Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology) – BPASEXPH1000

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology)

View semester session codes here.

Course BPASEXPH1000: Pass course; full-time, 4 years

Year 1

Semester 1
BACH1161 Introductory Behavioural Health Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Gilroy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: BACH1132, BACH1134, HSBH1003 Assessment: Assignment (30%), group class presentation (20%), exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides an introduction to areas of psychology and sociology relevant to health and wellbeing. The unit provides sociological tools (covering both theory and method) useful for understanding and practising in health and wellbeing as well as an introduction to the principles and applications of psychology as they pertain to these areas. The unit aims to develop a 'sociological imagination', a quality of mind that will be used to prompt students to question common-sense assumptions regarding health and wellbeing. Students will also gain familiarity with the major paradigms and methodological approaches of contemporary psychology and will develop the ability to apply psychological theory to specific health issues in their major area of study.
BIOS1167 Human Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Oakes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4hrs lectures/week, 6 hrs practical/semester Assessment: Online quizzes (5%), Examinations (95%) [consisting of a mid semester exam 30% and an end semester exam 70%] Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This is an entry level unit of study designed to give students an overview of the biological and biochemical processes that are fundamental to life. Knowledge gained in this unit will enable students to understand the key principles of health and disease and the scientific basis for many of the professional practices they will undertake in their careers. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to general chemistry or biochemistry units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of the following topics: structure and function of cells, homeostasis, the basic chemistry of life, the biochemistry of human cell function (including protein synthesis, metabolic processes and diseases), and the genetics of health and disease. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit and to apply their knowledge to the relevance of these fundamental principles to health care practices.
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS1018 Biomechanics of Human Movement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture /week, 4x2-hr tutorial/practical per semester, drop in tutorials for assistance, online weekly quizzes for feedback Assumed knowledge: HSC mathematics Assessment: 2 hr mid-semester exam (40%), and 2 hr end-semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to develop an appreciation of how mechanical principles can be applied to understand the underlying causes of human movement. Topics include: kinematics, vectors, Newton`s laws of motion, work, energy, power, and momentum; for both translational and rotational motion; and the influence of fluids on motion. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical skills and analytical problem solving techniques. The laboratory classes complement the lectures; providing opportunities to validate mechanical principles in a quantitative manner.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross anatomical structure and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and head and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Students will also look at the anatomical basis of chewing, swallowing and communication. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1155, BMED2403, PHSI2005, PHSI2006 Assessment: mid semester exam (30%), end semester exam (70%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes at which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
EXSS1029 Muscle Mechanics and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Tom Gwinn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Mid semester exam (25%), practical exam (10%), tutorial assignment (5%) end semester exam (60%) Practical field work: Includes participation in high resistance training and muscle stretch intervention Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The determinants of maximal active muscle force and power production are examined in terms of the crossbridge cycle, sarcomere arrangement, myosin isoforms and the extent of muscle activation. Evidence for neural adaptations to high resistance training is examined and the practical significance of these adaptations is discussed. The responses of skeletal muscle to high-resistance training are discussed in terms of i) the control of protein synthesis, ii) sarcomere remodelling and myofibril assembly, and iii) whole muscle hypertrophy and fibre type shifts. An evidence-based approach is used to examine the dose-response relationship between high-resistance variables (load, number of sets, training, frequency, rest interval) and hypertrophy. Muscle structural and functional adaptations to disuse (bed rest, non-weight bearing, immobilization) are examined, as well as the effects of re-ambulation and re-training. The determinants of muscle range of motion and passive stiffness are discussed. The response of muscle to long term stretching (e.g. bone elongation) is examined. This is contrasted to the relative lack of muscle structural adaptation to short-term static stretch interventions.
Textbooks
No textbook required, students are recommended to obtain unit of study manual
EXSS1032 Fundamentals of Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lectures/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Practical skills assessment (20%), excel tutorial and practical class-based worksheets (20%) and end semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of exercise science and an introduction to their application to physical activity, sport, fitness and health. A focus of Fundamentals of Exercise Science is the practical application of testing procedures to the measurement of physiological function. In this unit issues related to work (and its measurement), energy supply, physiological capacity and muscular fitness are covered, with emphasis on the integration of these concepts, the use of scientific rigour and evidence-based practice. Practical classes will cover various fundamental skills for exercise scientists including standard health screening procedures and the principles and practice aerobic and muscular fitness testing. Worksheets will include data presentation and analysis skills using excel software. The exercise prescription component of the unit introduces students to the concepts of programming for cardio-respiratory/aerobic and muscular fitness for healthy individuals. A major emphasis of the unit is the acquisition of laboratory based testing/assessment skills, and data handling and presentation skills
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2 (last offered 2014)

