Faculty elective list

The following list shows the units of study available as electives or research electives to undergraduate students throughout the faculty. The mode of presentation varies between academic units. Units are offered subject to sufficient demand and staff availability. See the pages following for descriptions of the units of study. Students who require further information on the content or administration of electives and when they are offered should contact the coordinator of the specific unit of study.

Undergraduate electives

Availability of electives may vary from year to year.
BACH3128 Health and Globalisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zakia Hossain Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week for Wk 1-13 Prohibitions: HSBH3009 Assessment: Online assessment (MCQ and True/False, 30 mins in week 6) (15%), Presentation (10 mins) (10%), 1000wd literature review (15%), and 1.5-hr exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The focus of this unit of study is on the meaning of globalisation and its impact on health. It examines social and cultural shifts and technological advancement and their impact on health and disability. It also examines the key drivers of globalisation and features of the shift from international to global health. The unit also aims to provide understanding of both the direct and indirect impact of global changes on biopsychosocial aspects of health. The direct impact includes shifting disease, disability and behaviour patterns. The indirect impacts include those of international trade laws, global governance, the advancement of medical technology and internet 'globalisation' on health care service delivery and professional practices. The unit analyses health issues such as health security, climate change, C&NCDs, pharmaceuticals, and tobacco control from global perspectives.
Textbooks
Lee, K. and Collin, J. (eds). Global Change and Health, reprinted 2005,
BACH3146 Cyberpsychology and e-Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week Assessment: Quiz (25%) and practical assignment (35%) and exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cyberpsychology and e-health aims to educate those seeking careers in allied health on how societal and individual health is affected by the internet and other technologies. The course will be based on current research and policy guidelines set by the Australian and American Medical Associations, the American Psychological Association and Australian Psychological Society for the use of information technology in the following areas: informing allied health professionals of online resources for their profession; how types of ICT functions may affect the behaviour of youth and the elderly; ethics and viability of delivering general health and mental health resources online; the evolution of telemedicine practices; the rise of serious games for health; social media in health; provision of therapy over the internet for general health and mental health; quality control and assessment of general and specific online health resources; and future directions of information technology and its application to health.
BACH3147 Health at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Bohle Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures /week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: One 2500 word essay (50%), one 1-hour exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a critical introduction to health at work in the Australian and international contexts. It examines the nature, prevalence, origins, and management of disease and injury in the workplace. Topics covered include the distribution and impact of occupational injury, ill health and disease in Australia; different perspectives on occupational injury and disease causation; the effects of psychosocial factors and work organisation, and the roles of professionals, managers and workers in prevention and management.
BIOS1155 Structure, Function and Disease A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Hegedus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Four 1hr lectures, one 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1170 Assessment: 1hr mid semester assessment MCQ exam (30%),2hr end semester exam (70%). Formative assessment provided. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an entry-level unit designed to give students an overview of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems relevant for professional practice. The basic concepts of pharmacology will also be introduced to enable students to understand the action of drugs on each of the body systems as they are covered in this unit and in BIOS1158, Structure, Function and Disease B. Material will be presented in lectures and practical sessions. Students are expected to complete self-directed learning packages prior to some practical sessions. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS1158 Structure, Function and Disease B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Hegedus Session: Semester 2 Classes: Four 1hr lectures, one 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: HSBM1003 Assessment: 1hr mid-semester exam (30%), 2hr end semester exam (70%). Formative assessment provided Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an entry-level unit designed to give students an overview of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the digestive, urinary, reproductive, endocrine, nervous and immune systems relevant for professional practice. The basic concepts of neoplasia will be introduced and students will also learn the essential principles of infection control in health care practice Material will be presented in lectures, tutorials and practical sessions. Students are expected to complete self-directed learning packages prior to some practical sessions. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS1167 Human Cell Biology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Oakes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lectures/week, 3 x 2hr practical/semester Prohibitions: BIOS1161, BIOS1156, BIOS1126, HSBM1001, BIOS1130 Assessment: Online quizzes (5%), Examinations (95%) [consisting of a mid semester exam 30% and an end semester exam 70%] Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an entry level unit of study designed to give students an overview of the biological and biochemical processes that are fundamental to life. Knowledge gained in this unit will enable students to understand the key principles of health and disease and the scientific basis for many of the professional practices they will undertake in their careers. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to general chemistry or biochemistry units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of the following topics: structure and function of cells, homeostasis, the basic chemistry of life, the biochemistry of human cell function (including protein synthesis, metabolic processes and diseases), and the genetics of health and disease. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit and to apply their knowledge to the relevance of these fundamental principles to health care practices.
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Leslie Nicholson, Dr Bronwen Ackermann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Prohibitions: BIOS1136, BIOS1159, BIOS5090 Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Prohibitions: BIOS1144, BIOS1139, BIOS1160 Assessment: Mid-semester practical exam (35%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1133, BIOS1127, BMED2403, PHSI2006, BIOS2099, PHSI2005, BIOS1155, BIOS2098 Assessment: mid semester exam (30%), end semester exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes at which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hrs practical/week, with a small online component Prohibitions: BIOS1137, BIOS2103 Assessment: mid-semester exam (40%), end-semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study includes fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the somatosensory and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1172 Biological Aspects of Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Knight Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance education mode: independent learning package with email support. No on-campus attendance required Prohibitions: BIOS4036 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), end-semester exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit of study examines the physiological changes associated with the normal processes of ageing and the decrease in functional capacity which occurs as a result. It will include a physiological explanation of ageing in relation to the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, nervous, musculoskeletal, renal and endocrine systems and the skin. An understanding of the normal processes of ageing will help health professionals to interpret the ageing experience from the point of view of the client, understand the functional limitations which result from ageing, and differentiate 'normal' from 'abnormal' ageing. This is an entry level unit designed to give students an overview of topics relevant for professional practice. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to specialist clinical units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS1173 Disease in Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Knight Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance education mode: independent learning package with email support. No on-campus attendance required Prohibitions: BIOS4038 Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology Assessment: mid-semester exam (30%), end-semester exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit of study examines the disease processes and other physical health issues, which are important as people age. Students will study the factors which are responsible for the increased incidence of disease in the aged, the role of environmental factors in the development of disease, the relationships between disease and functional limitation, and the measures which can be taken to minimise the development and biological impact of disease. Students will also examine the relationships between the biomedical effects of ageing and sexuality. There will be in-depth consideration of one common disease of the aged, and its management in terms of prevention, treatment and residual disability. This is an entry level unit designed to give students an overview of topics relevant for professional practice. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to specialist clinical units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS2115 Embryology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Ritchie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance education mode: independent learning package with LMS support. No on-campus attendance is required Assumed knowledge: 6 credit points of Junior Biology Assessment: 1hr online mid semester exam (30%), 1hr end semester exam (30%), Project (25%), quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study aims to develop an understanding of the embryological processes occurring in to form the human body from fertilisation to birth. Topics also to be discussed are: infertility, abnormal development, artificial reproductive technologies and fetal surgery.
BIOS3063 Project Design and Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Knight Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance education mode: independent learning package with email support Assessment: Workbook (50%) & end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit of study examines the principles and factors involved in the design and management of services, programs, and projects. Students will develop skills in planning, developing, implementing and evaluating projects as well as be given an introduction to financial management. This is an introductory level that aims to develop generic skills relevant to project management. It is not a specialist project management unit. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of project management. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems.
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture, 2hr practical, tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: mid-semester exam (35%), end-semester exam (35%), quizzes (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS3066 Current Issues in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Oakes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture fortnightly, commencing week 2, plus independent on-line learning modules with email support Assessment: Online quiz (20%), written assignment (25%), end semester exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to selected developments that are impacting, or are likely to impact, on the practice and management of the health care in Australia. Because health care is driven by a multitude of forces, the scope of the developments studied is broad. Topics to be covered will be drawn from the basic sciences applicable to health care, and health management. Examples of the topics under consideration include a critical analysis of complementary and alternative medicine, advances in assisted reproductive technologies and emerging diseases and infections. Material will be presented in lectures, with use of self-directed learning and individual or group projects. The unit integrates units of study completed earlier in the program, thus enabling students to apply their knowledge while developing the skills needed to analyse, understand and anticipate future directions in health care.
CSCD1032 Human Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Greg Flannery Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr lecture/week (weeks 3-13) 4x1hr tutorials/semester Prerequisites: BACH1165 or PSYC1001 or PSYC1002 or HSBH1003 Assumed knowledge: CSCD1034 Assessment: mid semester exam (20%), assignment (40%) final exam (35%) and oral reflection task (5% barrier task) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Speech Pathology students must pass this unit in order to enrol in clinical units in Year 2
Students will acquire knowledge about typical communication development in English across the lifespan and in cultures relevant to the Australian context. Students will learn about the sequence of normal communication development from prelinguistic communication development through to adult language; the significance of context and function in the development of language; the universality of communication development, and the effect of gender in communication development. This unit of study prepares students to undertake observation of communication and to demonstrate understanding of the theories and facts in the normal acquisition of communication skills and apply this knowledge to people of different ages. Students will also begin accumulating knowledge about professional communication skills needed by health professionals to work with clients, carers and colleagues.
Textbooks
McLaughlin, S. (2006) Introduction to Language Development. Clifton Park,NY: Thompson Delmar; Bentzen, W.R. (2009) Seeing Young Children. A Guide to observing and recording behaviour. Clifton Park, NY: Thompson Delmar. (5th ed)
EXSS1032 Fundamentals of Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lectures/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Practical skills assessment (20%), excel tutorial and practical class-based worksheets (20%) and end semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of exercise science and an introduction to their application to physical activity, sport, fitness and health. A focus of Fundamentals of Exercise Science is the practical application of testing procedures to the measurement of physiological function. In this unit issues related to work (and its measurement), energy supply, physiological capacity and muscular fitness are covered, with emphasis on the integration of these concepts, the use of scientific rigour and evidence-based practice. Practical classes will cover various fundamental skills for exercise scientists including standard health screening procedures and the principles and practice aerobic and muscular fitness testing. Worksheets will include data presentation and analysis skills using excel software. The exercise prescription component of the unit introduces students to the concepts of programming for cardio-respiratory/aerobic and muscular fitness for healthy individuals. A major emphasis of the unit is the acquisition of laboratory based testing/assessment skills, and data handling and presentation skills
EXSS2026 Growth, Development and Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Emmanuel Stamatakis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week for 13 weeks, 1x1-hr tutorial/week for 6 weeks Assessment: Mid semester exam (30%) and end semester exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide the student with an appreciation of certain critical phases of both ends of the lifespan. Issues around physiologic changes, motor skill development, physical performance, the role of exercise for disease prevention and treatment, and the role of nutrition, will be examined and related to stages of childhood and adolescent growth and ageing. The relationships between growth, development, gender and physical activity in its broader sense will also be explored. The biological changes and consequences of ageing on physiologic and psychological health, disease and exercise capacity will be investigated. The student will also be able to gain some understanding of exercise prescription for pregnant women, children, adolescents and older adults.
HSBH1005 Human Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week and tutorial activities equivalent to 1-hr/week Assessment: research case study and participation (20%), essay (40%), and 2-hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study considers the important psychosocial and functional changes that occur across the lifespan. Understanding psychosocial factors associated with healthy human development is important for addressing our major national health priority areas. Areas discussed include child development, family development, adolescent risk taking behaviour, mental health, social relationships and social support, dementia, older age and chronic diseases across the lifespan.
Textbooks
Gerrig, R.J., Zimbardo, P.G., Campbell, A.J., Cumming, S.R., and Wilkes, F.J. (2011). Psychology and Life: Australian Edition (2nd Edition). Sydney: Pearson Education Australia.
HSBH1010 Foundations of eHealth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melanie Nguyen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: Reflection task (15%), case study (45%), eHealth portfolio (35%), and participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, students will be introduced to eHealth and the role of technology in healthcare. The aim of the unit is to provide future health professionals and policy makers with a strong foundation in eHealth on which they can make evidence-based decisions. In particular, this unit will provide students with opportunities to examine: how technology affects health care in different Australian health contexts; ethical issues surrounding eHealth; innovations in eHealth including designing health apps for mobile devices; how emerging technologies affect patient-centred communication between health professionals and between health professionals and their clients/patients; and strategies for interacting with patients and clients using different technologies. Students will develop their skills in various technologies identified as important for future clinicians and create an ePortfolio to showcase their learning to potential employers. This unit will also enhance students as learners by providing them with reflective learning skills identified as core to successful health care.
HSBH3008 Interdisciplinary eHealth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melanie Nguyen, Dr Mary Lam, Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH1010 Assessment: Reflection task (15%), case study (40%), eHealth portfolio (40%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to provide senior students with a range of eHealth experiences on which they can make evidence-based decisions. In particular, this unit will provide students with opportunities to examine: how emerging technologies affect patient-centred, interdisciplinary communication and healthcare; strategies for interacting with patients and clients using different technologies; how technology affects health care in different Australian health contexts by drawing upon their clinical experiences and research literature; issues surrounding eHealth practice; innovations in eHealth including designing health apps for mobile devices; the role of technology in healthcare management. Students will develop skills identified as key for future clinicians and create an ePortfolio to showcase their learning to potential employers. This unit will also enhance students as learners by providing them with reflective learning skills, interdisciplinary health experiences and opportunities to integrate their clinical and university learning experiences through case-based learning.
HSBH3012 FHS Abroad

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elaine Ryan, Dr Charlotte Scarf Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Full-day briefing session, half-day debriefing session. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre-departure research (30%), field diary (20%), report (40%) and presentation (10%). Practical field work: 4-6 weeks working with a community-based organisation in a developing country. Mode of delivery: Field experience
Cultural practices, disease patterns and healthcare systems are vastly different in different countries around the globe. This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain international experience in a health services setting in a developing country. Students will participate in a 4-6 week health or care placement with a community-based organisation in South or Southeast Asia. Countries where students can be placed include Vietnam, Cambodia, India and Nepal. As part of the unit, you will be expected to participate in local development programs, live within the community that you are visiting, and document and reflect on key health and development issues facing local populations. The unit will require you to demonstrate cultural sensitivity and an ability to adapt to new environments, a capacity for critical reflection and awareness of complex global health and development issues.
HSBH3013 FHS Indigenous Communities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Michelle Lincoln Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr introduction session (to be completed before enrolment), 4x2-hr briefing sessions, 1x2-hr debriefing session, and online learning activities. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre placement briefing paper 1000wd (20%), participation and contribution to on-line learning activities and discussion (20%), community development project report 3000wd (40%), oral presentation (20%) Practical field work: 4-6 weeks working in an Indigenous community Mode of delivery: Field experience
This unit provides theoretical and practical knowledge about relevant models of community development in Aboriginal communities in New South Wales. Students will gain experience in working with Aboriginal communities in a health services setting. Students participate in a 4-6 week placement in a local Aboriginal community. The placement is preceded by cultural awareness training by the FHS partner organisation. Students participate in a community identified development project. Students will document and report on their experiences in working with the local Aboriginal community. Students will also provide a 10-15 minute presentation of their experiences. Students will be required to demonstrate project management skills including time management and reporting abilities. Students are required to attend briefing and debriefing activities and complete on-line learning activities in addition to their field experience.
HSBH3014 Workplace Injury Prevention/Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Richard Smith Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week (Wk -1 to 9) Prerequisites: BIOS1168, EXSS1018 Assessment: Workplace assessment (group task) (40%), quizzes (10%), 1x2hr end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit provides a framework for exploring the role of health professionals in the field of workplace rehabilitation and occupational health and safety, with a focus on work injury prevention and early injury assessment and management. This unit will develop students' knowledge and skills in assessing the physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands of work and explore workplace modifications and functional restorative strategies to assist people with injuries and disability return to meaningful and productive employment. An evidence-based, approach will be used to explore the patterns, causation and management of workplace injury and illness, and associated legislation in NSW. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and practice of ergonomics, workplace assessments and functional evaluations and how these can be applied to the prevention and management of work injuries. To this effect, the role of the health professional as a consultant in the workplace will be discussed.
HSBH3015 Mental Health Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prerequisites: (HSBH1006, (HSBH1007 or HSBH2007), HSBH1008, HSBH1009) or (48 credit points of previous study with a miminum of 24 from Intermediate units of study). Prohibitions: OCCP2084 Assessment: 2x online tests (40%) ,1x2000wd essay (50%) and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students must have completed at least 48 credit points to enrol in this UoS
Poor mental health poses a major challenge to our society, and health care professionals, among others, are charged with 'making a difference'. To do so, they need to be equipped with the most up-to-date knowledge of effective mental health approaches and interventions. This unit will overview major mental health conditions and significant social, philosophical, and historical influences on health care service delivery and reform to provide a context for contemporary rehabilitation practice. Students will be introduced to the goals, values and guiding principles of psychiatric rehabilitation and to practices that aim to address the culture of stigma and low expectations by society of people with mental health conditions. Rehabilitation interventions that have demonstrated efficacy in promoting recovery by reducing obstacles to participation for people with mental health conditions will be examined. Local and international research underpinning best practice in rehabilitation management and service delivery will be reviewed and consumer perspectives and experiences explored.
HSBH3016 Individual and Societal Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: BACH1161 or HSBH1003 or HSBH1008 Assessment: 1500wd essay (30%), group tutorial and online activities (20%) and 1hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit offers students an insight into the challenges and opportunities associated with population ageing and what is required to meet the needs of the increasing numbers of older people and those who will interact with them. It addresses the social and individual dimensions of ageing, health and well-being and the transitions that occur in later life. There will be an emphasis on the policy and practice implications of an ageing society and the role of various public and private providers (government, health care practitioners, family, voluntary) in providing services and care to older people. Students will be expected to develop a critical understanding of the issues related to ageing and the life course and gain an understanding of initiatives and policy debates relating to population ageing and quality of life of older people, their families and carers.
HSBH3017 Disability, Sport and Social Inclusion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nikki Wedgwood Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: BACH1161 or HSBH1003 or HSBH1008 Assessment: 2 x short answer assignments (2x15%), 1500wd written assignment (40%), Presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must have completed 48 credit points to enrol in this unit.
The primary goal of this unit is to inform the understandings and practices of our future allied health professionals and health policymakers about: 1) sports participation from a disabled as well as able-bodied perspective (via reverse integration); 2) the dominant medical model of disability and how that shapes the approach of health professions towards people with impairments; 3) the social model of disability; 4) the potential role of sport, not just in the physical, but also the psychological and social rehabilitation, of people with impairments; 5) sport, not just as a physical activity, competition or leisure activity but as a social institution, which arises out of particular social and historical contexts in accordance with the interests of dominant social groups (ie able-bodied, medical profession); 6) how sporting practice is heavily shaped by social structures like gender and ableism but also that people who facilitate sport (like health professionals) are not completely constrained by these structures because ableism is ultimately either reproduced or challenged by everyday practices, attitudes and behaviours; 7) the role of sport in either promoting or reproducing the social inclusion and/or exclusion of people with impairments; 8) how sport can be emancipatory at the lived/embodied level; and 9) the role of sport in the lives of people with an intellectual disability.
REHB2026 Fundamentals of Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Elias Mpofu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: Case-based exam Wk 6 (30%), end-semester case-based exam (40%), Practical and reflective journal log (30%) Practical field work: Field experiences with community partners approx. 24 hrs/semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to broad definitions pertinent to both disability/disadvantage and rehabilitation. Using both face-to-face learning experiences combined with community-based experience, the unit provides unique opportunities to learn about the disablement process and both the individual and systemic factors that explain disability and disadvantage. The unit surveys international perspectives on the disablement process and with a disability-human rights perspective. The unit outlines the rehabilitation process. Interventions, physical and psychological, to redress disability and disadvantage problems and issues will also be canvassed. The significance of adopting a multi-disciplinary team approach to successful disability management is highlighted as is the importance of inter-professional learning. The nature of specific services provided and the ways in which clients of rehabilitation are managed through the rehabilitation process will be covered. The unit considers vocational and avocational rehabilitation and community re-entry aspects of disability and disadvantage.
Textbooks
Text book list will be provided
REHB3062 Public Offenders: Criminality and Rehab

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodd Rothwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online Prohibitions: REHB3051 Assessment: short answer test (20%) , 2 MCQ tests (40%), 1500 word essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to issues relating to the rehabilitation of public offenders including adults (males and females) and youth offenders. Students will study the major theories of criminality and community attitudes impacting on government approaches to rehabilitation and incarceration policy. The unit will examine the different approaches and policies to the incarceration of adult males and females and young people and the goals of these approaches. Special attention will be paid to examining the nature of the objectives and desired outcomes of incarceration. Students will analyse the roles and functions of personnel employed within the prison system, including that of custodial personnel and professional workers. In particular the unit will look at the various health issues associated with public offender rehabilitation, including drug addiction, mental illness and HIV/AIDS, the health services available within the prisons and the role played by the various health professionals employed to deal with such problems. Students will also be introduced to the probation and parole system and to the various alternative to full-time incarceration, including community service, day release, work release, and weekend detention. They will examine the aims and objectives of these alternatives and the roles and functions of professional workers (including health workers) employed to administer these programs.
REHB3064 Alcohol and Drug Misuse Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodd Rothwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prerequisites: (HSBH1006, (HSBH1007 or HSBH2007), HSBH1008, HSBH1009) or 48 credit points of previous study. Prohibitions: REHB3061 Assessment: Short answer test (20%), Essay 2500 words (40%), 2 x online MCQ tests (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
Note: Students must have completed 48 credit points to enrol in this unit
This unit introduces students to issues relating to a major public health problem: the misuse of alcohol and other addictive drugs. The unit introduces students to two major aspects of this area: issues relating to the development of health prevention/health promotion policy, covering the philosophies of harm minimisation and zero tolerance; approaches to rehabilitation and treatment of those overusing both alcohol and other drugs. The unit commences with an analysis of public health policy approaches to the rehabilitation and treatment of people overusing alcohol and other harmful drugs. Students will be required to undertake an exercise involving an analysis of the effectiveness of the two major policy approaches to the problem of drug overuse and abuse: harm reduction and zero tolerance. They will be required to examine the evidence supporting these two approaches to public health policy. In the second part of the unit students will study the major therapeutic approaches to treatment and rehabilitation. This will include familiarisation with Alcoholics Anonymous, clinically based approaches including transactional analysis and other group therapy oriented approaches, the various behavioural therapies, therapeutic communities, methadone maintenance, needle exchange and recent trails in safe injection facilities. They will become familiar with the nature of services offered, the role of the various health professionals in these services and the nature of effective treatment and rehabilitation outcomes.
REHB3065 PTSD and Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prohibitions: REHB3059, REHB5063, REHB5034 Assessment: Online test Week 5 (20%), online test Week 9 (20%), essay Week 13 (50%) and participation in weekly online discussions (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students must have completed 48 credit points for enrolment into this unit.
Exposure to traumatic events such as natural disasters, assaults and road accidents are relatively common in Australia. This unit introduces the clinical entity of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Students will learn about the nature of traumatic stressors and the course of posttraumatic reactions. Evidence-based approaches to treatment and rehabilitation of PTSD are examined with interventions for both acute and persistent forms of the disorder being presented. The impact of a range of barriers to social and economic participation of people with PTSD will be explored and the legal and compensation issues associated with the disorder will be considered.

Faculty research electives

BACH3127 History and Philosophy of Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodd Rothwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online (equivalent to 13x2-hr face-to-face lectures) Assessment: short answer test (25%) and 1200 wd essay (25%) and 2x mulifple choice test (50%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit is designed to provide students with a critical understanding of science as a specific form of knowledge. It introduces students to the major philosophies of science including empiricism, positivism, hypothetico-deductionism and the work of philosopher Thomas Kuhn. The unit will focus also on scientific method and the qualitative/quantitative methodological distinction with particular attention to the hermeneutic/interpretive research tradition.
Textbooks
Chalmers A, What is This Thing Called Science?, University of Queensland Press (1999)
BACH4056 Qualitative Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jennifer Smith-Merry Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH3019 Assessment: 1000wd research report (30%),1000wd research report (30%) and end semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
In this unit, students will learn the skills involved in undertaking qualitative research. The main focus is therefore on the practicalities of carrying out the methods. The unit is based on seminars which combine a traditional lecture format with interactive practice-based learning. Students will have the opportunity to develop and practice their skills in interviewing, focus groups, observation, visual methods and documentary analysis. This experience will assist students to confidently apply these methods within research projects and future work in their chosen fields.
HSBH3020 Research Team Engagement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr seminars/fortnight Prerequisites: 96 Credit points Assessment: Letter of introduction to research team (0%barrier task), participation in peer mentoring seminars (20%), seminar presentation (30%) and 2000wd report (50%) Practical field work: Engagement with a research team for 4-hrs/week over 12 weeks Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: All students must have completed 96 credit points for enrolment into this unit. Not intended for Honours programs.
Students will join an established research team for one semester and contribute to the team's activities. With peers engaged in similar experiences, students will also participate in a fortnightly seminar designed to foster specific skills, including problem solving. For the practical component, students will spend at least 4 hours per week with a Faculty-based research team, engaging with the team and attending team meetings. For the seminar, students will meet fortnightly in a 2-hour peer-mentoring seminar with a Faculty mentor (an experienced researcher). Each student will take responsibility for leading a seminar under the guidance of the mentor. The overall aims are for students to: 1) work with a functioning research team to contribute to the production of knowledge, 2) take responsibility for their development as researchers and contribute to the development of peers, 3) take on the values of a researcher (e.g., respect for evidence, tolerance of ambiguity, courage, rigour, scepticism, persistence). At the completion of the unit, each student will be competent to: 1) perform supervised activities contributing to the success of a research team (e.g. obtain relevant information, collect valid and reliable data, maintain and use equipment; enter data into relevant programs), 2) synthesise a subset of research findings within a given framework and present them in a clear and meaningful way, 3) contribute in a reflective way to peer mentoring: giving, receiving and acting on constructive, thoughtful feedback.
Textbooks
Recommended readings on qualitative quantitative research,