Master of Project Management

Master of Project Management

To qualify for the award of the Master of Project Management a candidate must complete 72 credit points including:
(a) 24 credit points of Project Management Core Foundation units of study;
(b) 24 credit points of Project Management Core Competency units of study;
(c) 12 credit points of Research/Capstone units of study; and
(d) 12 credit points of Elective units of study.
(e) Candidates may complete a major in one of the areas listed below.
Completion of a major is not a requirement of the Master of Project Management, it is optional. A major requires the completion of 12 credit points made up of the core unit for that major and one other from the major electives list. The majors available are:
(a) Global
(b) Strategic Change Implementation
(c) Organisational Project Management
(d) Risk and Control
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Diploma in Project Management a candidate must complete 48 credit points, including:
(a) the 24 credit points of Project Management Core Foundation units of study;
(b) PMGT5871 and PMGT5872;
(c) and 12 credit points of Project Management Core Competency or Elective units of study.
To qualify for the award of the Graduate Certificate in Project Management a candidate must complete 24 credit points:
(a) A candidate will normally complete the 24 credit points of Project Management Foundation units of study.

Project Management Core Foundation units

ENGG5205 Professional Practice in Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Louis Taborda Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (75%) and Final Exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: This is a core unit for all Master of Professional Engineering students as well as all students pursuing Project Management studies (including Master of Project Management, Graduate Certificate in Project Management and Graduate Diploma in Project Management). No prerequisite or assumed knowledge.
This unit of study teaches the fundamental knowledge on the importance, organisational context and professional practice in project management. It serves as an introduction to project management practices for non-PM students. For PM students, this unit lays the foundation to progress to advanced PM subjects. Although serving as a general introduction unit, the focus has been placed on scope, time, cost, and integration related issues.
Specifically, the unit aims to: Introduce students to the institutional, organisational and professional environment for today's project management practitioners as well as typical challenges and issues facing them; Demonstrate the importance of project management to engineering and organisations; Demonstrate the progression from strategy formulation to execution of the project; Provide a set of tools and techniques at different stages of a project's lifecycle with emphasis on scope, time, cost and integration related issues; Highlight examples of project success/failures in project management and to take lessons from these; Consider the roles of project manager in the organization and management of people; Provide a path for students seeking improvements in their project management expertise.
ENGG5811 Critical and Systems Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, Workshops, Project Work Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Critical and Systems Thinking engages with the analytical thinking abilities required in deciding and communicating management strategy for complex large-scale projects.
The unit develops skills in making basic critical judgments on complex problem situations involving uncertainty, incomplete information and dynamically interacting technical and non- technical systems and contexts. There is a particular focus on the ability to articulate a critical, reflected and well- reasoned response at a level that contributes usefully to project strategy discussions. In addition the unit also equips students with knowledge and communication competencies of immediate relevance to the academic structure. Students engage with theoretical frameworks and concepts in order to practice robust methods of questioning and argument. A central element of content is linking theory to practice with students' experience as the focal point.
The unit is pitched at the level of Associate to Practitioner (Levels 2 to 3) on the Project Management Learning Progression Table, addressing the critical thinking and systems thinking dimensions of Project Communication and Project Development. At this level, you are not necessarily expected to produce fully researched and optimised solutions to the problems posed, but you do need to be able to clearly define the main problem at hand, organise and filter relevant evidence and issues, identify and evaluate logical connections, recognise critical assumptions and uncertainties, reach well-reasoned conclusions, develop and reflect on your own personal views and present critical arguments in a constructive manner to colleagues and supervisors. These abilities are essential for an understanding of the relevance of epistemological and ontological considerations in relation to the broader, more thoroughgoing analysis of complex system dynamics to be developed in other advanced Project Management units.
ENGG5820 Applied Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain hands on, practical experience managing all aspects of a live project. It complements ENGG5205 Professional Practice in Project Management which introduces students to standard project management processes and key knowledge areas. Working in teams, students will be given the opportunity to apply this knowledge to the execution of a project under the guidance of a senior project management professional. The primary focus is on the execution, monitoring and control and closing process groups.
Students will facilitate workshops on scoping and risk identification, and update the project plan in response to change requests or variations. They will be required to report and present on project status and to complete a post project review to identify lessons learned and improvements for future projects. Under the guidance of a senior project management professional, students will be guided through the lifecycle of a project and learn about real world practices and techniques. They will have time in most sessions to work on their assessment tasks whilst receiving guidance and immediate feedback on their progress. Effective project teamwork is fundamental to project performance and will be an important aspect of the subject.
Working as part of a team, students select from a range of meaningful projects that will enhance the reputation of the project management profession and provide genuine value to the Faculty. Teams will be responsible for developing the key project management deliverables and executing the project, including the: project charter, scope statement and delivery approach; project schedule and project budget; project stakeholder and communication plan; project quality plan; status reports and sponsor updates; project control logs - assumptions, risks, decisions, change requests; and post implementation review.
Students will deliver a presentation to sponsors and approval committees; facilitate workshops on scoping and risk identification; and prepare a change impact assessment in response to a change request or variation. Students will be required to present on project status each fortnight and to complete a post implementation review to identify lessons learned and improvements for future projects. Students will have time in most sessions to work on their assessment tasks whilst receiving guidance and immediate feedback on their progress.
PMGT6867 Quantitative Methods: Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Methods studied in this unit are used in a wide range of project management tasks and problems. The unit explains why and where particular methods are used and provides examples and opportunities to apply these methods in practice. This unit will also facilitate the understanding of the mechanics of these methods and their underlying theory.

Project Management Core Competency units

PMGT5871 Project Process Planning and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fatima Afzal Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Prohibitions: PMGT6871 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit of study teaches fundamental theory and practice of project planning and control. Project planning and control are the key processes in project management, which moves the project from initiation through all its phases to a successful conclusion. Project planning refers to planning of time, cost and resources adequately to estimate the work needed and to effectively manage risk in a project.
PMGT5872 People and Leadership

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Intensive February,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6872 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is a core program unit with a focus on enhancing leadership and people management capability. It covers diverse traditional and innovative theories, models and tools. It complements traditional views based on PMBoK, applying diverse approaches to contemporary project environments. Many of the unit tasks are framed in uncertain and potentially ambiguous terms as is common in many project environments.
Topic areas covered: Project context; Personal Competence; Interpersonal Competence; Team Competence.
The unit references a range of Australian and global Project Management, Management and Consulting Standards. It integrates theory and practice to optimise results.
PMGT5873 Project Economics and Finance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Tutorials, Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6873 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This course equips members of project management teams with information and tools to do financial appraisal and optimise decision making. It imparts basic knowledge and competencies required in project appraisal and financial management applicable to all sectors of industry and business. These include services, business investment, RandD, capital projects, local, state and national government departments and agencies.
Topics include: Review of the Fundamentals of Project Economics and Financial Techniques; Implementation of Fundamental Principles including EUAC, NPV, IRR, B/C, Valuation, Depreciation, Replacement Studies and Life Cycle Costing; Development of Project Alternatives and Application of the Analysis Techniques; Sensitivity Analysis, Risk Analysis and Management; Project Funding and Selection; Project Appraisal Report.
PMGT5891 Project Risk Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Gerard Mcgarry; Gerard Mcgarry Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: PMGT6891 Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit is delivered in multiple modes (online and weekly). Please ensure that the correct mode is selected before checking the detailed content. The aims of this course are to develop students' understanding and ability in applying project risk management skills in project environments. The course enables the students to apply best practice techniques and methods commonly used by industry in project risk management. The competencies developed through this unit cover and go beyond the competencies in Risk areas as outlined in the competency standards by the Australian Institute of Project Management and Project Management Institute in the USA, respectively. The unit aims to develop students ability to understand and conceptualise risk management issues, and analyse and apply risk management techniques using concepts and frameworks from the underpinning literature. - Ability to establish risk management plans, policies and integrate them with other project plans, organisation and align them to the business case - Ability to understand the sources of potential risks (including but not limited to political, organisational, psychological and technical risks) and to use risk management tools and techniques to identify, assess, evaluate, and prioritise risks - Ability to simulate the potential effects of risks on schedule, cost and other performance dimensions using sensitivity analysis, decision tree analysis and simulation techniques. - Ability to track, monitor and control risks and actions to achieve project objectives and the business case - Ability to close risks for an optimal outcome

Project Management Electives

PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, RandD units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.
PMGT5886 System Dynamics Modelling for PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mikhail Prokopenko Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Students should achieve an understanding of dynamical systems methods applied to complex adaptive systems (CAS). CAS is a new approach to engineering and management that studies and models how relationships between parts give rise to collective and dynamic system-level behaviours, for example, in communication and transport networks, megaprojects, social and eco-systems. Effectively implemented, the methods can dramatically improve a manager's effectiveness in today's complex and interconnected business world, by helping to predict and evaluate indirect effects of actions and policies. This course provides managers with many practical quantitative tools to enhance individual, team, and organisational learning, change, and performance.
PMGT5887 Computer Applications in PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Computer-Aided Project Management builds a bridge from the genesis of project management principles through today's software, developing a postmodern project management systems paradigm for the twenty-first century. Adopting a unique systems perspective that emphasises project coding--an essential skill in project database management--this course demonstrates what fundamental project management principles are, what they do, and how they work in the software environment. Addressing all phases of a project, it illustrates and expands theories through the use of realistic case studies and extensive exercises running on computers.
An important feature of systems project management, the use of scope and quality is also discussed.
By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to:
- Understand application-based introduction to effective systems and methods for project planning and control
- Understand essential knowledge to manage successfully and to create, use, and communicate PC-, Server-, Web-, and Internet-based project management information.
- Understand the use of structures such as PDS (Project Definition Structure), WBS (Work Breakdown Structure), OBS (Organizational Breakdown Structure), and Masterformat project coding for areas, functions, elements, phases, stages, packages, purchase orders, contracts, and human resources planning and scheduling by CPM (Critical Path Method) and PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) communicating with Gantt and bar charts and graphics such as S curves relating estimating and cost control from order-of-magnitude numbers to appropriation grade budgets.
- Understand how to apply project concepts from knowledge areas at an operational level using project-based software applications.
PMGT5888 Global Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This course has been designed to suggest the development of best practices in communication, collaboration and management across international borders. The objectives are to: Understand the challenges faced by a global program and project teams; and, Improve the overall skills and practices of global project managers that will lead international companies to achieve maturity in global project management. Topics include: Introduction to traditional, distributed, and virtual project work; Global projects and requirements; Organisational change and organisational theory; Cross-cultural collaboration; Global project leadership; Trust building and conflict resolution; Coaching over distance; Global communication and channels; Leading a global organisation; Implementing collaborative tools; and, Implementing a Global Project Management Framework.
PMGT5889 Integrated Cost and Scheduling Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study focuses on the integrated management of project scope, time and cost for effective control and delivery of projects. The scope of the subject matter includes delivering comprehensive theoretical knowledge and application skills in integrated management and control of cost and schedule in complex projects. By successful completion of this unit of study, students should achieve a clear understanding of the time and cost management and appropriate control measures in project development environments.
Students should be able to: Discuss the project management trade-offs on balancing the triple-constraint; Explain the integrated cost and schedule control processes; Construct work breakdown structure (WBS) using given project information; Discuss scope monitoring and change control system; Produce networks diagrams for project scheduling; Apply critical path analysis (CPA) in network scheduling; Apply critical chain method in project scheduling; Estimate the project cost and duration; Apply resource scheduling techniques; Construct a timephased budget plan; Discuss cost monitoring and control processes; Undertake earned value analysis (EVA); and Undertake integrated cost and schedule control processes using project management software (Microsoft Project or Primavera)By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to: Undertake WBS exercises, CPA, EVA and tradeoff analysis using the given project information; Explain how the components of time and cost management interrelate; Explain in depth why integrated cost and schedule management are important to project management; and Analyse a project situation that involves time and cost management issues and apply a solution(s)
PMGT5895 Contracts Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Natalie Perisa Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of this unit is the understanding of fundamental contracts as it relates to project management. The aim is that students are able to understand various contracts that are available and have the ability to select the right contract for a project. The unit aims to give an understanding of contract terms and conditions that may give rise to potential issues and methods to mitigate this. Given contracts are pivotal in a project manager's role the overall aim is for students to understand contracts better and have the confidence to use contracts in their day to day activities to avoid potential risks and conflicts. In addition it will assist students to have the ability to solve complex issues by being able to think critically and analyse issues.
Outcomes: Understanding the basis of contract management-including traditional and contemporary theories; Being able to identify contract terms that expose the project manager to risk; Gain confidence to be able to raise contract issues and negotiate terms.
PMGT6885 Project Placement Special Topic

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: meetings Assumed knowledge: [Permission by the Director, PM Program] Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit will cover some topic of active and cutting-edge research related to the management of projects; the content of this unit may be varied depending on special opportunities such as a distinguished researcher visiting the University.
Electives may be taken in Semester 1 or Semester 2.

Research and Capstone units

All Master of Project Management candidates must complete a Capstone (12 credit points), Thesis (12 credit points), or Dissertation option (24 credit points), comprising those units listed under the relevant heading below.

Capstone units

ENGG5812 Project Delivery Approaches

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminar, Workshops, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit develops skills in critically evaluating different project management methods and tools in relation to the complex systems environments that they are required to manage. Students will work on project case studies and be given the opportunity to consider different contemporary project delivery approaches and the relationship with both benefits and organisational change management. Lean Six Sigma, PRINCE2, PMBoK, agile methods and others will be examined in addition to hybrid models that blend more than one framework or method. The unit targets the higher analytical capabilities required at Practitioner to Manager levels (Levels 3 to 4) on the Project Management Learning Progression Table, addressing the critical thinking and systems thinking dimensions of Project Methods, Project Development, Project Communication and Project Delivery. The distinguishing quality of thinking at this level is its systematic character, working from a broad-based theoretical and practical understanding of the project delivery environment. The unit will go beyond what the approaches are and critically explore how to select the most suitable delivery method for your project. The aim at this level is not only to formulate reasonable and critical responses to a given problem, but also to articulate thorough and conclusive assessments for the development of tailored project delivery approaches that combine elements from different project delivery systems and methodologies. You need to identify key elements of the project and organise them into a coherent and persuasive argument about the recommended project delivery approach, encompassing consideration of the various risks, benefits, costs and processes involved. The unit builds upon the skills of complex problem analysis developed at a more basic level in Critical and Systems Thinking and together with this unit forms a two-part sequence dealing with the analytical abilities required in determining specific project delivery approaches for complex projects with different characteristics. Students enrolling in this unit are expected to have already developed a basic level of ability in forming and communicating critical judgments regarding complex problem situations through completion of the Critical and Systems Thinking unit or equivalent.
PMGT5850 Project Management Capstone Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Louis Taborda; Louis Taborda Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project work - own time, Meetings, Workshops, Presentation Prerequisites: ENGG5205 AND ENGG5811 AND PMGT6867 AND ENGG5820 AND (PMGT5871 OR PMGT6871) AND (PMGT5872 OR PMGT6872) AND (ENGG5812 OR PMGT6812) Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
The capstone project aims to provide students with the opportunity to carry out a defined piece of workplace related research and assessment in a way that fosters the development of practical and research skills relevant to project management. Students will work in small, randomly selected groups on an assigned project for the semester. The concepts covered depend on the nature of the project.
The project outcomes will be presented in a report that is clear, coherent and logically structured. The project will be judged on the extent and quality of the student's contribution to original work and particularly how critical, perceptive and constructive he or she has been in assessing his/her work and that of others, in understanding the business or organisational context and needs. Students will also be required to present the results of their findings to their peers and supervisors either face to face or by production of a video or other recorded presentation.
The skills acquired will be invaluable to students progressing their careers in project management work.

Thesis units

PMGT5883 Project Management Thesis A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Project Work - own time, Meeting Prohibitions: PMGT5892 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 6 credit point units PMGT5883 and PMGT5884 may be undertaken concurrently. Students must have a 75% average WAM and approval from the Program Director to be eligible to enrol in this unit. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
Project Management Thesis A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to Project Management. Students will work individually to plan and write reports.
Project Management Thesis can be spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Project Management Thesis A (PMGT5883) and Project Management Thesis B (PMGT5884). This particular unit of study, which must precede PMGT5884 Project Management Thesis B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete thesis project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT5884 Project Management Thesis B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: PMGT5892 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: It is expected that the project will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 6 credit point units PMGT5883 and PMGT5884 may be undertaken concurrently. Students must have a 75% average WAM and approval from the Program Director to be eligible to enrol in this unit. Students considering this option should discuss it with the Thesis coordinator at least one semester before they intend to start.
Project Management Thesis A and B provide an opportunity for students to undertake a major project in a specialised area relevant to Project Management. Students will work individually to plan and write reports.
Project Management Thesis can be spread over a whole year, in two successive Units of Study of 6 credits points each, Project Management Thesis A (PMGT5883) and Project Management Thesis B (PMGT5884). This particular unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with PMGT5883 Project Management Thesis A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete thesis project. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT5883 Project Management Thesis A.

Dissertation units

Enrolment in the Dissertation option is with permission only. If undertaking this option, replace 12 credit points of Elective units with Dissertation units.
PMGT5851 Project Management Dissertation A

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: (ENGG5205 AND ENGG5811 AND PMGT6867 AND ENGG5820) Prohibitions: PMGT5883 OR PMGT5884 OR PMGT5850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: All students wishing to enrol in Dissertation A and B must submit a research proposal and obtain the approval of the Program Director in order to enrol in these units. Under normal circumstances students will be expected to have a 75% average WAM. Where a student has been granted 24 cp credit on entry and wishes to start the dissertation in their first semester, permission to enrol will be based on the research proposal.
The dissertation is available to students who have a strong research interest and who are deemed capable of completing an extensive research project. The aim of the dissertation is to complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate research methods, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. It is expected that the dissertation will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 12 credit point units PMGT5851 and PMGT5852 may, with permission, be undertaken concurrently.
This unit of study, which must precede PMGT5852 Project Management Dissertation B, should cover the first half of the work required for a complete dissertation project. In particular, it should include almost all project planning, a major proportion of the necessary background research, and a significant proportion of the investigative or design work required of the project.
PMGT5852 Project Management Dissertation B

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Lynn Crawford Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Meeting, Project Work - own time Prerequisites: ENGG5205 AND ENGG5811 AND PMGT6867 AND ENGG5820 AND PMGT5851 Prohibitions: PMGT5883 OR PMGT5884 OR PMGT5850 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: All students wishing to enrol in Dissertation A and B must submit a research proposal and obtain the approval of the Program Director in order to enrol in these units. Under normal circumstances students will be expected to have a 75% average WAM. Where a student has been granted 24 cp credit on entry and wishes to start the dissertation in their first semester, permission to enrol will be based on the research proposal.
The dissertation is available to students who have a strong research interest and who are deemed capable of completing an extensive research project. The aim of the dissertation is to complete a substantial research project and successfully analyse a problem, devise appropriate research methods, analyse the results and produce a well-argued, in-depth thesis. It is expected that the dissertation will be conducted over two consecutive semesters although the two 12 credit point units PMGT5851 and PMGT5852 may, with permission, be undertaken concurrently.
This unit of study, which must be preceded by or be conducted concurrently with PMGT5851 Project Management Dissertation A, should cover the second half of the work required for a complete dissertation project. In particular, it should include completion of all components planned but not undertaken or completed in PMGT5851 Project Management Dissertation B.

Master of Project Management majors

Select 12 credit points of Electives units listed in the table for the relevant major.
To be eligible for a major, the Major Core unit of that major must be completed.

Global

Major Core unit
PMGT5888 Global Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Petr Matous Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This course has been designed to suggest the development of best practices in communication, collaboration and management across international borders. The objectives are to: Understand the challenges faced by a global program and project teams; and, Improve the overall skills and practices of global project managers that will lead international companies to achieve maturity in global project management. Topics include: Introduction to traditional, distributed, and virtual project work; Global projects and requirements; Organisational change and organisational theory; Cross-cultural collaboration; Global project leadership; Trust building and conflict resolution; Coaching over distance; Global communication and channels; Leading a global organisation; Implementing collaborative tools; and, Implementing a Global Project Management Framework.
Major Elective units
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, RandD units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.

Strategic Change Implementation

Major Core unit
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.
Major Elective units
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, RandD units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.

Organisational Project Management

Major Core unit
PMGT5877 Management of Project Organisations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Readings, Online discussions, Group Assignment Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course examines the challenges and approaches of managing project-oriented organisations. These could be independent business units or divisions within a larger corporation. Examples are construction contractors, ICT services, RandD units and many internal business units that concurrently undertake multiple projects. Today, more organisations are adopting project management as a management strategy to provide effective and timely solutions to clients. They are adapting organisational architectures to support both 'business as usual' and the multiple projects that are increasingly important to the organisation. Focus is on the relationship between project management and the following: organisational culture, structure, processes, cross-functional teams, project governance, performance management, organisational learning, change and knowledge management. The assessment comprises of a case study team assignment, quizzes and online discussions.
Major Elective units
PMGT5875 Project Innovation Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Cheng Ang Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Innovation is widely-recognised as a major driver of economic growth. Yet innovation projects can be difficult to manage: they typically involve a high level of uncertainty, and many organisations are unsatisfied with the level of innovation they achieve. In this unit of study, we focus on issues in the management of innovation projects at the individual project level, organisational level and across networks of organisations. Since a systematic approach can and does improve our effectiveness in managing innovation, we begin by exploring several different process models of the stages through which innovation projects are managed. We discuss context and challenges which impact such projects, as well as the concepts of creativity and intellectual property management. Using focused case studies, we analyse best practice in the structures and processes that organisations can provide to enable innovation, as well as to support the search, selection, implementation, dissemination, feedback and evaluation stages of their innovative projects. We also examine the impact of networks on innovation (e.g. collaboration networks), national innovation policies and systems, and trends towards open innovation.
PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julien Pollack; Julien Pollack Session: Semester 2 Classes: Seminars, E-Learning Prohibitions: WORK6026 Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Welcome to PMGT5876 Strategic Delivery of Change. This course is designed to foster and promote critical thinking and the application of good theory to inform good practice in the strategic delivery of organisational change. The philosophy underpinning this course is design thinking and storytelling. You will learn quite a bit about these ideas over the duration of the course, and why it is increasingly important to change management. The course develops capabilities that will differentiate you from the average project manager and change agent, and which are in high demand in forward thinking organisations: be they in private, public or third sector.

Risk and Control

Major Core unit
PMGT5889 Integrated Cost and Scheduling Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study focuses on the integrated management of project scope, time and cost for effective control and delivery of projects. The scope of the subject matter includes delivering comprehensive theoretical knowledge and application skills in integrated management and control of cost and schedule in complex projects. By successful completion of this unit of study, students should achieve a clear understanding of the time and cost management and appropriate control measures in project development environments.
Students should be able to: Discuss the project management trade-offs on balancing the triple-constraint; Explain the integrated cost and schedule control processes; Construct work breakdown structure (WBS) using given project information; Discuss scope monitoring and change control system; Produce networks diagrams for project scheduling; Apply critical path analysis (CPA) in network scheduling; Apply critical chain method in project scheduling; Estimate the project cost and duration; Apply resource scheduling techniques; Construct a timephased budget plan; Discuss cost monitoring and control processes; Undertake earned value analysis (EVA); and Undertake integrated cost and schedule control processes using project management software (Microsoft Project or Primavera)By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to: Undertake WBS exercises, CPA, EVA and tradeoff analysis using the given project information; Explain how the components of time and cost management interrelate; Explain in depth why integrated cost and schedule management are important to project management; and Analyse a project situation that involves time and cost management issues and apply a solution(s)
Major Elective units
PMGT5886 System Dynamics Modelling for PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mikhail Prokopenko Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
Students should achieve an understanding of dynamical systems methods applied to complex adaptive systems (CAS). CAS is a new approach to engineering and management that studies and models how relationships between parts give rise to collective and dynamic system-level behaviours, for example, in communication and transport networks, megaprojects, social and eco-systems. Effectively implemented, the methods can dramatically improve a manager's effectiveness in today's complex and interconnected business world, by helping to predict and evaluate indirect effects of actions and policies. This course provides managers with many practical quantitative tools to enhance individual, team, and organisational learning, change, and performance.
PMGT5887 Computer Applications in PM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mohammed Uddin Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (60%) and Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Computer-Aided Project Management builds a bridge from the genesis of project management principles through today's software, developing a postmodern project management systems paradigm for the twenty-first century. Adopting a unique systems perspective that emphasises project coding--an essential skill in project database management--this course demonstrates what fundamental project management principles are, what they do, and how they work in the software environment. Addressing all phases of a project, it illustrates and expands theories through the use of realistic case studies and extensive exercises running on computers.
An important feature of systems project management, the use of scope and quality is also discussed.
By the end of this unit of study, students should be able to:
- Understand application-based introduction to effective systems and methods for project planning and control
- Understand essential knowledge to manage successfully and to create, use, and communicate PC-, Server-, Web-, and Internet-based project management information.
- Understand the use of structures such as PDS (Project Definition Structure), WBS (Work Breakdown Structure), OBS (Organizational Breakdown Structure), and Masterformat project coding for areas, functions, elements, phases, stages, packages, purchase orders, contracts, and human resources planning and scheduling by CPM (Critical Path Method) and PERT (Program Evaluation and Review Technique) communicating with Gantt and bar charts and graphics such as S curves relating estimating and cost control from order-of-magnitude numbers to appropriation grade budgets.
- Understand how to apply project concepts from knowledge areas at an operational level using project-based software applications.
PMGT5895 Contracts Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Natalie Perisa Session: Semester 1 Classes: Workshops, Seminars, E-Learning Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of this unit is the understanding of fundamental contracts as it relates to project management. The aim is that students are able to understand various contracts that are available and have the ability to select the right contract for a project. The unit aims to give an understanding of contract terms and conditions that may give rise to potential issues and methods to mitigate this. Given contracts are pivotal in a project manager's role the overall aim is for students to understand contracts better and have the confidence to use contracts in their day to day activities to avoid potential risks and conflicts. In addition it will assist students to have the ability to solve complex issues by being able to think critically and analyse issues.
Outcomes: Understanding the basis of contract management-including traditional and contemporary theories; Being able to identify contract terms that expose the project manager to risk; Gain confidence to be able to raise contract issues and negotiate terms.

For more information on units of study visit CUSP (https://cusp.sydney.edu.au).