Business School

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Business School
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
CLAW2209
Intellectual Property for Business
6    P 24 credit points of study
Semester 1
CLAW2211
Commercial Practice in China
6    P 24 credit points of study
Semester 2
CLAW2212
Franchising
6    P 24 credit points of study
Semester 2
CLAW2213
Legal Regulation of Int'l Business
6    P 24 credit points of study
Semester 2
CLAW3209
The Environment, Law and Business
6      Semester 1
CLAW3210
Banking and Financial Law
6    P completion of at least 48 credit points
N CLAW2204
Semester 1
IBUS2101
International Business Strategy
6      Intensive January
Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS3103
Entrepreneurship and Innovation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

6    P 48 credit points of units


Students enrolled in the combined Law degrees are able to complete this unit in their third year of enrolment (full-time).
Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS3104
Ethical International Business Decisions
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
Semester 1
Semester 2
IBUS3107
Business Negotiations
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points


This unit will require student's participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of your grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
Semester 2
IBUS3108
Social Entrepreneurship
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
Semester 1
INFS2010
People, Information and Knowledge
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 2
INFS2020
Business Process Modelling and Improvement
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 2
INFS2030
Digital Business Management
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 1
INFS2040
Project Management Foundations
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
N INFO3402 or ENGG1850
Semester 2
INFS2050
Data Governance and Technology Assurance
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
N INFS3010 or INFS3030
Semester 2
INFS3040
Enterprise Systems and Integrated Business
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 1
INFS3050
Business Intelligence for Managers
6    A INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903
Semester 2
WORK2203
IR Policy and Processes
6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study including (WORK1003 or WORK1002)
Semester 2
WORK2205
HR Strategies and Processes
6    P 24 credit points of Junior units of study including (WORK1003 or WORK1002)
Semester 1
WORK2210
Strategic Management
6    P 40 credit points worth of units of study
Semester 1
Semester 2
WORK2218
Managing Organisational Behaviour
6    P 24 Junior credit points
Semester 1
Semester 2
WORK3201
International Human Resource Management
6    A WORK1003
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2217
Intensive June
Semester 1
WORK3202
Leadership
6    P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2222
Semester 1
WORK3204
Managing Organisational Sustainability
6    A WORK1004 or WORK2201
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2219
Semester 1
WORK3205
Organisational Communication
6    A WORK1004 or WORK2201
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2221


The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in the Semester 2 session.
Intensive July
Semester 2
WORK3206
Workplace Law and Regulation
6    A WORK1003
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2227
Semester 2
WORK3207
Future of Work
6    A WORK1003
P Completion of at least 48 credit points
N WORK2225
Semester 1

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Business School
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
CLAW2209 Intellectual Property for Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: 24 credit points of study Assessment: class participation (10%), case study (15%), presentation (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Innovation is a key driver of business. This unit addresses the intellectual property regime - the statutory and common law mechanisms that recognise and protect creative effort and proprietary knowledge and reward innovation. The intellectual property rights available under the law are discussed but the focus is on the commercial implications of the IP regime. This unit covers not only the protection and enforcement of Intellectual Property Rights [IPRs] but also their commercialisation and the management. The unit outlines the key IPRs granted by the statutory IP regimes - trademarks, copyright, designs and patents - as well as the common law protection of confidential information and trade secrets. The protection of trade designations, branding and character merchandising through the statutory misleading or deceptive conduct action is also covered as is the protection of business goodwill through restraint of trade covenants. The ownership of IP, its protection internationally and its commercialisation through licensing and technology transfers are also discussed.
CLAW2211 Commercial Practice in China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week, which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of study Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), group presentation (15%), proposal of research paper (10%), research paper (40%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
China is currently the second biggest economy in the world and is Australia's most important trading partner. Australian businesses are increasingly engaging with China. This Unit of Study addresses the frequently asked questions of what underpins commercial practice in China and how to do business with China. It explores China's unique business environment, which has resulted from its culture, history and demography, and examines the business regulations, tax system, and the administrative and compliance issues businesses will face when carrying on business with China. The Unit first outlines the Chinese business environment in terms of culture, history, economics, demography, and government administration. It then provides students with an understanding of the legal environment that businesses will face in China. Through a hypothetical case study, different aspects of commercial practice in China such as contract, entity structure, mergers and acquisition, property and intellectual property rights, the tax system, different tax types and associated international issues, and social insurance are analysed.
CLAW2212 Franchising

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: 24 credit points of study Assessment: engagement and participation (10%), in-class test (10%), in-class test (15%), presentation (25%), research assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Franchising is an increasingly popular business model in Australia and internationally which offers an effective strategy for expanding an existing business or entering an industry. It is rapidly becoming the dominating force in the distribution of goods and services. This unit examines the nature, development and operation of franchising and its growing influence in Australia and overseas. It addresses key legal and commercial issues in establishing, structuring and managing franchise systems as well as legal and commercial issues arising in the course of the continuing business relationship. Particular emphasis is placed on franchising development in the ASEAN countries.
CLAW2213 Legal Regulation of Int'l Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three hours of classes per week which may include one or more of the following: lectures; seminars; tutorials or workshops Prerequisites: 24 credit points of study Assessment: presentation (20%), mid-semester test (40%), research paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The global architecture of international trade and business sets the parameters within which countries and businesses interact with each other across borders. All those involved in trade or investment activities that may result in cross border transactions should be aware of the regulatory dimensions of that global system. The system informs trade and investment policy as well as the regulation of particular business transactions. This can lead to new markets or limit certain business activities. It can result in new regulation and laws and provides avenues to resolve disputes between countries and businesses and between businesses and businesses. The international regulatory system has different dimensions. These can be described as the multilateral system; bilateral agreements and trading blocs; conventions governing transactions; international regulatory bodies and self regulatory bodies. This unit will introduce students to aspects of this international system. Students will explore institutions and instruments of the system and how they fit together. There will be opportunities for students to examine how this impacts on regulatory policy and current negotiations.
CLAW3209 The Environment, Law and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive 3-hour seminars involving lectures, student presentations and critiques, and class discussions. Assessment: class discussion leading on seminal reading (10%); in-class test (20%); research project proposal presentation (10%); critique (10%); individual research project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The relationship between the natural environment and business practice is deep and complex, and a multiplicity of regulatory initiatives have been employed in an attempt to manage and influence their interaction. This unit of study aims to demystify environmental regulation as far as it is relevant to the running of a business. It begins with an analysis of the contemporary institutional framework surrounding the interaction between business and the environment with particular reference to the historical conditions which have given rise to it, before introducing major stakeholders in the development of environmental and business regulation (including nation states, international organisations and other non-state actors) and their respective roles. The unit then discusses international environmental regulation and situates Australian regulation within it in order to explain its impact on Australian businesses. The effectiveness of different regulatory styles in this area is assessed together with the argument that business can and should take ownership of problematic elements of their interactions with the natural environment. Different strategies developed to 'manage' a business' relationship with the environment and issues surrounding liability for environmental damage are also considered.
CLAW3210 Banking and Financial Law

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prerequisites: completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: CLAW2204 Assessment: mid-semester exam (25%), case study / research (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Banks and financial institutions are central to the stability, efficiency and wealth of modern economies and businesses. This unit focuses on the impact of national and international financial regulation on banking contracts, bank secrecy, money laundering and fraud. Students become familiar with legal risks in commercial and investment banking, by examining the complex relationships and legal duties of the various parties engaged in modern finance. Topics covered include electronic banking, international trade finance and securitisation. The unit assists students to understand how the law is applied in practice through the use of case studies. Special emphasis is placed on how banking disputes may be resolved.
IBUS2101 International Business Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture and 1x 1hr workshop per week. Assessment: mid-term exam (20%), tutorial participation (10%), consulting project (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
This unit of study aim to understand how multinational enterprises strategize and operate in global competition. Major topics include the International Business Environment (e.g. the differences in economic, political, legal, and cultural environments); International Business Strategy (e.g. International expansion strategy, entry mode choices, cross-border strategic alliances, and mergers and acquisitions); and International Business Management (e.g. design, structure and control of international operations; and foreign subsidiary management). The emphasis of the unit is on the application of contextual knowledge about international business and strategic management theories as tailored to the Asia Pacific, to analyse and make decisions faced by companies operating in the Asia Pacific region.
IBUS3103 Entrepreneurship and Innovation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Massimo Garbuio Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1 x 1.5hr tutorial/lab class per week. Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: take home assessment (25% - part 1 10% & part 2 15%), individual report (20%), in class assessment (25%), group presentation (15%), business plan (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students enrolled in the combined Law degrees are able to complete this unit in their third year of enrolment (full-time).
Successful entrepreneurship requires knowledge of several key business processes and is ideally learned by actually starting a business. In this unit of study, you will learn the business processes and concepts that will help you becoming an entrepreneur. Working towards a pitch and a business plans the most effective way to master many of the critical skills and concepts of entrepreneurship since it simulates, to a degree, real world processes. During this unit, you will learn how to investigate customer needs and markets to generate an innovative idea for a start-up. Then, you will participate in the realistic simulation of the creation of a start-up from the best student-submitted ideas to develop these ideas into a business model. All students will join a team that will remain together for the entire duration of the unit and will create and pitch sections of a business plan as well draft the final complete business plan for their company. The unit will bring together the skills you have acquired across multiple disciplines of study and will require your active participation as you work towards raising funds for starting your business.
IBUS3104 Ethical International Business Decisions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3 hour seminar per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: Group project (30%), final exam (30%), workshops (20%), and reflective journals (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In order to succeed in international business, both corporations and individuals need broad decision-making abilities. Business decision-making tools yield more coherent and justifiable results when used with an understanding of the ethical, social and environmental aspects of the process. This applies to various situations in the international business setting including business relations with government, customers, employees, and NGOs. This unit is designed to look at these non-financial elements in the decisions made within the international business context. Following the completion of this unit, students will have enhanced skills and knowledge relevant to the understanding of ethical issues and ethical decisions making in international business organizations.
IBUS3107 Business Negotiations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: In-class exercises (50%), written assignment (10%), exam (25%), writing a ten page negotiator's handbook (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit will require student's participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of your grade, will require time-pressured reading of material in class.
The purpose of this unit is to build students' understanding of the theory of negotiation as it is practised in a variety of strategic settings. The aim is to build students' confidence with the negotiation process. The unit is relevant to the broad spectrum of negotiation problems that are faced by managers and specific examples from international strategy such as M and A and joint ventures are used. The unit provides participants with an opportunity to develop skills experientially and to understand negotiation in useful analytic frameworks. Considerable emphasis is placed on role-playing exercises and case studies. This unit requires participation in a number of negotiations. Preparation for these negotiations, which are a large part of the final grade, requires time-pressured reading of material in class.
IBUS3108 Social Entrepreneurship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1.5hr lecture and 1x 1.5hr workshop per week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Assessment: individual report (25%), practice and final pitch (25%), final report (25%), reflective piece (15%), workshop engagement and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide you the opportunity to learn how you can apply your business knowledge and skills to address complex social and environmental problems. Social entrepreneurs are committed to furthering a social mission, and rank social, environmental or cultural impact on a par with, or even above, profit. At the intersection of business and not-for-profit organisations, these social entrepreneurs are now visible and having an impact on a global scale. This unit is structured around engaged inquiry-based learning, proving you the opportunity to learn from theory and practice. Topics will include critically reviewing concepts, challenges of growing a social enterprise, frameworks for understanding, sourcing funds from a variety of stakeholders, understanding and reporting social impact, as well as collaboration and leadership.
INFS2010 People, Information and Knowledge

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: group project report (30%); group project presentation (10%); individual assignment (10%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To compete effectively in today's knowledge economy businesses are required to systematically manage their information and knowledge resources. In this unit you will develop an understanding of the main issues businesses face when they develop and implement knowledge management initiatives. You will be introduced to the tools and systems that enable businesses to acquire, store, distribute, analyse, and leverage information and knowledge resources. By focusing on the theoretical and practical principles that link people, information, and organisations, this unit will help you understand the processes of generating, communicating, and using knowledge in businesses, and the way these can be integrated with business strategy and information technology. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2020 Business Process Modelling and Improvement

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3 hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides you with an in depth understanding of the role of business process management (BPM) and process architectures in a business environment. You will gain essential skills of the entire BPM lifecycle, from process identification to process monitoring, including process modelling, analysis, redesign and automation required to achieve high performing business processes in a service oriented business environment. In this unit, you will attain considerable hands-on skills with BPM tools, by documenting, analysing, and simulating current and improved processes. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2030 Digital Business Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual project proposal (10%), group project report (35%), group project presentation (5%), mid-term exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide you with a detailed overview of the concepts and models used in doing business digitally via the Internet. These concepts and models will enable you to evaluate, synthesise and implement Internet-enabled business models. The unit will provide the critical link between the firm's performance and modern Internet technologies, such as e-Commerce platforms, Social Media and Social Networking. Emphasis will be put on the utilisation of Internet technologies to enable new forms of digital business, rather than on the technologies themselves. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS2040 Project Management Foundations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFO3402 or ENGG1850 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: group assignment (30%), mid-term exam (20%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Projects are a common way of managing organisational transformation and change, the development of new products and the implementation of Information Technology (IT) in business. Information Systems (IS) business analysts will work in projects and need an understanding of both project management and the project environment. This unit will introduce you to the end-to-end project management lifecycle as described in the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK). You will learn how to successfully manage projects from initiation through execution to completion. The focus of this unit will be on the management, execution, and coordination of project activities. To this end you will learn hands-on project management techniques and gain first hand experience with a modern online project management platform, including an introduction to agile project management methodologies.
INFS2050 Data Governance and Technology Assurance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 3hr seminar per week Prohibitions: INFS3010 or INFS3030 Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (20%), group project (30%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Data governance is a major imperative for organisations in effectively managing, using, protecting and leveraging their critical data assets. This unit introduces students to key concepts, processes, technologies and stakeholders related to the design and implementation of a data governance program. The unit takes an interdisciplinary and multi-level approach that examines standards, frameworks and methodologies for managing data quality, protecting critical and sensitive information, supporting business analytics and meeting compliance obligations. In examining different stages of the data lifecycle, students also learn about legal, professional and ethical responsibilities, policy implications, required skill sets and accountabilities.
INFS3040 Enterprise Systems and Integrated Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: individual assignment (25%), group project (25%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides you with an in depth understanding of the way in which implementation and use of large scale integrated Enterprise Systems change the nature of organisational capabilities, processes, and roles. You will understand the strategic role of Enterprise Systems in providing a platform for improved business operations and designing information infrastructures. You will gain considerable hands on experience with an enterprise wide system, such as SAP, concentrating on the way in which such systems support integrated business processes. Through a combination of discussion and practical work, you will gain strong knowledge in both the organisational and technical aspects of Enterprise Systems You will also explore the emergence and implications of cloud-based Enterprise Systems and the implementation process. Assumed knowledge for this unit is INFS1000 or equivalent.
INFS3050 Business Intelligence for Managers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 3hr seminar per week Assumed knowledge: INFS1000 or INFO1000 or INFO1003 or INFO1903 Assessment: tutorial work (10%), midsession exam (30%), practical assignment (30%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To gain or maintain their competitive edge, more than ever before, organisations need to rely on high-quality information to support decision making processes at all organizational levels. Business Intelligence (BI) is now being recognized as one of the top business priorities world-wide. While in the past, the term BI was used to describe a very broad range of software applications, the latest thinking in this field emphasises IS support for human intelligence, in the context of business decision making. In this unit students learn how BI helps information discovery and how to analyse multidimensional data. Students gain hands-on experience in using a commercial BI platform. These practical skills, combined with in-depth analytical skills enable students to assist any organization (regardless of its size and industry domain) to derive more intelligence from its data, improve its performance and ultimately, compete on analytics. Issues are explored from the business rather than the technology perspective. This unit does not require prior programming experience.
WORK2203 IR Policy and Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1hr tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study including (WORK1003 or WORK1002) Assessment: class participation (10%), tutorial presentation/facilitation (20%), essay/report (40%), final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit of study is to provide an understanding of the institutions and processes engaged in the regulation of work and labour markets. At times of intense change and debate such as today, it becomes all the more important to develop understandings of industrial relations policy which are intellectually rigorous; that is, which are evidence-based, theoretically-explicit and historically-informed. This unit is framed by these considerations. Particular topics may include: the development of policy; the nature of regulation; state and federal government policies; arguments for change; the influence of lobby groups; employer and union strategy; work-family debates and policies; the working of tribunals and courts; dispute settling procedures; the development of wage determination; the outcomes and implications of policy change.
WORK2205 HR Strategies and Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Junior units of study including (WORK1003 or WORK1002) Assessment: multiple choice exam (10%), tutorial activities (20%), research essay (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Building on the foundational coverage of Human Resource Management (HRM) issues and concepts provided in WORK1003, this unit provides a more focused understanding of key HRM concepts, processes, strategies and practices. The unit covers the way HR concepts, such as the employee psychological contract, might shape HR strategies and practices and highlights the interplay between the strategic approaches to HR and the practices of HR including talent attraction and selection; talent retention and development; managing performance and rewards; diversity and inclusion strategies, workplace health and well being to name a few. It concludes with an investigation of how the HRM system can be effectively evaluated to capture the long term sustainability of the HR processes and strategies adopted.
WORK2210 Strategic Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures and 1x 1hr lab time Prerequisites: 40 credit points worth of units of study Assessment: case simulation (40%), case study report (25%), final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores how strategy is formulated, implemented and evaluated. Strategic management concepts, frameworks and tools are applied to organizational case studies. Current debates in strategic management are evaluated for their relevance to strategists in a range of organizational contexts.
WORK2218 Managing Organisational Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: 24 Junior credit points Assessment: individual assignement (20%); group report (20%); group presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to give students the ability to understand how organisations operate. As an introductory organisational behaviour unit, it covers key debates across a range of social science disciplines including business, management, psychology, sociology, and communication studies. Key topics explored include power, control, networks, and organisational culture.
WORK3201 International Human Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive June,Semester 1 Classes: 2x 1 hour lecture and 1x 1.5 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2217 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: quiz (readiness assurance test) - individual (20%); quiz (readiness assurance test) - group (5%); team strategy exercise (20%); written assignment (30%); exam (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
This unit considers the opportunities and challenges associated with managing employees in international and cross-cultural contexts, with specific emphasis on international recruitment, selection, preparation, placement, management development, performance management, reward and remuneration in the international, multi-national and trans-national corporation. Within the context of global labour markets, the unit considers the implications of internationalisation and globalisation for human resource management (HRM), the difference between domestic and international HRM, and the challenges of cross-cultural management. This unit provides students with a theoretical understanding of IHRM and cross-cultural management, as well as a practical understanding of the issues and challenges associated with managing employees in international, global and cross-cultural contexts.
WORK3202 Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2222 Assessment: group assessment (30%), reflective essays (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Leadership is increasingly seen to be a key factor affecting the performance of contemporary organisations and is an important area of study in the fields of management and organisational behaviour. While leadership principles are often associated with the work of senior management, they also have potential application to all members of organisations. This unit explores conventional and alternative perspectives on leadership and also examines the practice of leadership in diverse organisational contexts. Practitioner perspectives, experiences and case studies of business leaders are also presented.
WORK3204 Managing Organisational Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1x 1 hour tutorial hour per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2219 Assumed knowledge: WORK1004 or WORK2201 Assessment: mid-semester test (15%); tutorial participation (10%); sustainability presentations (15%); real-world project essay (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Managing organisational sustainability is critical for effective, contemporary managers. This unit focuses on how to conceptualise and to practice sustainability in its broadest sense. Topics covered include the ethical aspects of management and organisational practice, corporate social responsibility, governance models in organisations and managing in diverse environments. Students are encouraged to enhance their understanding of the roles and responsibilities of management and the impact of organisations on stakeholders including staff, government and community.
WORK3205 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: Semester 2 session: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week. Intensive July session (Study Abroad students only): 2 x 4hr workshops per week. Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2221 Assumed knowledge: WORK1004 or WORK2201 Assessment: tutorial attendance and participation (10%); communication analysis report (30%); team case analysis presentation (20%); final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Block mode
Note: The Intensive July session of this unit is only available to Study Abroad students. All other students should enrol in the Semester 2 session.
Communication is integral to many organisational processes; for instance, effective planning, decision-making, negotiation, conflict management, change management and leadership all rely upon effective communication by organisational actors. At the same time, organisational communication has become more complex due to increasing levels of diversity in the workplace and an increasing reliance on emergent and rapidly changing communication technologies. Drawing on communication research models, theories and case studies, this unit provides students with insight into how to manage the complexities of contemporary organisational communication. The unit focuses primarily on internal organisational communication and examines communication processes at various levels: interpersonal (dyadic), group and organisation.
WORK3206 Workplace Law and Regulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2227 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: case study (30%), tutorial presentation (20%), tutorial participation (10%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the regulatory framework that exists around paid work in Australia. It examines the development of employee and employer rights and responsibilities through the employment contract and labour law. It focuses on both individual and collective regulation of work in Australia paying particular attention to the industrial sphere, as well as discrimination and termination of employment. Both the aim and purpose of industrial regulation and the impact of this regulation on workplace relations is analysed.
WORK3207 Future of Work

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2 hour lecture and 1 x 1 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Completion of at least 48 credit points Prohibitions: WORK2225 Assumed knowledge: WORK1003 Assessment: tutorial work (30%); research essay (30%), final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Contemporary workplaces are, and will continue to be, disrupted by a multitude of factors, many of which are yet to be identified. The aims of this unit are to analyse three significant megatrends facing business today which include: firstly how the people¿s approach and attachments to their work will change in the future; the way technological advancements driven by computing power will shape future work; and finally the implication of globalisation on the future of work. While these three megatrends might provide unprecedented opportunities for business, this unit also debates the significant challenges these megatrends present for individuals, business and the society in which we live.