Unit of study descriptions

Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) (Telecommunications)

To qualify for the award of the Master of Professional Engineering (Accelerated) in this specialisation, a candidate must complete 96 credit points, including core and elective units of study as listed below.
ELEC9305 Digital Signal Processing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: ELEC5736 Assumed knowledge: Specifically the following concepts are assumed knowledge for this unit: familiarity with basic Algebra, Differential and Integral Calculus, continuous linear time-invariant systems and their time and frequency domain representations, Fourier transform, sampling of continuous time signals. Assessment: Through semester assessment (43%) and Final Exam (57%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to teach how signals are processed by computers. It describes the key concepts of digital signal processing, including details of various transforms and filter design. Students are expected to implement and test some of these ideas on a digital signal processor (DSP). Completion of the unit will facilitate progression to advanced study in the area and to work in the industrial use of DSP.
The following topics are covered. Review of analog and digital signals. Analog to digital and digital to analog conversion. Some useful digital signals. Difference equations and filtering. Impulse and step response of filters. Convolution representation of filters. The Z-transform. Transfer functions and stability. Discrete time Fourier transform (DTft) and frequency response of filters. Finite impulse response (FIR) filter design: windowing method. Infinite impulse response (IIR) filter design: Butterworth filters, Chebyshev filters, Elliptic filters and impulse invariant design. Discrete Fourier Transform (Dft): windowing effects. Fast Fourier Transform (Fft): decimation in time algorithm. DSP hardware.
ELEC9505 Communications

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Tutorials Prohibitions: ELEC5739 Assumed knowledge: ELEC9302 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an intermediate unit of study in telecommunications following on the general concepts studied in earlier units such as Signal and Systems and leading on to more advanced units such as Digital Communication Systems. Student will learn how to critically design and evaluate digital communication systems including the elements of a digital transmission system, understand the limitations of communications channels, different analog and digital modulation schemes and reasons to use digital techniques instead of analog, and the effect of noise and interference in performance of the digital communication systems. On completion of this unit, studentss will have sufficient knowledge of the physical channel of a telecommunications network to approach the study of higher layers of the network stack.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to communications systems, random signals and stochastic process, components, signals and channels, sampling, quantization, pulse amplitude modulation (PAM), pulse code modulation (PCM), quantization noise, time division multiplexing, delta modulation. Digital communications: baseband signals, digital PAM, eye diagram, equalization, correlative coding, error probabilities in baseband digital transmission, bandpass transmission, digital amplitude shift keying (ASK), frequency shift keying (FSK), phase shift keying (PSK) and quadrature shift keying (QPSK), error probabilities in bandpass digital transmission, a case study of digital communication systems. Introduction to information theory: fundamental limits in communications, channel capacity and channel coding, signal compression.
ELEC9515 Digital Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ELEC5744 Assessment: Through semester assessment (45%) and Final Exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The lecture starts with an overview of major components of a digital communication system and current technology. Then the following knowledge will be covered: efficient coding/representation of information source, channel coding of information to combat noise and interference, optimal received design, principles of incoherent systems, error probability calculations, solutions to problems caused by transmitting a signal through a bandlimited channel and caused by multipath, and spread spectrum systems. The lecture concludes with a discussion of future directions of digital communication systems.
ENGG5202 Sustainable Design, Eng and Mgt

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: General knowledge in science and calculus and understanding of basic principles of chemistry, physics and mechanics Assessment: Through semester assessment (70%) and Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to give students an insight and understanding of the environmental and sustainability challenges that Australia and the planet are facing and how these have given rise to the practice of Sustainable Design, Engineering and Management. The objective of this course is to provide a comprehensive overview of the nature and causes of the major environmental problems facing our planet, with a particular focus on energy and water, and how engineering is addressing these challenges.
ELEC9506 Data Communications and the Internet

