Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology) – BPASEXPH1000

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology)

View semester session codes here.

Course BPASEXPH-01: Pass course; full-time, 4 years

Year 1

Semester 1
BIOS1167 Foundations of Biomedical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Oakes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lectures/week, 4 x 2hr practical/semester Prohibitions: BIOS1126 or BIOS1130 or BIOS1156 or BIOS1161 or HSBM1001 Assessment: Online quizzes (5%), Mid-semester examination (30%), End-semester examinations (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an entry level unit of study designed to give students an overview of the biological and biochemical processes that are fundamental to life. Knowledge gained in this unit will enable students to understand the key principles of health and disease and the scientific basis for many of the professional practices they will undertake in their careers. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to general chemistry or biochemistry units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of the following topics: structure and function of cells, homeostasis, the basic chemistry of life, the biochemistry of human cell function (including protein synthesis, metabolic processes and diseases), and the genetics of health and disease. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit and to apply their knowledge to the relevance of these fundamental principles to health care practices.
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan, Dr Bronwen Ackermann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Prohibitions: BIOS1136 or BIOS1159 or BIOS5090 Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 Unit Coordinator is A/Prof Leslie Nicholson, Semester 2 unit coordinator is Dr Bronwen Ackermann
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS1032 Fundamentals of Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lectures/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Practical skills assessment (20%), excel tutorial and practical class-based worksheets (20%) and end semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of exercise science and an introduction to their application to physical activity, sport, fitness and health. A focus of Fundamentals of Exercise Science is the practical application of testing procedures to the measurement of physiological function. In this unit issues related to work (and its measurement), energy supply, physiological capacity and muscular fitness are covered, with emphasis on the integration of these concepts, the use of scientific rigour and evidence-based practice. Practical classes will cover various fundamental skills for exercise scientists including standard health screening procedures and the principles and practice aerobic and muscular fitness testing. Worksheets will include data presentation and analysis skills using excel software. The exercise prescription component of the unit introduces students to the concepts of programming for cardio-respiratory/aerobic and muscular fitness for healthy individuals. A major emphasis of the unit is the acquisition of laboratory based testing/assessment skills, and data handling and presentation skills
Textbooks
Recommended: Powers and Howley. Exercise Physiology: Australia and New Zealand (2014). McGraw-Hill Education, Australia
HSBH1003 Health, Behaviour and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mairwen Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: BACH1130 or BACH1132 or BACH1133 or BACH1134 or BACH1161 Assessment: Assignment (25%), group class presentation (25%), 1.5 hr end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to areas of psychology and sociology relevant to health and wellbeing. The unit provides sociological tools (covering both theory and method) useful for understanding and practicing in health and wellbeing. It is also an introduction to the principles and applications of psychology as they pertain to these areas. The unit aims to develop a 'sociological imagination', a quality of mind that will be used to prompt students to question common-sense assumptions regarding health and wellbeing. Students will also gain familiarity with the major paradigms and methodological approaches of contemporary psychology and will develop the applications of psychological theory to specific health issues in their major area of study.
Textbooks
Germov, J (2014), BACH1161 Introductory Behavioural Health Sciences + HSBH1003 Health, Behaviour & Society, Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Prohibitions: BIOS1139 or BIOS1144 or BIOS1160 Assessment: Online mastery test (5%), mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1127 or BIOS1133 or BIOS2098 or BIOS2099 or BMED2403 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 Assessment: Mid semester exam (40%), end semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes at which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
EXSS1029 Muscle Mechanics and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Tom Gwinn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Mid semester exam (30%), practical exam (10%), end semester exam (60%) Practical field work: Includes participation in high resistance training. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The determinants of maximal active muscle force and power production are examined in terms of the crossbridge cycle, sarcomere arrangement, myosin isoforms and the extent of muscle activation. Evidence for neural adaptations to high resistance training is examined and the practical significance of these adaptations is discussed. The responses of skeletal muscle to high-resistance training are discussed in terms of i) the control of protein synthesis, ii) sarcomere remodelling and myofibril assembly, and iii) whole muscle hypertrophy and fibre type shifts. An evidence-based approach is used to examine the dose-response relationship between high-resistance variables (load, number of sets, training, frequency, rest interval) and hypertrophy. Muscle structural and functional adaptations to disuse (bed rest, non-weight bearing, immobilization) are examined, as well as the effects of re-ambulation and re-training. The determinants of muscle range of motion and passive stiffness are discussed. The response of muscle to long term stretching (e.g. bone elongation) is examined. This is contrasted to the relative lack of muscle structural adaptation to short-term static stretch interventions.
Textbooks
No textbook required, students are recommended to obtain unit of study manual
EXSS1018 Biomechanics of Human Movement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr René Ferdinands Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture /week, 4x2-hr practical/semester, 4x1-hr tutorials/semester, online weekly quizzes for feedback Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 2-hr mid-semester exam (40%), and 2-hr end-semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop an appreciation of how mechanical principles can be applied to understand the underlying causes of human movement. Topics include: kinematics, vectors, Newton`s laws of motion, work, energy, power, and momentum; for both translational and rotational motion; and the influence of fluids on motion. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical skills and analytical problem solving techniques. The laboratory classes complement the lectures; providing opportunities to validate mechanical principles in a quantitative manner.
Textbooks
Hamill J and Knutzen KM (2014) Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement 4th. Ed., Baltimore: Wolters Kluwer.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hrs practical/week, with a small online component Prohibitions: BIOS1137 or BIOS2103 Assessment: Mid-semester exam (40%), end-semester exam (60%) Practical field work: 2hrs/week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 coordinator is Dr Jin Huang, Semester 2 coordinator is Dr Alan Freeman
This unit of study includes fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the somatosensory and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS2018 Biomechanical Analysis of Movement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Sinclair Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-2-hrs tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: EXSS1018 Assessment: movement analysis assignment (25%), mid semester exam (30%), end of semester exam (45%) Practical field work: Problem solving and data analysis from laboratory work Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The main emphasis of this unit is in developing practical expertise in techniques for the biomechanical analysis of human movement. Students will learn how to conduct kinematic and kinetic analyses, using video, force platforms and electromyography. Other components of this unit are aimed at further development of mathematical and problem-solving skills for the analysis of movement. Topics include static and dynamic equilibrium, calculation of centre of mass, determination of joint torques using inverse dynamics, electromyography, tissue mechanics and gait analysis.
EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kieron Rooney Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week for 13 weeks, 1x2-hr tutorial on 4 occasions Prohibitions: EXSS2017 or EXSS2019 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1167 and EXSS1032 Assessment: quizzes (13%), 1.5h mid semester exam (46%), 2 hr end semester exam (41%) , 1x2hr Practical Skills Barrier task (0% Pass/Fail) Practical field work: 1x2-hr class on 3 occasions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit discusses the acute responses to exercise with a specific emphasis on the roles of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in oxygen transport and the significance of sub-maximal and maximal oxygen consumption in the limitations to performance. The concepts of acid-base balance during exercise and of lactate and ventilatory thresholds will be examined. Furthermore, this unit develops an understanding of the specific metabolic response to exercise at the peripheral cellular level and the biochemical strategies that maintain energy balance during exercise and a return to homeostasis in recovery. Students will put theory into practice with laboratory tasks that encourage skill acquisition in the collection of real-time physiological data of the respiratory and cardiovascular response to exercise.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA; Fahey, TD; Baldwin KM/Exercise physiology: human bioenergetics and its applications/Fourth Edition/2005/0-07-255642-0/. Tiidus P, Russell Tupling A., Houston, ME. Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science
EXSS2029 Practice in Clinical Exercise Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Semaan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lectures/week, 2x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: Client interview 20 min (30%), Viva 15 min (40%), evidence-based practice report 500 words (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to introduce students to a range of issues related to clinical exercise professional practice and service delivery. Topics covered include interdisciplinary collaboration, professional ethics, communication skills, clinical documentation and report writing. A major focus of this unit will be to introduce the concept of evidence-based practice and to teach how scientific evidence can be used in clinical decision making about appropriate interventions for individual clients.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS2021 Nutrition, Health and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen O'Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture / week Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: mid-semester examination (20%), presentation (20%), end of semester exam (60%) Practical field work: 1x2-hr practical / fortnight Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the principles of nutrition to optimise physical performance in sport, recreation and occupation. In addition key aspects of public health nutrition including dietary management of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are also a focus. This unit defines the importance of macro and micro nutrients in the maintenance of health, and the specific roles of carbohydrate, protein and lipids in energy metabolism during exercise. In addition, the interaction between dietary intake and physical activity and its effects on energy-balance, cardiovascular health and other lifestyle diseases are considered.
EXSS2022 Exercise Physiology-Training Adaptations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Chin-Moi Chow Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3-hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 2-hr practical-tutorial/week for 4 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: debate session (10%), quizzes (5x1%), 1.5-hr mid semester exam (35%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is concerned with the physiological adaptations associated with training. This unit will focus on cardiorespiratory and metabolic adaptations to endurance, high resistance and interval/sprint training, and benefits/interference effects of concurrent training. The implications of training will be discussed with respect to mechanisms behind muscle damage and fatigue, improved fatigue resistance resulting from changes in the structural and functional capacities of organ systems under normal conditions as well as altered environmental conditions such as altitude and temperature. The physical and physiological mechanisms that determine exercise and work performance in the heat, and how these can be modified, will also be examined. Appropriate recovery, in particular sleep needs in athletes, will also be discussed. This unit will build on fundamental topics of EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA, Fahey, TD, and Baldwin, KM, Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and its application (4th Ed), McGraw-Hill (2005) Thompson WR; American College of Sports Medicine; Gordon NF; Pescatello LS/ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription/Eigth/2009/ -- Brooks GA, Fahey TD, White TP and Baldwin KM/Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and Its Applications/4th/2005/0072556420/
EXSS2026 Growth, Development and Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nathan Johnson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week for 13 weeks, 1x1-hr tutorial/week for 6 weeks Assessment: Mid semester exam (35%) and end semester exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide the student with an appreciation of certain critical phases of both ends of the lifespan. Issues around physiologic changes, motor skill development, physical performance, the role of exercise for disease prevention and treatment, and the role of nutrition, will be examined and related to stages of childhood and adolescent growth and ageing. The relationships between growth, development, gender and physical activity in its broader sense will also be explored. The biological changes and consequences of ageing on physiologic and psychological health, disease and exercise capacity will be investigated. The student will also be able to gain some understanding of exercise prescription for pregnant women, children, adolescents and older adults.
EXSS3023 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ché Fornusek Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 3x 1-hr tutorial, 5x2-hr practical Assumed knowledge: EXSS2027 or EXSS2028 Assessment: brochure/report (20%), practical exam with report (30%), end semester exam (50%) Practical field work: During practical session, students will have to use different techniques and protocols to evaluate aerobic fitness and muscle function. This will also involve adequate collection and interpretation of data. Tutorials will be used to introduce students to exercise programming. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to provide a comprehensive and critical examination of exercise testing and programming in low-risk populations. The scientific evidence for exercise dosages for aerobic exercise and resistance training required for health and fitness outcomes will be critically reviewed. Other aspects of exercise programming such as flexibility, warm up and instructional technique will also be covered in this unit. Through the use of lectures and case studies, students will learn how to integrate both the physiological components and logistical aspects of exercise performance, to devise individualised exercise test batteries and prescriptions. During practical sessions, students will have to use different techniques and protocols to evaluate aerobic fitness and muscle function. Student will have to demonstrate excellent data collection skills and ability to interpret results and communicate them to a lay audience.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 3

