Nutrition Science

Study in the area of Nutrition Science is taught by the School of Life and Environmental Sciences in the Faculty of Science. Units of study in this major are available at standard level.

About the major

Nutrition Science is a multidisciplinary area of study that covers the role of food and nutrients in health and disease, across the lifespan. You will explore the basics of biology and biochemistry before focusing on human nutrition. You will have opportunity to further develop critical thinking skills as you investigate nutrition and the effects of nutrients on health and disease from the molecular to the systems level. You will learn how we sense, digest, metabolise and store nutrients and also develop a wide range of laboratory and research skills, including working with big data sets. There is a strong emphasis on communication skills; written, visual and spoken. This major will provide a strong foundation for a possible career as a nutrition scientist, a research pathway, or, with additional prerequisites, competitive entry to the Master of Nutrition and Dietetics program.

Requirements for completion

A major in Nutrition Science requires 48 credit points, consisting of:

(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level biochemistry units or
(b) 6 credit points of 2000-level MEDS coded biochemistry units for students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level major core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level core interdisciplinary project units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level major disciplinary selective or interdisciplinary project units

A minor in Nutrition Science requires 36 credit points, consisting of:

(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level units according to the following rules:
(a) 6 credit points of 2000-level biochemistry units or
(b) 6 credit points of 2000-level MEDS coded biochemistry units for the students in the Medical Science stream
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level minor core units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level minor selective

First year

Core to major: BIOL1XX7 From Molecules to Ecosystems, CHEM1XX1 Chemistry 1A

Second year

Core to major: BCMB2X01 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, BCMB2X02 Proteins in Cells

Third year

NUTM3001 Introductory Nutrition and Metabolism, NUTM3888 Metabolic Cybernetics (designated project unit), FOOD3001 Food Processing and Value Adding,
and 6 credit points from a selection of: BCHM3X82 Medical and Metabolic, BCHM3X71 Molecular Biology and Biochemistry-Genes, BCHM3X81 Mol Biology and Biochemistry-Proteins, BCHM3X72 Human Molecular Cell Biology, MICR3XXX
In your third year you must take at least one designated project unit.

Fourth year

The fourth year is only offered within the combined Bachelor of Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies course.

Advanced Coursework
The Bachelor of Advanced Studies advanced coursework option consists of 48 credit points, with a minimum of 24 credit points at 4000-level or above. Of these 24 credit points, you must complete a project unit of study worth at least 12 credit points. Advanced coursework will be included in the table for 2020.

Contact and further information

W http://sydney.edu.au/science/life-environment/
E
T +61 2 9351 5819

Address:
Level 4 East,
Charles Perkins Centre D17
University of Sydney NSW 2006

Mrs Wendy Stuart-Smith
E

Dr Kim Bell-Anderson
E

Learning Outcomes

  1. Exhibit a broad and coherent body of knowledge in energy regulation, utilisation and fuel transport, describing the importance of these principles and processes in maintaining health status and how they area are affected in obesity and diabetes.
  2. Exhibit a depth of knowledge in nutrient requirements, processing and utilisation within the human body and integrate core principles and concepts to evaluate how these vary across life stages and health status.
  3. Execute a variety of discipline-specific research and analytical skills safely and productively within laboratory settings.
  4. Work safely and productively in collaborative laboratory settings, using applied knowledge of modern medical and metabolic biochemistry.
  5. Communicate concepts and findings in nutrition science through a range of modes for a variety of purposes and audiences, using evidence-based arguments that are robust to critique.
  6. Source, collate, synthesise and critically evaluate the scientific literature in nutrition science, examining and positioning the validity of their own research data.
  7. Relate food safety, food science and food processing concepts to human physiology and nutrition using a systems-level approach.
  8. Devise and investigate novel research questions in nutrition science, food science and food processing.
  9. Address authentic problems in nutrition science, working professionally and ethically and with consideration of cross-cultural perspectives, in collaborative, interdisciplinary teams.