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Prohibitions: ELEC5740 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students undertaking this unit should be familiar with fundamental digital technologies and representations such as bit complement and internal word representation. Students should also have a basic understanding of the physical properties of communication channels, techniques and limitations. Furthermore, students should be able to apply fundamental mathematical skills.
The unit will cover the following specific material: Communication reference models (TCP/IP, ATM and OSI). Circuit switched and packet switched communication. Network node functions and building blocks. LAN, MAN and WAN technologies. ATM systems. Protocols fundamental mechanisms. The TCP/IP core protocols (IP, ICMP, DHCP, ARP, TCP, UDP etc. ). Applications and protocols (ftP, Telnet, SMTP, HTTP etc. ).
ENGG5204 Engineering Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Curry Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures Assumed knowledge: Competences and experience in engineering obtained during an accepted engineering degree Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to provide graduate engineers studying for a Master of Professional Engineering degree with an introduction to the professional engineering skills necessary to practice as an engineer.
These include the various elements of engineering practice, an understanding of the role of the engineer in industry, basic knowledge of the law of contracts and legal responsibility, teamwork and leadership skills, an understanding of the professional responsibilities of engineers, competence in verbal communication and presentations and in reading and writing reports, and an understanding of ethical considerations. The material, learning and assessment is tailored for graduates from Australian and overseas universities.
ENGG5217 Practical Experience

Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Practical Experience Prohibitions: ENGP1000 OR ENGP2000 OR ENGP3000 OR ENGG4000 OR CHNG5205 OR AMME5010 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Students should have completed one year of their MPE program before enrolling in this unit.
The 3 year MPE requires students to obtain industrial work experience of twelve weeks duration (60 working days) or its equivalent towards satisfying the requirements for award of the degree. Students can undertake their work experience in the final year of the MPE program (Year 3). Students may have prior work in an Engineering field carried out on completion of their undergraduate degree accepted as meeting the requirements of this component.
Students must be exposed to professional engineering practice to enable them to develop an engineering approach and ethos, and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics. and to gain an appreciation of engineering ethics.
The student is required to inform the Faculty of any work arrangements by emailing the Graduate School of Engineering and Information Technologies. Assessment in this unit is by the submission of a portfolio containing written reports on the involvement with industry. For details of the reporting requirements, go to the faculty's Practical Experience portfolio web site http://sydney.edu.au/engineering/practical-experience/index.shtml

Specialist Elective units

Candidates must complete 36 credit points from the following table of Specialist Elective units of study.
ELEC5101 Antennas and Propagation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Laboratories, Lectures Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The basics of antenna radiation are introduced with emphasis on the important performance characteristics of the radiation field pattern (in 3 dimensions) and feed impedance. The omnidirectional and Hertzian dipole antennas (both hypothetical in practise but robust theoretically) provide the starting point to analyse real antenna operation. Mutual coupling between close antennas and important 'ground' imaging effects lead to the design of antenna arrays to increase gain and directivity. Aperture antennas and frequency broadbanding techniques are introduced. Ionospheric propagation is discussed and also the the reception efficiency of receiving antennas which allows consideration of a Transmitter - Receiver 'Link budget'. The important 'Pocklington' equation for a wire dipole is developed from Maxwell's equations and leads to the numerical analysis of wire antennas using 'Moment' methods. Real world applications are emphasised throughout and are reinforced by the hands on laboratory program which includes design projects.
ELEC5507 Error Control Coding

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Project Work - own time, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Fundamental mathematics including probability theory and linear algebra. Basic knowledge on digital communications. Basic MATLAB programming skills is desired. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit deals with the principles of error control coding techniques and their applications in various communication and data storage systems. Its aim is to present the fundamentals of error control coding techniques and develop theoretical and practical skills in the design of error control encoders/decoders. Successful completion of this unit will facilitate progression to advanced study or to work in the fields of telecommunications and computer engineering. It is assumed that the students have some background in communications principles and probability theory.
The following topics are covered: Introduction to error control coding, Linear algebra, Linear block codes, Cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Solomon codes, Applications of block codes in communications, Convolutional codes, Viterbi algorithm, Applications of convolutional codes in communications, Soft decision decoding of block and convolutional codes, LDPC codes, Turbo codes, MIMO and rateless codes.
ELEC5508 Wireless Engineering

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Basic knowledge in probability and statistics, analog and digital communications, error probability calculation in communications channels, and telecommunications network. Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce the key ideas in modern wireless telecommunications networks. It will address both physical layer issues such as propagation and modulation, plus network layer issues such as capacity, radio resource management and mobility management issues.
The following topics are covered. Wireless channel: Multipath fading, frequency selective fading, Doppler spread, statistical models, diversity, GSM, OFDM. Capacity and Interference: Cell types, coverage, frequency reuse, interference management, SIMO, MISO, multiuser diversity, CDMA, OFDMA, beamforming, superposition coding. MIMO: SVD, waterfilling, beamforming, V-BLAST, SIC, MMSE, Power Allocation. LTE/LTE-Advanced: Uplink-downlink channels, control signals, data transmission, spatial multiplexing, CoMP, spectrum reuse, heterogeneous networks, inter-cell interference coordination, carrier aggregation. Queueing theory: basic models, queueing systems, waiting time, delay, queue length, priority queues, wireless network virtualization (WNV) queues.
ELEC5509 Mobile Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: ELEC3505 AND ELEC3506. Basically, students need to know the concepts of data communications and mobile communications, which could be gained in one the following units of study: ELEC3505 Communications, ELEC3506 Data Communications and the Internet, or similar units. If you are not sure, please contact the instructor. Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study serves as an introduction to communications network research. The unit relies on a solid understanding of data communications and mobile networks. It introduces some of the currently most debated research topics in mobile networking and presents an overview of different technical solutions. Students are expected to critically evaluate these solutions in their context and produce an objective analysis of the advantages/disadvantages of the different research proposals. The general areas covered are wireless Internet, mobility management, quality of service in mobile and IP networks, ad hoc networks, and cellular network architectures.
The following topics are covered. Introduction to wireless and mobile Internet. Wireless cellular data networks. Cellular mobile networks. Mobile networks of the future. Quality of service in a mobile environment. Traffic modelling for wireless Internet. Traffic management for wireless Internet. Mobility management in mobile networks. Transport protocols for mobile networks. Internet protocols for mobile networks.
ELEC5510 Satellite Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Site Visit, Project Work - own time, Tutorials, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of error probabilities, analog and digital modulation techniques and error performance evaluation studied in ELEC3505 Communications and ELEC4505 Digital Communication Systems, is assumed. Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Satellite communication systems provide fixed and mobile communication services over very large areas of land, sea and air. This unit presents the fundamental knowledge and skills in the analysis and design of such systems. It introduces students to the broad spectrum of satellite communications and its position in the entire telecommunications network; helps students to develop awareness of the key factors affecting a good satellite communications system and theoretical and practical skills in the design of a satellite communications link.
Topic areas include: satellite communication link design; propagation effects and their impact on satellite performance; satellite antennas; digital modem design, speech codec design; error control for digital satellite links.
ELEC5511 Optical Communication Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: (ELEC3405 OR ELEC9405) AND (ELEC3505 OR ELEC9505). Basic knowledge of communications, electronics and photonics Assessment: Through semester assessment (25%) and Final Exam (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: -
Optical telecommunications has revolutionized the way we receive information and communicate with one another. This course will provide an understanding of the fundamental principles of optical fibre communication systems. It commences with a description of optical fibre propagation characteristics and transmission properties. We will then consider light sources and the fundamental principles of laser action in semiconductor and other lasers including quantum well lasers, tunable lasers and fibre lasers, and also the characteristics of optical transmitters based on semiconductor and electro-optic modulation techniques. The characteristics of optical amplifiers will also be discussed. On the receiver side, the principles of photodetection and optical receiver sensitivity will be presented. Other aspects such as fibre devices and multiple wavelength division multiplexing techniques will also be discussed. Finally, the complete optical fibre communication system will be studied to enable the design of data transmission optical systems, local area networks and multi-channel optical systems.
ELEC5512 Optical Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of digital communications, wave propagation, and fundamental optics Assessment: Through semester assessment (30%) and Final Exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds upon the fundamentals of optical communication introduced in ELEC3405 (Communications Electronics and Photonics). It focuses on photonic network architectures and protocols, network design, enabling technologies and the drivers for intelligent optical network.
Students will learn how to analyse and design optical networks and optical components.
Introduction, photonic network architectures: point to point, star, ring, mesh; system principles: modulation formats, link budgets, optical signal to noise ratio, dispersion, error rates, optical gain and regeneration; wavelength division multiplexed networks; WDM components: optical filters, gratings, multiplexers, demultiplexers, wavelength routers, optical crossconnects, wavelength converters, WDM transmitters and receivers; Wavelength switched/routed networks, ultra high speed TDM, dispersion managed links, soliton systems; broadcast and distribution networks, multiple access, subcarrier multiplexed lightwave video networks, optical local area and metropolitan area networks; protocols for photonic networks: IP, Gbit Ethernet, SDH/SONET, FDDI, ATM, Fibre Channel.
ELEC5514 Networked Embedded Systems

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories Prerequisites: ELEC5509 Assumed knowledge: ELEC3305 AND ELEC3506 AND ELEC3607 AND ELEC5508 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aim to teach the fundamentals concepts associated with: Networked Embedded Systems, wireless sensor networks; Wireless channel propagation and radio power consumption; Wireless networks, ZigBee, Bluetooth, etc. ; Sensor principle, data fusion, source detection and identification; Multiple source detection, multiple access communications; Network topology, routing, network information theory; Distributed source channel coding for sensor networks; Power-aware and energy-aware communication protocols; Distributed embedded systems problems such as time synchronization and node localisation; Exposure to several recently developed solutions to address problems in wireless sensor networks and ubiquitous computing giving them a well-rounded view of the state-of the-art in the networked embedded systems field.
Student involvement with projects will expose them to the usage of simulators and/or programming some types of networked embedded systems platforms.
Ability to identify the main issues and trade-offs in networked embedded systems; Understanding of the state-of-the-art solutions in the area; Based on the above understanding, ability to analyse requirements and devise first-order solutions for particular networked embedded systems problems; Familiarisation with a simulator platform and real hardware platforms for network embedded systems through the students involvement in projects.
ELEC5516 Electrical and Optical Sensor Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, E-Learning, Laboratories Assumed knowledge: Math Ext 1, fundamental concepts of signal and systems, fundamental electrical circuit theory and analysis Assessment: Through semester assessment (40%) and Final Exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course focuses on environmentally friendly, intelligent sensors for multiple parameters monitoring to be used in power network and broadband network. The concepts learnt in this unit will be heavily used in various engineering applications in power systems, fiber optic systems and health monitoring. These concepts include: 1) Theory, design and applications of optical fiber sensors. 2) Sensor technologies for the growth of smart grid in power engineering. 3) Actuators and motors for electrical sensor and its applications. 4) Wearable sensor technologies for ehealth monitoring.
ELEC5517 Software Defined Networks

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: ELEC3506 OR ELEC9506 Assessment: through semester assessment (60%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce an emerging networking paradigm- Software Defined Networks (SDNs). By separating the control logics from the physical networks, the software defined networks allow an automated and programmable software program to logically control and manage the network. This unit introduces the basic principles of software defined networks, its architecture, abstraction, SDN programming, programmable control plane and data plane protocols, network update, network virtualisation, traffic management as well as its applications and implementations. Student will learn and practice SDN programming, testing and debugging on SDNs platforms through experiments and group projects. It is assumed that the students have some knowledge on data communications and networks.
ELEC5616 Computer and Network Security

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: A programming language, basic maths. Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the basic cryptographic building blocks of security, working through to their applications in authentication, key exchange, secret and public key encryption, digital signatures, protocols and systems. It then considers these applications in the real world, including models for integrity, authentication, electronic cash, viruses, firewalls, electronic voting, risk assessment, secure web browsers and electronic warfare. Practical cryptosystems are analysed with regard to the assumptions with which they were designed, their limitations, failure modes and ultimately why most end up broken.

Management Elective units

Candidates must complete 12 credit points from the following Management Elective units of study.
ENGG5203 Quality Engineering and Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Presentation, Project Work - in class, Project Work - own time Assumed knowledge: First degree in Engineering or a related discipline Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This subject is designed to support Engineers in the implementation of engineering tasks in the workplace. It addresses the use of quality control and management as well as systems assurance processes. It is designed to enable engineers entering practice from other related disciplines or with overseas qualifications to do so in a safe and effective way. The study program will include management of quality in research, design and delivery of engineering works and investigation, as well as of safe work practices and systems assurance.
ENGG5205 Professional Practice in Project Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: This is a core unit for all Master of Professional Engineering students as well as all students pursuing Project Management studies (including Master of Project Management, Graduate Certificate in Project Management and Graduate Diploma in Project Management). No prerequisite or assumed knowledge.
This unit of study teaches the fundamental knowledge on the importance, organisational context and professional practice in project management. It serves as an introduction to project management practices for non-PM students. For PM students, this unit lays the foundation to progress to advanced PM subjects. Although serving as a general introduction unit, the focus has been placed on scope, time, cost, and integration related issues.
Specifically, the unit aims to: Introduce students to the institutional, organisational and professional environment for today's project management practitioners as well as typical challenges and issues facing them; Demonstrate the importance of project management to engineering and organisations; Demonstrate the progression from strategy formulation to execution of the project; Provide a set of tools and techniques at different stages of a project's lifecycle with emphasis on scope, time, cost and integration related issues; Highlight examples of project success/failures in project management and to take lessons from these; Consider the roles of project manager in the organization and management of people; Provide a path for students seeking improvements in their project management expertise.
ENGG5214 Management of Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to develop competence in the management of technology. It will address all aspects of the management of technology, the nature and importance of technological change and innovation, within the context of the global knowledge economy, the management of the new product development process, the role of technology in manufacturing and service competitiveness, the role of IT in logistics management, supply chain strategies, and communication, and the characteristics of high technology markets.
ENGG5215 International Eng Strategy and Operations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: John Curry Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management and globalisation Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to introduce students to the global context of much of contemporary engineering and the consequent strategic and operational issues. It will address the nature, characteristics and variety of risks of global businesses, the opportunities and pressures for effective strategies, and the many management challenges in international business. In particular it will focus on Australian consulting, logistics and construction engineering firms that are operating on a global basis.
ENGG5216 Management of Engineering Innovation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures, Tutorials, Presentation, Project Work - in class Assumed knowledge: Sound competence in all aspects of engineering, and some understanding of issues of engineering management Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed as enable students to grapple with the challenges of engaging in, facilitating and managing innovation and technology commercialisation. Key learning outcomes are: developing an understanding of the processes of management, and in particular of innovation, dealing with uncertain and inadequate information, how to communicate effectively to and motivate a group of people to work out what to do, and how to do it.
Content will include the challenges of modern management; understanding of the new rules of international competitiveness; effects of globalisation on Australia's economic performance; the competitiveness of Australian firms; the generation of employment and wealth; the changing requirements of the engineer; the engineer as manager and strategist; the role of innovation in business management; product innovation and commercialisation; IP recognition and management; starting a high-tech company.

Project units

All candidates are required to complete a minimum of 12 credit points of Project or Research units during the final year of study.
Candidates achieving an average mark of 70% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study are eligible for the Extended Capstone Project.
Extended Capstone Project candidates take Capstone Project units ELEC5020 and ELEC5022 (total 18 cp) in place of Capstone Project ELEC5021 and 6 cp of elective units.
ELEC5020 Capstone Project A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 96 cp from MPE degree program or 48 cp from the MPE(Accel) program or 24 cp from the ME program (including any credit for previous study). Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5021 Capstone Project B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Corequisites: ELEC5020 Prohibitions: ELEC5022 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scope. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally, the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints, and also the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research, are key assessment criteria.
ELEC5022 Capstone Project B Extended

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time Prerequisites: 24 credit points in the Master of Engineering and WAM >=70, or 96 credit points in the Master of Professional Engineering and WAM >=70 or 48cp from MPE(Accel) program and WAM >=70 Prohibitions: ELEC5021 OR ELEC5222 OR ELEC5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The capstone project requires the student to plan and execute a substantial research-based project, using their technical and communication skills to design, evaluate, implement, analyse and theorise about developments that contribute to professional practice thus demonstrating the achievement of AQF Level 9.
The Capstone Project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of independent research or design work in a setting and in a manner that fosters the development of engineering skills in research or design. These skills include the capacity to define a research or design question, showing how it relates to existing knowledge, identifying the tools needed to investigate the question, carrying out the research or design in a systematic way, analysing the results obtained and presenting the outcomes in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. Capstone Project is undertaken across two semesters of enrolment, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each. Capstone Project A covers first steps of thesis research starting with development of research proposal. Capstone Project B covers the second of stage writing up and presenting the research results, and Capstone Project B extended allows the student to investigate a topic of greater depth and scope.
Students are asked to write a thesis based on a research or major design project, which is very often related to some aspect of a staff member's research interests. Some projects will be experimental in nature, others may involve computer-based simulation, feasibility studies or the design, construction and testing of equipment. Direction of thesis work may be determined by the supervisor or be of an original nature, but in either case the student is responsible for the execution of the practical work and the general layout and content of the thesis itself. The final thesis must be the student's individual work, although research is sometimes conducted in the framework of a group project shared with others. Students undertaking research on this basis will need to take care in ensuring the individual quality of their own research work and the final thesis submission. The thesis will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors as part of a seminar program.
A thesis at this level will represent a contribution to professional practice or research, however the timeframe available for the thesis also needs to be considered when developing project scopes. Indeed, a key aim of the thesis is to specify a research topic that arouses sufficient intellectual curiosity, and presents an appropriate range and diversity of technical and conceptual challenges, while remaining manageable and allowing achievable outcomes within the time and resources available. It is important that the topic be of sufficient scope and complexity to allow a student to learn their craft and demonstrate their research skills. Equally imperative is that the task not be so demanding as to elude completion. Finally the ability to plan such a project to achieve results within constraints and the identification of promising areas and approaches for future research is a key assessment criterion.

Research pathway

Candidates achieving an average mark of 75% or higher over 48 credit points of units of study or equivalent are eligible for the Research Pathway.
Research pathway candidates take Dissertation units ELEC5222 and ELEC5223 (total 24 cp) in place of Capstone Project units and 12 cp of elective units.
ELEC5222 Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ENGG5223 or ENGG5222 or ELEC8902 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.
ELEC5223 Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prohibitions: ELEC8901 or ELEC8902 or ENGG5222 or ENGG5223 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: In order to enrol in a project, students must first secure an academic supervisor in an area that they are interested. The topic of your project must be determined in discussion with the supervisor. The supervisor can come from any of the Engineering Departments, however, they need to send confirmation of their supervision approval to the Postgraduate Administrator.
To complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate experiments, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis.

Exchange units

Exchange units require the approval of the Program Director. With approval, up to 12 credit points of Exchange units may be taken in place of other units, towards the requirements of the degree.
ELEC6901 Electrical Exchange Unit 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one quarter of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6902 Electrical Exchange Unit 1B

Credit points: 12 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one half of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6903 Electrical Exchange Unit 1C

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6904 Electrical Exchange Unit 2A

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one quarter of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6905 Electrical Exchange Unit 2B

Credit points: 12 Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to one half of that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.
ELEC6906 Electrical Exchange Unit 2C

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a unit of study for the University of Sydney students who have gone on exchange and are doing unit(s) with a syllabus that is equivalent to unit(s) of study in the School of Electrical and Information Engineering. The enrollment in this unit needs to be approved by the school. The enrollment in this unit will be granted for a workload that is equivalent to that of a (normal) full time student at the exchange university. Assessment is set by the exchange university. A Pass/Fail grade is awarded by the University of Sydney in this unit. Thus the marks obtained at the exchange university will not be included in any WAM calculations.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).