Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy) – BPASPHYS6000

Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy) Pass

View semester session codes here.

Course BPASPHY-06: Pass course; full-time, 4 years

Year 1

Semester 1
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Leslie Nicholson, Dr Bronwen Ackermann Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical:tutorial/week Prohibitions: BIOS1136, BIOS1159, BIOS5090 Assessment: Mid semester practical exam (30%), end semester practical exam (30%), end semester exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BIOS1133, BIOS1127, BMED2403, PHSI2006, BIOS2099, PHSI2005, BIOS1155, BIOS2098 Assessment: mid semester exam (30%), end semester exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and renal systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes at which human cadaveric material is studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
HSBH1003 Health, Behaviour and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mairwen Jones Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: BACH1133, BACH1134, BACH1130, BACH1161, BACH1132 Assessment: Assignment (30%), group class presentation (20%), 1.5 hr end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is an introduction to areas of psychology and sociology relevant to health and wellbeing. The unit provides sociological tools (covering both theory and method) useful for understanding and practicing in health and wellbeing. It is also an introduction to the principles and applications of psychology as they pertain to these areas. The unit aims to develop a `sociological imagination¿, a quality of mind that will be used to prompt students to question common-sense assumptions regarding health and wellbeing. Students will also gain familiarity with the major paradigms and methodological approaches of contemporary psychology and will develop the applications of psychological theory to specific health issues in their major area of study.
PHTY1023 Foundations of Physiotherapy Practice A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Leaver Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Corequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: 1x2-hr written exam (50%), 1000wd project report (30%) and practical skills assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit sets the context of physiotherapy professional practice through an introduction to the issues and practices in healthcare delivery affecting physiotherapists, including relevant professional, state and federal policies and laws related to professional conduct. The unit also examines the observation and measurement of normal movement using methods that are suitable for clinical application, including biomechanical analyses. The importance of measurement is emphasised and the validity and reliability of different procedures are studied. Students are taught and practice a number of basic therapeutic techniques, including general musculoskeletal screening, observation of normal movement, manual handling, soft tissue massage and the use of heating and cooling. The importance of communication, documentation and respect for cultural differences in professional practice is addressed. Students are introduced to the concepts and principles of evidence-based practice.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Prohibitions: BIOS1144, BIOS1139, BIOS1160 Assessment: Mid-semester practical exam (35%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hrs practical/week, with a small online component Prohibitions: BIOS1137, BIOS2103 Assessment: mid-semester exam (40%), end-semester exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study includes fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the somatosensory and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
EXSS1029 Muscle Mechanics and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Tom Gwinn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture/week, 2hr practical/week Assessment: Mid semester exam (30%), practical exam (10%), end semester exam (60%) Practical field work: Includes participation in high resistance training. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The determinants of maximal active muscle force and power production are examined in terms of the crossbridge cycle, sarcomere arrangement, myosin isoforms and the extent of muscle activation. Evidence for neural adaptations to high resistance training is examined and the practical significance of these adaptations is discussed. The responses of skeletal muscle to high-resistance training are discussed in terms of i) the control of protein synthesis, ii) sarcomere remodelling and myofibril assembly, and iii) whole muscle hypertrophy and fibre type shifts. An evidence-based approach is used to examine the dose-response relationship between high-resistance variables (load, number of sets, training, frequency, rest interval) and hypertrophy. Muscle structural and functional adaptations to disuse (bed rest, non-weight bearing, immobilization) are examined, as well as the effects of re-ambulation and re-training. The determinants of muscle range of motion and passive stiffness are discussed. The response of muscle to long term stretching (e.g. bone elongation) is examined. This is contrasted to the relative lack of muscle structural adaptation to short-term static stretch interventions.
Textbooks
No textbook required, students are recommended to obtain unit of study manual
PHTY1024 Foundations of Physiotherapy Practice B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Marlene Fransen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 2x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: PHTY1023 Corequisites: BIOS1169, EXSS1029 Assessment: 1x2-hr end semester written exam (50%), end semester practical skills assessment (20%) and 1000wd written report/clinical workbook (30%) Practical field work: 1 week mentored clinical placement Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit builds upon the material covered and the skills learned during PHTY1023. In this unit, measurement is extended to include muscle function and is coordinated with EXSS1029. The principles and application of therapeutic exercise for mobility, strength and coordination are explored and practised and the students extend their knowledge and application of therapeutic skills to include regional musculoskeletal examination, manual therapy and electrical stimulation. The unit also explores the physiology, psychology, measurement and management of pain. Students are introduced to searching the scientific literature and evaluating randomised controlled trials.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 2

Semester 1
EXSS2025 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephen Cobley (sem 1) & Prof Ross Sanders (sem 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week; Practical field work 1x2-hr class/week (Weeks 1-7, 9) Assumed knowledge: BIOS1171 Assessment: tutorial presentation (15%), mid semester exam (10%), group presentation of training project skill (pass/fail), written group project report (30%), end semester exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement. The unit consists of 3 modules. The first module examines the information processing and energetic capacities of the learner that underpin motor performance; that is, characteristics of the perceptual-motor system such as memory, attention, reaction time, speed-accuracy trade-off, force control, economy of energy, coordination, and automaticity. The second module examines features of the learning environment that can be manipulated to promote motor learning such as individual differences (e.g., motivation), methods of instruction, practice conditions, and the structuring of feedback. The third module examines applications to teaching motor skills, coaching and rehabilitation and includes a group project in which a motor skill is trained, thereby enabling students to apply the principles of motor control and learning.
EXSS2027 Exercise Physiology for Clinicians

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr and 1x2-hr lecture/week, 4x1-hr tutorials/semester Assumed knowledge: BIOS1170 Assessment: Class practical reports (25%), mid semester exam (25%), end semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed EXSS1032 for enrolment into this unit of study
The aim of this unit is to provide students with a broad understanding of the physiological responses and adaptations to physical activity and inactivity. The unit has a primary focus on the physiological responses to exercise, and the application of exercise as a treatment modality.. The unit describes the basic metabolic, cardiovascular and respiratory responses and adaptations to exercise training in healthy, asymptomatic individuals (children, adults and the elderly). Attention is given to special populations who are often in need of increased exercise training (eg. overweight, obese, elderly). Two class experiments are included during lecture hours to add practical experience and to develop critical thinking.
Textbooks
Powers, SK and Howley ET, Exercise Physiology; Theory and Application to Fitness and Performance (8th Ed). McGraw-Hill (2012).
PHTY2058 PT in Musculoskeletal Conditions A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Milena Simic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY1024 Assessment: Mid semester practical assessment (20%), end semester practical assessment (20%) and end semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to provide students with the bases of assessment, and treatment planning and application for uncomplicated musculoskeletal conditions affecting the lower limbs and lumbar region of the spine. Students will develop the ability to select and implement interventions based on clinical reasoning, principles of evidence-based practice and safety. Emphasis will be given to the systematic structuring and recording of the physical examination and to the application of anatomy, physiology and pathology to these clinical problems.
Textbooks
Brukner P and Khan K (2012): Clinical Sports Medicine (4th Ed). Sydney: McGraw-Hill; Refshauge K and Gass E (2004) Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy Clinical Science and Evidence-Based Practice. 2nd Ed Butterworth Heinemann
PHTY2060 Preventative Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Dennis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial/practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY1024 Assessment: Group seminar presentation (health promotion) (week 7) (40%), one page reflective report (behaviour change intervention) (10%) and 1x1-hr end semester written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a framework for exploring the role of physiotherapy in the prevention of chronic injury and disease. Preventative health issues specific to workers, women and the elderly will be addressed. Physiotherapy service delivery in a range of settings will be explored including the community, workplace and the clinic. Students will examine the social determinants of heath and disease and will apply health promotion models to facilitate health-enhancing behaviour change in a range of populations and settings.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
PHTY2059 PT in Musculoskeletal Conditions B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Niamh Moloney Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2058 Assessment: Mid semester practical assessment (30%), end semester practical assessment (30%), and end semester written exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The purpose of this unit is to provide students with the bases of assessment and treatment planning and application for uncomplicated musculoskeletal conditions affecting the upper limbs and cervical and thoracic regions of the spine. Students will develop the ability to select and implement interventions based on clinical reasoning, principles of evidence-based practice and safety. Students will also consider the impact of surgical intervention on physiotherapy management of musculoskeletal conditions.
Textbooks
Brukner P and Khan K (2012): Clinical Sports Medicine (4th Ed). Sydney: McGraw-Hill
PHTY2061 PT in Neurological Conditions A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leanne Hassett Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: BIOS1171, EXSS1029, EXSS2025, PHTY1024 Assessment: mid semester practical assessment (25%), end semester practical assessment (25%) and end semester written exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop students' ability to apply relevant theoretical and data-based scientific findings to clinical practice in the area of disease and trauma to the nervous system. This unit examines the pathology, impairments (weakness, loss of dexterity, loss of sensation and spasticity as well as adaptations such as contracture), activity limitations (difficulty standing up, sitting and standing, walking, reaching and manipulating objects with the hand, rolling over and getting out of bed) and participation restrictions arising from conditions of acute onset (stroke, traumatic brain injury, cerebral palsy and Guillain-Barré Syndrome). Students will learn to assess, train and measure outcome of everyday activities integrated within the rehabilitation team.
Textbooks
Carr JH and Shepherd RB (2010) Neurological Rehabilitation: Optimizing motor performance (2nd Ed). Oxford:Elsevier
PHTY2062 PT in Respiratory and Cardiac Conditions A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Louise Ganderton Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial/practical/week Prerequisites: BIOS1170, EXSS1029, PHTY1024, EXSS2027 Assessment: mid semester practical assessment (20%), end semester practical assessment (20%), end semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will introduce students to the knowledge, skills and clinical decision making processes necessary for effective assessment and treatment of patients across the age spectrum with acute and chronic respiratory and cardiac dysfunction. In particular, students will evaluate the patho-physiological and functional consequences of surgery (abdominal, thoracic and cardiac); infective, inflammatory; restrictive; and obstructive pulmonary disorders, and coronary artery disease. Students will learn the practical skills and develop treatment strategies to effectively manage respiratory problems.
Textbooks
Pryor JA and Prasad SA (2008) Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems 4th Ed.
PHTY2063 Clinical Practicum A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Belinda Judd Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: Clinical placement, on-campus and online attendance Prerequisites: PHTY1024 Corequisites: PHTY2062, PHTY2059, PHTY2061 Assessment: CPA: Clinical Placement Assessment (50%) and Clinical Workbook (30%) and Online Module (20%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
The purpose of this unit is to provide an introduction to the application of foundation physiotherapy skills within a clinical setting. Students will interview patients and record a comprehensive history of their clinical conditions, apply assessment, measurement and treatment techniques under direction and participate in the planning and decision-making processes within the clinic.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 3 (first offered 2015)

Semester 1
PHTY3081 PT in Musculoskeletal Conditions C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Evangelos Pappas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2059 Assessment: Mid semester practical assessment (15%), end semester practical assessment (25%), end semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will integrate knowledge from earlier units of study and develop the skills required for primary care management of musculoskeletal conditions with a more complex presentation. Students learn to distinguish patients with non-specific pain from those suspected of having underlying disease/pathology. The unit covers the epidemiology of acute and chronic spinal pain (risk factors, clinical course, prognostic factors) and degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) and the assessment of treatment outcomes for such conditions. The evidence base for management options is explored and students learn to apply a range of treatments such as education and advice, manual therapy, exercise, McKenzie therapy etc. Students will develop the ability to select and implement interventions based on clinical reasoning, principles of evidence-based practice and safety. Students will also consider the implementation of management guidelines for work-related injuries, including whiplash, soft tissue injury and musculoskeletal injury of the low back, neck and upper limb.
Textbooks
Brukner P and Khan K (2012): Clinical Sports Medicine (4th Ed). Sydney: McGraw-Hill
PHTY3082 PT in Neurological Conditions B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Natalie Allen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2061 Assessment: Mid-semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The first module of this unit focuses on the physiotherapy management of spinal cord lesions incorporating scientifically-derived and evidence-based practice and integrated patient-centred healthcare. The second module examines the pathology, impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions arising from neurodegenerative conditions which require adaptation (such as Parkinsonism, multiple sclerosis, and motor neuron disease). Students learn to assess and train or prescribe appropriate aids to enable activities such as rolling over, sitting, walking, transferring, wheelchair mobility and reaching and manipulating objects to be carried out.
Textbooks
Carr JH, Shepherd RB/Neurological Rehabilitation - Optimizing motor performance 2nd ed. 2010
PHTY3084 Paediatric Physiotherapy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week over 13 weeks, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week over 6 weeks Corequisites: PHTY3081, PHTY3082, PHTY3087 Assessment: 1x2-hr written exam (70%), written report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to prepare the student for practice in the area of paediatric physiotherapy. Emphasis is given to students developing a clear understanding of typical development and the potential influences upon a child's development. The student will become aware of the changes which occur from infancy to maturity in the neuro-motor, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary body systems, and the impact of congenital or acquired conditions, or lifestyle diseases causing dysfunction in one or more of these systems. The emphasis of the teaching approach will be on clinical and ethical reasoning within the WHO ICF (International Classification of Function) to promote health and well-being for children within a family-centred practice framework. Paediatric clinical scenarios are designed to help students self-direct their learning in order to problem-solve assessment and management strategies for children with dysfunction, and/or are at risk of poor health and well-being. The approach will also emphasise the role of physiotherapy within broader health care teams/services to prepare students for the variety of health care settings/contexts in which paediatric physiotherapists may work. The unit is designed to facilitate students to integrate prior learning from other units of study with the content of this unit.
PHTY3087 PT in Respiratory & Cardiac Conditions B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maree Milross Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2061, PHTY2062 Assessment: Mid-semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The acute care module focuses on assessment and treatment of patients with acute pulmonary dysfunction. In addition students examine specific clinical and professional issues relating to the intensive care and acute care environment. The emphasis is on appropriate assessment, safe and effective management of intubated and non-intubated patients. The acute neurological and cardiopulmonary care module focuses on physiotherapy management of acute neurological and neurosurgical conditions. The unit examines the scientific basis for clinical intervention and examines a range of complex clinical issues organised on a case-basis including multi-system dysfunction (physiological, psychological and social). Students will be expected to evaluate the scientific basis and ethical, legal and practical implications of current physiotherapy interventions in relation to the case studies.
Textbooks
Pryor JA and Prasad SA Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems 4th ed. 2008
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
PHTY3083 Clinical Practicum B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Julia Blackford/Belinda Judd Session: Intensive August,Intensive February,Intensive September Classes: 37 hrs/week for 5 weeks at clinical facilities Prerequisites: PHTY2063, PHTY3081, PHTY3082, PHTY3087 Corequisites: Corequisites: PHTY3085 Assessment: Assessment based on clinical performance, written material, communication skills, organisational skills and professionalism (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study involves clinical placements in one of the four following areas: rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory care/outpatients and community/general. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in both the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. During practicum placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. In addition, students will be responsible for individual and group training sessions such as strength and fitness sessions. Clinical Practicum B is a five-week placement which require full-time attendance (37 hours per week) at clinical facilities. In addition, it may be in a rural or regional setting.
PHTY3085 Clinical Practicum C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Julia Blackford/Belinda Judd Session: Intensive February,Intensive September Classes: 37 hrS/week for 5 weeks at clinical facilities Prerequisites: PHTY2063, PHTY3081, PHTY3082, PHTY3087 Corequisites: Corequisites: PHTY3083 Assessment: Assessment based on clinical performance, written material, communication skills, organisational skills and professionalism (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study involves clinical placements in one of the four following areas: rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory care/outpatients and community/general. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in both the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. During practicum placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. In addition, students will be responsible for individual and group training sessions such as strength and fitness sessions. Clinical Practicum C is a five-week placement which require full-time attendance (37 hours per week) at clinical facilities. In addition, the placements may be in a rural or regional setting.
PHTY3086 Physiotherapy in Multisystem Problems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sue Coulson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial or practical/week over 6 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3081 Assessment: 1x2-hr written exam (70%), group presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, students will explore common clinical conditions in which the primary problem is complicated by the co-existence of other pathologies, involvement of other physiological systems or where environmental, psychological or socio-economic factors are of primary significance. Students will design and evaluate interventions for conditions such as cervicogenic headache, respiratory disease with and without diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, cancer, pregnancy and women and men¿s health issues. Students will also consider the impact of mental health problems on patient responses and will investigate other complex clinical cases involving health, psycho-social and socio-economic factors, particularly in older people. The unit will provide the student with an understanding of the roles of other health workers and of the relevant legislation and social services relevant to the care of people within the community and in remote areas.
One Elective [6] (see elective list below)
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 4 (last offered 2015)

Semester 1
PHTY4110 Musculoskeletal Physiotherapy F

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Niamh Moloney Session: Semester 1a Classes: 6-hr lecture/week, 2-4-hr tutorial/week, unit is conducted over intensive short semester Prerequisites: PHTY3068, PHTY3069, PHTY3070 Assessment: 2hr exam (60%) and 10 min practical exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students may be required to participate in practical sessions during which they will act as patients for other students. Practical techniques may include manipulation. Students will be invited to provide informed consent when acting as patients for other students. Students will be provided with a questionnaire to complete prior to manipulation classes to screen for risk factors for adverse events.
The aim of this unit of study is to develop students' abilities to apply evidence-based practice during the management of selected complex musculoskeletal presentations. A case-study based approach to learning will be adopted throughout the unit of study. Using interactive lectures, students will study selected cases that can be used as templates to facilitate foundation clinical behaviours for beginning physiotherapy graduates. Further, students will be guided through the application of the various domains of evidence based practice over the period of management for each representative case. During concurrent tutorial sessions, students will practice the application of advanced physiotherapy procedures, including manipulation for selected regions. Classroom demonstrations will be supported by online video and other materials to enhance the learning experience. Overall, unit of study content will provide the background for students to apply and evaluate a range of strategies to decrease pain, and improve impairments and function in patients with a range of complex conditions. Thus, this unit of study will consolidate the theoretical and practical bases for clinical intervention in the area of musculoskeletal physiotherapy to prepare students for the range of complex conditions they will confront upon graduation.
PHTY4111 Neurological & Cardiopulmonary Physio B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Colleen Canning, Dr Zoe McKeough Session: Semester 1a Classes: 8-hr lectures/week for 3 weeks, 2x2-hr tutorial/week for 3 weeks. Unit is conducted over 4 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3071 Assessment: 2hr written exam (80%) and 10min practical/viva exam (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines the scientific basis for clinical intervention in neurological and cardiopulmonary physiotherapy. The cardiopulmonary module will examine a range of complex clinical issues organised on a case-basis including multi-system dysfunction (physiological, psychological and social). Students will be expected to evaluate the scientific basis and ethical, legal and practical implications of current physiotherapy interventions in relation to the case studies. The neurological module focuses on the physiotherapy management of spinal cord lesions incorporating scientifically-derived and evidence-based practice and integrated patient-centred healthcare.
PHTY4112 Physiotherapy Practicum D

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Belinda Judd Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: 37-hrs/wk for 5 weeks at clinical facilities Prerequisites: PHTY2052, PHTY2053, PHTY3068, PHTY3069, PHTY3070, PHTY3071 Corequisites: PHTY4110, PHTY4111, PHTY4113 Assessment: Assessment based on clinical performance, written material, communication skills, organisational skills and professionalism (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Physiotherapy Practicum D involves clinical placement in an area not previously covered in physiotherapy practicum A, B or C: rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory/outpatients, community health or an elective unit such as paediatrics, private practice, burns or hand therapy. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. During practicum placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. Physiotherapy Practicum A, B, C, D, E are all five week placements which require full-time attendance (37 hours per week) at clinical facilities. In addition, at least one of the placements will be in a rural or regional setting.
PHTY4113 Physiotherapy Practicum E

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Belinda Judd Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Intensive June,Intensive March,Intensive May,Intensive November,Intensive October,Intensive September Classes: 37-hrs/wk for 5 weeks at clinical facilities Prerequisites: PHTY2052, PHTY2053, PHTY3068, PHTY3069, PHTY3070, PHTY3071 Corequisites: PHTY4110, PHTY4111, PHTY4112 Assessment: Assessment based on clinical performance, written material, communication skills, organisational skills and professionalism (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Physiotherapy Practicum E involves clinical placement in an area not previously covered in physiotherapy practicum A, B,C or D: rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory/outpatients, community health or an elective unit such as paediatrics, private practice, burns or hand therapy. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. During practicum placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. Physiotherapy Practicum A, B, C, D, E are all five week placements which require full-time attendance (37 hours per week) at clinical facilities. In addition, at least one of the placements will be in a rural or regional setting.
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
PHTY4114 Physiotherapy in Childhood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jennifer Follett Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 6x2-hr tutorial/semester plus structured learning activities Prerequisites: PHTY4110, PHTY4111 Corequisites: PHTY4112, PHTY4113 Assessment: Written report -Pre-school activity (30%) and written exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to prepare the student as a competent entry-level practitioner in paediatric physiotherapy. Emphasis is given to students developing a clear understanding of typical development and the potential influences upon a child's development. The student will become aware of the changes which occur from infancy to maturity in the neuromotor, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary body systems, and the impact of congenital or acquired conditions, or lifestyle diseases causing dysfunction in one or more of these systems. The emphasis of the teaching approach will be on clinical and ethical reasoning) to promote health and well-being for children within a family-centred practice framework. Paediatric clinical scenarios have been designed to help students in their learning to problem-solve assessment and management strategies for children with dysfunction, and/or are at risk of poor health and well-being. The approach will also emphasise the role of physiotherapy within broader health care teams/services so as to prepare students for the variety of health care settings/contexts in which paediatric physiotherapists may work. The unit is designed to facilitate students to integrate prior learning from other units of study with the content of this unit.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook (not compulsory)
PHTY4115 Physiotherapy in Preventative Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mi-Joung Lee Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial over 6 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3072, PHTY3073, PHTY3074, PHTY3075 Corequisites: PHTY4112, PHTY4113 Assessment: 15 min group presentation (30%) and individual viva (oral) exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a framework for exploring the role of physiotherapy in the prevention of chronic injury and disease. Preventative health issues specific to women, the elderly, workers and athletes will be addressed. Physiotherapy service delivery in a range of settings will be explored including the community, workplace, sporting arena and the clinic. Students will examine the social determinants of heath and disease and will apply health promotion models to facilitate health-enhancing behaviour change in a range of populations and settings. The evidence basis of physical activity and exercise for the prevention of chronic conditions and injuries will also be explored and evaluated.
PHTY4116 Exercise as Physiotherapy in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zoe McKeough Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr practical over 6 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3072, PHTY3073, PHTY3074, PHTY3075 Corequisites: PHTY4112, PHTY4113 Assessment: 15 min group presentation (30%) and invividual viva (oral) exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This purpose unit of study assists the student to develop integrated management strategies which address particular primary health issues and the common comorbid conditions attendant on them. The unit will consist of a lecture series exploring contemporary health issues and the availability of community-based services in the prevention of disease and the restoration of function following injury or illness. There will be a strong practical component to the unit, during which students will explore and evaluate interventions based on exercise prescription, particularly to groups in a community context. As part of the unit, students will be assisted in the development of skills relevant to the supervision and direction of other personnel, including exercise scientists and physiotherapy assistants. The unit builds on content covered and practical expertise gained through pre-clinical units of study and the clinical practica undertaken earlier in the course.
PHTY4117 Physiotherapy Management in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Susan Coulson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial over 6 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3072, PHTY3073, PHTY3074, PHTY3075 Corequisites: PHTY4112, PHTY4113 Assessment: 15 min group presentation (30%) and individual viva (oral) exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on prior learning in musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiopulmonary aspects of physiotherapy and community experience while consolidating knowledge and skills learned on clinical practica. Complex cases requiring inter-professional referral and management will be undertaken. Students will participate in panel discussions, debates and in master classes requiring synthesis of information and application of discipline-specific content to scenarios outside of their university/clinical practicum learning environment.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS

Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy) Electives

Students choose one elective.
Availability of electives may vary from year to year.

Physiotherapy electives

HSBH3007 Cancer: Prevention through to Palliation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Sharon Kilbreath Session: Intensive October,Semester 2 Classes: 4x1-hr lectures/week and 1x2-hr tutorial/week for 6 weeks (Week 10 - 15) Prerequisites: Students must have completed at least 48 credit points Assessment: Group presentation (15mins) (30%), 2-hr exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Cancer has been listed as one of the top priorities by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare due to the commonality of this disease and its impact. In this unit of study, students will be introduced to a range of issues related to prevention, detection and interventions for cancer. Breast cancer will be used as the exemplar, but we will also draw examples from other cancer. Topics to be covered will include an overview of the pathophysiology of cancer and the medical management of this condition, detection of cancer (imaging), role of exercise in prevention through palliation, prevention and interventions for psychosocial and physical impairments arising from treatments, communication strategies for persons with cancer and their families, and an overview of services for the cancer community, including the patient. One of the focuses of intervention strategies will be patient-centred care, informed by current evidence.
HSBH3008 Interdisciplinary eHealth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melanie Nguyen, Dr Mary Lam, Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH1010 Assessment: Reflection task (15%), case study (40%), eHealth portfolio (40%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study aims to provide senior students with a range of eHealth experiences on which they can make evidence-based decisions. In particular, this unit will provide students with opportunities to examine: how emerging technologies affect patient-centred, interdisciplinary communication and healthcare; strategies for interacting with patients and clients using different technologies; how technology affects health care in different Australian health contexts by drawing upon their clinical experiences and research literature; issues surrounding eHealth practice; innovations in eHealth including designing health apps for mobile devices; the role of technology in healthcare management. Students will develop skills identified as key for future clinicians and create an ePortfolio to showcase their learning to potential employers. This unit will also enhance students as learners by providing them with reflective learning skills, interdisciplinary health experiences and opportunities to integrate their clinical and university learning experiences through case-based learning.
HSBH3012 FHS Abroad

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elaine Ryan, Dr Charlotte Scarf Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Full-day briefing session, half-day debriefing session. Prerequisites: Successful completion of all 1st year units in an undergraduate FHS degree Assessment: Pre-departure research (30%), field diary (20%), report (40%) and presentation (10%). Practical field work: 4-6 weeks working with a community-based organisation in a developing country. Mode of delivery: Field experience
Cultural practices, disease patterns and healthcare systems are vastly different in different countries around the globe. This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain international experience in a health services setting in a developing country. Students will participate in a 4-6 week health or care placement with a community-based organisation in South or Southeast Asia. Countries where students can be placed include Vietnam, Cambodia, India and Nepal. As part of the unit, you will be expected to participate in local development programs, live within the community that you are visiting, and document and reflect on key health and development issues facing local populations. The unit will require you to demonstrate cultural sensitivity and an ability to adapt to new environments, a capacity for critical reflection and awareness of complex global health and development issues.

Bachelor of Applied Science (Physiotherapy) Honours

View semester session codes here.

Course BHASPHYH-05: Honours course; full-time, 4 years

Years 1 to 2

As per Pass course

Year 3 (first offered 2015)

Semester 1
PHTY3081 PT in Musculoskeletal Conditions C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Evangelos Pappas Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2059 Assessment: Mid semester practical assessment (15%), end semester practical assessment (25%), end semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will integrate knowledge from earlier units of study and develop the skills required for primary care management of musculoskeletal conditions with a more complex presentation. Students learn to distinguish patients with non-specific pain from those suspected of having underlying disease/pathology. The unit covers the epidemiology of acute and chronic spinal pain (risk factors, clinical course, prognostic factors) and degenerative joint disease (osteoarthritis) and the assessment of treatment outcomes for such conditions. The evidence base for management options is explored and students learn to apply a range of treatments such as education and advice, manual therapy, exercise, McKenzie therapy etc. Students will develop the ability to select and implement interventions based on clinical reasoning, principles of evidence-based practice and safety. Students will also consider the implementation of management guidelines for work-related injuries, including whiplash, soft tissue injury and musculoskeletal injury of the low back, neck and upper limb.
Textbooks
Brukner P and Khan K (2012): Clinical Sports Medicine (4th Ed). Sydney: McGraw-Hill
PHTY3082 PT in Neurological Conditions B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Natalie Allen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2061 Assessment: Mid-semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The first module of this unit focuses on the physiotherapy management of spinal cord lesions incorporating scientifically-derived and evidence-based practice and integrated patient-centred healthcare. The second module examines the pathology, impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions arising from neurodegenerative conditions which require adaptation (such as Parkinsonism, multiple sclerosis, and motor neuron disease). Students learn to assess and train or prescribe appropriate aids to enable activities such as rolling over, sitting, walking, transferring, wheelchair mobility and reaching and manipulating objects to be carried out.
Textbooks
Carr JH, Shepherd RB/Neurological Rehabilitation - Optimizing motor performance 2nd ed. 2010
PHTY3084 Paediatric Physiotherapy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week over 13 weeks, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week over 6 weeks Corequisites: PHTY3081, PHTY3082, PHTY3087 Assessment: 1x2-hr written exam (70%), written report (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to prepare the student for practice in the area of paediatric physiotherapy. Emphasis is given to students developing a clear understanding of typical development and the potential influences upon a child's development. The student will become aware of the changes which occur from infancy to maturity in the neuro-motor, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary body systems, and the impact of congenital or acquired conditions, or lifestyle diseases causing dysfunction in one or more of these systems. The emphasis of the teaching approach will be on clinical and ethical reasoning within the WHO ICF (International Classification of Function) to promote health and well-being for children within a family-centred practice framework. Paediatric clinical scenarios are designed to help students self-direct their learning in order to problem-solve assessment and management strategies for children with dysfunction, and/or are at risk of poor health and well-being. The approach will also emphasise the role of physiotherapy within broader health care teams/services to prepare students for the variety of health care settings/contexts in which paediatric physiotherapists may work. The unit is designed to facilitate students to integrate prior learning from other units of study with the content of this unit.
PHTY3087 PT in Respiratory & Cardiac Conditions B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maree Milross Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week Prerequisites: PHTY2061, PHTY2062 Assessment: Mid-semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester practical/viva assessment (20%), end of semester written exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The acute care module focuses on assessment and treatment of patients with acute pulmonary dysfunction. In addition students examine specific clinical and professional issues relating to the intensive care and acute care environment. The emphasis is on appropriate assessment, safe and effective management of intubated and non-intubated patients. The acute neurological and cardiopulmonary care module focuses on physiotherapy management of acute neurological and neurosurgical conditions. The unit examines the scientific basis for clinical intervention and examines a range of complex clinical issues organised on a case-basis including multi-system dysfunction (physiological, psychological and social). Students will be expected to evaluate the scientific basis and ethical, legal and practical implications of current physiotherapy interventions in relation to the case studies.
Textbooks
Pryor JA and Prasad SA Physiotherapy for Respiratory and Cardiac Problems 4th ed. 2008
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semeter 2
BHSC3021 Honours A: Research Design

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 12x1hr Inter-disciplinary seminars, 12x1hr Discipline specific topics, 6x1hr FRG, mentor or supervisor research meetings Assessment: Ethics application OR Research proposal OR Discussion paper on appropriate methodology (5,000 words or as per ethics or journal requirements) (70%), Multiple choice and short answer format exam on inter-disciplinary material (30%) Practical field work: Optional discipline specific practicals Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides the conceptual framework and theoretical knowledge and some practical skills required to understand how scientific research is conducted and interpreted. The core content is fundamental for researchers and clinicians alike for evidence-based-practice and life-long learning. Content and skills are taught/learned via a series of web-based and class-based activities.
Textbooks
Polgar, Stephen. Introduction to research in the health sciences / Stephen Polgar, Shane A. Thomas. Edinburgh ; New York : Elsevier, 2008 ISBN 9780443074295
PHTY3083 Clinical Practicum B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Julia Blackford/Belinda Judd Session: Intensive August,Intensive February,Intensive September Classes: 37 hrs/week for 5 weeks at clinical facilities Prerequisites: PHTY2063, PHTY3081, PHTY3082, PHTY3087 Corequisites: Corequisites: PHTY3085 Assessment: Assessment based on clinical performance, written material, communication skills, organisational skills and professionalism (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study involves clinical placements in one of the four following areas: rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory care/outpatients and community/general. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in both the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. During practicum placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. In addition, students will be responsible for individual and group training sessions such as strength and fitness sessions. Clinical Practicum B is a five-week placement which require full-time attendance (37 hours per week) at clinical facilities. In addition, it may be in a rural or regional setting.
PHTY3085 Clinical Practicum C

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Julia Blackford/Belinda Judd Session: Intensive February,Intensive September Classes: 37 hrS/week for 5 weeks at clinical facilities Prerequisites: PHTY2063, PHTY3081, PHTY3082, PHTY3087 Corequisites: Corequisites: PHTY3083 Assessment: Assessment based on clinical performance, written material, communication skills, organisational skills and professionalism (100%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study involves clinical placements in one of the four following areas: rehabilitation, acute care, ambulatory care/outpatients and community/general. Students will be required to demonstrate competence in both the specific clinical skills for each area as well as the generic skills and attributes of physiotherapy professionals. During practicum placements there will be opportunities for interprofessional learning. In addition, students will be responsible for individual and group training sessions such as strength and fitness sessions. Clinical Practicum C is a five-week placement which require full-time attendance (37 hours per week) at clinical facilities. In addition, the placements may be in a rural or regional setting.
PHTY3086 Physiotherapy in Multisystem Problems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sue Coulson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4-hr lecture/week, 2-hr tutorial or practical/week over 6 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3081 Assessment: 1x2-hr written exam (70%), group presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, students will explore common clinical conditions in which the primary problem is complicated by the co-existence of other pathologies, involvement of other physiological systems or where environmental, psychological or socio-economic factors are of primary significance. Students will design and evaluate interventions for conditions such as cervicogenic headache, respiratory disease with and without diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, cancer, pregnancy and women and men¿s health issues. Students will also consider the impact of mental health problems on patient responses and will investigate other complex clinical cases involving health, psycho-social and socio-economic factors, particularly in older people. The unit will provide the student with an understanding of the roles of other health workers and of the relevant legislation and social services relevant to the care of people within the community and in remote areas.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL:24 CREDIT POINTS

Year 4 (last offered 2015)

Semester 1
As per pass program
SEMESTER 1 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS
Semester 2
PHTY4114 Physiotherapy in Childhood

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Jennifer Follett Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 6x2-hr tutorial/semester plus structured learning activities Prerequisites: PHTY4110, PHTY4111 Corequisites: PHTY4112, PHTY4113 Assessment: Written report -Pre-school activity (30%) and written exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to prepare the student as a competent entry-level practitioner in paediatric physiotherapy. Emphasis is given to students developing a clear understanding of typical development and the potential influences upon a child's development. The student will become aware of the changes which occur from infancy to maturity in the neuromotor, musculoskeletal and cardiopulmonary body systems, and the impact of congenital or acquired conditions, or lifestyle diseases causing dysfunction in one or more of these systems. The emphasis of the teaching approach will be on clinical and ethical reasoning) to promote health and well-being for children within a family-centred practice framework. Paediatric clinical scenarios have been designed to help students in their learning to problem-solve assessment and management strategies for children with dysfunction, and/or are at risk of poor health and well-being. The approach will also emphasise the role of physiotherapy within broader health care teams/services so as to prepare students for the variety of health care settings/contexts in which paediatric physiotherapists may work. The unit is designed to facilitate students to integrate prior learning from other units of study with the content of this unit.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook (not compulsory)
PHTY4117 Physiotherapy Management in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Susan Coulson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x2-hr tutorial over 6 weeks Prerequisites: PHTY3072, PHTY3073, PHTY3074, PHTY3075 Corequisites: PHTY4112, PHTY4113 Assessment: 15 min group presentation (30%) and individual viva (oral) exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on prior learning in musculoskeletal, neurological and cardiopulmonary aspects of physiotherapy and community experience while consolidating knowledge and skills learned on clinical practica. Complex cases requiring inter-professional referral and management will be undertaken. Students will participate in panel discussions, debates and in master classes requiring synthesis of information and application of discipline-specific content to scenarios outside of their university/clinical practicum learning environment.
PHTY4118 Honours Dissertation

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paulo Ferreira Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x3-hr lectures; research project participation 50 hours/semester Assessment: 1x seminar presentation (30%) and 1x5000wd essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The program consists of a series of formal classes in which a number of topics relevant to practical and theoretical aspects of research will be covered. These sessions will include discussion and instruction in research design and data analysis, database management, research ethics and scientific writing and the processes by which a research idea is translated into a project. In addition, students will have an opportunity to discuss the work of a distinguished scientist with that person in an informal setting. Opportunities will be provided for students to discuss the progress of their own research areas and to obtain help, from staff and their peers, in dealing with any issues that arise in the course of the semester. Students are required to spend 50 hours in "hands-on" research activity. The nature of this supports the concept of a broad-based experience, including aspects of development and design, data collection, data analysis and interpretation and the presentation of results. Students will work in depth on one particular aspect of a research project.
SEMESTER 2 TOTAL: 24 CREDIT POINTS