Bachelor of Health Sciences – movement science major

Bachelor of Health Sciences with a Movement Science second major

View semester session codes here.

Course BPHEASCI-02: Pass course; full-time, 3 years

Year 1

Semester 1
BIOL1003 Human Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Osu Lilje Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week (three lectures in some weeks), one 3-hour practical class per fortnight, one 2-hour workshop per fortnight, 6-9 hours of online activities per fortnight. Prohibitions: EDUH1016, BIOL1903, BIOL1500, BIOL1993 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology, however, students who have not completed HSC biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (in February). Assessment: One 2-hour exam, assignment, group project presentation and quizzes (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides an introduction to human anatomy and physiology. It includes an overview of cell and tissue structures, the skeletal system, nutrition, digestion and excretion. Human Biology looks at how our bodies respond to environmental stimuli with respect to the endocrine, nervous and immune systems. After discussion of reproduction and development, it concludes with an overview of modern studies in human genetics. This unit has four main components: lectures, practicals, workshops and HB Online activities; this unit of study provides a suitable foundation for intermediate biology units of study.
Textbooks
Van Putte, C., Regan, J. and Russo, A. (2013) Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology, McGraw Hill.The edition comes with a custom publication of:Mader, S.S. (2006) Human Biology, 11th edition, McGraw Hill. (Chapters 19, 24, 26)
HSBH1006 Foundations of Health Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lee-Fay Low Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week and eLearning online learning support. Assessment: Tutorial attendance and presentation (25%), essay (25%) and 2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an introductory unit for students entering the health sciences. The unit will provide students with knowledge and understanding of key approaches to health and illness, patterns of health and disease at a national and international level, and how we measure health status in an individual, a community and a nation. Students will gain an understanding of who provides health care at the professional, community and family level, and the roles taken up by non-professionals in advocating for change through health-focused consumer and community-based support groups. Students will develop a range of core skills and competencies needed in the study and practice of health sciences and as a basis for working in health-related areas or for postgraduate study.
HSBH1008 Health Determinants and Interventions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: Tutorial attendance and presentation (25%), essay (25%), 2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will introduce students to the main social and economic factors associated with patterns of health in Australia and a global context and will explore the social, cultural and environmental processes involved in determining the similarities and disparities in the health of populations and peoples, drawing primarily on sociological approaches. Students will be introduced to a repertoire of key concepts for understanding these processes including class, gender, occupation, ethnicity, indigeneity, disability, inequality, globalisation, and the role of governments. Initiatives to promote preventable hospitalisation and increased health and wellbeing within and across population groups will be examined, particularly those proposed by the WHO¿s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health.
PSYC1001 Psychology 1001

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caleb Owens Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1000w essay, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; behavioural neuroscience; applied psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the website:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Course Coordinator will advise
or
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caleb Owens Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5 hour exam, one 1250 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: human mental abilities; learning, motivation and emotion; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Course Coordinator will advise
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
HSBH1009 Health Care Resources and Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stephanie Short Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: online quizzes (30%), team project (30%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit of study comprises three modules: Health care systems - provides foundational knowledge about the Australian health care system in an international context. Approaches to health policy - introduces students to the key approaches and concepts in health policy analysis and applies them to contemporary challenges in Australian health policy. Key challenges in health care resources and systems - outlines key challenges for analysis.
Textbooks
Palmer, G. R., & Short, S. D. (2014). Health care and public policy: An Australian analysis (5th ed.). Melbourne: Palgrave Macmillan
Three electives [18] (see note 2)
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2 (first offered 2015)

Semester 1
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1133, BIOS1127, BMED2403, PHSI2006, BIOS2099, PHSI2005, BIOS1155, BIOS2098 Assessment: mid semester exam (30%), end semester exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes at which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hrs practical/week, with a small online component Prohibitions: BIOS1137, BIOS2103 Assessment: mid-semester exam (40%), end-semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study includes fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the somatosensory and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS1032 Fundamentals of Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lectures/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Practical skills assessment (20%), excel tutorial and practical class-based worksheets (20%) and end semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of exercise science and an introduction to their application to physical activity, sport, fitness and health. A focus of Fundamentals of Exercise Science is the practical application of testing procedures to the measurement of physiological function. In this unit issues related to work (and its measurement), energy supply, physiological capacity and muscular fitness are covered, with emphasis on the integration of these concepts, the use of scientific rigour and evidence-based practice. Practical classes will cover various fundamental skills for exercise scientists including standard health screening procedures and the principles and practice aerobic and muscular fitness testing. Worksheets will include data presentation and analysis skills using excel software. The exercise prescription component of the unit introduces students to the concepts of programming for cardio-respiratory/aerobic and muscular fitness for healthy individuals. A major emphasis of the unit is the acquisition of laboratory based testing/assessment skills, and data handling and presentation skills
HSBH2007 Research Methods in Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Prohibitions: HSBH1007 or BACH2140 Assessment: Written group assignment (30%), written individual assignment (20%), 1x2-hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit of study introduces students to the design and evaluation of research questions relating to health. Drawing on both qualitative and quantitative research methods, students will be introduced to key concepts relating to methodology; research design and research method.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Leslie Nicholson, Dr Bronwen Ackermann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Prohibitions: BIOS1136, BIOS1159, BIOS5090 Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS1018 Biomechanics of Human Movement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture /week, 4x2-hr practical/semester, 4x1-hr tutorials/semester, online weekly quizzes for feedback Assumed knowledge: HSC mathematics Assessment: 2 hr mid-semester exam (40%), and 2 hr end-semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop an appreciation of how mechanical principles can be applied to understand the underlying causes of human movement. Topics include: kinematics, vectors, Newton`s laws of motion, work, energy, power, and momentum; for both translational and rotational motion; and the influence of fluids on motion. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical skills and analytical problem solving techniques. The laboratory classes complement the lectures; providing opportunities to validate mechanical principles in a quantitative manner.
One BHlthSci Senior unit of study [6] (see note 1)
One elective [6] (see note 2)
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 3 (last offered 2015)

Semester 1
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Prohibitions: BIOS1144, BIOS1139, BIOS1160 Assessment: Mid-semester practical exam (35%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS2027 Exercise Physiology for Clinicians

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr and 1x2-hr lecture/week, 4x1-hr tutorials/semester Assumed knowledge: BIOS1170 Assessment: Class practical reports (25%), mid semester exam (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed EXSS1032 for enrolment into this unit of study
The aim of this unit is to provide students with a broad understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to physical activity and inactivity. The unit has a primary focus on the physiological responses to exercise, and the application of exercise as a treatment modality.. The unit describes the basic metabolic, cardiovascular and respiratory responses and adaptations to exercise training in healthy, asymptomatic individuals (children, adults and the elderly). Attention is given to special populations who are often in need of increased exercise training (eg. overweight, obese, elderly). Two class experiments are included during lecture hours to add practical experience and to develop critical thinking.
Textbooks
Powers, SK and Howley ET, Exercise Physiology; Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance (8th Ed). McGraw-Hill (2012).
Two BHlthSci Senior units of study [12] (see note 1)
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 1) & Prof Ross Sanders (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement. The unit consists of 3 modules. The first module examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, and automaticity. The second module examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as individual differences (e.g., motivation), methods of instruction, practice conditions, and the structuring of feedback. The third module examines applications to teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation and includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning.
One BHlthSci Senior unit of study [6] (see note 1)
Two electives [12] (see note 2)
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Notes
1. A list of available BHlthSci Senior units of study can be found in the Bachelor of Health Sciences (Pass) table.
2. Electives may be chosen from units of study available throughout the University, subject to approval, availability and minimum enrolment. A list of electives available in the Faculty of Health Sciences is included in Faculty Electives chapter of the handbook.