Semester 1
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ross Sanders (sem 1) and Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement.
The unit consists of a motor control strand and a motor learning strand. The motor control strand examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, and automaticity. The motor learning strand examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as individual differences (e.g., motivation), methods of instruction, practice conditions, and the structuring of feedback. Implications for, and applications to, teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation are drawn. The unit includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning.
EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial for 9 weeks, 2-hr practical for 1 week Assumed knowledge: EXSS3023 and (EXSS2022 or EXSS2027) Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), oral presentation (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the application of exercise science for the promotion and maintenance of health via the prevention of chronic disease and the management of people suffering from chronic disease. Students will explore a range of topics including the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, risk factor assessment, clinical exercise testing, ECG interpretation, and exercise prescription. Emphasis will be placed on the use of scientific evidence to guide exercise prescription for individuals with chronic diseases. The chronic disease conditions covered include obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
EXSS3049 Sport and Exercise Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2-hr lecture /week for Weeks 1-4; 1 x 2-hr lecture/week for Weeks 5-9; 2-hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: BACH1161 or HSBH1003 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), facilitating behaviour change assignment (45%), knowledge dissemination assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the key psychological factors and explanatory frameworks relating to engagement, participation and adherence in exercise and sport. A broad array of topics is covered in the unit including: motivation, behavioural modification, addiction, anxiety, psychological skills training, sport performance, burnout & injury. Special consideration is given to facilitating exercise adherence, youth sport participation, the development of athletic performance, and how exercise and physical activity influences psychological function and well-being. Practical applications are made in relation to exercise practitioners, including health promotion professions, exercise physiologists, as well as teachers and coaches across age and skill level.
Textbooks
Cox, R. H. (2007). Sport psychology: Concepts & applications. (7th ed). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
EXSS3052 Practicum with Low Risk Clients

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Semaan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1-hr placement preparation tutorials held for students in Semester 2 of the year that precedes this unit of study, and 2 x 1-hr tutorials in the semester of enrolment in the unit of study. Prerequisites: EXSS3023 Assessment: Competency in professional and practical skills relevant to ESSA Exercise Physiologist accreditation Practical field work: Minimum 140 hours professional experience with apparently healthy populations of low risk Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit will engage students in practical experiences relevant to exercise science and Exercise Physiology. These practical experiences will reinforce theoretical knowledge and skills acquired through university studies. Students will complete at least 140 hours of supervised practicum in relevant areas such as design, delivery and evaluation of exercise interventions for healthy, low risk populations. Prior to undertaking an off-campus allocated placement, students participate in an on-campus placement, which allows them to build their skill and confidence.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS3027 Exercise and Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alycia Fong Yan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr practical for 10 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS3024 Assumed knowledge: (EXSS2028 and EXSS2022) or EXSS2027 Assessment: practical exam 1 (25%), practical exam 2 (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the strategic application of the principles of exercise prescription to target specific prevention and rehabilitation goals. The unit explores the pathophysiological basis of exercise limitations across a range of musculoskeletal injuries including the ankle, knee and shoulder, chronic lower back pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and joint replacement.. The underlying aim of the unit focuses on the application of exercise to rehabilitate functional capacity for patients who suffer from such conditions. The principles of exercise prescription include examining scientific evidence for the safety and efficacy of numerous exercise modalities to help establish core stability; re-establish neuromuscular control; restore full range of motion; restore or increase muscular strength, endurance, and power; and maintain cardio-respiratory fitness.
EXSS3037 Exercise Pharmacology and Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rhonda Orr Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 5 tutorials/semester Prerequisites: BIOS1170 and EXSS2028 Assessment: Mid semester exam (30%), Drug Information Brochure (20%) and end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce the student to the principles of pharmacology and immunology as well as the effect and influence of exercise on the respective fields. Students will gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic action of drugs in the body. Students will be able to describe the site and mechanism of action of selected drug groups, to identify the therapeutic use of the drug and its adverse effects, to examine the effect of the exercise and disease on drug action, and the effect of the drug on the exercise response. Special emphasis will be given to drugs used for therapeutic medication, for recreational purposes and for performance enhancement in sport. The nature of immunity, the immune response, pathological disorders of the immune system and its response to exercise and ageing will be examined.
EXSS3050 Exercise Across the Lifespan

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Fiatarone Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/tutorial/week Prerequisites: EXSS2022 and EXSS2028 and EXSS3023 Assessment: Oral presentation and reference library preparation (20%), written end-semester examination (20%) and written group assignment (60%) Practical field work: Demonstration of skills in testing of exercise capacity and training for balance and strength in older adults; body composition measurements including BIA an waist circumference, library work in computer lab on database searching for conduct of literature review and creation of reference library in Endnote, cognitive testing Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the rationale and recommendations for the use of exercise and the promotion of physical activity from childhood through to old age, including those with chronic disease and disability. The student will explore evidence for the contribution of exercise to psychological health and well-being, improvement in body composition associated with poor health outcomes, and for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and disability, including cancer, osteoporosis, arthritis, cognitive impairment, depression, diabetes, obesity, vascular disease, renal failure, and mobility impairment . Appropriate exercise modalities for older adults and implementing the exercise prescription in those with chronic disease and frailty as well as promoting behavioural change will also be taught.
HSBH1007 Health Science and Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grace Spencer Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH2007 Assessment: Individual written report (30%), group written report (20%), 90 min end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to key research paradigms in health, and to the major approaches to designing and evaluating basic and applied research in health. Students are exposed to the types of research which inform our understanding of normal and abnormal functions of the human body and of treatment and preventative health care. Students will be engaged in the generation of new knowledge through evidence-based practice and evidence-based innovation. Current issues in health science research will be identified, with emphasis on the role of technology and e-health.
Textbooks
Saks, M. & Allsop, J. (eds.) (2013). Researching Health: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. London: sage.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 4

Semester 1
EXSS4007 Clinical Placement 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive June,Intensive October,Semester 2b Classes: Two-day workshop-style briefing prior to undertaking placement Prerequisites: EXSS3024 and EXSS3027 and (EXSS3045 or EXSS3052) Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assisgnment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4010 Case Studies 1 Clinical Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ché Fornusek Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block mode: 1x2-hr lecture (-1 to 9) and 1x 2-4hr practical or tutorial (-1 to 9) weeks Assumed knowledge: EXSS3037 and EXSS3050 Assessment: Written Assessment 1600 words (30%), written case study and oral defence (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Classes for this unit of study commence in Week -1
This unit will develop a higher level of knowledge, clinical decision making and problem-solving skills by using complex cases related to clinical exercise physiology practice. The cases will include pathologies from the cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular and metabolic areas. Academic staff and experienced practitioners will use clinical scenarios to guide students through the process of selecting and administering appropriate screening and assessment tools and developing effective, individualized exercise management plans. The clinical scenarios will present more complex cases than previously covered and will require the student to integrate prior knowledge and experiences with new learning.
Two Electives [12] (see elective list below)
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS4011 Clinical Placement 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive October,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assisgnment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4012 Clinical Placement 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive October,Semester 2,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assisgnment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4013 Clinical Placement 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive November,Intensive October,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assignment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4014 Case Studies 2 Clinical Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ché Fornusek Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode: 8-hrs/week for 7 weeks (Wk -1 to 6) Prerequisites: EXSS4010 Assumed knowledge: EXSS3037 and EXSS3050 Assessment: Written Assignment 2000 words (30%), written case study and oral defence (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will develop a higher level of knowledge, clinical decision making and problem-solving skills by using complex cases related to clinical exercise physiology practice. The cases will include pathologies in cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, cancers, neoplastic conditions and neurological/intellectual clinical conditions. Academic staff and experienced practitioners will use clinical scenarios to guide students through the process of selecting and administering appropriate screening and assessment tools and developing effective, individualized exercise management plans. The clinical scenarios will present more complex cases than previously covered and will require the student to integrate prior knowledge and experiences with new learning.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Exercise Physiology electives

Notes
Availability of electives may vary from year to year. Subject to approval of relevant head of academic unit, elective units of study may be taken from within or outside the Faculty.
HSBH3014 Workplace Injury Prevention/Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week (Wk -1 to 9) Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and EXSS1018 Assessment: Workplace assessment (group task) (40%), quizzes (10%), 1x2hr end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit provides a framework for exploring the role of health professionals in the field of workplace rehabilitation and occupational health and safety, with a focus on work injury prevention and early injury assessment and management. This unit will develop students' knowledge and skills in assessing the physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands of work and explore workplace modifications and functional restorative strategies to assist people with injuries and disability return to meaningful and productive employment. An evidence-based, approach will be used to explore the patterns, causation and management of workplace injury and illness, and associated legislation in NSW. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and practice of ergonomics, workplace assessments and functional evaluations and how these can be applied to the prevention and management of work injuries. To this effect, the role of the health professional as a consultant in the workplace will be discussed.
HSBH2008 Physical Activity and Population Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Martin Mackey Session: Semester 1 Classes: 9x2hr lectures/sem (Wk -1 to 9), 8x1hr online lectures/sem, 4x1hr tutorials/sem and 1x2hr prac/sem Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: Mid-semester exam (30%), group presentation (30%), Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to develop an up-to-date critical understanding of the role of physical activity for the health of the population as well as the most promising principles that underpin mass-level physical activity interventions. Students will examine in detail the population¿s participation patterns and barriers to be physically active and has a primary focus on every-day incidental (non-sporting) physical activity for the prevention of physical and mental chronic disease. The unit is largely multi-disciplinary and it goes beyond disease prevention, to explore themes like positive wellbeing/happiness and maintenance of functional ability and independence to an older age.This unit takes a lifespan approach and actively promotes an understanding of the direct and distal implications of physical inactivity at each life stage. Particular acknowledgement is given to physical activity as a behaviour that is not merely a lifestyle 'choice' as it is often thought by medicine and other individual-centred disciplines; but rather the outcome of a complex web of societal, cultural, economic, political and individual circumstances that lead to the formation of personal habits across the lifespan. The entire unit will be largely interactive and will encourage students to disuss, debate, and critically evaluate the evidence. At the start of the unit the students will be provided with an accessible and user-friendly set of skills and tools (e.g. statistics, physical activity measurement) to enable them to make the most of their learning experience.
HSBH3021 Environmental Stress and Physiological Strain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ollie Jay Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-hrs/wk for 9 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS1032 or EXSS2027 or BIOS1170 Assessment: 1x2hr final exam (50%), 4 x lab reports (5% each; 20% total), and 1 x 0.5hr case study oral exam (30%) Practical field work: (4 x 2hr prac)/sem Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and first-hand experience (through laboratory practicals) of how the human body responds to extreme environmental stressors (i.e. high altitude, hyperbaria, extreme heat, extreme cold), and how these conditions alter the capacity of humans to perform physical and mental tasks. Special attention will also be given to the theoretical basis of how these stressors can lead to decrements to human health in the form of injury (e.g. frostibite, heat exhaustion) and illness (e.g. pulmonary/cerebral oedema, actue mountain sickness, 'the bends'). This unit will also focus on how this information can be used to develop therapeutic, pharmacological, and/or technological interventions to improve human functioning in extreme environments and reduce the risk of illness and injury. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies and short practical assignments.
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture, 2hr practical, tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Quizzes (3x10%), mid-semester exam (35%), end semester exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS3040 Physiological Testing and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ollie Jay Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr practical for 8 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2022 Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%) practical activity report (30%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills (laboratory and field-based) for the physiological assessment and training of elite athletes. The application of current tests and measurements in sports science together with training theory and practice will be critically reviewed. Special attention will be given to the role of speed, strength and endurance in sports performance. Fundamental questions concerning the nature of the training stimulus, training thresholds, plasticity of muscle, dose-response relationships, detraining and overtraining will be investigated. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies, practical test and measurement skills. On completion of this unit of study students will demonstrate competency within the sports testing environment and a capacity to provide well researched consultancy advice on sports training theory and practice.
EXSS3041 Management, Marketing and the Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Dieter Wilhelmi Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: assignment (35%), end semester exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presents management, marketing and legal issues that impact on Australian businesses. The management component provides an overview to the key elements in operating a small business within the sport, health or fitness industry. Management concepts that will be covered include business planning, total quality management, operations management, negotiation and leadership. The marketing component introduces marketing strategies such as market planning, market research and market segmentation. All businesses must demonstrate legal compliance. This unit highlights those areas of the law that have particular relevance to businesses operating within the health and fitness industry. Workplace contracts, insurance, sponsorship, consumer protection, liability and legislative obligations (harassment and discrimination) will be discussed. Students will develop an understanding of the various business legal structures and will be able to select an appropriate structure for a business of their choice.
HSBH3012 FHS Abroad

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Dylke Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Full-day briefing session, half-day debriefing session. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre-departure research (30%), field diary (20%), report (40%) and presentation (10%). Practical field work: 4-6 weeks working with a community-based organisation in a developing country. Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students interested in participating must obtain permission from their course director before enrolling in FHS Abroad. Some degrees require participants have a minimum credit average.
Cultural practices, disease patterns and healthcare systems are vastly different in different countries around the globe. This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain international experience in a health services setting in a developing country. Students will participate in a 4-6 week health or care placement with a community-based organisation in South or Southeast Asia. Countries where students can be placed include Vietnam, Cambodia, India and the Philippines. As part of the unit, you will be expected to participate in local development programs, live within the community that you are visiting, and document and reflect on key health and development issues facing local populations. The unit will require you to demonstrate cultural sensitivity and an ability to adapt to new environments, a capacity for critical reflection and awareness of complex global health and development issues.

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology) Honours

Route code: BPASEXPH1HON: Honours course; full-time, 4 years

Years 1 and 2

As per Pass course

Year 3

Semester 1
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ross Sanders (sem 1) and Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement.
The unit consists of a motor control strand and a motor learning strand. The motor control strand examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, and automaticity. The motor learning strand examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as individual differences (e.g., motivation), methods of instruction, practice conditions, and the structuring of feedback. Implications for, and applications to, teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation are drawn. The unit includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning.
EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial for 9 weeks, 2-hr practical for 1 week Assumed knowledge: EXSS3023 and (EXSS2022 or EXSS2027) Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), oral presentation (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the application of exercise science for the promotion and maintenance of health via the prevention of chronic disease and the management of people suffering from chronic disease. Students will explore a range of topics including the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, risk factor assessment, clinical exercise testing, ECG interpretation, and exercise prescription. Emphasis will be placed on the use of scientific evidence to guide exercise prescription for individuals with chronic diseases. The chronic disease conditions covered include obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
EXSS3049 Sport and Exercise Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2-hr lecture /week for Weeks 1-4; 1 x 2-hr lecture/week for Weeks 5-9; 2-hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: BACH1161 or HSBH1003 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), facilitating behaviour change assignment (45%), knowledge dissemination assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the key psychological factors and explanatory frameworks relating to engagement, participation and adherence in exercise and sport. A broad array of topics is covered in the unit including: motivation, behavioural modification, addiction, anxiety, psychological skills training, sport performance, burnout & injury. Special consideration is given to facilitating exercise adherence, youth sport participation, the development of athletic performance, and how exercise and physical activity influences psychological function and well-being. Practical applications are made in relation to exercise practitioners, including health promotion professions, exercise physiologists, as well as teachers and coaches across age and skill level.
Textbooks
Cox, R. H. (2007). Sport psychology: Concepts & applications. (7th ed). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
EXSS3052 Practicum with Low Risk Clients

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Semaan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1-hr placement preparation tutorials held for students in Semester 2 of the year that precedes this unit of study, and 2 x 1-hr tutorials in the semester of enrolment in the unit of study. Prerequisites: EXSS3023 Assessment: Competency in professional and practical skills relevant to ESSA Exercise Physiologist accreditation Practical field work: Minimum 140 hours professional experience with apparently healthy populations of low risk Mode of delivery: Professional practice
This unit will engage students in practical experiences relevant to exercise science and Exercise Physiology. These practical experiences will reinforce theoretical knowledge and skills acquired through university studies. Students will complete at least 140 hours of supervised practicum in relevant areas such as design, delivery and evaluation of exercise interventions for healthy, low risk populations. Prior to undertaking an off-campus allocated placement, students participate in an on-campus placement, which allows them to build their skill and confidence.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS3027 Exercise and Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alycia Fong Yan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr practical for 10 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS3024 Assumed knowledge: (EXSS2028 and EXSS2022) or EXSS2027 Assessment: practical exam 1 (25%), practical exam 2 (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the strategic application of the principles of exercise prescription to target specific prevention and rehabilitation goals. The unit explores the pathophysiological basis of exercise limitations across a range of musculoskeletal injuries including the ankle, knee and shoulder, chronic lower back pain, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, and joint replacement.. The underlying aim of the unit focuses on the application of exercise to rehabilitate functional capacity for patients who suffer from such conditions. The principles of exercise prescription include examining scientific evidence for the safety and efficacy of numerous exercise modalities to help establish core stability; re-establish neuromuscular control; restore full range of motion; restore or increase muscular strength, endurance, and power; and maintain cardio-respiratory fitness.
EXSS3037 Exercise Pharmacology and Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rhonda Orr Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 5 tutorials/semester Prerequisites: BIOS1170 and EXSS2028 Assessment: Mid semester exam (30%), Drug Information Brochure (20%) and end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce the student to the principles of pharmacology and immunology as well as the effect and influence of exercise on the respective fields. Students will gain an understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic action of drugs in the body. Students will be able to describe the site and mechanism of action of selected drug groups, to identify the therapeutic use of the drug and its adverse effects, to examine the effect of the exercise and disease on drug action, and the effect of the drug on the exercise response. Special emphasis will be given to drugs used for therapeutic medication, for recreational purposes and for performance enhancement in sport. The nature of immunity, the immune response, pathological disorders of the immune system and its response to exercise and ageing will be examined.
EXSS3050 Exercise Across the Lifespan

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Maria Fiatarone Singh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr lecture/tutorial/week Prerequisites: EXSS2022 and EXSS2028 and EXSS3023 Assessment: Oral presentation and reference library preparation (20%), written end-semester examination (20%) and written group assignment (60%) Practical field work: Demonstration of skills in testing of exercise capacity and training for balance and strength in older adults; body composition measurements including BIA an waist circumference, library work in computer lab on database searching for conduct of literature review and creation of reference library in Endnote, cognitive testing Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers the rationale and recommendations for the use of exercise and the promotion of physical activity from childhood through to old age, including those with chronic disease and disability. The student will explore evidence for the contribution of exercise to psychological health and well-being, improvement in body composition associated with poor health outcomes, and for the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases and disability, including cancer, osteoporosis, arthritis, cognitive impairment, depression, diabetes, obesity, vascular disease, renal failure, and mobility impairment . Appropriate exercise modalities for older adults and implementing the exercise prescription in those with chronic disease and frailty as well as promoting behavioural change will also be taught.
BHSC3021 Honours A: Research Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 12x 2hr Inter-disciplinary seminars, 6x1hr FRG, mentor or supervisor research meetings Assessment: Research proposal (3,000 to 5,000 words) (70%), Multiple choice and short answer format exam on inter-disciplinary material (30%) Practical field work: Optional discipline specific practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides the conceptual framework and theoretical knowledge and some practical skills required to understand how scientific research is conducted and interpreted. The core content is fundamental for researchers and clinicians alike for evidence-based-practice and life-long learning. Content and skills are taught/learned via a series of web-based and class-based activities.
Textbooks
Polgar, Stephen. Introduction to research in the health sciences / Stephen Polgar, Shane A. Thomas. Edinburgh ; New York : Elsevier, 2008 ISBN 9780443074295
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 4 (first offered 2017)

Semester 1
EXSS4007 Clinical Placement 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive June,Intensive October,Semester 2b Classes: Two-day workshop-style briefing prior to undertaking placement Prerequisites: EXSS3024 and EXSS3027 and (EXSS3045 or EXSS3052) Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assisgnment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4010 Case Studies 1 Clinical Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ché Fornusek Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block mode: 1x2-hr lecture (-1 to 9) and 1x 2-4hr practical or tutorial (-1 to 9) weeks Assumed knowledge: EXSS3037 and EXSS3050 Assessment: Written Assessment 1600 words (30%), written case study and oral defence (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Classes for this unit of study commence in Week -1
This unit will develop a higher level of knowledge, clinical decision making and problem-solving skills by using complex cases related to clinical exercise physiology practice. The cases will include pathologies from the cardiopulmonary, neuromuscular and metabolic areas. Academic staff and experienced practitioners will use clinical scenarios to guide students through the process of selecting and administering appropriate screening and assessment tools and developing effective, individualized exercise management plans. The clinical scenarios will present more complex cases than previously covered and will require the student to integrate prior knowledge and experiences with new learning.
EXSS4011 Clinical Placement 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive October,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assisgnment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
BHSC4012 Honours B: Applied Research Skills

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6x 2-hr inter-disciplinary seminars, , 6x1-hr FRG, mentor or supervisor research meetings Prerequisites: BHSC3021 Assessment: Reflection presentation (10 mins and 3 mins questions) (30%) and exam (70%) Practical field work: Optional discipline specific practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours students undertake a supervised research project in a health discipline area within the Faculty. Students will contribute to designing and/or implementing an approved research project and submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. in designing the methodology the student will work closely with academic staff/mentor who will supervise their research activities. Students will meet regularly with their supervisor; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process and their thesis.
Textbooks
Polgar, Stephen. Introduction to research in the health sciences / Stephen Polgar, Shane A. Thomas. Edinburgh ; New York : Elsevier, 2008 ISBN 9780443074295
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS4012 Clinical Placement 3

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive October,Semester 2,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assisgnment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4013 Clinical Placement 4

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive November,Intensive October,Semester 2b Prerequisites: EXSS4007 Assessment: Assessment based on performance of specific clinical skills and professional behaviour (Pass/Fail) and written assignment (Pass/Fail). At least 90% attendance at clinical sites is mandatory. Practical field work: Attendance at clinical placement site for up to 37.5 hours/week and up to 5 weeks Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must have a current CPR certificate of competency and be verified in ClinConnect prior to undertaking clinical work
This unit is designed to provide students with the opportunity to learn and demonstrate the knowledge, skills and abilities of the clinical exercise physiologist. Students will work under supervision in professional settings and will assist in managing clients with chronic disease, while demonstrating and being assessed on specific clinical practice skills and professional behaviour which are consistent with their stage of learning.
EXSS4014 Case Studies 2 Clinical Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ché Fornusek Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode: 8-hrs/week for 7 weeks (Wk -1 to 6) Prerequisites: EXSS4010 Assumed knowledge: EXSS3037 and EXSS3050 Assessment: Written Assignment 2000 words (30%), written case study and oral defence (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will develop a higher level of knowledge, clinical decision making and problem-solving skills by using complex cases related to clinical exercise physiology practice. The cases will include pathologies in cardiovascular, musculoskeletal, cancers, neoplastic conditions and neurological/intellectual clinical conditions. Academic staff and experienced practitioners will use clinical scenarios to guide students through the process of selecting and administering appropriate screening and assessment tools and developing effective, individualized exercise management plans. The clinical scenarios will present more complex cases than previously covered and will require the student to integrate prior knowledge and experiences with new learning.
BHSC4013 Honours C: Research Project

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x2-hr inter-disciplinary seminars,, 5x1-hr FRG, mentor or supervisor research meetings Prerequisites: BHSC4012 Assessment: Journal article (3,000 to 6,500 words, OR as per journal requirements) (80%), Honours presentation (10 minutes, 3 mins for questions) (20%) Practical field work: Optional discipline specific practicals Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Honours students complete a supervised research project in a health discipline area within the Faculty. In completing the research, the student will work closely with academic staff/mentor who will supervise their research activities. Honours students learning and teaching activities will largely be driven by the nature of their research project. Likely learning and teaching activities include the production of written work that may be suitable for submission to a relevant refereed journal for publication or equivalent. These activities necessitate a collaborative relationship between supervisor and student.
Textbooks
Polgar, Stephen. Introduction to research in the health sciences / Stephen Polgar, Shane A. Thomas. Edinburgh ; New York : Elsevier, 2008 ISBN 9780443074295
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS