Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science) – BPASENUD1000 / Master of Nutrition and Dietetics - MANUTDIE1000

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science) / Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course BPASENUD-01: Pass course; full-time, 3 years
Candidates must complete the BAppSc (Ex&SportSc) degree with an overall Weighted Average Mark (WAM) of at least 65 in order to be accepted into the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics. Students who do not achieve a WAM of 65 will graduate with the award of BAppSc (Ex&SportSc).

Year 2 (last offered 2018)

Semester 1
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Prohibitions: BIOS1139 or BIOS1144 or BIOS1160 Assessment: Online test (5%), mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures per week, 2 hours of practical classes per week, with a small online component Prohibitions: BIOS1137 or BIOS2103 or ANAT2010 Assessment: Mid-semester examination (40%), end-semester examination (60%) Practical field work: 2 hours per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 coordinator is Dr Jin Huang, Semester 2 coordinator is Dr Alan Freeman
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the sensory systems and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.Practical class attendance for this unit is compulsory.
EXSS2018 Biomechanical Analysis of Movement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Peter Sinclair Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-2-hrs tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: EXSS1018 Assessment: movement analysis assignment (25%), mid semester exam (30%), end of semester exam (45%) Practical field work: Problem solving and data analysis from laboratory work Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The main emphasis of this unit is in developing practical expertise in techniques for the biomechanical analysis of human movement. Students will learn how to conduct kinematic and kinetic analyses, using video, force platforms and electromyography. Other components of this unit are aimed at further development of mathematical and problem-solving skills for the analysis of movement. Topics include static and dynamic equilibrium, calculation of centre of mass, determination of joint torques using inverse dynamics, electromyography, tissue mechanics and gait analysis.
EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kieron Rooney Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures/week for 13 weeks, 1x2-hr tutorial on 4 occasions Prohibitions: EXSS2017 or EXSS2019 Assumed knowledge: BIOS1167 and EXSS1032 Assessment: quizzes (13%), 1.5h mid semester exam (46%), 2 hr end semester exam (41%) , 1x2hr Practical Skills Barrier task (0% Pass/Fail) Practical field work: 1x2-hr class on 3 occasions Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit discusses the acute responses to exercise with a specific emphasis on the roles of the respiratory and cardiovascular systems in oxygen transport and the significance of sub-maximal and maximal oxygen consumption in the limitations to performance. The concepts of acid-base balance during exercise and of lactate and ventilatory thresholds will be examined. Furthermore, this unit develops an understanding of the specific metabolic response to exercise at the peripheral cellular level and the biochemical strategies that maintain energy balance during exercise and a return to homeostasis in recovery. Students will put theory into practice with laboratory tasks that encourage skill acquisition in the collection of real-time physiological data of the respiratory and cardiovascular response to exercise.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA; Fahey, TD; Baldwin KM/Exercise physiology: human bioenergetics and its applications/Fourth Edition/2005/0-07-255642-0/. Tiidus P, Russell Tupling A., Houston, ME. Biochemistry Primer for Exercise Science
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
EXSS2021 Nutrition, Health and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen O'Connor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture / week Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: mid-semester examination (20%), presentation (20%), end of semester exam (60%) Practical field work: 1x2-hr practical / fortnight Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with an understanding of the principles of nutrition to optimise physical performance in sport, recreation and occupation. In addition key aspects of public health nutrition including dietary management of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease are also a focus. This unit defines the importance of macro and micro nutrients in the maintenance of health, and the specific roles of carbohydrate, protein and lipids in energy metabolism during exercise. In addition, the interaction between dietary intake and physical activity and its effects on energy-balance, cardiovascular health and other lifestyle diseases are considered.
EXSS2022 Exercise Physiology-Training Adaptations

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Chin-Moi Chow Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3-hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 2-hr practical-tutorial/week for 8 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2028 Assessment: Quizzes (5%), Group exercise instructions (5%) Training report (15%), 75-min mid semester exam (30%), end semester exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is concerned with the physiological adaptations associated with training. This unit will focus on cardiorespiratory and metabolic adaptations to endurance, high resistance and interval/sprint training, and benefits/interference effects of concurrent training. The implications of training will be discussed with respect to mechanisms behind muscle damage and fatigue, improved fatigue resistance resulting from changes in the structural and functional capacities of organ systems under normal conditions as well as altered environmental conditions such as altitude and temperature. The physical and physiological mechanisms that determine exercise and work performance in the heat, and how these can be modified, will also be examined. Appropriate recovery, in particular sleep needs in athletes, will also be discussed. This unit will build on fundamental topics of EXSS2028 Exercise Physiology and Biochemistry.
Textbooks
Brooks, GA, Fahey, TD, and Baldwin, KM, Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and its application (4th Ed), McGraw-Hill (2005) Thompson WR; American College of Sports Medicine; Gordon NF; Pescatello LS/ACSM's Guidelines for Exercise Testing and Prescription/Eigth/2009/ -- Brooks GA, Fahey TD, White TP and Baldwin KM/Exercise Physiology - Human Bioenergetics and Its Applications/4th/2005/0072556420/
EXSS3023 Exercise Testing and Prescription

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ché Fornusek Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 3x 1-hr tutorial, 5x2-hr practical Assumed knowledge: EXSS2027 or EXSS2028 Assessment: brochure/report (20%), practical exam with report (30%), end semester exam (50%) Practical field work: During practical session, students will have to use different techniques and protocols to evaluate aerobic fitness and muscle function. This will also involve adequate collection and interpretation of data. Tutorials will be used to introduce students to exercise programming. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to provide a comprehensive and critical examination of exercise testing and programming in low-risk populations. The scientific evidence for exercise dosages for aerobic exercise and resistance training required for health and fitness outcomes will be critically reviewed. Other aspects of exercise programming such as flexibility, warm up and instructional technique will also be covered in this unit. Through the use of lectures and case studies, students will learn how to integrate both the physiological components and logistical aspects of exercise performance, to devise individualised exercise test batteries and prescriptions. During practical sessions, students will have to use different techniques and protocols to evaluate aerobic fitness and muscle function. Student will have to demonstrate excellent data collection skills and ability to interpret results and communicate them to a lay audience.
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessment (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 3 (first offered 2018)

Semester 1
BCMB2001 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three lectures/tutorials per week ; one 4-hour practical session per fortnight Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2901 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quizzes, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. Our practicals, along with other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to widely applied and cutting edge tools that are essential for modern biochemistry and molecular biology. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the life and medical sciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
or
BCMB2901 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Dale Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures/tutorials per week; one 4-hour practical per fortnight Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: BCHM2072 or BCHM2972 or MBLG2071 or MBLG2971 or BMED2405 or BCMB2001 Assessment: Assignments, quiz, skills-based assessment, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Without cells, life as we know it would not exist. These dynamic assemblies, packed with biological molecules are constantly in action. But how do cells work? Why is the food that you eat so important for cellular function? How is information transmitted from generation to generation? And, what happens as a result of disease or genetic mutation? In this unit of study you will learn how cells work at the molecular level, with an emphasis on human biochemistry and molecular biology. We will focus initially on cellular metabolism and how cells extract and store energy from fuels like fats and carbohydrates, how the use of fuels is modulated in response to exercise, starvation and disease, and how other key metabolites are processed. Then we will explore how genetic information is regulated in eukaryotes, including replication, transcription and translation, and molecular aspects of the cell cycle, mitosis and meiosis. The advanced laboratory component will provide students with an authentic research laboratory experience while in the theory component, current research topics will be presented in a problem-based format through dedicated advanced tutorial sessions. This material will be assessed by creative student-centered activities supported by eLearning platforms.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
and
EXSS3024 Exercise, Health and Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Daniel Hackett Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial for 9 weeks, 2-hr practical for 1 week Assumed knowledge: EXSS3023 and (EXSS2022 or EXSS2027) Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), oral presentation (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to investigate the application of exercise science for the promotion and maintenance of health via the prevention of chronic disease and the management of people suffering from chronic disease. Students will explore a range of topics including the pathophysiology of numerous chronic diseases, risk factor assessment, clinical exercise testing, ECG interpretation, and exercise prescription. Emphasis will be placed on the use of scientific evidence to guide exercise prescription for individuals with chronic diseases. The chronic disease conditions covered include obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, cardiovascular, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
EXSS3049 Sport and Exercise Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2-hr lecture /week for Weeks 1-4; 1 x 2-hr lecture/week for Weeks 5-9; 2-hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: BACH1161 or HSBH1003 Assessment: mid semester exam (25%), facilitating behaviour change assignment (45%), knowledge dissemination assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the key psychological factors and explanatory frameworks relating to engagement, participation and adherence in exercise and sport. A broad array of topics is covered in the unit including: motivation, behavioural modification, addiction, anxiety, psychological skills training, sport performance, burnout and injury. Special consideration is given to facilitating exercise adherence, youth sport participation, the development of athletic performance, and how exercise and physical activity influences psychological function and well-being. Practical applications are made in relation to exercise practitioners, including health promotion professions, exercise physiologists, as well as teachers and coaches across age and skill level.
Textbooks
Cox, R. H. (2007). Sport psychology: Concepts and applications. (7th ed). New York, NY: McGraw Hill.
HSBH1007 Health Science and Research

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH2007 Assessment: Individual written report (30%), group written report (20%), 90 min end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to key research paradigms in health, and to the major approaches to designing and evaluating basic and applied research in health. Students are exposed to the types of research which inform our understanding of normal and abnormal functions of the human body and of treatment and preventative health care. Students will be engaged in the generation of new knowledge through evidence-based practice and evidence-based innovation. Current issues in health science research will be identified, with emphasis on the role of technology and e-health.
Textbooks
Saks, M. and Allsop, J. (eds.) (2013). Researching Health: qualitative, quantitative and mixed methods. London: sage.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
BCMB2002 Proteins in Cells

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: 6cp of (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XXX) and 6cp of CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2902 Assessment: Assignments, skills-based assessment, quiz, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. Our practicals, other guided and online learning sessions will introduce you to a wide range of currently utilised techniques for protein biochemistry ranging from protein visualization, quantification, purification and enzymatic activity, to in silico studies and cellular targeting experiments. By the end of this unit you will be equipped with foundational skills and knowledge to support your studies in the cellular and molecular biosciences.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
or
BCMB2902 Proteins in Cells (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sandro Ataide Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week; one 4-hour practical/tutorial session per week Prerequisites: A mark of at least 70 from (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) and CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: BCHM2071 or BCHM2971 or BCMB2002 Assessment: Assignment, skills-based assessment, quiz, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
A single human cell contains billions of protein molecules that are constantly in motion. Why so many? What are they doing? And, how are they doing it? In simple terms, proteins define the function of and drive almost every process within cells. In this unit of study you will learn about the biochemistry of proteins in their natural environment - within cells - with a focus on eukaryotes including plant and other cell types. You will discover the dynamic interplay within and between proteins and other cellular components and how the physical properties of proteins dictate function. You will discover how proteins are compartmentalized, modified, folded, transported in and between cells, the mechanisms by which proteins regulate biological activities, interact and transport molecules across membranes, and how mutations in proteins can lead to pathological consequences. There will be a research-focused approach to the advanced practical component, including real and virtual extensions to key experiments. This approach will continue in the lecture series with several unique advanced lectures covering current research topics. You will further investigate a selected area of interest from these topics using original source material and present your findings through an oral presentation in dedicated advanced tutorials.
Textbooks
Lehninger Principles of Biochemistry 7th edition (2016) David L. Nelson Michael M. Cox Macmillan (ISBN-10: 1-4641-2611-9; ISBN-13: 978-1-4641-2611-6)
and
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ross Sanders (sem 1) and Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement.
The unit consists of a motor control strand and a motor learning strand. The motor control strand examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, and automaticity. The motor learning strand examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as individual differences (e.g., motivation), methods of instruction, practice conditions, and the structuring of feedback. Implications for, and applications to, teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation are drawn. The unit includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning.
EXSS2026 Growth, Development and Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nathan Johnson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week for 13 weeks, 1x1-hr tutorial/week for 6 weeks Assessment: Mid semester exam (35%) and end semester exam (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide the student with an appreciation of certain critical phases of both ends of the lifespan. Issues around physiologic changes, motor skill development, physical performance, the role of exercise for disease prevention and treatment, and the role of nutrition, will be examined and related to stages of childhood and adolescent growth and ageing. The relationships between growth, development, gender and physical activity in its broader sense will also be explored. The biological changes and consequences of ageing on physiologic and psychological health, disease and exercise capacity will be investigated. The student will also be able to gain some understanding of exercise prescription for pregnant women, children, adolescents and older adults.
EXSS3045 Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Semaan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x 1-hr placement preparation tutorials held for students in Semester 2 of the year that precedes EXSS3045 and 1-hr tutorial in the semester of enrolment in the unit of study. Prerequisites: EXSS3023 Assessment: Attendance on placement, competency in professional and practical skills and submission of paperwork (Pass/Fail) Practical field work: supervised experience in professional settings Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The aim of this unit is to engage students in practical experiences relevant to exercise science. These experiences should reinforce theoretical knowledge and practical skills acquired through university studies. Students complete at least 140 hours of supervised practicum in relevant areas such as design, delivery and evaluation of exercise interventions as well as exercise science projects in a community health area. Students participate in an on-campus placement which allows them to build their skill and confidence prior to undertaking an allocated placement at a site which is usually located off-campus.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Note
Entry to the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics is dependent on the student achieving a credit (65%) average or above in the undergraduate degree.

Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course MANUTDIE-01: Pass course; full-time, 2 years

Year 1

Semester 1
NTDT5503 Dietary Intake and Nutritional Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anna Rangan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures/tutorials/workshops averaging 5 hours per week Corequisites: NTDT5602 and NTDT5601 and NTDT5604 Assessment: One quiz (25%), one assignment (25%), 2.5-hour end of semester exam, (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers Dietary Assessment Methods in the context of individual, group and population dietary data: purposes of dietary assessment; uses of dietary data; key dietary assessment methods and their use, application, strengths, weaknesses, sources of measurement error; quantification of portion and serve sizes; evaluation and validation of dietary data; use and application of dietary reference standards; food composition databases; and the appraisal and interpretation of dietary assessment methods in published literature. This unit of study also covers Anthropometry, Body Composition, Nutritional Biochemistry and Nutritional Screening: anthropometric and body composition methods for the assessment of nutritional status; reference standards for assessing body composition; anthropometric measurements; biochemical and haematological indices for nutritional assessment; assessment of physical activity; objectives, advantages, limitations, and applications of nutritional screening. Tutorials and workshops aim to address the practical aspects of the administration of dietary assessment methods, as well as validation, interpretation and critical appraisal of such methods.
Textbooks
R.S. Gibson Principles of Nutritional Assessment, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press. 2005. (recommended)
NTDT5601 Nutritional and Food Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Gemming Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours lectures and 1 workshop per week (1-2 hours) Corequisites: NTDT5602 and NTDT5503 and (NTDT5604 or NTDT5504) Assessment: Short quizzes (20%); group presentation (30%); 3 hour final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study give students a broad appreciation of food and nutrients, including an understanding of food sources of nutrients; the nutrients that are necessary for survival and maintenance of individual and population health; nutrient requirements at different stages of life, such as childhood, pregnancy and lactation and older age; factors affecting nutrient availability for absorption; and the significance of nutrient deficiency and excess intakes/toxicity on nutritional and disease status.
Textbooks
Mann J and Truswell AS 'Essentials of Human Nutrition' Oxford: Oxford University Press, 4th Edition, 2012.
NTDT5602 Methods in Nutrition Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Vasant Hirani Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorial or practical work per week. Corequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and (NTDT5504 or NTDT5604) Assessment: 2.5 hour exam (60%), two assignments (10% and 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to both qualitative and quantitative research methods that are essential tools for dietitians. Methods include the development of questionnaires and conduct of focus groups. Students will learn about study design and methods used in epidemiology to be able to critically analyse the scientific literature of nutrition and dietetics. An introduction to statistical tests with practical computer classes will also be included. Scientific writing techniques will also be covered.
Textbooks
Bonita R, Beaglehole R, Kjellstrom T. Basic Epidemiology. 2nd Ed. World Health Organisation: Geneva, 2005 Lawrence M and Wolsely T (editors). Public Health Nutrition from Principles to Practice. Allen and Unwin 2007. ISBN: 978 174175 102 4. Chapter 14, pages 344-349
NTDT5604 Dietetics Professional Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona O'Leary Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture/workshops and tutorials average 5 hours per week Corequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5602 and NTDT5503 Assessment: Business assignment (40%), Small Group Education assignment (30%) and Communication assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to facilitate students to develop professional communication and organization/management skills that will enable them to work effectively as dietitians. Dietitians work in varied environments - within private and government organizations, industry and in private practice; within teams and as sole practioners. Interpersonal, individual and group communication, as well as professional, management, organizational and general business skills are required in all of these areas. This unit of study introduces communication, management, group dynamics and behavioural theory to dietetics students. Students will have the opportunity to apply these through practical examples in class and by the completion of assessment tasks. Of the 4 components of the Unit of Study, namely Business, Small Group Education, Interpersonal Communication and Media Skills, only the first three are assessed.
Textbooks
Bauer K and Sokolik C. Basic Nutrition Counselling Skills. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN: 0720916645
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5305 Food Service Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Gemming Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hour Lectures and 3 hour workshops on average per week Prerequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5307 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Practical task (30%), Major project (50%), Minor project (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course introduces students to the principles of Food Service Management including food service systems, food safety, food service across the continuum of care and special populations, accreditation and standards, menu and recipe development and assessment, nutrition promotion and marketing, and management and leadership in food service. Students gain knowledge, as well as practical skills in clinical, community, industry and commercial applications.
NTDT5307 Medical Nutrition

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anna Rangan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and tutorials average 8 hours per week, and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Workshops average 4 hours per week Prerequisites: NTDT5503 and NTDT5601 and NTDT5602 and NTDT5604 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Two assignments (15%) and (20%), a mid semester test (15%) and end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The broad objectives involve learning the role of medical nutrition therapy to prevent and alleviate disease.The importance of client focused factors in dietary modification; education and interpretation of theory for client understanding are key discussion points.This unit of study involves the study of medicine as it relates to nutrition, and the modification of diet to alter the disease process and nutrition support of patients with wasting illnesses and it includes a paediatric program at the Children's Hospital Westmead.
Textbooks
Stewart, R. Griffith Handbook of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. 5th Edition, 2015.
NTDT5608 Community and Public Health Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Vasant Hirani Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hours lectures and 2 tutorials per week Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 Assessment: 2 hour exam (50%); two assignments (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: NTDT5608 is available as an elective to students in the Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master of Medicine as well as the Master of Science in Medicine (Metabolic Health). For these students, there are no prerequisites for entry into NTDT5608. However, these students must apply for Special Permission from the unit of study coordinator in order to be enrolled.
This unit of study introduces students to the concepts and principles underlying, and issues associated with, nutrition in community and public health contexts. It covers the principles of health promotion and teaches the students how to plan, implement and evaluate nutrition promotion strategies. The scope and distribution of chronic diseases and the role of nutrition in the etiology of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity is examined. This unit of study also investigates the food habits of culturally and linguistically diverse groups, nutritional intakes and requirements of people across the lifespan, and the current nutrition policies and guidelines aimed at preventing chronic diseases.
Textbooks
Lawrence M and Worseley (eds). Public Health Nutrition - from Principles to Practice. Sydney: Allen and Unwin. 2007.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
NTDT5612 Dietetics Training Placement

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Margaret Nicholson Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: 20 weeks full-time placement Prerequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 and NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Pass or fail at completion Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Placements commence in late January or early July.
During twenty weeks students develop further practice-based skills in each of three domains; individual case management, community/public health nutrition and food service management. The semester commences late January for 1st semester or early July for 2nd semester and runs for 20 weeks as prescribed in the requirements of the professional accrediting body, DAA.
Textbooks
Placement manual provided by the University.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5310 Nutrition Research Project

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli, Merryl Ireland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research experience, tutorial on scientific writing. Assessment: Oral presentation (15%), Supervisor assessment (35%) and research treatise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
During the research semester each student conducts a small research project under the supervision of a research academic or practitioner. Research projects can include small surveys, simple bench work, literature reviews, epidemiology or clinical trials, and are carried out within the University or with an approved external supervisor.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science) Honours / Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course BHASESSH-01: Honours program; full-time, 4 years
Candidates must complete the BAppSc (Ex&SportSc) degree with an overall Weighted Average Mark (WAM) of at least 65 in order to be accepted into the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics. Students who do not achieve a WAM of 65 will graduate with the award of BAppSc (Ex&SportSc).

Years 1-3

As per Pass course

Year 4

Semester 1
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
BHSC4005 Honours Thesis A

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tatjana Seizova-Cajic Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Average seminars/tutorials per week over the 13-week semester: 6 hrs. Wk 1-8: 6-12 hrs. Wk 9-13: 0-3 hrs. Supervisory meetings: normally 1-hr/week (variable) Assessment: Research methods assessments (42%); Presentation of the research proposal (20%); Literature review 3000wds (38%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit constitutes 40% of the final Honours grade.
Honours students undertake a supervised research project in a health discipline area within the Faculty. Each student will contribute to designing and/or implementing an approved research project and submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. In completing the research thesis, the student will work closely with academic staff, normally 2 co-supervisors, who will supervise their research activities. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process and their thesis. Students will attend classes on research methods and statistics, ethics, library skills, writing a literature review, and presentation skills. Additionally students should expect to engage with their supervisor(s) on a regular basis for iIndividual academic/research supervision.
Textbooks
A list of required and recommended textbooks will be available at the beginning of semester.
Semester 2
BHSC4006 Honours Thesis B

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Che Fornusek Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Seminars and tutorials: 24-hrs, irregularly throughout the semester. Supervisory meetings: normally 1-hr/week (varies) Prerequisites: BHSC4005 Assessment: Journal manuscript and detailed methods chapter (5000 words) (80%); Oral presentation (20 mins) (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit constitutes 60% of the final Honours mark.
Honours students undertake a supervised research project in a health discipline area within the Faculty. Each student will contribute to designing and/or implementing an approved research project and submit a thesis describing the project and its implications. In completing the research thesis, the student will work closely with academic staff, normally 2 co-supervisors, who will supervise their research activities. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process and their thesis. During this semester the student will work closely with their supervisor to carry out, analyse and synthesise their results. Each student will submit a thesis describing the project and its implications comprised of their literature review, their research proposal, their journal manuscript and associated methods chapter, their final oral slides and their response to the questions. Students will meet regularly with their supervisors; attend seminars and workshops that contribute to the research process and their thesis.
Textbooks
A list of recommended or required texts will be provided at the beginning of semester
Note
Entry to the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics is dependent on the student achieving a credit (65%) average or above in the undergraduate degree.

Master of Nutrition and Dietetics

Course MANUTDIE-01: Pass course; full-time, 2 years

Year 1

Semester 1
NTDT5503 Dietary Intake and Nutritional Assessment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anna Rangan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures/tutorials/workshops averaging 5 hours per week Corequisites: NTDT5602 and NTDT5601 and NTDT5604 Assessment: One quiz (25%), one assignment (25%), 2.5-hour end of semester exam, (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study covers Dietary Assessment Methods in the context of individual, group and population dietary data: purposes of dietary assessment; uses of dietary data; key dietary assessment methods and their use, application, strengths, weaknesses, sources of measurement error; quantification of portion and serve sizes; evaluation and validation of dietary data; use and application of dietary reference standards; food composition databases; and the appraisal and interpretation of dietary assessment methods in published literature. This unit of study also covers Anthropometry, Body Composition, Nutritional Biochemistry and Nutritional Screening: anthropometric and body composition methods for the assessment of nutritional status; reference standards for assessing body composition; anthropometric measurements; biochemical and haematological indices for nutritional assessment; assessment of physical activity; objectives, advantages, limitations, and applications of nutritional screening. Tutorials and workshops aim to address the practical aspects of the administration of dietary assessment methods, as well as validation, interpretation and critical appraisal of such methods.
Textbooks
R.S. Gibson Principles of Nutritional Assessment, 2nd ed. Oxford University Press. 2005. (recommended)
NTDT5601 Nutritional and Food Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Gemming Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours lectures and 1 workshop per week (1-2 hours) Corequisites: NTDT5602 and NTDT5503 and (NTDT5604 or NTDT5504) Assessment: Short quizzes (20%); group presentation (30%); 3 hour final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study give students a broad appreciation of food and nutrients, including an understanding of food sources of nutrients; the nutrients that are necessary for survival and maintenance of individual and population health; nutrient requirements at different stages of life, such as childhood, pregnancy and lactation and older age; factors affecting nutrient availability for absorption; and the significance of nutrient deficiency and excess intakes/toxicity on nutritional and disease status.
Textbooks
Mann J and Truswell AS 'Essentials of Human Nutrition' Oxford: Oxford University Press, 4th Edition, 2012.
NTDT5602 Methods in Nutrition Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Vasant Hirani Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 hours of lectures and 2 hours of tutorial or practical work per week. Corequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and (NTDT5504 or NTDT5604) Assessment: 2.5 hour exam (60%), two assignments (10% and 30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces students to both qualitative and quantitative research methods that are essential tools for dietitians. Methods include the development of questionnaires and conduct of focus groups. Students will learn about study design and methods used in epidemiology to be able to critically analyse the scientific literature of nutrition and dietetics. An introduction to statistical tests with practical computer classes will also be included. Scientific writing techniques will also be covered.
Textbooks
Bonita R, Beaglehole R, Kjellstrom T. Basic Epidemiology. 2nd Ed. World Health Organisation: Geneva, 2005 Lawrence M and Wolsely T (editors). Public Health Nutrition from Principles to Practice. Allen and Unwin 2007. ISBN: 978 174175 102 4. Chapter 14, pages 344-349
NTDT5604 Dietetics Professional Studies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona O'Leary Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lecture/workshops and tutorials average 5 hours per week Corequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5602 and NTDT5503 Assessment: Business assignment (40%), Small Group Education assignment (30%) and Communication assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to facilitate students to develop professional communication and organization/management skills that will enable them to work effectively as dietitians. Dietitians work in varied environments - within private and government organizations, industry and in private practice; within teams and as sole practioners. Interpersonal, individual and group communication, as well as professional, management, organizational and general business skills are required in all of these areas. This unit of study introduces communication, management, group dynamics and behavioural theory to dietetics students. Students will have the opportunity to apply these through practical examples in class and by the completion of assessment tasks. Of the 4 components of the Unit of Study, namely Business, Small Group Education, Interpersonal Communication and Media Skills, only the first three are assessed.
Textbooks
Bauer K and Sokolik C. Basic Nutrition Counselling Skills. Wadsworth, 2002. ISBN: 0720916645
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5305 Food Service Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Luke Gemming Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 hour Lectures and 3 hour workshops on average per week Prerequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5307 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Practical task (30%), Major project (50%), Minor project (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course introduces students to the principles of Food Service Management including food service systems, food safety, food service across the continuum of care and special populations, accreditation and standards, menu and recipe development and assessment, nutrition promotion and marketing, and management and leadership in food service. Students gain knowledge, as well as practical skills in clinical, community, industry and commercial applications.
NTDT5307 Medical Nutrition

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Anna Rangan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures and tutorials average 8 hours per week, and Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT) Workshops average 4 hours per week Prerequisites: NTDT5503 and NTDT5601 and NTDT5602 and NTDT5604 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Two assignments (15%) and (20%), a mid semester test (15%) and end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The broad objectives involve learning the role of medical nutrition therapy to prevent and alleviate disease.The importance of client focused factors in dietary modification; education and interpretation of theory for client understanding are key discussion points.This unit of study involves the study of medicine as it relates to nutrition, and the modification of diet to alter the disease process and nutrition support of patients with wasting illnesses and it includes a paediatric program at the Children's Hospital Westmead.
Textbooks
Stewart, R. Griffith Handbook of Clinical Nutrition and Dietetics. 5th Edition, 2015.
NTDT5608 Community and Public Health Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Vasant Hirani Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hours lectures and 2 tutorials per week Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 Assessment: 2 hour exam (50%); two assignments (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: NTDT5608 is available as an elective to students in the Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master of Medicine as well as the Master of Science in Medicine (Metabolic Health). For these students, there are no prerequisites for entry into NTDT5608. However, these students must apply for Special Permission from the unit of study coordinator in order to be enrolled.
This unit of study introduces students to the concepts and principles underlying, and issues associated with, nutrition in community and public health contexts. It covers the principles of health promotion and teaches the students how to plan, implement and evaluate nutrition promotion strategies. The scope and distribution of chronic diseases and the role of nutrition in the etiology of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity is examined. This unit of study also investigates the food habits of culturally and linguistically diverse groups, nutritional intakes and requirements of people across the lifespan, and the current nutrition policies and guidelines aimed at preventing chronic diseases.
Textbooks
Lawrence M and Worseley (eds). Public Health Nutrition - from Principles to Practice. Sydney: Allen and Unwin. 2007.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
NTDT5612 Dietetics Training Placement

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Margaret Nicholson Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: 20 weeks full-time placement Prerequisites: NTDT5601 and NTDT5503 and NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 and NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 and NTDT5608 Assessment: Pass or fail at completion Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment. Placements commence in late January or early July.
During twenty weeks students develop further practice-based skills in each of three domains; individual case management, community/public health nutrition and food service management. The semester commences late January for 1st semester or early July for 2nd semester and runs for 20 weeks as prescribed in the requirements of the professional accrediting body, DAA.
Textbooks
Placement manual provided by the University.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
NTDT5310 Nutrition Research Project

Credit points: 24 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli, Merryl Ireland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervised research experience, tutorial on scientific writing. Assessment: Oral presentation (15%), Supervisor assessment (35%) and research treatise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
During the research semester each student conducts a small research project under the supervision of a research academic or practitioner. Research projects can include small surveys, simple bench work, literature reviews, epidemiology or clinical trials, and are carried out within the University or with an approved external supervisor.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS