboratories Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to introduce students to the main issues involved in producing systems that use sensor data, such as those from physiology and activity tracking, often combined with patients self-reports. As sensing devices become ubiquitous, data processing, storage and visualisation techniques are becoming part of all health systems, both institutionalised and individually driven.
The unit is related to, but distinct, to health informatics- an area that focuses on the the use of computing to deliver cost efficient healthcare and the area of bioinformatics, that explores the role of computing in understanding biology at the cellular level (e. g. genome). This unit focuses on the technical and non-technical problems of developing increasingly ubiquitous devices and systems that can be used for personal and clinical monitoring.

Management Elective units

Candidates must complete 12 credit points from the following Management Elective units of study.
ENGG5203 Quality Engineering and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Cafe Session: Semester 2 Classes: Presentation, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: First degree in Engineering or a related discipline Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This subject is designed to support Engineers in the implementation of engineering tasks in the workplace. It addresses the use of quality control and management as well as systems assurance processes. It is designed to enable engineers entering practice from other related disciplines or with overseas qualifications to do so in a safe and effective way. The study program will include management of quality in research, design and delivery of engineering works and investigation, as well as of safe work practices and systems assurance.
ENGG5214 Management of Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ron Johnston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to develop competence in the management of technology. It will address all aspects of the management of technology, the nature and importance of technological change and innovation, within the context of the global knowledge economy, the management of the new product development process, the role of technology in manufacturing and service competitiveness, the role of IT in logistics management, supply chain strategies, and communication, and the characteristics of high technology markets.
ENGG5215 International Eng Strategy and Operations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Currie Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management and globalisation Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce students to the global context of much of contemporary engineering and the consequent strategic and operational issues. It will address the nature, characteristics and variety of risks of global businesses, the opportunities and pressures for effective strategies, and the many management challenges in international business. In particular it will focus on Australian consulting, logistics and construction engineering firms that are operating on a global basis.
ENGG5216 Management of Engineering Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ron Johnston Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Presentation, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed as enable students to grapple with the challenges of engaging in, facilitating and managing innovation and technology commercialisation. Key learning outcomes are: developing an understanding of the processes of management, and in particular of innovation, dealing with uncertain and inadequate information, how to communicate effectively to and motivate a group of people to work out what to do, and how to do it.
Content will include the challenges of modern management; understanding of the new rules of international competitiveness; effects of globalisation on Australia's economic performance; the competitiveness of Australian firms; the generation of employment and wealth; the changing requirements of the engineer; the engineer as manager and strategist; the role of innovation in business management; product innovation and commercialisation; IP recognition and management; starting a high-tech company.
INFO6007 Project Management in IT

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Hamzah Osop Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Workshops, Assignments, Exam Preparation Prohibitions: PMGT5871 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in INFO6007 are assumed to have previously completed a Bachelor's degree in some area of IT, or have completed a Graduate Diploma in some area of IT, or have three years experience as a practising IT professional. Recent work experience, or recent postgraduate education, in software project management, software process improvement, or software quality assurance is an advantage. Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit of study covers the key components of successfully managing a wide variety of Information Technology projects. The course covers both quantitative and qualitative aspects of project management. Topics include the management of time, scope, budget, risk, quality, and resources through each of the phases of a project.

Project units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research units during the final year of study.
Candidates achieving an average mark of 70% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study are eligible for the Extended Capstone Project.
Extended Capstone Project candidates take Capstone Project units ELEC5020 and ELEC5022 (total 18 CP) in place of Capstone Project ELEC5021 and 6 credit points of elective units.
ELEC5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Corequisites: ELEC5020 Prohibitions: ELEC5022 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70 or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: ELEC5021 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results, and Capstone Project B extended allows the student to investigate a topic of greater depth and scope.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.

Research Pathway

Candidates achieving an average mark of 75% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study or equivalent are eligible for the Research Pathway.
Research pathway candidates take Dissertation units ELEC5222 and ELEC5223 (total 24 CP) in place of Capstone Project units and 12 credit points of elective units.
ELEC5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ENGG5223 or ENGG5222 or ELEC8902 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
ELEC5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yash Shrivastava Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ELEC8902 or ENGG5222 or ENGG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.

Exchange units

With approval of the Program Director, up to 12 credit points of Exchange units may be taken in place of other units, towards the requirements of the degree.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).