Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science) – BPASENUD1000 / Master of Nutrition and Dietetics - MANUTDIE1000

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science) / Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

View semester session codes here.

Course BPASENUD1000: Pass course; full-time, 3 years
Candidates must complete the BAppSc (Ex&SportSc) degree with an overall Weighted Average Mark (WAM) of at least 65 in order to be accepted into the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics. Students who do not achieve a WAM of 65 will graduate with the award of BAppSc (Ex&SportSc).

Year 1

Semester 1
CHEM1001 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prohibitions: CHEM1101, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study, but students who have not undertaken an HSC chemistry course are strongly advised to complete a chemistry bridging course before lectures commence. Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignments (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of the unit of study is to provide those students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent) with a good grounding in fundamental chemical principles together with an overview of the relevance of chemistry. There is no prerequisite or assumed knowledge for entry to this unit of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1101 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Corequisites: Recommended concurrent units of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1001, CHEM1109, CHEM1901, CHEM1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Chemistry and Mathematics Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Chemistry 1A is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC Chemistry course. Chemistry 1A covers chemical theory and physical chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
and
BACH1161 Introductory Behavioural Health Sciences

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Gilroy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: BACH1132, BACH1134, HSBH1003 Assessment: Assignment (30%), group class presentation (20%), exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides an introduction to areas of psychology and sociology relevant to health and wellbeing. The unit provides sociological tools (covering both theory and method) useful for understanding and practising in health and wellbeing as well as an introduction to the principles and applications of psychology as they pertain to these areas. The unit aims to develop a 'sociological imagination', a quality of mind that will be used to prompt students to question common-sense assumptions regarding health and wellbeing. Students will also gain familiarity with the major paradigms and methodological approaches of contemporary psychology and will develop the ability to apply psychological theory to specific health issues in their major area of study.
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS1018 Biomechanics of Human Movement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture /week, 4x2-hr tutorial/practical per semester, drop in tutorials for assistance, online weekly quizzes for feedback Assumed knowledge: HSC mathematics Assessment: 2 hr mid-semester exam (40%), and 2 hr end-semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to develop an appreciation of how mechanical principles can be applied to understand the underlying causes of human movement. Topics include: kinematics, vectors, Newton`s laws of motion, work, energy, power, and momentum; for both translational and rotational motion; and the influence of fluids on motion. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical skills and analytical problem solving techniques. The laboratory classes complement the lectures; providing opportunities to validate mechanical principles in a quantitative manner.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
CHEM1002 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or equivalent Prohibitions: CHEM1102, CHEM1108, CHEM1902, CHEM1904 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Practical field work: A series of 9 three-hour laboratory sessions, one per week for 9 weeks of the semester. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
CHEM1002 builds on CHEM1001 to provide a sound coverage of inorganic and organic chemistry. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
or
CHEM1102 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: One 3 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week; one 3 hour practical per week for 9 weeks. Prerequisites: CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or a Distinction in CHEM1001 or equivalent Corequisites: Recommended concurrent units of study: 6 credit points of Junior Mathematics Prohibitions: CHEM1002, CHEM1108, CHEM1902, CHEM1904 Assessment: Theory examination (60%), laboratory work (15%), online assignment (10%) and continuous assessment quizzes (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A and covers inorganic and organic chemistry. Successful completion of Chemistry 1B is an acceptable prerequisite for entry into Intermediate Chemistry units of study. Lectures: A series of 39 lectures, three per week throughout the semester.
Textbooks
A booklist is available from the First Year Chemistry website. http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/firstyear
and
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1155, BMED2403, PHSI2005, PHSI2006 Assessment: mid semester exam (30%), end semester exam (70%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes at which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
EXSS1029 Muscle Mechanics and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Tom Gwinn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Mid semester exam (25%), practical exam (10%), tutorial assignment (5%) end semester exam (60%) Practical field work: Includes participation in high resistance training and muscle stretch intervention Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The determinants of maximal active muscle force and power production are examined in terms of the crossbridge cycle, sarcomere arrangement, myosin isoforms and the extent of muscle activation. Evidence for neural adaptations to high resistance training is examined and the practical significance of these adaptations is discussed. The responses of skeletal muscle to high-resistance training are discussed in terms of i) the control of protein synthesis, ii) sarcomere remodelling and myofibril assembly, and iii) whole muscle hypertrophy and fibre type shifts. An evidence-based approach is used to examine the dose-response relationship between high-resistance variables (load, number of sets, training, frequency, rest interval) and hypertrophy. Muscle structural and functional adaptations to disuse (bed rest, non-weight bearing, immobilization) are examined, as well as the effects of re-ambulation and re-training. The determinants of muscle range of motion and passive stiffness are discussed. The response of muscle to long term stretching (e.g. bone elongation) is examined. This is contrasted to the relative lack of muscle structural adaptation to short-term static stretch interventions.
Textbooks
No textbook required, students are recommended to obtain unit of study manual
EXSS1032 Fundamentals of Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lectures/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Practical skills assessment (20%), excel tutorial and practical class-based worksheets (20%) and end semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of exercise science and an introduction to their application to physical activity, sport, fitness and health. A focus of Fundamentals of Exercise Science is the practical application of testing procedures to the measurement of physiological function. In this unit issues related to work (and its measurement), energy supply, physiological capacity and muscular fitness are covered, with emphasis on the integration of these concepts, the use of scientific rigour and evidence-based practice. Practical classes will cover various fundamental skills for exercise scientists including standard health screening procedures and the principles and practice aerobic and muscular fitness testing. Worksheets will include data presentation and analysis skills using excel software. The exercise prescription component of the unit introduces students to the concepts of programming for cardio-respiratory/aerobic and muscular fitness for healthy individuals. A major emphasis of the unit is the acquisition of laboratory based testing/assessment skills, and data handling and presentation skills
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross anatomical structure and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and head and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Students will also look at the anatomical basis of chewing, swallowing and communication. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hrs practical/week, with a small online component Assessment: mid semester exam (40%), end semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study includes fundamental concepts of nervous system organization and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movement and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the somatosensory and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS2018 Biomechanical Analysis of Movement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Sinclair Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2 hr tutorial/practical most weeks Prerequisites: EXSS1018 Assessment: filming practical (20%), mid semester exam (30%), end of semester exam (50%) Practical field work: Problem solving and data analysis from laboratory work Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The main emphasis of this unit is in developing practical expertise in techniques for the biomechanical analysis of human movement. Students will learn how to conduct kinematic and kinetic analyses, using video, force platforms and electromyography. Other components of this unit are aimed at further development of mathematical and problem-solving skills for the analysis of movement. Topics include static and dynamic equilibrium, calculation of centre of mass, determination of joint torques using inverse dynamics, electromyography, tissue mechanics and ergonomic task analysis.
EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kieron Rooney Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week, 2-hr practical or tutorial some weeks Prohibitions: EXSS2017, EXSS2019 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1167, EXSS1032 Assessment: practical report (10%), quizzes (4x1%), 1.5h mid semester exam (38%), 2 hr end semester exam (48%) Practical field work: 1x2-hr class on 3 occasions Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit discusses the acute responses to exercise with a specific emphasis on the roles of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in oxygen transport and the significance of sub-maximal and maximal oxygen consumption in the limitations to performance. The concepts of acid-base balance during exercise and of lactate and ventilatory thresholds will be examined. Furthermore, this unit develops an understanding of the specific metabolic response to exercise at the peripheral cellular level and the biochemical strategies that maintain energy balance during exercise and a return to homeostasis in recovery. Students will put theory into practice with laboratory tasks that encourage skill acquisition in the collection of real-time physiological data of the respiratory and cardiovascular response to exercise.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA; Fahey, TD; Baldwin KM/Exercise phsyiology: human bioenergetics and its applications/Fourth Edition/2005/0-07-255642-0/. Tiidus P, Russell Tupling A., Houston, ME. Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS2021 Nutrition, Health and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen O'Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/tutorial/alternate weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: mid-semester examination (20%), presentation (20%), end of semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the principles of nutrition to optimise physical performance in sport, recreation and occupation. In addition key aspects of public health nutrition including dietary management of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are also a focus. This unit defines the importance of macro and micro nutrients in the maintenance of health, and the specific roles of carbohydrate, protein and lipids in energy metabolism during exercise. In addition, the interaction between dietary intake and physical activity and its effects on energy-balance, cardiovascular health and other lifestyle diseases are considered.
EXSS2022 Exercise Physiology-Training Adaptations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chin-Moi Chow Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1-hr lectures /week, 2-hr practical or tutorial some weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: debate session (10%), quizzes (2x1%), 1.5-hr mid semester exam (40%), end semester exam (48%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is concerned with the physiological adaptations associated with training. This unit will focus on cardiorespiratory and metabolic adaptations to endurance, high resistance and interval/sprint training. The implications of training will be discussed with respect to improved fatigue resistance, resulting from changes in the structural and functional capacities of organ systems under normal conditions as well as altered environmental conditions such as altitude and temperature. The mechanisms behind muscle damage and fatigue, including acidosis and excitation-coupling failure, will be examined in the untrained individual and the elite athlete with respect to their specific stimulus and appropriate recovery. This unit will build on fundamental topics of EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA, Fahey, TD, and Baldwin, KM, Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and its application (4th Ed), McGraw-Hill (2005) Thompson WR; American College of Sports Medicine; Gordon NF; Pescatello LS/ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription/Eigth/2009/ -- Brooks GA, Fahey TD, White TP and Baldwin KM/Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and Its Applications/4th/2005/0072556420/
EXSS3023 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Corinne Caillaud Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 3x 1-hr tutorial, 5x2-hr practical Assumed knowledge: EXSS2027 or EXSS2028 Assessment: brochure/report (20%), practical exam with report (30%), end semester exam (50%) Practical field work: During practical session, students will have to use different techniques and protocols to evaluate aerobic fitness and muscle function. This will also involve adequate collection and interpretation of data. Tutorials will be used to introduce students to exercise programming. Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit is designed to provide a comprehensive and critical examination of exercise testing and programming in low-risk populations. The scientific evidence for exercise dosages for aerobic exercise and resistance training required for health and fitness outcomes will be critically reviewed. Other aspects of exercise programming such as flexibility, warm up and instructional technique will also be covered in this unit. Through the use of lectures and case studies, students will learn how to integrate both the physiological components and logistical aspects of exercise performance, to devise individualised exercise test batteries and prescriptions. Although not a co-requisite, students will benefit from undertaking EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease in parallel with Exercise Testing and Prescription.
MBLG1001 Molecular Biology and Genetics (Intro)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 1-hour tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight Prohibitions: MBLG1901 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology and 6 credit points of Junior Chemistry Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, in-semester skills test and assignments (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The lectures in this unit of study introduce the "Central Dogma" of molecular biology and genetics -i.e., the molecular basis of life. The course begins with the information macromolecules in living cells: DNA, RNA and protein, and explores how their structures allow them to fulfill their various biological roles. This is followed by a review of how DNA is organised into genes leading to discussion of replication and gene expression (transcription and translation). The unit concludes with an introduction to the techniques of molecular biology and, in particular, how these techniques have led to an explosion of interest and research in Molecular Biology. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments which explore the measurement of enzyme activity, the isolation of DNA and the 'cutting' of DNA using restriction enzymes. However, a key aim of the practicals is to give students higher level generic skills in computing, communication, criticism, data analysis/evaluation and experimental design.
Textbooks
Introduction to Molecular Biology MBLG1001 & MBLG1901, 3rd edition compiled by D. Hancock, G. Denyer and B. Lyon, Pearson ISBN 978 1 4860 0039 5
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 3 (first offered 2014)

Semester 1
BCHM2072 Human Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Gareth Denyer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week, one tutorial per fortnight, and 2-3 hours per week of practical Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 credit points of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: BCHM2972. All intermediate BMED units. Assessment: One 3-hour exam (65%), practical work (25%), in semester assignments (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This unit is not available to BMedSc students. Recommended concurrent units of study: (MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) and BCHM2071 for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study aims to describe how cells work at the molecular level, with a special emphasis on human biochemistry. The chemical reactions that occur inside cells are described in the first series of lectures, Cellular Metabolism. Aspects of the molecular architecture of cells that enable them to transduce messages and communicate with each other are described in the second half of the unit of study, Signal Transduction. At every stage there is emphasis on the 'whole body' consequences of reactions, pathways and processes. Cellular Metabolism describes how cells extract energy from fuel molecules like fatty acids and carbohydrates, how the body controls the rate of fuel utilisation and how the mix of fuels is regulated (especially under different physiological circumstances such as starvation and exercise). The metabolic inter-relationships of the muscle, brain, adipose tissue and liver and the role of hormones in coordinating tissue metabolic relationships is discussed. The unit also discusses how the body lays down and stores vital fuel reserves such as fat and glycogen, how hormones modulate fuel partitioning between tissues and the strategies involved in digestion and absorption and transport of nutrients. Signal Transduction covers how communication across membranes occurs (i.e. via surface receptors and signaling cascades). This allows detailed molecular discussion of the mechanism of hormone action and intracellular process targeting. The practical component complements the lectures by exposing students to experiments that investigate the measurement of glucose utilisation using radioactive tracers and the design of biochemical assay systems. During the unit of study, generic skills are nurtured by frequent use of analytical and problem solving activities. Opportunities are provided to redesign and repeat experiments so as to provide a genuine research experience. Student exposure to generic skills will be extended by the introduction of exercises designed to teach oral communication, instruction writing and planning skills.
EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial for 7 weeks, 2-hr practical for 4 weeks Assumed knowledge: EXSS3023 and either EXSS2022 or EXSS2027 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), oral presentation (25%), end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the application of exercise science for the promotion and maintenance of health via the prevention of chronic disease and the management of people suffering from chronic disease. Students will explore a range of topics including the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, risk factor assessment, clinical exercise testing, ECG interpretation, and exercise prescription. Emphasis will be placed on the use of scientific evidence to guide exercise prescription for individuals with chronic diseases. The chronic disease conditions covered include obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
EXSS3049 Sport and Exercise Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture /week, 2-hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: BACH1161 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), facilitating behaviour change project (35%), end semester exam (45%), tutorial presentation (0% barrier task) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides an introduction to the key psychological factors that influence sport, exercise and motor performance. Consideration is also given to how participation in physical activity influences psychological function and well being. A broad array of topics is covered, including: theoretical and applied perspectives of motivation, goal setting, behavioural modification, addiction, arousal, anxiety, imagery, attention and expert performance. Practical applications are made to teaching, coaching and rehabilitation for all ages and for all levels of skill. Special consideration is given to facilitating exercise adherence, youth sport participant and peak performance.
MBLG2071 Molecular Biology and Genomics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Vanessa Gysbers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 4-hour practical per fortnight and five 1-hour tutorials. Prerequisites: (MBLG1001 or MBLG1901) and 12 CP of Junior Chemistry Prohibitions: MBLG2971 Assessment: One 2.5-hour exam, practical work, laboratory reports (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Recommended concurrent units of study: (BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) and (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972) for progression to Senior Biochemistry.
This unit of study extends the basic concepts introduced in MBLG1001/1901 and provides a firm foundation for students wishing to continue in the molecular biosciences as well as for those students who intend to apply molecular techniques to other biological or medical questions. The unit explores the regulation of the flow of genetic information in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. The central focus is on the control of replication, transcription and translation and how these processes can be studied and manipulated in the laboratory. The processes of DNA mutation and repair are also discussed. Experiments in model organisms are presented to illustrate current advancements in the field, together with discussion of work carried out in human systems and the relevance to human genetic diseases. Tools of molecular biology are taught within the context of recombinant DNA cloning - with an emphasis on essential knowledge required to use plasmid vectors. The methods of gene introduction (examples of transgenic animals) are also discussed along with recent developments in stem cell biology. Other techniques include the separation and analysis of macromolecules, like DNA, RNA and proteins, by gel electrophoresis and Southern, Northern & Western blotting. Analysis of gene expression by microarrays is also discussed. In the genomics section, topics include structure, packaging and complexity of the genome: assigning genes to specific chromosomes, physical mapping of genomes as well as DNA and genome sequencing methods and international projects in genome mapping. The practical course complements the theory and builds on the skills learnt in MBLG1001. Specifically students will: use spectrophotometry for the identification and quantification of nucleic acids, explore the lac operon system for the investigation of gene expression control, perform plasmid isolation, and complete a PCR analysis for detection of polymorphisms. As with MBLG1001, strong emphasis is placed on the acquisition of generic and fundamental technical skills.
Textbooks
Watson, J et al. Molecular Biology of the Gene. Pearson 7th edition, 2013.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ross Sanders (sem 1); Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam SAQ (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam MCQ, LAQ (45%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement. The unit consists of 3 modules. The first module examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, automaticity, lateralisation, arousal and stress, and expertise. The second module examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as goals, motivation, instruction, practice conditions and feedback. The third module examines applications to teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation and includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning that they have learned.
EXSS2026 Growth, Development and Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rhonda Orr Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hrs lectures/week, 7 tutorials/semester Assessment: Mid semester exam (25%), and assignment (25%) and end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study aims to provide the student with an appreciation of growth, development and ageing of the human across the lifespan. Physiologic changes, motor skill development and physical performance will be examined and related to morphology and stages of childhood and adolescent growth and ageing. The relationships between growth, development, gender and physical activity will be explored. The biological changes and consequences of ageing on physiologic and psychological health, disease and exercise capacity will be investigated. The student will also be able to gain an understanding of exercise prescription for pregnant women, children, adolescents and older adults.
EXSS3045 Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jacqueline Raymond Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1-hr information tutorials held for students once per semester, or twice if required Prerequisites: EXSS3023 Assessment: Completion of 140 hrs professional experience and competency in professional and practical skills Practical field work: supervised experience in professional settings Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
The aim of this unit is to engage students in practical experiences relevant to exercise science. These experiences should reinforce theoretical knowledge and practical skills acquired through university studies. Students complete at least 140 hours of supervised practicum in relevant areas such as design, delivery and evaluation of exercise interventions as well as exercise science projects in a community health area.
HSBH1007 Health Science and Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Deborah Black Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: Individual written report (20%), group written report (20%), 90 min end of semester exam (60%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces students to key research paradigms in health, and to the major approaches to designing and evaluating basic and applied research in health. Students are exposed to the types of research which inform our understanding of normal and abnormal functions of the human body and of treatment and preventative health care. Students will be engaged in the generation of new knowledge through evidence-based practice and evidence-based innovation. Current issues in health science research will be identified, with emphasis on the role of technology and e-health.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Note
Entry to the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics is dependent on the student achieving a credit (65%) average or above in the undergraduate degree.

Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course MANUTDIE1000: Pass course; full-time, 2 years

Year 1

Semester 1
NTDT5503 Dietary Intake & Nutritional Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anna Rangan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures/tutorials/workshops averaging 5 hours per week Corequisites: NTDT5602, NTDT5601 and NTDT5604 Assessment: One quiz (25%), one assignment (25%), 2-hour end of semester exam, (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study covers Dietary Assessment Methods in the context of individual, group and population dietary data: purposes of dietary assessment; uses of dietary data; key dietary assessment methods and their use, application, strengths, weaknesses, sources of measurement error; quantification of portion and serve sizes; evaluation and validation of dietary data; use and application of dietary reference standards; food composition databases; and the appraisal and interpretation of dietary assessment methods in published literature. This unit of study also covers Anthropometry, Body Composition, Nutritional Biochemistry and Nutritional Screening: anthropometric and body composition methods for the assessment of nutritional status; reference standards for assessing body composition; anthropometric measurements; biochemical and haematological indices for nutritional assessment; assessment of physical activity; objectives, advantages, limitations, and applications of nutritional screening. Tutorials and workshops aim to address the practical aspects of the administration of dietary assessment methods, as well as validation, interpretation and critical appraisal of such methods.
Textbooks
R.S. Gibson Principles of Nutritional Assessment, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press. 2005.
NTDT5601 Nutritional and Food Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial per week (1-2 hours) Corequisites: NTDT5602, NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 (previously known as NTDT5504) Assessment: Two formative quizzes (2x25%); kitchen laboratory work book (Pass/Fail); one 3 hour final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study give students a broad appreciation of food and nutrients, including an understanding of food sources of nutrients; the nutrients that are necessary for survival and maintenance of individual and population health; nutrient requirements at different stages of life, such as childhood, pregnancy and lactation and older age; factors affecting nutrient availability for absorption; and the significance of nutrient deficiency and excess intakes/toxicity on nutritional and disease status.
Textbooks
Mann J and Truswell AS 'Essentials of Human Nutrition' Oxford: Oxford University Press, 4th Edition, 2012.
NTDT5602 Methods in Nutrition Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorial or practical work per week. Corequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 Assessment: 2.5 hour exam (60%); 2 assignments (10% and 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces students to both qualitative and quantitative research methods that are essential tools for dietitians. Qualitative methods include the development of questionnaires and conduct of focus groups. Students will learn about study design and methods used in epidemiology to be able to critically analyse the scientific literature of nutrition and dietetics. An introduction to statistical tests with practical computer classes will also be included. Scientific writing techniques will be covered.
Textbooks
Bonita R, Beaglehole R, Kjellstrom T. Basic Epidemiology. 2nd Ed. World Health Organisation: Geneva, 2005 Lawrence M and Wolsely T (editors). Public Health Nutrition from Principles to Practice. Allen and Unwin 2007. ISBN: 978 174175 102 4. Chapter 14, pages 344-349
NTDT5604 Dietetics Professional Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona O'Leary, Mrs Merryl Ireland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures and 3 practicals per week Corequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5602 and NTDT5503 Assessment: Assignments (100%): Business assignment (40%), Small Group Education assignment (30%) and Communication assignment (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This course is designed to facilitate students to develop professional communication and organization/management skills that will enable them to work effectively as dietitians. Dietitians work in varied environments - within private and government organizations, industry and in private practice; solely and within teams . Interpersonal, individual and group communication, as well as professional, management, organizational and general business skills are required in all of these areas. This unit of study introduces communication, management and organizational group dynamics and behavioural theory to dietetics students. Students will have the opportunity to apply these through practical examples in class and by the completion of assessment tasks. Of the 4 components of the Unit of Study, namely Business, Small Group Education, Interpersonal Communication and Media Skills, only the first three are assessed. Teachers in this Unit of Study comprise university staff and dietitians working in the hospital and private sector settings.
Textbooks
Bauer K and Sokolik C. Basic Nutrition Counselling Skills. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN: 0720916645
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5305 Food Service Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona O'Leary Session: Semester 2 Classes: 10 hours practical classes per semester, 4 hours lectures per week. Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5307 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Practical assignments (15%), minor projects (30%), major project (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The course introduces students to the principles of Food Service Management including food safety, nutrition marketing, technology in foodservice, food regulations, foodservice across the continuum of care, foodservice for special populations, menu and recipe assessment, menu and recipe development, and management and leadership in foodservice. Students gain knowledge, as well as practical skills in clinical, community, industry and commercial applications.
NTDT5307 Medical Nutrition

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anna Rangan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and tutorials average 8 hours per week, and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Workshops average 4 hours per week Prerequisites: NTDT5503, NTDT5601, NTDT5602, NTDT5604 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Two assignments (15%) and (20%), a mid semester test (15%) and end of semester exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The broad objectives involve learning the role of medical nutrition therapy to prevent and alleviate disease.The importance of client focused factors in dietary modification; education and interpretation of theory for client understanding are key discussion points.This unit of study involves the study of medicine as it relates to nutrition, and the modification of diet to alter the disease process and nutrition support of patients with wasting illnesses and it includes a paediatric program at the Children's Hospital Westmead.
Textbooks
Stewart, R. Griffith Handbook of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. 4th Edition, 2011.
NTDT5608 Public Health and Community Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBA Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hrs lectures and 2 tutorials per week Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 Assessment: 2 hr exam (45%); 4 assignments (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces students to the concepts and principles underlying, and issues associated with, nutrition in community and public health contexts. It covers the principles of health promotion and teaches the students how to plan, implement and evaluate nutrition promotion strategies. The scope and distribution of chronic diseases and the role of nutrition in the etiology of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity is examined. This unit of study also investigates the food habits of culturally and linguistically diverse groups, nutritional intakes and requirements of people across the lifespan, and the current nutrition policies and guidelines aimed at preventing chronic diseases.
Textbooks
Lawrence M & Worseley (eds). Public Health Nutrition - from Principles to Practice. Sydney: Allen & Unwin. 2007.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
NTDT5612 Dietetics Training Placement

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Margaret Nicholson Session: Int February,Int July Classes: 20 weeks full-time placement Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604, NTDT5602, NTDT5305, NTDT5307, NTDT5608 Assessment: Pass or fail at completion Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Placements commence in late January or early July.
During twenty weeks students develop further practice-based skills in each of three settings of work; individual case management, community/public health and food service management. The semester commences late January for 1st semester or early July for 2nd semester and runs for 20 weeks as prescribed in the requirements of the professional accrediting body.
Textbooks
Placement manual provided by the University.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5310 Nutrition Research Project

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research experience. Tutorials on scientific writing and statistics. Assessment: Oral presentation (15%), supervisor mark (35%) research treatise (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
During the research semester each student conducts a small project under the supervision of research academic or practitioner. Research projects can include small surveys, simple bench work, literature reviews, or clinical trials, and are carried out in the University or with an approved external supervisor.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science) Honours / Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

View semester session codes here.

Course BHASESSH1000: Honours program; full-time, 4 years
Candidates must complete the BAppSc (Ex&SportSc) degree with an overall Weighted Average Mark (WAM) of at least 65 in order to be accepted into the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics. Students who do not achieve a WAM of 65 will graduate with the award of BAppSc (Ex&SportSc).

Years 1-3

As per Pass course

Year 4

Semester 1
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
BHSC4005 Honours Thesis A

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 26 hrs of seminars, Wk 1-4, 6&7; Taught classes of research methods and statistics, ethics, writing a literature review, and preseatation skills. Students will also engage with their supervisor on a regular basis for Individual academic/research supervision. Tutorial sessions will be provided for the preparation of the literature review. Students will also prepare presentations of research progress. Assessment: 10 min presentation of research topic and progress (20%), systematic or narrative literature review on the topic of the thesis. This may be submitted in a format for a specific journal (Equivalent work can be an ethics applications) 3000 word (80%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 2
Honours students undertake a supervised research project in a health discipline area within the Faculty. Each student will contribute to designing and/or implementing an approved research project and submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. In completing the research thesis, the student will work closely with academic staff who will supervise their research activities. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process and their thesis.
Textbooks
Discipline will determine texts and readings appropriate to the research content and design
Semester 2
BHSC4006 Honours Thesis B

Credit points: 24 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 10 hours of seminars irregularly throughout the semester. Individual academic/research supervision and Discipline specific workshops Prerequisites: BHSC4005 Assessment: A seminar presentation summarizing the entire work (20%), thesis comprising a journal article outlining research project in a format determined by the Discipline or equivalent, method (20%), Draft Journal Article (40%) and thesis Overall (20%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Semester 1
During this semester the student will work closely with their supervisor to carry out, analyse and synthesise their results.
Each student will submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process
and their thesis.
Textbooks
Discipline will determine texts and readings appropriate to the research content and design
Note
Entry to the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics is dependent on the student achieving a credit (65%) average or above in the undergraduate degree.

Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course MANUTDIE1000: Pass course; full-time, 2 years

Year 1

Semester 1
NTDT5503 Dietary Intake & Nutritional Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anna Rangan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures/tutorials/workshops averaging 5 hours per week Corequisites: NTDT5602, NTDT5601 and NTDT5604 Assessment: One quiz (25%), one assignment (25%), 2-hour end of semester exam, (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study covers Dietary Assessment Methods in the context of individual, group and population dietary data: purposes of dietary assessment; uses of dietary data; key dietary assessment methods and their use, application, strengths, weaknesses, sources of measurement error; quantification of portion and serve sizes; evaluation and validation of dietary data; use and application of dietary reference standards; food composition databases; and the appraisal and interpretation of dietary assessment methods in published literature. This unit of study also covers Anthropometry, Body Composition, Nutritional Biochemistry and Nutritional Screening: anthropometric and body composition methods for the assessment of nutritional status; reference standards for assessing body composition; anthropometric measurements; biochemical and haematological indices for nutritional assessment; assessment of physical activity; objectives, advantages, limitations, and applications of nutritional screening. Tutorials and workshops aim to address the practical aspects of the administration of dietary assessment methods, as well as validation, interpretation and critical appraisal of such methods.
Textbooks
R.S. Gibson Principles of Nutritional Assessment, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press. 2005.
NTDT5601 Nutritional and Food Science

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures and 1 tutorial per week (1-2 hours) Corequisites: NTDT5602, NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 (previously known as NTDT5504) Assessment: Two formative quizzes (2x25%); kitchen laboratory work book (Pass/Fail); one 3 hour final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study give students a broad appreciation of food and nutrients, including an understanding of food sources of nutrients; the nutrients that are necessary for survival and maintenance of individual and population health; nutrient requirements at different stages of life, such as childhood, pregnancy and lactation and older age; factors affecting nutrient availability for absorption; and the significance of nutrient deficiency and excess intakes/toxicity on nutritional and disease status.
Textbooks
Mann J and Truswell AS 'Essentials of Human Nutrition' Oxford: Oxford University Press, 4th Edition, 2012.
NTDT5602 Methods in Nutrition Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorial or practical work per week. Corequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 Assessment: 2.5 hour exam (60%); 2 assignments (10% and 30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces students to both qualitative and quantitative research methods that are essential tools for dietitians. Qualitative methods include the development of questionnaires and conduct of focus groups. Students will learn about study design and methods used in epidemiology to be able to critically analyse the scientific literature of nutrition and dietetics. An introduction to statistical tests with practical computer classes will also be included. Scientific writing techniques will be covered.
Textbooks
Bonita R, Beaglehole R, Kjellstrom T. Basic Epidemiology. 2nd Ed. World Health Organisation: Geneva, 2005 Lawrence M and Wolsely T (editors). Public Health Nutrition from Principles to Practice. Allen and Unwin 2007. ISBN: 978 174175 102 4. Chapter 14, pages 344-349
NTDT5604 Dietetics Professional Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona O'Leary, Mrs Merryl Ireland Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 lectures and 3 practicals per week Corequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5602 and NTDT5503 Assessment: Assignments (100%): Business assignment (40%), Small Group Education assignment (30%) and Communication assignment (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This course is designed to facilitate students to develop professional communication and organization/management skills that will enable them to work effectively as dietitians. Dietitians work in varied environments - within private and government organizations, industry and in private practice; solely and within teams . Interpersonal, individual and group communication, as well as professional, management, organizational and general business skills are required in all of these areas. This unit of study introduces communication, management and organizational group dynamics and behavioural theory to dietetics students. Students will have the opportunity to apply these through practical examples in class and by the completion of assessment tasks. Of the 4 components of the Unit of Study, namely Business, Small Group Education, Interpersonal Communication and Media Skills, only the first three are assessed. Teachers in this Unit of Study comprise university staff and dietitians working in the hospital and private sector settings.
Textbooks
Bauer K and Sokolik C. Basic Nutrition Counselling Skills. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN: 0720916645
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5305 Food Service Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona O'Leary Session: Semester 2 Classes: 10 hours practical classes per semester, 4 hours lectures per week. Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5307 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Practical assignments (15%), minor projects (30%), major project (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The course introduces students to the principles of Food Service Management including food safety, nutrition marketing, technology in foodservice, food regulations, foodservice across the continuum of care, foodservice for special populations, menu and recipe assessment, menu and recipe development, and management and leadership in foodservice. Students gain knowledge, as well as practical skills in clinical, community, industry and commercial applications.
NTDT5307 Medical Nutrition

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anna Rangan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and tutorials average 8 hours per week, and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Workshops average 4 hours per week Prerequisites: NTDT5503, NTDT5601, NTDT5602, NTDT5604 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Two assignments (15%) and (20%), a mid semester test (15%) and end of semester exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The broad objectives involve learning the role of medical nutrition therapy to prevent and alleviate disease.The importance of client focused factors in dietary modification; education and interpretation of theory for client understanding are key discussion points.This unit of study involves the study of medicine as it relates to nutrition, and the modification of diet to alter the disease process and nutrition support of patients with wasting illnesses and it includes a paediatric program at the Children's Hospital Westmead.
Textbooks
Stewart, R. Griffith Handbook of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. 4th Edition, 2011.
NTDT5608 Public Health and Community Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBA Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hrs lectures and 2 tutorials per week Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 Assessment: 2 hr exam (45%); 4 assignments (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces students to the concepts and principles underlying, and issues associated with, nutrition in community and public health contexts. It covers the principles of health promotion and teaches the students how to plan, implement and evaluate nutrition promotion strategies. The scope and distribution of chronic diseases and the role of nutrition in the etiology of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity is examined. This unit of study also investigates the food habits of culturally and linguistically diverse groups, nutritional intakes and requirements of people across the lifespan, and the current nutrition policies and guidelines aimed at preventing chronic diseases.
Textbooks
Lawrence M & Worseley (eds). Public Health Nutrition - from Principles to Practice. Sydney: Allen & Unwin. 2007.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
NTDT5612 Dietetics Training Placement

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Margaret Nicholson Session: Int February,Int July Classes: 20 weeks full-time placement Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604, NTDT5602, NTDT5305, NTDT5307, NTDT5608 Assessment: Pass or fail at completion Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Placements commence in late January or early July.
During twenty weeks students develop further practice-based skills in each of three settings of work; individual case management, community/public health and food service management. The semester commences late January for 1st semester or early July for 2nd semester and runs for 20 weeks as prescribed in the requirements of the professional accrediting body.
Textbooks
Placement manual provided by the University.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5310 Nutrition Research Project

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research experience. Tutorials on scientific writing and statistics. Assessment: Oral presentation (15%), supervisor mark (35%) research treatise (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
During the research semester each student conducts a small project under the supervision of research academic or practitioner. Research projects can include small surveys, simple bench work, literature reviews, or clinical trials, and are carried out in the University or with an approved external supervisor.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS