Bachelor of Health Sciences – descriptions

Pass table

View semester session codes here.

Course BPHEASCI2000: Pass course; full-time, 3 years
Students commencing in 2014 must complete the following units of study for the award of the Bachelor of Health Sciences:
Three core BHlthSci Junior units of study:
HSBH1006 Foundations of Health Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Steven Cumming Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week and eLearning online learning support. Assessment: Tutorial attendance, presentation (25%), integrative essay (25%) and 2hr final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is an introductory unit for students entering the health sciences. This unit aims to expose students to a range of definitions of health, and key concepts in health and health systems. Students will develop a range of core skills and competencies needed in the study and practice of health sciences and a basis for work practice in the health system or for postgraduate study. Topics include: what is health; how is health status classified; biomedical, psychological and sociological aspects of health and health care; what 'should' a health care system do; how do we measure health status in an individual, a community and a nation? An integrated sciences model of health care is explored which covers different domains of health, including biological, behavioural, socio-cultural and environmental.
HSBH1008 Health Determinants and Interventions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Toni Schofield Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial /week Assessment: Multiple choice test (15% ), essay test (15%), individual tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial discussion contribution (20% ) and essay (40%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Health Determinants will introduce students to the major Australian and international patterns of health and well being as measured and reported by the leading national and global health agencies, and the main social factors associated with these trends. It will explore the social, cultural and environmental processes involved in determining the similarities and disparities in the health of populations and peoples, drawing primarily on sociological approaches. Students will be introduced to a repertoire of key concepts for understanding these processes including class, gender, ethnicity, indigeneity, racism, ageing, the state, discourse, globalisation, and embodiment. Initiatives to promote preventable hospitalisation and increased health and wellbeing within and across population groups will be examined, particularly those proposed by the WHO's Commission on the Social Determinants of Health.
HSBH1009 Health Care Resources and Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Stephanie Short Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1-hr tutorial/week and eLearning online learning support. Assessment: Assignment (30%), team project (30%) and final exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit comprises three modules: first, we explore the organisation and structure of the Australian health care system in an international context. Then students will analyse health policy within an analytical framework that incorporates four perspectives on health policy: economic, political science; sociological and epidemiological. The third module outlines for students the main approaches to health promotion, with a consideration of implications for policies, services and advocacy.
Textbooks
Palmer, G. R., & Short, S. D. (2010). Health care and public policy: An Australian analysis (4th ed.). South Yarra, VIC: Palgrave Macmillan.
The core Biology and Psychology units of study:
PSYC1001 Psychology 1001

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caleb Owens Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5hr exam, one 1000w essay, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Psychology 1001 is a general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1001 covers the following areas: science and statistics in psychology; behavioural neuroscience; applied psychology; social psychology; personality theory; human development.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the website:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Course Coordinator will advise
or
PSYC1002 Psychology 1002