Semester 1
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hrs practical/week, with a small online component Assessment: mid semester exam (40%), end semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study includes fundamental concepts of nervous system organization and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movement and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the somatosensory and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS2018 Biomechanical Analysis of Movement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Sinclair Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2 hr tutorial/practical most weeks Prerequisites: EXSS1018 Assessment: filming practical (20%), mid semester exam (30%), end of semester exam (50%) Practical field work: Problem solving and data analysis from laboratory work Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The main emphasis of this unit is in developing practical expertise in techniques for the biomechanical analysis of human movement. Students will learn how to conduct kinematic and kinetic analyses, using video, force platforms and electromyography. Other components of this unit are aimed at further development of mathematical and problem-solving skills for the analysis of movement. Topics include static and dynamic equilibrium, calculation of centre of mass, determination of joint torques using inverse dynamics, electromyography, tissue mechanics and ergonomic task analysis.
EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kieron Rooney Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 2-hr practical or tutorial some weeks Prohibitions: EXSS2017, EXSS2019 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1167, EXSS1032 Assessment: practical report (10%), quizzes (4x1%), 1.5h mid semester exam (38%), 2 hr end semester exam (48%) Practical field work: 1x2-hr class on 3 occasions Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit discusses the acute responses to exercise with a specific emphasis on the roles of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in oxygen transport and the significance of sub-maximal and maximal oxygen consumption in the limitations to performance. The concepts of acid-base balance during exercise and of lactate and ventilatory thresholds will be examined. Furthermore, this unit develops an understanding of the specific metabolic response to exercise at the peripheral cellular level and the biochemical strategies that maintain energy balance during exercise and a return to homeostasis in recovery. Students will put theory into practice with laboratory tasks that encourage skill acquisition in the collection of real-time physiological data of the respiratory and cardiovascular response to exercise.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA; Fahey, TD; Baldwin KM/Exercise phsyiology: human bioenergetics and its applications/Fourth Edition/2005/0-07-255642-0/. Tiidus P, Russell Tupling A., Houston, ME. Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science
HSBH1007 Health Science and Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Deborah Black Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: Individual written report (20%), group written report (20%), 90 min end of semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces students to key research paradigms in health, and to the major approaches to designing and evaluating basic and applied research in health. Students are exposed to the types of research which inform our understanding of normal and abnormal functions of the human body and of treatment and preventative health care. Students will be engaged in the generation of new knowledge through evidence-based practice and evidence-based innovation. Current issues in health science research will be identified, with emphasis on the role of technology and e-health.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS2021 Nutrition, Health and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen O'Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/tutorial/alternate weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: mid-semester examination (20%), presentation (20%), end of semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the principles of nutrition to optimise physical performance in sport, recreation and occupation. In addition key aspects of public health nutrition including dietary management of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are also a focus. This unit defines the importance of macro and micro nutrients in the maintenance of health, and the specific roles of carbohydrate, protein and lipids in energy metabolism during exercise. In addition, the interaction between dietary intake and physical activity and its effects on energy-balance, cardiovascular health and other lifestyle diseases are considered.
EXSS2022 Exercise Physiology-Training Adaptations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chin-Moi Chow Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1-hr lectures /week, 2-hr practical or tutorial some weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: debate session (10%), quizzes (2x1%), 1.5-hr mid semester exam (40%), end semester exam (48%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is concerned with the physiological adaptations associated with training. This unit will focus on cardiorespiratory and metabolic adaptations to endurance, high resistance and interval/sprint training. The implications of training will be discussed with respect to improved fatigue resistance, resulting from changes in the structural and functional capacities of organ systems under normal conditions as well as altered environmental conditions such as altitude and temperature. The mechanisms behind muscle damage and fatigue, including acidosis and excitation-coupling failure, will be examined in the untrained individual and the elite athlete with respect to their specific stimulus and appropriate recovery. This unit will build on fundamental topics of EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA, Fahey, TD, and Baldwin, KM, Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and its application (4th Ed), McGraw-Hill (2005) Thompson WR; American College of Sports Medicine; Gordon NF; Pescatello LS/ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription/Eigth/2009/ -- Brooks GA, Fahey TD, White TP and Baldwin KM/Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and Its Applications/4th/2005/0072556420/
EXSS2026 Growth, Development and Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rhonda Orr Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hrs lectures/week, 7 tutorials/semester Assessment: Mid semester exam (25%), and assignment (25%) and end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study aims to provide the student with an appreciation of growth, development and ageing of the human across the lifespan. Physiologic changes, motor skill development and physical performance will be examined and related to morphology and stages of childhood and adolescent growth and ageing. The relationships between growth, development, gender and physical activity will be explored. The biological changes and consequences of ageing on physiologic and psychological health, disease and exercise capacity will be investigated. The student will also be able to gain an understanding of exercise prescription for pregnant women, children, adolescents and older adults.
EXSS3023 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Corinne Caillaud Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 3x 1-hr tutorial, 5x2-hr practical Assumed knowledge: EXSS2027 or EXSS2028 Assessment: brochure/report (20%), practical exam with report (30%), end semester exam (50%) Practical field work: During practical session, students will have to use different techniques and protocols to evaluate aerobic fitness and muscle function. This will also involve adequate collection and interpretation of data. Tutorials will be used to introduce students to exercise programming. Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to provide a comprehensive and critical examination of exercise testing and programming in low-risk populations. The scientific evidence for exercise dosages for aerobic exercise and resistance training required for health and fitness outcomes will be critically reviewed. Other aspects of exercise programming such as flexibility, warm up and instructional technique will also be covered in this unit. Through the use of lectures and case studies, students will learn how to integrate both the physiological components and logistical aspects of exercise performance, to devise individualised exercise test batteries and prescriptions. Although not a co-requisite, students will benefit from undertaking EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease in parallel with Exercise Testing and Prescription.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 3

Semester 1
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ross Sanders (sem 1); Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam SAQ (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam MCQ, LAQ (45%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement. The unit consists of 3 modules. The first module examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, automaticity, lateralisation, arousal and stress, and expertise. The second module examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as goals, motivation, instruction, practice conditions and feedback. The third module examines applications to teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation and includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning that they have learned.
EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial for 7 weeks, 2-hr practical for 4 weeks Assumed knowledge: EXSS3023 and either EXSS2022 or EXSS2027 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), oral presentation (25%), end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the application of exercise science for the promotion and maintenance of health via the prevention of chronic disease and the management of people suffering from chronic disease. Students will explore a range of topics including the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, risk factor assessment, clinical exercise testing, ECG interpretation, and exercise prescription. Emphasis will be placed on the use of scientific evidence to guide exercise prescription for individuals with chronic diseases. The chronic disease conditions covered include obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
EXSS3049 Sport and Exercise Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture /week, 2-hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: BACH1161 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), facilitating behaviour change project (35%), end semester exam (45%), tutorial presentation (0% barrier task) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides an introduction to the key psychological factors that influence sport, exercise and motor performance. Consideration is also given to how participation in physical activity influences psychological function and well being. A broad array of topics is covered, including: theoretical and applied perspectives of motivation, goal setting, behavioural modification, addiction, arousal, anxiety, imagery, attention and expert performance. Practical applications are made to teaching, coaching and rehabilitation for all ages and for all levels of skill. Special consideration is given to facilitating exercise adherence, youth sport participant and peak performance.
EXSS3052 Practicum with Low Risk Clients

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Placement preparation tutorials held for students twice per semester, or three times if required. Prerequisites: EXSS3023 Assessment: Completion of 140 hours professional experience and competency in professional and practical skills relevant to ESSA Exercise Physiologist accreditation (100%). Completion of a Portfolio as described in UoS Outline (barrier task). Practical field work: Minimum 140 hours professional experience with apparently healthy populations of low risk Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
This unit will engage students in practical experiences relevant to exercise science and Exercise Physiology. These practical experiences will reinforce theoretical knowledge and skills acquired through university studies. Students will complete at least 140 hours of supervised practicum in relevant areas such as design, delivery and evaluation of exercise interventions for healthy, low risk populations.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS3027 Exercise and Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Natalie Vanicek Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial for 3 weeks, 1-hr practical for 7 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS3024 Assumed knowledge: Either both EXSS2028 and EXSS2022 or EXSS2027 Assessment: practical exam 1 (25%), practical exam 2 (25%), end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the strategic application of the principles of exercise prescription to target specific prevention and rehabilitation goals. The unit explores the pathophysiological basis of exercise limitations across a range of musculoskeletal injuries including the ankle, knee and shoulder, chronic lower back pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, joint replacement and other chronic diseases, such as peripheral arterial disease. The underlying aim of the unit focuses on the application of exercise to rehabilitate functional capacity for patients who suffer from such conditions. The principles of exercise prescription include examining scientific evidence for the safety and efficacy of numerous exercise modalities to help establish core stability; re-establish neuromuscular control; restore full range of motion; restore or increase muscular strength, endurance, and power; and maintain cardio-respiratory fitness.
EXSS3037 Exercise Pharmacology and Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rhonda Orr Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 5 tutorials/semester Prerequisites: Either (BIOS1170 and EXSS2028) or (BIOS1170 and EXSS2019) Assessment: Mid semester exam (25%), infographic chart (15%), wiki collaborative activity(10%) and end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will introduce the student to the principles of pharmacology and immunology as well as the effect and influence of exercise on the respective fields. Students will gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic action of drugs in the body. Students will be able to describe the site and mechanism of action of selected drug groups, to identify the therapeutic use of the drug and its adverse effects, to examine the effect of the exercise and disease on drug action, and the effect of the drug on the exercise response. Special emphasis will be given to drugs used for therapeutic medication, for recreational purposes and for performance enhancement in sport. The nature of immunity, the immune response, pathological disorders of the immune system and its response to exercise and ageing will be examined.
EXSS3050 Exercise Across the Lifespan

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Fiatarone Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: EXSS2022, EXSS2028, EXSS3023 Assessment: Quizzes (50%), oral presentation (25%) and written assignment (25%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will examine the rationale, recommendations and practical implementation strategies to engage people in physical activity, exercise and health promoting behaviours across different life stages, from childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, pregnancy, middle age to old-age, and to explore evidence for best practice in the promotion of physical activity across the lifespan, for disease prevention, and treatment of chronic disease and disability.
One Elective [6] (see elective list below)
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 4

Semester 1
EXSS4007 Clinical Placement 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Int February,Int January,Int June Prerequisites: EXSS3024, EXSS3027, (EXSS3045 or EXSS3052) Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int February,Int January
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4010 Case Studies 1 Clinical Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block mode: 3-hr lecture (total 26hrs)/semester, 2-hr practical (total 10 hrs)/semester, 1-hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: EXSS3037, EXSS3050 Assessment: Mid-semester exam (30%), written case study and oral defence (30%), final exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit will develop a higher level of knowledge, clinical decision making and problem-solving skills by using complex cases related to clinical exercise physiology practice. The cases will include pathologies from the cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular and metabolic areas. Academic staff and experienced practitioners will use clinical scenarios to guide students through the process of selecting and administering appropriate screening and assessment tools and developing effective, individualized exercise management plans. The clinical scenarios will present more complex cases than previously covered and will require the student to integrate prior knowledge and experiences with new learning.
Two Electives [12] (see elective list below)
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS4011 Clinical Placement 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Int July,Int June Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int June
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4012 Clinical Placement 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Int July,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Int July
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4013 Clinical Placement 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Int November,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4014 Case Studies 2 Clinical Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode: 3-hr lecture (total 26hrs)/semester, 2-hr practical (total 10 hrs)/semester, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: EXSS4010 Assumed knowledge: EXSS3037, EXSS3050 Assessment: Mid-semester exam (30%), written case study and oral defence (30%), final exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit will develop a higher level of knowledge, clinical decision making and problem-solving skills by using complex cases related to clinical exercise physiology practice. The cases will include pathologies in cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, cancers, neoplastic conditions and neurological/intellectual clinical conditions. Academic staff and experienced practitioners will use clinical scenarios to guide students through the process of selecting and administering appropriate screening and assessment tools and developing effective, individualized exercise management plans. The clinical scenarios will present more complex cases than previously covered and will require the student to integrate prior knowledge and experiences with new learning.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Exercise Physiology electives

Notes
Availability of electives may vary from year to year. Subject to approval of relevant head of academic unit, elective units of study may be taken from within or outside the Faculty.
Year 3 Semester 2
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture, 2hr practical, tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: mid-semester written exam (35%), practical exam (15%); end-semester written exam (35%), practical exam (15%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS3040 Physiological Testing and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Corinne Caillaud Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr practical for 8 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2022 Assessment: assignment (30%), practical book (20%), end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills (laboratory and field-based) for the physiological assessment and training of elite athletes. The application of current tests and measurements in sports science together with training theory and practice will be critically reviewed. Special attention will be given to the role of speed, strength and endurance in sports performance. Fundamental questions concerning the nature of the training stimulus, training thresholds, plasticity of muscle, dose-response relationships, detraining and overtraining will be investigated. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies, practical test and measurement skills. On completion of this unit of study students will demonstrate competency within the sports testing environment and a capacity to provide well researched consultancy advice on sports training theory and practice.
EXSS3041 Management, Marketing and the Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Dieter Wilhelmi Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: assignment (40%), end semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit presents management, marketing and legal issues that impact on Australian businesses. The management component provides an overview to the key elements in operating a small business within the sport, health or fitness industry. Management concepts that will be covered include business planning, total quality management, operations management, negotiation and leadership. The marketing component introduces marketing strategies such as market planning, market research and market segmentation. All businesses must demonstrate legal compliance. This unit highlights those areas of the law that have particular relevance to businesses operating within the health and fitness industry. Workplace contracts, insurance, sponsorship, consumer protection, liability and legislative obligations (harassment and discrimination) will be discussed. Students will develop an understanding of the various business legal structures and will be able to select an appropriate structure for a business of their choice.
EXSS3051 Projects in Exercise and Sport Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1-hr lecture/week, 2-hr practical or tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1007 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1168, BIOS1169, EXSS1018, EXSS1032, EXSS2022, EXSS2025, EXSS2028 Assessment: 2500 word lliterature review (50%), 500 word project proposal (10%), 15 minute presentation (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to allow students to integrate knowledge from previous units of study in the exploration of a research question of their own interest. The unit is designed specifically for students who may be interested in gaining some research experience. Topics covered include: critical evaluation of the literature, research design, research ethics, data collection and analysis and presentation of results. Activities and assessments will focus on practical applications in exercise and sport science. Emphasis will be placed on practical research skills and generic skills such as communication, teamwork, independent and critical thinking. Students who are planning on enrolling into Honours are encouraged to enrol in this unit.
HSBH3012 FHS Abroad

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elaine Ryan, Dr Charlotte Scarf Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x6-hr briefing session,1x4-hr debriefing session, and online learning activities Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre placement briefing paper (20%), reflective diary (30%), report (40%) and oral presentation (10%). Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Field Experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain international experience in a health services setting in a developing country. Students will participate in a 4-6 week placement with a community based organisation in South or South East Asia. They will participate in local development programs, living within the community that they are visiting, and report on their experiences working with the local community.
Participants in the FHS Abroad program develop skills in:
- assessing the welfare requirements of individuals, groups and communities
- assisting individuals, groups and communities in relation to health and rehabilitation
- assisting individuals, groups and communities to utilise their own resources to improve their wellbeing
- communicating with young children, parents and other professionals
- planning, organising and implementing programmes for the care of adults and children in their host community
- demonstrating project management skills including time management and reporting abilities;
- demonstrating cross-cultural sensitivity and the ability to adapt to new environments;
- developing an awareness of complex global health issues;
Year 4 Semester 1
EXSS4009 Clinical Exercise Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lecture/week (week1-9), 2-hr tutorial/week (week2-9) Assessment: Client interview (25 mins) (40%), oral presentation (15 mins) (30%) and 500wd evidence-based practice report (30%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The aim of this unit is to introduce the student to a range of issues related to clinical exercise professional practice and service delivery. Topics covered include working in multidisciplinary teams, professional ethics, communication skills, clinical documentation and report writing. A major focus of this unit will be to develop skills in evidence-based practice and to understand how the scientific evidence can be used in clinical decision making about appropriate interventions for individual clients.
HSBH3014 Workplace Injury Prevention/Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 7x2-hr tutorials Assumed knowledge: Functional anatomy Assessment: 1x2hr end of semester exam (50%), workplace assessment (group task) (30%), quizzes (20%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit provides a framework for exploring the role of health professionals in the field of workplace rehabilitation and occupational health and safety, with a focus on work injury prevention and early injury assessment and management. This unit will develop students' knowledge and skills in assessing the physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands of work and explore workplace modifications and functional restorative strategies to assist people with injuries and disability return to meaningful and productive employment. An evidence-based, approach will be used to explore the patterns, causation and management of workplace injury and illness, and associated legislation in NSW. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and practice of ergonomics, workplace assessments and functional evaluations and how these can be applied to the prevention and management of work injuries. To this effect, the role of the health professional as a consultant in the workplace will be discussed.