Dalyell Stream Descriptions

Dalyell Stream

Achievement of the Dalyell stream requires 12 credit points of Dalyell units from this table.
Students in the Dalyell stream may take Dalyell units offered by any faculty.
Units of study
The units of study are listed below.

Arts and Social Sciences

FASS2100 Ideas and Movements that Changed the World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: 4x500wd Reponse Papers (40%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), Seminar Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is committed to deep thinking and learning through engaging with six topics and seven or so key texts with the focus on closely reading these texts. The texts examine ideas across a range of cultures. Ideas and debates regarding feminism, aboriginality, racism, power, identity, narcissism, nationalism, and music will be discussed via these texts. Also movements such as the aboriginal and civil rights movements will be explored as will the revolutionary communist and punk movements. The overall aim of the unit is to make a case for the benefits of broad reading and engaging with ideas, and how doing so can help us think more creatively and in less restricted ways. FASS2100 can be taken before, after, or independently of FASS2200.
FASS2200 Great Books that Changed the World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1.5hr seminar/week Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: 4x500wd Response Papers (40%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), Seminar Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Guided by experts from across the Faculty, students will learn how to interrogate and analyse a range of great books in the humanities and social sciences from both ancient and modern times. Weekly lectures will be followed by seminars where a strong emphasis will be placed on detailed, group discussion to build key skills as well as understanding of the ideas and questions raised by the works studied. Authors and texts covered in the unit could include Homer's Iliad, Plato's The Death of Socrates, Confucius's The Analects, Machiavelli's The Prince, Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species, George Eliot's Middlemarch, Sigmund Freud's Civilizations and its Discontents, and Toni Morrison's Beloved. FASS2200 can be taken before, after, or independently of FASS2100.

Engineering and Information Technology

ENGD1000 Building a Sustainable World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream; ATAR equivalent score of at least 98 and faculty permission Prohibitions: ENGG1111 OR INFO1111 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Real engineering in 1st year! The course is designed to introduce Dalyell students to the essential professional engineering skills of leadership, communication, problem identification and solution, design, teamwork, project management and understanding of the social, cultural, global, ethical and environment responsibilities of the professional engineer. These skills are pursued through a real world Engineers Without Borders Challenge project in a developing country.
ENGD2001 Protecting People Who Use Technology

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, laboratories Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: through semester assessment (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit takes an interdisciplinary approach to think strategically about a selection of key issues that emerge from human-technology interactions. This unit shows how the human-technology interface impacts on what people do with technology (whether a computer program, or a physical equipment), and especially on mistakes that might be made, which can threaten physical safety, social well-being, privacy, and other human needs. The unit will analyse risks that arise from poor or malicious interface design, how one can evaluate these risks, some different ways to limit the risks, and the ethical implications of this. Students will learn about physiological, cognitive, social and cultural aspects of human interaction; diversity among people (including cultural norms etc) impacting both what they aim to do, and how they 'read' instructions, discover affordances and actually use systems. The unit deals with fairness, accountability and transparency of sophisticated interfaces. The unit will provide insights that are important for future leaders, both of technology creation activities and of organizations that include the users. An interdisciplinary approach to evaluating these systems provides an opportunity for collaboration and identification of many factors that would otherwise not typically be considered by the designers of the system. This leads to a collective effort to improve current systems and for future systems to be designed that not only consider better functionality and usability, but also their impact on people, society and the environment across time and space.
ENGD3001 Technological Innovation through New Ventures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures, project work Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course is designed to provide students with the challenging experience of transforming a good idea, of their own choosing, into a commercial reality. It provides the opportunity for students to assess and develop their entrepreneurial skills. It develops the key competencies of opportunity identification, creativity, vision, ideas assessment, self-awareness, motivation, mobilising resources, financial and economic literacy, planning and management, coping with uncertainty and the pursuit of learning through experience.

Science

SCDL1991 Science Dalyell Showcase

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Science Dalyell Coordinator Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: no timetabled hours, 2 hours of weekly group meetings; 3-hr final showcase presentation night Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assumed knowledge: strong understanding of the scientific method. Students should have completed a science subject at HSC level. Assessment: report, presentation, research participation, assignment Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Scientific research is one of the keys to expanding our understanding of the workings of the universe, and is a key driver of technological innovation, which in turn drives many social changes. This unit of study introduces students with a passion and enthusiasm for research science and a demonstrated aptitude in science to scientific research at a tertiary level. In small groups, you will engage with cutting-edge problems studied by research groups across the Faculty of Science, and connected by a theme of current importance and interest. Led by a senior undergraduate mentor, and supported by an academic expert, you will learn about a field of study related to this problem. Together you will collect and critically investigate data, then create models, hypotheses, and conclusions supported by this data. Your group will collectively develop collaboration and communication skills, engaging a wide audience in the Showcase event where you will present your results to other students, academics, and the general public. You will also develop your scientific writing skills, by preparing a scientific report on the outcomes of your study.
SCDL2991 Leadership in STEMM

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x1hr progress and planning meetings. 1 hr/week seminar/interview. Online readings and quizzes. Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Assessment will include online quizzes (25%), discussion participation (15%), an assessment of a leadership activity of your choice by group members (20%) and a critical reflection assignment (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
How can you prepare for impactful careers and leadership in science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM)? This unit will span leadership theory, experience, and practice. You will host, hear from, and engage with experts and leaders with experience leading a wide range of STEMM organizations and endeavours. Examples include entrepreneurs, science policy experts, scientific media personalities, coaching psychologists, leading academics, and leaders of scientific cultural institutions. A key aspect of this unit is your participation in practical leadership of your choice, reflection on this experience, and sharing your learning with your cohort of like-minded future leaders. This unit is open to any student enrolled in the Dalyell stream.
SCDL3991 Science Dalyell Individual Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: To be negotiated with the academic supervisor and departmental Dalyell coordinator. Approximately 9 hours/week of which up to 6 will be contact hours. Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Assessment of this unit will include a project proposal (0%, mandatory), a 3500 word written report (45%), a 15 minute oral presentation including questions (35%), and continuous assessment of your research performance (20%). Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
To discover something new, we must go beyond what we read in books, what we hear in lectures, beyond what is already known. In this unit, you will be doing research, rather than just learning about research others have done. This Dalyell unit is your opportunity to engage in genuine scientific, mathematical, health or medical research, from your second year. You will research and contribute to answering a novel research question, closely aligned to the current research interests of an academic supervisor and group. You will design, plan, and execute a research project, and communicate your results. Depending on your project, this may involve collecting and analysing data, modelling a phenomenon, devising an instrument, synthesizing materials, or theoretical predictions. You will present and report your results and conclusions in a scientific seminar and report. By completing this unit, you will get a first-hand experience of cutting-edge research. Please note: You may consult with departmental Dalyell coordinators to locate potential supervisors. The research question will be chosen in consultation with the academic supervisor, in advance of enrolling in the unit. As part of this, the unit requires permission from an academic supervisor, and the unit coordinator. If necessary, the supervisor may require you to have previous WHS experience relevant to the project. An Individual Research Project Proposal signed by the supervisor should be submitted in the supporting information of your application for departmental permission in Sydney Student.
SCDL3992 Science Dalyell Individual Research Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: To be negotiated with the academic supervisor and departmental Dalyell coordinator. Approximately 9 hours/week of which up to 6 will be contact hours. Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: Assessment of this unit will include a project proposal (0%, mandatory), a 3500 word written report (45%), a 15 minute oral presentation including questions (35%), and continuous assessment of your research performance (20%). Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
To discover something new, we must go beyond what we read in books, what we hear in lectures, beyond what is already known. In this unit, you will be doing research, rather than just learning about research others have done. This Dalyell unit is your opportunity to engage in genuine scientific, mathematical, health or medical research, from your second year. You will research and contribute to answering a novel research question, closely aligned to the current research interests of an academic supervisor and group. You will design, plan, and execute a research project, and communicate your results. Depending on your project, this may involve collecting and analysing data, modelling a phenomenon, devising an instrument, synthesizing materials, or theoretical predictions. You will present and report your results and conclusions in a scientific seminar and report. By completing this unit, you will get a first-hand experience of cutting-edge research. Please note: You may consult with departmental Dalyell coordinators to locate potential supervisors. The research question will be chosen in consultation with the academic supervisor, in advance of enrolling in the unit. As part of this, the unit requires permission from an academic supervisor, and the unit coordinator. If necessary, the supervisor may require you to have previous WHS experience relevant to the project. An Individual Research Project Proposal signed by the supervisor should be submitted in the supporting information of your application for departmental permission in Sydney Student. Please note: This unit is structurally identical to SCDL3991. This allows completion of multiple individual research projects.

Business School

BUDL2901 Leading Creative Solutions: Ideas

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February Classes: blended approach; lectures; tutorials; online Prerequisites: must be in the Dalyell stream Assessment: short essay (20%); long essay (35%); tutorial/online participation (20%); group presentation (based on text and long essay) (25%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit challenges students to think about innovation and problem solving through a critical lens by engaging students with critical incidents and messy problems that have occupied the world: such as for instance, the fraught transport of goods and services; the role of men and women in these critical incidents; agility, resilience and negotiation in the face of disagreement and resistance. Underscoring the insights from key texts examining critical incidents is our ability to look for and find innovative solutions.