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Caleb Owens Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week, plus 1 hour per week of additional web-based (self-paced) material related to the tutorial. Assessment: One 2.5 hour exam, one 1250 word research report, multiple tutorial tests, experimental participation (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Psychology 1002 is a further general introduction to the main topics and methods of psychology, and it is the basis for advanced work as well as being of use to those not proceeding with the subject. Psychology 1002 covers the following areas: human mental abilities; learning, motivation and emotion; visual perception; cognitive processes; abnormal psychology.
This unit is also offered in the Sydney Summer School. For more information consult the web site:
http://sydney.edu.au/summer_school/
Textbooks
Course Coordinator will advise
Any Junior Biology unit of study [6] Select this unit from the Faculty of Science, table 1: Biology, link available at top of this table.
One core BHlthSci Intermediate unit of study [6] first offered in 2015 for year 2
At least three of the following BHlthSci Senior units of study:
HSBH3001 Health and Indigenous Populations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Vanessa Lee Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: (HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008 and HSBH1009) or (NURS1003) Assessment: On line quizzes (4x10%), report 1 500wd (30%), on line discussion 1500wd (30%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This Unit of Study provides students with specific knowledge pertaining to Indigenous people's health and the complexities surrounding 'closing the gap' between non-Indigenous and Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Australians. Students are exposed to the impacts of colonisation and past policies that have contributed to Indigenous disadvantage and Indigenous health status. The unit examines models of care that promote 'best practice' of health service delivery to Indigenous people, including comprehensive primary healthcare and Aboriginal Community Control. Students will be engaged in strategies for effective cultural communication between health professionals and Indigenous peoples. Ethical approaches for researching Indigenous peoples and communities will also be explored.
HSBH3003 Health Service Strategy and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Assessment: On-line assessment of tutorial content (20%),1500 word report (40%) and 2hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study offers students an insight into the larger picture of how a nation sets priorities for health services. The importance of evidence-based health policy development in planning health services will be highlighted. Strategies for increasing the cost-effectiveness of health services will be covered. Issues of communication and advocacy in health are portrayed. Students will gain skills in health service needs assessment, measuring cost-effectiveness, macroeconomic evaluation of health services and systems and health equity assessment. It is envisaged that students will develop a capacity to understand the concept of health policy and its relevance to the delivery of health care services and to take a problem-oriented approach to analysing and evaluating current policy provisions and strategies in the Australian context.
HSBH3004 Health, Ethics and the Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Smith-Merry Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Assessment: Participation (10%), mid-semester exam (20%), research report (40%) and final exam (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study focuses on ethics and law in relation to the Australian health system. Fundamental ethical principles applied to ethical issues in health and health research are covered. Medico-legal aspects of health and health services will be explored. Particular areas of focus include mental health, health complaints, reproductive technologies, the start and end of life, disability, public health and genetic technology. Students will develop their own ethical thinking and an understanding of professionally acceptable behaviours appropriate to practice in a wide range of health professions. Learning is interactive and scenarios are used to develop ethical thinking. Students get to write a research report on an ethical and legal issue of their choosing.
Textbooks
Kerridge, I., M. Lowe and C. Stewart (2013) Ethics and Law for the Health Professions. Leichardt: The Federation Press
HSBH3009 International Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charlotte Scarf Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture/week Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Assessment: blog (30%),discussion (20%) and 2000wd report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit examines theoretical and practical issues confronting global health professionals, especially in low resource settings. The unit introduces students to: a) historical, political and economic forces that influence the health of populations around the world and contribute to international health inequities; and b) international health practices, including key actors and initiatives, as well as challenges and strategies for working in post-colonial and cross-cultural contexts. Examples of topics covered include health, poverty and inequality, globalisation and trade, foreign aid and development assistance. The unit also provides an introductory overview of contemporary international health challenges such as humanitarian crises and climate change. Students will undertake an in-depth study of a global health issue, exploring the context in which it emerged and the forces that propel it, and advocate for actions to improve the issue in a specific local context and population group.
HSBH3010 Health and Lifelong Disability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nathan Wilson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr online tutorial/week. Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Assessment: On line participation (20%), essay 2000wd (35%) and individual case study (45%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study explores the roles and responsibilities of health professionals who work with children, adolescents and adults with lifelong disabilities, and their families. Using an inter-professional case-based curriculum, students will examine the nature of lifelong disability; factors which affect the participation of persons with lifelong disability in everyday life activities including education, leisure, and employment; and strategies for increasing their participation in these activities. Students will be supported to critique research literature, to examine the roles and responsibilities of allied health professionals in the context of working with persons with lifelong disability, and to develop practical strategies for interacting and working collaboratively and successfully with children, adolescents, and adults with lifelong disabilities, their families and fellow professionals. It is expected that through a combination of face-to-face teaching and online learning activities, this unit will assist students in preparing to work with individuals with lifelong disabilities in a range of workplace settings.
HSBH3011 Rural Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Sheila Keane Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance education mode, web-based learning: Week 1 lecture (2hrs) and Week 7 workshop (4hrs) on campus with mandatory attendance; 1-hr tutorial/week by teleconference. Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Assessment: Participation (20%), group paper (15%), mid term exam (30%), case study (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit introduces students to issues in rural health care. Topics covered include the nature and varieties of rural lifestyles, impact of lifestyle on health status, population health perspectives, common health conditions in rural Australia, rural health promotion, injury prevention and education, settlement and health care for refugees, indigenous health services, community-based health service delivery in rural settings, rural health workforce, eHealth, eLearning and eResearch for rural health practice, and innovation in health service delivery, for example, cross-sector service coordination and interprofessional practice.
HSBH3012 FHS Abroad

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elaine Ryan, Dr Charlotte Scarf Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x6-hr briefing session,1x4-hr debriefing session, and online learning activities Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre placement briefing paper (20%), reflective diary (30%), report (40%) and oral presentation (10%). Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Field Experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain international experience in a health services setting in a developing country. Students will participate in a 4-6 week placement with a community based organisation in South or South East Asia. They will participate in local development programs, living within the community that they are visiting, and report on their experiences working with the local community.
Participants in the FHS Abroad program develop skills in:
- assessing the welfare requirements of individuals, groups and communities
- assisting individuals, groups and communities in relation to health and rehabilitation
- assisting individuals, groups and communities to utilise their own resources to improve their wellbeing
- communicating with young children, parents and other professionals
- planning, organising and implementing programmes for the care of adults and children in their host community
- demonstrating project management skills including time management and reporting abilities;
- demonstrating cross-cultural sensitivity and the ability to adapt to new environments;
- developing an awareness of complex global health issues;
HSBH3014 Workplace Injury Prevention/Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 7x2-hr tutorials Assumed knowledge: Functional anatomy Assessment: 1x2hr end of semester exam (50%), workplace assessment (group task) (30%), quizzes (20%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit provides a framework for exploring the role of health professionals in the field of workplace rehabilitation and occupational health and safety, with a focus on work injury prevention and early injury assessment and management. This unit will develop students' knowledge and skills in assessing the physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands of work and explore workplace modifications and functional restorative strategies to assist people with injuries and disability return to meaningful and productive employment. An evidence-based, approach will be used to explore the patterns, causation and management of workplace injury and illness, and associated legislation in NSW. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and practice of ergonomics, workplace assessments and functional evaluations and how these can be applied to the prevention and management of work injuries. To this effect, the role of the health professional as a consultant in the workplace will be discussed.
HSBH3015 Mental Health Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: online, e-learning Assessment: 2x online tests (40%) ,1x2000wd essay (50%) and participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
Poor mental health poses a major challenge to our society, and health care professionals, among others, are charged with 'making a difference'. To do so, they need to be equipped with the most up-to-date knowledge of effective mental health approaches and interventions. This unit will overview major mental health conditions and significant social, philosophical, and historical influences on health care service delivery and reform to provide a context for contemporary rehabilitation practice. Students will be introduced to the goals, values and guiding principles of psychiatric rehabilitation and to practices that aim to address the culture of stigma and low expectations by society of people with mental health conditions. Rehabilitation interventions that have demonstrated efficacy in promoting recovery by reducing obstacles to participation for people with mental health conditions will be examined. Local and international research underpinning best practice in rehabilitation management and service delivery will be reviewed and consumer perspectives and experiences explored.
REHB3064 Alcohol and Drug Misuse Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodd Rothwell Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Distance education with Blackboard online site only Assessment: 2 on line MCQ (50%),1500wd essay (35%) and 1000wd short answer exam (15%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Distance Education
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit introduces students to issues relating to a major public health problem: the misuse of alcohol and other addictive drugs. The unit introduces students to two major aspects of this area: issues relating to the development of health prevention/health promotion policy, covering the philosophies of harm minimisation and zero tolerance; approaches to rehabilitation and treatment of those overusing both alcohol and other drugs. The unit commences with an analysis of public health policy approaches to the rehabilitation and treatment of people overusing alcohol and other harmful drugs. Students will be required to undertake an exercise involving an analysis of the effectiveness of the two major policy approaches to the problem of drug overuse and abuse: harm reduction and zero tolerance. They will be required to examine the evidence supporting these two approaches to public health policy. In the second part of the unit students will study the major therapeutic approaches to treatment and rehabilitation. This will include familiarisation with Alcoholics Anonymous, clinically based approaches including transactional analysis and other group therapy oriented approaches, the various behavioural therapies, therapeutic communities, methadone maintenance, needle exchange and recent trails in safe injection facilities. They will become familiar with the nature of services offered, the role of the various health professionals in these services and the nature of effective treatment and rehabilitation outcomes.
Textbooks
Study notes provided with references
At least one of the following BHlthSci Senior Research units of study:
BHSC3014 Writing a Research Proposal

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1007 or BACH2140 Assessment: Project plan (20%), research proposal (60%) and oral presentation (20%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit is designed to assist students understand the principles of writing a research proposal, applicable for either project planning or evaluation within health or for further research (eg Honours). At the completion of this unit of study, students will have written and orally presented a project proposal, and will be familiar with the process of applying for ethics approval. This unit of study is recommended for students who wish to undertake Honours after completion of the pass degree.
HSBH3005 Evidence Based Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luis Salvador-Carulla Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1006, HSBH1007, HSBH1008, HSBH1009 Assessment: 1500wd essay (40%) and 2500wd critical appraisal (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will explore theoretical frameworks and practical applications of evidence based health care (EBHC) within the allied health professions and health service. EBHC is an approach to health care practice in which the practitioner is aware of the evidence (based on research) that bears on practice, the strength of that evidence in the context of decision making regarding an individual client. This unit will also introduce students to the social, philosophical and historical underpinnings of EBHC, emphasising the importance of developing a critical understanding of the production, application and translation of 'evidence' in a range of healthcare contexts
HSBH3018 Quantitative Research Methods in Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tatjana Seizova-Cajic, Dr Mary Lam Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hrl ecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial or laboratory session/week Prerequisites: HSBH1007 Prohibitions: PSYC2012, SCLG3603 Assessment: Class and online participation (10%), in-class quiz (20%), 800wd report (20%) and end semester exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit teaches about the research process from development of a research question to study design, quantitative data analysis, and interpretation of outcomes in the context of theory and practical applications. You will learn about concepts and logic that apply to quantitative research in general with an emphasis on issues and types of studies most relevant in health research. As either an individual or group exercise, you will perform most aspects of the research process using examples given to you or created by you, and will receive comprehensive feedback along the way. The unit will prepare you to critically evaluate research findings in your future career, and to engage in further research training should you wish to do so. Skills you are expected to develop include succinct academic writing, simple data analysis using SPSS, and developing ideas in the context of teamwork.
Textbooks
Portney, L.G & Watkins,M.P.: Foundations of Clinical Research: Applications to Practice, 3rd edition, 2009
HSBH3019 Qualitative Research Methods in Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Karen Willis, Dr Jennifer Smith-Merry Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1007 Prohibitions: SCLG2602 Assessment: 1000wd research report (30%),1000wd research report (30%) and end semester exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This is a senior unit of study. Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit of study has three aims: First, to build on core units of study offered in Year One and Year Two to provide critical appraisal skills in reading and utilising qualitative research related to health behaviour and health care. Second, to understand the theoretical orientation of contemporary qualitative health research methods. Third, to develop skills in undertaking qualitative research methods. With a focus on applying critical and theoretical knowledge, the unit has a practical orientation and students will gain experience in techniques of observation, document analysis, in-depth interviewing and focus group interviews.
Units of study required for the second major (see note 1)
Elective units of study (see note 2)
Notes
1. The number of credit points required to satisfy the requirements for the second major varies with each major.
2. Along with satisfying the double major requirements, students must complete enough electives to achieve 144 credit points for the award of the degree. Electives may be chosen from units of study available throughout the University, subject to approval, availability and minimum enrolment.
3. Students that commenced prior to 2014, may also select from the BHlthSc Senior Research units of study as part of their BHlthSc Senior units of study requirements.

Honours table

View semester session codes here.

Course BHHEASCH2000: Honours program; full-time, 4 years

Years 1 to 3

As per Pass course
Notes
1. Honours is undertaken as an additional fourth year of study.
2. Electives may be chosen from electives available throughout the University, subject to approval, availability and minimum enrolment. A list of electives available in the Faculty of Health Sciences is included in the Faculty Electives chapter of the handbook.

Year 4

Semester 1
BHSC4005 Honours Thesis A

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 26 hrs of seminars, Wk 1-4, 6&7; Taught classes of research methods and statistics, ethics, writing a literature review, and preseatation skills. Students will also engage with their supervisor on a regular basis for Individual academic/research supervision. Tutorial sessions will be provided for the preparation of the literature review. Students will also prepare presentations of research progress. Assessment: 10 min presentation of research topic and progress (20%), systematic or narrative literature review on the topic of the thesis. This may be submitted in a format for a specific journal (Equivalent work can be an ethics applications) 3000 word (80%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Honours students undertake a supervised research project in a health discipline area within the Faculty. Each student will contribute to designing and/or implementing an approved research project and submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. In completing the research thesis, the student will work closely with academic staff who will supervise their research activities. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process and their thesis.
Textbooks
Discipline will determine texts and readings appropriate to the research content and design
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
BHSC4006 Honours Thesis B

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 10 hours of seminars irregularly throughout the semester. Individual academic/research supervision and Discipline specific workshops Prerequisites: BHSC4005 Assessment: A seminar presentation summarizing the entire work (20%), thesis comprising a journal article outlining research project in a format determined by the Discipline or equivalent, method (20%), Draft Journal Article (40%) and thesis Overall (20%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
During this semester the student will work closely with their supervisor to carry out, analyse and synthesise their results.
Each student will submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process
and their thesis.
Textbooks
Discipline will determine texts and readings appropriate to the research content and design
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS