Medicine and Health (School of Medical Sciences)

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

Classes have changed for the following units:

IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology. Classes are now: Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight:  2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week.  Two hour tutorials will run weeks 2 to 7 and four hour practical will run from week 8 to 13.

IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced). Classes are now: Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight:  2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week.  Two hour tutorials will run weeks 2 to 7 and four hour practical will run from week 8 to 13.

14/1/2019
2.

The description has changed for the following unit. The description should now read:

IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology. Description: This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course.

14/1/2019
3.

The description has changed for the following unit. The description should now read:

IMMU3902 Molecular and Cellular Immunology (Advanced). Description: This unit is available to students who have performed well in Introductory Immunology (IMMU2101). Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material and carry out practical work as students in IMMU3102 but attend a series of specialized seminar and research based tutorial classes.
14/1/2018

Unit of study Credit points A: Assumed knowledge P: Prerequisites C: Corequisites N: Prohibition Session

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Medicine and Health (School of Medical Sciences)
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
AMED3001
Cancer
6    P 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N AMED3901
Semester 1
AMED3002
Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data
6    A Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra.
Semester 1
AMED3003
Diagnostics and Biomarkers
6    P 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N AMED3903
Semester 2
ANAT2008
Principles of Histology
6    A BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01
N BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808


Due to the independent nature of this course, it is recommended that students have successfully completed 48 credit points of junior units of study before enrolling in ANAT2008.
Semester 1
ANAT2009
Comparative Primate Anatomy
6    P 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX OR MEDS1X01 OR PSYC1XXX OR ARCA1XXX
Semester 2
ANAT2010
Concepts of Neuroanatomy
6    P 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
N ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808
Semester 2
ANAT2011
Fundamentals of Human Anatomy
6    N ANAT3007 or ANAT3907 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808
Semester 1
Semester 2
ANAT2910
Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv
6    P A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
N ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808

Note: Department permission required for enrolment

Semester 2
ANAT3004
Cranial and Cervical Anatomy
6    A Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993)
P 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)]
N ANAT3904 or ANAT3994
Semester 2
ANAT3006
Forensic Osteology
6    A BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01
P ANAT2008 and a mark of 65 or above in ANAT2009
N BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808
Semester 1
ANAT3007
Visceral Anatomy
6    A BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993
P 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)]
N ANAT2011 or ANAT3907 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005
Semester 1
ANAT3008
Musculoskeletal Anatomy
6    A Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993)
P 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI12008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)
N ANAT3908
Semester 2
ANAT3009
Functional Systems Histology
6    A (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993)
P 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)]
N HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3909
Semester 2
CPAT3201
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)]
N CPAT3901
Semester 1
CPAT3202
Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2
6    A Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites
P 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)]
C CPAT3201
N CPAT3901
Semester 2
IMMU2011
Immunobiology
6    A CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
P BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1
N IMMU2911
Semester 1
IMMU3102
Molecular and Cellular Immunology
6    P IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11
N IMMU3902
Semester 1
IMMU3202
Immunology in Human Disease
6    P IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11
N IMMU3903


.
Semester 2
NEUR3003
Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
N NEUR3903
Semester 2
NEUR3004
Integrative Neuroscience
6    A Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain".
N NEUR3904
Semester 2
NEUR3005
Functional Neuroanatomy
6    A [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905
Semester 1
NEUR3006
Neural Information Processing
6    A (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402
P 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906
Semester 1
NEUR3905
Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)
6    A [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
P Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year
N NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005
Semester 1
PCOL2021
Key Concepts in Pharmacology
6    A [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3)
P CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903
N PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or MEDS2002 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2002
Semester 1
PCOL2022
Drugs in Contemporary Society
6    A PCOL2021
P [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903)
N PCOL2555 or PCOL2012
Semester 2
PCOL3011
Toxicology
6    P (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405)
N PCOL3911
Semester 1
PCOL3021
Drug Therapy
6    P (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N PCOL3921
Semester 2
PCOL3022
Neuropharmacology
6    P (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015)
N PCOL3921
Semester 2
PHSI2007
Key Concepts in Physiology
6    A Human biology
P 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]
N PHSI2907 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001
Semester 1
PHSI2008
Integrated Physiology
6    A Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)]
P [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]}
N PHSI2908
Semester 2
PHSI3009
Frontiers in Cellular Physiology
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)]
N PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3909


We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
Semester 1
PHSI3011
Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)
N PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3911


BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
Semester 2
PHSI3012
Physiology of Disease
6    P (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406)
N PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3912
Semester 2

Dalyell enrichment units of study

Medicine and Health (School of Medical Sciences)
The Dalyell enrichment units of study are listed below.
AMED3001 Cancer

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Geraldine O'Neill Session: Semester 1 Classes: interactive face to face activities 4 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3901 Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, quiz, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What does it mean when someone tells you: "you have cancer"? Initially you're probably consumed with questions like: "how did this happen?" and "will this cancer kill me?". In this unit, we will explore all aspects of the "cancer problem" from the underlying biomedical and environmental causes, through to emerging approaches to cancer diagnosis and treatment. You will integrate medical science knowledge from a diverse range of disciplines and apply this to the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of cancer both at the individual and community level. Together we will explore the epidemiology, aetiology and pathophysiology of cancer. You will be able to define problems and formulate solutions related to the study, prevention and treatment of cancer with consideration throughout for the economic, social and psychological costs of a disease that affects billions. Face-to-face and online learning activities will allow you to work effectively in individual and collaborative contexts. You will acquire the skills to interpret and communicate observations and experimental findings related to the "cancer problem" to diverse audiences. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations that will allow you to follow a career in cancer research, clinical and diagnostic cancer services and/or the corporate system that supports the health care system.
Textbooks
Recommended Textbook: 1.,Weinberg (2013) The Biology of Cancer. 2nd edition. Garland Science Recommended reading: 1.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2000). The hallmarks of cancer. Cell 100, 57-70. 2.,Hanahan and Weinberg (2011). Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell 144, 646-74
AMED3002 Interrogating Biomedical and Health Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jean Yang Session: Semester 1 Classes: face to face 5 hrs/week; online 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Assumed knowledge: Exploratory data analysis, sampling, simple linear regression, t-tests, confidence intervals and chi-squared goodness of fit tests, familiar with basic coding, basic linear algebra. Assessment: in-semester exam, assignments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biotechnological advances have given rise to an explosion of original and shared public data relevant to human health. These data, including the monitoring of expression levels for thousands of genes and proteins simultaneously, together with multiple databases on biological systems, now promise exciting, ground-breaking discoveries in complex diseases. Critical to these discoveries will be our ability to unravel and extract information from these data. In this unit, you will develop analytical skills required to work with data obtained in the medical and diagnostic sciences. You will explore clinical data using powerful, state of the art methods and tools. Using real data sets, you will be guided in the application of modern data science techniques to interrogate, analyse and represent the data, both graphically and numerically. By analysing your own real data, as well as that from large public resources you will learn and apply the methods needed to find information on the relationship between genes and disease. Leveraging expertise from multiple sources by working in team-based collaborative learning environments, you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play an active role in finding meaningful solutions to difficult problems, creating an important impact on our lives.
AMED3003 Diagnostics and Biomarkers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fabienne Brilot-Turville Session: Semester 2 Classes: interactive face to face 4 hrs/week; online activities 2 hrs/week; individual and/or group work 3-6 hrs/week Prerequisites: 12cp from (IMMU2101 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902 or PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001 or PCOL2011 or PHSI2021 or MEDS2002 or BCMB2001 or BCMB2901 or MEDS2003) or [BMED2401 and 6cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: AMED3903 Assessment: in-semester exam, skill based assessments, presentation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Diagnostic sciences have evolved at a rapid pace and provide the cornerstone of our health care system. Effective diagnostic assays enable the identification of people who have, or are at risk of, a disease, and guide their treatment. Research into the pathophysiology of disease underpins the discovery of novel biomarkers and in turn, the development of revolutionary diagnostic assays that make use of state-of-the-art molecular and cellular methods. In this unit you will explore a diverse range of diagnostic tests and gain valuable practical experience in a number of core diagnostic methodologies, many of which are currently used in hospital laboratories. Together we will also cover the regulatory, social, and ethical aspects of the use of biomarkers and diagnostic tests and explore the pathways to their translation into clinical practice. By undertaking this unit, you will develop your understanding of diagnostic assays and biomarkers and acquire the skills needed to embark on a career in diagnostic sciences.
ANAT2008 Principles of Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samson Dowland and Dr Katie Dixon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures Prohibitions: BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XX3 or BIOL1XX8 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: One 1-hour theory exam,one 1-hour practical exam, mid-semester exam, theory and practical quizzes (100%) Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Due to the independent nature of this course, it is recommended that students have successfully completed 48 credit points of junior units of study before enrolling in ANAT2008.
This 2000 level unit of study covers the principles of cell biology and study of the structure of cells, tissues and organ systems at the light and electron microscopic levels. The focus is on human systems. Modern practical applications of histological techniques and analysis for research are also presented.
Textbooks
Paulina, W. Histology - A Text and Atlas. 7th Edition, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2015.
ANAT2009 Comparative Primate Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Associate Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX OR MEDS1X01 OR PSYC1XXX OR ARCA1XXX Assessment: Two quizzes (10%), theory exam (60%), practical exam (30%). Practical field work: One 2-hour practical per week Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of student covers the musculo-skeletal anatomy of the human body with particular emphasis on human evolution and comparisons with apes and fossil hominids. The topics covered include the versatility of the human hand, in manipulation and locomotion, bipedalism, climbing and brachiation in apes, and the change in pelvic anatomy associated with bipedalism and obstetric consequences.
Textbooks
Kapit, W and Elson, LM 2014 The Anatomy Coloring Book. Addison-Wesley. 4th edition
ANAT2010 Concepts of Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: 6 credit points from BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2910 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments, one written assignment Practical field work: Tutorials: One 2-hour practical tutorial in 5 sessions during semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study, in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT2011 Fundamentals of Human Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sean Lal Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1hr anatomy lecture, 1hr histology lecture, 2hrs anatomy prac, 2hrs histology prac, 6hrs private study per week. Prohibitions: ANAT3007 or ANAT3907 or MEDS2005 or BMED2402 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: in-semester online quizzes (25%), practical exam (35%), theory exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Where is your pancreas? What about your pituitary gland? How do we pack nine meters of intestines into our body? ANAT2011 is designed for students who are studying human anatomy for the first time, as well as those who have been introduced to human anatomy in biological sciences. In laboratory classes using human cadavers you will gain fundamental knowledge of the anatomy of the brain and nerves; the anatomy of the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine and digestive systems, and musculoskeletal anatomy. The laboratory classes are interwoven with lectures, tutorials and discussion groups, as well as on-line quizzes and self-directed learning modules. The course teaches the language of anatomy, as well as knowledge and practical skills in human anatomy, preparing you for many applied anatomical settings. The hands-on laboratory sessions will require you to work together in teams to engage the content, building your interpersonal skills, and fostering a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. You will also consider the processes of body donation and the ethical, legal and moral frameworks around which people donate their remains for anatomical learning, teaching and research. This unit contains assumed knowledge for entry into the graduate medical program at the University of Sydney, and is also suitable for graduate programs in dentistry, nursing, physical therapies, forensic sciences.
ANAT2910 Concepts in Neuroanatomy Adv

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karen Cullen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 1 x 2hr tutorial Prerequisites: A mark of 70 or above in BIOL1XXX or MEDS1X01 or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: ANAT2010 or BIOS1171 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assessment: one 2-hour theory exam, one 45 min practical exam, one 1200 word critical scientific review article, one mid-semester quiz, three short online quiz-style assignments Practical field work: 1 x 1 hr practical Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Students are introduced to the structure and organisation of the central and peripheral nervous system. The course begins with an exploration into the make-up of the individual cells, followed by an examination of the different regions of the nervous system. A final theme of the course touches on the organisation of various systems (sensory and motor), together with aspects of higher-order function such as memory and language. In essence, the subject covers general concepts of organisation, structure and function of the brain. The laboratory practical sessions offer students the special privilege to examine human specimens in the Anatomy labs and museum. Tutorial meetings will provide the opportunity to encounter topics in functional anatomy and histology of the brain using photographs, diagrams, models, animations and problem-solving. Topics in identification of central nervous system structure in typical magnetic resonance images will assist in reinforcing the theory of functional anatomy in a format students are likely to encounter in further study and in real-world situations and readings. This course will be of considerable interest to students studying anatomy and related disciplines, as well as those wishing to pursue further study in Neuroscience at senior levels.
Textbooks
Required text: Bear, M.F., B.W. Connors, M.A. Paradiso. Neuroscience. Exploring the Brain (4th edition) Wolters Kluwer, 2016. Recommended Atlas: Nolte and Angevine. The human brain in photographs and diagrams. 4th edition Philadelphia: Elsevier/Saunders, 2013.
ANAT3004 Cranial and Cervical Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week Tutorials: the first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the head and neck currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: ANAT3904 or ANAT3994 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; [(BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1001 or MEDS1901) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide students with a detailed understanding of the anatomy of the head and neck regions, with a particular emphasis on the functional anatomy of the cranial nerves. This unit of study covers skull, muscles of facial expression, muscles of jaw and neck, ear, eye, nose, oral cavity and larynx and pharynx as well as peripheral distribution of cranial nerves in the head and neck. The functional components of the cranial nerves and their relationship to the special senses and special motor functions such as facial gesture and speech are also studied. The practical sessions aim to provide students with the ability to recognise the structures studied in human prosections and in medical images especially X Rays and CT scans and to know their main anatomical relationships. Students will also be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi, Lutjen-Drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3006 Forensic Osteology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Denise Donlon Session: Semester 1 Classes: Classes: Two 1-hour lectures. Practical Work: One 1 or 2-hour tutorial and one 1 or 2-hour practical per week (a total of 3 hours in the lab per week). The tutorial is aimed at understanding the methods used in forensic osteology while the practicals allow students to apply the knowledge gained to actual skeletal cases. Prerequisites: ANAT2008 and a mark of 65 or above in ANAT2009 Prohibitions: BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01 Assessment: Quiz 1 (5%), Quiz 2 (5%), Critique/review of journal article (15%), Case study report (20%), Theory exam (30%) Practical exam (25%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to introduce students to the area of forensic osteology, which is the study of human skeletal remains within the legal context. Thus the unit of study aims to help students learn about human morphology and variation through the investigation and identification of human bones. It will also help students gain skills in observation and rigorous record taking and in analysis and interpretation. Production of case reports and practice in acting as 'expert witness' will improve students written and oral skills. An additional objective will be to assist students in learning to deal with legal and ethical issues.
Textbooks
White, T.D. and P.A Folkens, 2005 The Human Bone Manual. Elsevier, NY.
ANAT3007 Visceral Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Robin Arnold Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 2-hour tutorials per week. The first tutorial each week includes an introductory talk illustrated by prosections and other anatomical media followed by individual study of relevant prosections, models, X rays. The second tutorial of the week is run on a small group basis and involves viewing and discussion of CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy of the region of the trunk currently being studied. Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] Prohibitions: ANAT2011 or ANAT3907 or BMED2401 or BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2803 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2005 Assumed knowledge: BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993 Assessment: theory exam - 55%, prac exam - 35%, continuous assessment (6 quizzes worth 2 marks each done at intervals during Semester, best 5/6 selected) - 10% Practical field work: Introductory practical talk followed by study of relevant prosections, models, X rays, also group discussions of features in CT and MR images with a view to understanding cross sectional and living anatomy. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to provide an understanding of the anatomy of the viscera of the thorax, abdomen and pelvis. Structures covered include the heart and associated great vessels, lungs, mediastinum and the abdominal viscera, the alimentary organs and the genitourinary system. The structure of anterior thoracic and abdominal walls and pelvis along with the nerve supply to the viscera and relevant endocrine structures is also covered. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of structure to function especially with respect to the important functions of breathing, digestion, excretion and reproduction. Students will be encouraged to relate their understanding of these structures to current research in anatomy and histology and in related fields such as molecular biology and physiology. The course also aims to provide both theoretical and practical skills which can provide a basis for further studies in fields such as physiotherapy, chiropractic or forensic science or in post graduate medicine or dentistry or in areas of research requiring a knowledge of anatomy.
Textbooks
Rohan, Yokochi and Lutjen-drecoll. Color Atlas of Human Anatomy.
ANAT3008 Musculoskeletal Anatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Richard Ward Session: Semester 2 Classes: Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 2-hour tutorial per week Practical Work: One two hour practical class per week Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI12008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: ANAT3908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: One 90 minute paper (70%), one 60 minute paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit provides an opportunity for students to study the topographical and systems anatomy of the upper limb, lower limb and the back regions. Emphasis is placed upon the identification and description of structures and the correlation of structure with function. This includes for the upper limb, its role in manipulation, for the lower limb standing and walking and for the back flexible support and protection. Emphasis is also given to the innervation of the limbs. The unit also aims to develop the general skills of observation, description, drawing, writing and discussion as applying to biological structure.
ANAT3009 Functional Systems Histology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Laura Lindsay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture 2h/wk; Practical class 3hr/wk Prerequisites: 12cp from [ANAT2008 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907 or MEDS2001) or (PHSI2008 or PHSI2908) or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2004 or MEDS2005 or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910) or (PSYC2011 or PSYC2911) or PSYC2012 or PSYC2013 or PSYC2014 or PSYC2015 or (BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402)] Prohibitions: HSTO3001 or HSTO3902 or EMHU3001 or EMHU3002 or ANAT3909 Assumed knowledge: (BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996) or (BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 or BIOL1997) or (BIOL1008 or BIOL1908 or BIOL1998 or MEDS1X01) or (BIOL1003 or BIOL1903 or BIOL1993) Assessment: Mid-semester exam - 45mins (20%), Final Theory Exam -2hrs (40%), Final Practical Exam -1hr (40%), regular formative discussions and quizzes, Mode of delivery: Block mode
ANAT3009 provides students with the theoretical knowledge of the histology of the whole body. Hands-on practical training is gained in the operation of a light microscope to examine complex human and animal histological slides. An in-depth understanding is gained about the alimentary, renal, endocrine, and reproductive systems and that knowledge is applied to current trends in research and the clinical field. Students are exposed to current research regarding implantation and placental development and the clinical field by examining IVF treatment. This encourages students to apply their knowledge to various fields and gain a professional attitude towards learning and scientific endeavour. The practical sessions ensure students apply lecture content and necessitate group work to complete practical discussion points. Students develop their written and oral communication skills in the language and conventions of the subject through regular discussions. The theoretical and practical skills gainedcan provide a basis for further studies in fields such as anatomy, histology, and pathology or in post graduate medicine or in areas of research requiring knowledge of advanced histological examination.
CPAT3201 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures and one 3-hour research tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), one major research essay (1500w) (20%), two 0.5-hour in-semester exams (20%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 1 unit of study modules will provide a theoretical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in theoretical modules include: tissue responses to exogenous factors, adaptive responses to foreign agents, cardiovascular/pulmonary/gut responses to disease, forensic science, neuropathology and cancer. The aims of the course are: - To give students an overall understanding of the fundamental biological mechanisms governing disease pathogenesis in human beings. - To introduce to students basic concepts of the pathogenesis, natural history and complications of common human diseases. - To demonstrate and exemplify differences between normality and disease. - To explain cellular aspects of certain pathological processes. Together with CPAT3202, the unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquires should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
CPAT3202 Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Paul Witting Session: Semester 2 Classes: Practical Module Prerequisites: 12cp from {[ANAT2008 or ANAT2009 or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or ANAT2011] or [(BCHM2071 or BCHM2971) or (BCHM2072 or BCHM2972)] or [(BCMB2001 or BCMB2901) or (BCMB2002 or BCMB2902)] or [(BIOL2021 or BIOL2921) or (BIOL2022 or BIOL2922) or (BIOL2024 or BIOL2924) or (BIOL2030 or BIOL2930) or (BIOL2031 or BIOL2931)] or [(GEGE2001 or GEGE2901)] or [(IMMU2101 or MICR2021 or MICR2921 or MICR2022 or MICR2922 or MICR2031 or MICR2931 or MIMI2002 or MIMI2902)] or [(MBLG2071 or MBLG2971) or (MBLG2072 or MBLG2972)] or [(PCOL2011 or PCOL2021) or (PCOL2012 or PCOL2022)] or [(PHSI2005 or PHSI2905) or (PHSI2006 or PHSI2906) or (PHSI2007 or PHSI2907) or [PHSI2008 or PHSI2908)] or [(BMED2403 and BMED2404)]} or [MEDS2004 and 6cp from (MEDS2001 or MEDS2002 or MEDS2003 or MEDS2005)] Corequisites: CPAT3201 Prohibitions: CPAT3901 Assumed knowledge: Sound knowledge of biology through meeting pre-requisites Assessment: One 2-hour exam (60%), Museum Practical Reports (40%). Practical field work: One 2-hour microscopic practical and one 2-hour museum practical per week. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The Pathogenesis of Human Disease 2 unit of study modules will provide a practical background to the scientific basis of the pathogenesis of disease. Areas covered in practical modules include disease specimen evaluation on a macroscopic and microscopic basis. The aims of the course are: - To enable students to gain an understanding of how different organ systems react to injury and to apply basic concepts of disease processes. - To equip students with skills appropriate for careers in the biomedical sciences and for further training in research or professional degrees. At the end of the course students will: - Have acquired practical skills in the use of a light microscope. - Have an understanding of basic investigative techniques for disease detection in pathology. - Be able to evaluate diseased tissue at the macroscopic and microscopic level. - Have the ability to describe, synthesise and present information on disease pathogenesis. - Transfer problem-solving skills to novel situations related to disease pathogenesis. This unit of study would be appropriate for those who intend to proceed to Honours research, to postgraduate studies such as Medicine or to careers in biomedical areas such as hospital science. Enquiries should be directed to anthea.matsimanis@sydney.edu.au.
Textbooks
Kumar, Abbas and Aster. Robbins Basic Pathology, 9th edition. Saunders. 2012.
IMMU2011 Immunobiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Umaimainthan Palendira Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lecturettes, weekly Interactive lectures, fortnightly Workshops and Practicals. ~4-5h face-to-face per week Prerequisites: BIOL1XX7 or (BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3 or MEDS1X01) or BIOL1XX2 or MBLG1XX1 Prohibitions: IMMU2911 Assumed knowledge: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Assessment: Online quizzes (15%), practical reports (30%), title and abstract task (15%) and final exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Immunobiology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect living organisms against life-threatening infections. In this unit of study you will explore the essential features of the host immune responses mounted by animals, both vertebrates and invertebrates, plants and microbes themselves. Studies in animal and microbial immunobiology are leading to breakthroughs in veterinary and clinical medicine, including combatting infectious diseases, maximising transplant success, treating allergies, autoimmune diseases and cancer, as well as the development of new vaccines to prevent disease. Understanding the immunobiology of plants also enables us to protect crops from disease which enhances our food security. In this unit of study you will be provided with an overview of immunobiology as a basic research science. We will explore the nature of the immune cells and molecules that recognise danger and how the immune system of animals and plants respond at the cellular and molecular level. Practical and tutorial sessions are designed to illustrate particular concepts introduced in other face-to-face activities. Further self-directed learning activities, including online learning activities, will facilitate integration of fundamental information and help you apply this knowledge to the ways in which the host organism defends against disease. Upon completion, you will have developed the foundations to undertake further studies in Biology, Animal Health, Immunology and Pathology. Ultimately, this could lead you to a career in medical research, biosecurity and/or Veterinary Science.
Textbooks
Abbas, Lichtman and Pillai (2016) Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of The Immune System, 5th Edition
IMMU3102 Molecular and Cellular Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Carl Feng Session: Semester 1 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4-hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Prohibitions: IMMU3902 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). In this unit the molecular and cellular aspects of the immune system are investigated in detail. We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies of the coordinated and regulated immune responses that lead to elimination of infectious organisms. Guest lectures from research scientists eminent in particular branches of immunological research are a special feature of the course. These provide challenging information from the forefront of research that will enable the student to become aware of the many components that come under the broad heading 'Immunology'. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Immunology in Human Disease IMMU3202' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier.
IMMU3202 Immunology in Human Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Allison Abendroth Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1 hour lectures, one tutorial and one 4 hour practical per fortnight. Prerequisites: IMMU2101 or BMED2404 or MEDS2004 or MIMI2X02 or IMMU2X11 Prohibitions: IMMU3903 Assessment: Formal examination (one 2 hour exam) and Progressive assessment including written, practical and oral based assessments (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: .
This study unit builds on the series of lectures that outlined the general properties of the immune system, effector lymphocytes and their functions, delivered in the core courses, IMMU2101 - Introductory Immunology and BMED2404 - Microbes, Infection and Immunity (formerly IMMU2001 and BMED2807). We emphasise fundamental concepts to provide a scientific basis for studies in clinical immunology; dysfunctions of the immune system e.g. autoimmune disease, immunodeficiencies, and allergy, and immunity in terms of host - pathogen interactions. This unit has a strong focus on significant clinical problems in immunology and the scientific background to these problems. The unit includes lectures from research scientists and clinicians covering areas such as allergy, immunodeficiency, autoimmune disease and transplantation. This course provides challenging information from the forefront of clinical immunology and helps the student develop an understanding of immune responses in human health and disease. Three lectures (1 hour each) will be given each fortnight: 2 lectures in one week and one lecture the following week, for the duration of the course. This unit directly complements the unit 'Molecular and Cellular Immunology IMMU3102' and students are very strongly advised to undertake these study units concurrently.
Textbooks
Abbas, AK, Lichtman, AH and Pillai, S. Cellular and Molecular Immunology 8th edition. 2015. Elsevier
NEUR3003 Cellular and Developmental Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Catherine Leamey and A/Prof. Kevin Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Three 1-hour lectures plus one 1-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: NEUR3903 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Final exam. Mid-semester exam, Major essay/report, attendance and particpation in assessment of Advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences. This course is a combination of small lectures on current issues in cellular and developmental neuroscience and a research-based library project. Issues covered in the lecture series will include the role of glial on cerebral blood flow and neural transmission, neurochemistry and psychiatric disorders, neurodegeneration and the development of central and peripheral nervous systems.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3004 Integrative Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kevin Keay, A/Prof Catherine Leamey Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-hour lecture, one 2-hour tutorial per week. Prohibitions: NEUR3904 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not successfully completed an introductory neuroscience course are advised to familarise themselves with the content in Bear, Connors and Paradiso "Exploring the Brain". Assessment: Mid-semester exam, Final exam, 3 short in-semester assessments/reports, Tutorial participation, attendance and at participation in assessment of Advanced student presentations (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This second semester unit is designed to introduce students to "cutting edge" issues in the neurosciences and to be taken in conjunction with NEUR3003. This course is a combination of small group lectures on current issues in neuroscience, seminar groups and mini research projects. Examples of recent seminar topics include imaging pain, emotions, neural development and plasticity, vision, stroke and hypertension, mechanisms of neural degeneration and long-term regulation of blood pressure.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3005 Functional Neuroanatomy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, one guest leacture, 3 three-hour seminars Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3905 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam ( in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, 'Neuroscience in the Media' 3 team-based assessment tasks during seminars and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circuits and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal cord specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional and structural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated into the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. The Neuroscience in the Media seminars will develop neuroscience literature searching skills as well as developing critical thinking and analysis of the accuracy of the media portrayal of neuroscience research. Building on these skills and working in small groups, students will re-frame and communicate neuroscience evidence through the production of a short video. Students will also learn the skills required to write an unbiased and accurate popular media article based on a recent neuroscience research paper. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte's. The Human Brain by Todd Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
NEUR3006 Neural Information Processing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bill Phillips Session: Semester 1 Classes: two lectures, 1 two-hour research paper session (journal club, 8 weeks) Prerequisites: 72cp 1000 to 3000 level units Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3906 Assumed knowledge: (PHSI2X05 or PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) or BMED2402 Assessment: one 2hr exam, 1500w essay, paper session oral presentation and participation marks, one prac report plus prac quizzes Practical field work: 1 x 3hour Prac (total of 5 such practical sessions) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction the mechanisms that drive neurons and neural circuits throughout the brain and body. The lectures explore how signal intensity is translated into nerve impulse codes and how this information is again translated through synapses to convey and interpret information about the external world, to control the body and to record information for future use (learning and memory). We also consider how sensory and motor information is integrated through neural circuits in the brain and spinal cord. Practical classes introduce some of the different ways in which the workings of the brain are studied. Each student chooses a journal club that focuses on a specific topic in neuroscience. In the weekly sessions, group members read, present and interpret original research papers, developing a deep understanding of the emerging scientific evidence in the topic area. This senior year unit of study will develop skills in critical analysis, interpretation and communication of new evidence.
Textbooks
Kandel, Schwartz, Jessel, Sigelbaum, Hudspeth. Principles of Neural Science. 5th Ed, Elsevier, NY, 2013
NEUR3905 Functional Neuroanatomy (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Austin Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two one-hour lectures per week, 8 one-hour seminars Prerequisites: Annual average mark of 70 or above in the previous year Prohibitions: NEUR3001 or NEUR3901 or NEUR3002 or NEUR3902 or NEUR3005 Assumed knowledge: [ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Assessment: One mid-semester practical exam (in-class), one final theory exam, one final practical exam, Journal Club participation, Journal Club presentation and 1 individual written assignment Practical field work: Weekly 1.5 hour practical class Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of functional neuroanatomy and systems neuroscience, and an appreciation that neuroscience is a constantly evolving field. There will be a detailed exploration of the anatomical structures and pathways that underlie sensation and perception in each of the sensory modalities. The neural circutis and mechanisms that control somatic and autonomic motor systems, motivated behaviours, emotions, and other higher order functions will be explored in great detail based on current neuroscience literature. Practical classes will allow students to identify and learn the functions of critical anatomical structures in human brain and spinal corde specimens. Reading and interpreting images from functional ans tructural brain imaging techniques will be incorporated intot the neuroanatomy practical classes, and develop an appreciation of how these technologies can be used in neuroscience research. By undertaking the advanced unit students will participate in weekly small group seminars under the guidance of a research-active academic. The seminars will take the form of a Journal Club, a style practiced widely in research laboratories around the world. The aim of the Journal Club is to develop critical thinking and detailed knowledge in a specific area of neuroscience research through group discussions. The Journal Club will also develop the skills required to lead a discussion in a small group setting as well as research and write a scholarly neuroscience review article. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for science graduates as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Nolte. Nolte's The Human Brain by Todd. Vanderah and Douglas Gould. 7th Ed, Elsevier, 2015
PCOL2021 Key Concepts in Pharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brent McParland Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903 Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2011 or MEDS2002 or BMED2401 or BMED2801 or BMED2802 or BMED2804 or BMED2805 or BMED2806 or BMED2807 or BMED2808 or MEDS2002 Assumed knowledge: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) Assessment: Cognitive, problem-based examination (40%), poster presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online quizzes (10%), and contribution to online discussion (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Pharmacology is the study of the properties and biological actions of drugs and chemicals and the keys role they play in the prevention and treatment of human diseases. In this unit of study you will be introduced to the fundamental concepts in pharmacology: a) principles of drug action, b) pharmacokinetics and precision medicine, c) drug design, and d) drug development and regulation. Additionally, you will learn the tools pharmacologists use in their investigations and develop skills in laboratory and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will learn the core concepts underpinning pharmacology and will have the opportunity to explore and apply these concepts through practicals, computer-aided learning and problem-based workshops. By undertaking this unit you will not only learn to view health and disease through the lens of a pharmacologist, you will further develop valuable skills in critical thinking and problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness. This unit will help you to develop a coherent and connected knowledge of the medical sciences and their broad applications, while also giving you the foundations for increasing your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
PCOL2022 Drugs in Contemporary Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hilary Lloyd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online mini-lectures, webinars, discussion forums and self-directed learning activities; Face-to-face seminars, practicals, enquiry-, multimedia module- and data analysis-based workshops (5 hours per week for 13 weeks). Prerequisites: [(BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or (MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) and (CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903) Prohibitions: PCOL2555 or PCOL2012 Assumed knowledge: PCOL2021 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%), oral presentation (10%), practical exercises (20%), written research topics (10%), online discussion posts (10%), Final Exam (problem-based) (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The prevention, control and treatment of many diseases and conditions remain major challenges within contemporary society. These challenges provide unique opportunities for pharmacologists to discover novel molecular targets for drug action. In this unit of study you will examine six major conditions that affect a range of body systems where improvements in treatment using pharmacotherapies are needed. In learning about unresolved issues, you will also evaluate the complexities of pharmacological treatment, including: ethical considerations, strength of evidence of drug efficacy, as well as safety and tolerability aspects of drug use. Using the tools of pharmacological enquiry you will further your practical and cognitive skills through laboratory- and problem-based enquiry. In both face-to-face and online learning environments you will explore a range of pharmacotherapeutic options currently available and will have the opportunity to research and apply your knowledge and understanding to unresolved health-related problems. By undertaking this unit you will develop your disciplinary expertise in pharmacology and further your skills in critical thinking, problem solving, communication, digital literacy, teamwork and interdisciplinary effectiveness.
Textbooks
All resources will be made available through the Canvas LMS UoS site. Links to other learning technologies will be available via Canvas LMS. Textbooks will be available for purchase from Co-op bookshop, in hard copy and online via the library.
PCOL3011 Toxicology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Slade Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week and one 3 hour tutorial/practical every 2 weeks and two practical sessions each 3 hours in length. Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2405) Prohibitions: PCOL3911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, tutorial presentations, assignments (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to introduce students with a basic understanding of pharmacology to the discipline of toxicology. The study of toxicology is central to the assessment of drug safety in drug development and in the explanation of toxicology associated with registered drugs (adverse drug reactions) and drug-drug interactions. These issues as well as the pharmacogenetic basis of adverse reactions will be considered. Environmental toxicology, particularly toxic reactions to environmental agents such as asbestos and pesticides, and target organ toxicology (lung, liver, CNS) are also covered. The diverse world of plants and animal toxins will also be explored. As a final consequence of exposure to many toxicants, the biology and causes of cancer are discussed. As part of the unit students are introduced to basic ideas about the collection and analysis of data from human and animal populations, both in the structured situation of clinical trials, forensic problems and in analysis of epidemiological data.
Textbooks
Klaasen, Curtis D. Casarett and Doull's Essentials of Toxicology 2 ed. McGraw Hill. 2010, or, by the same authors: Toxicology: The Basic Science of Poisons. 7 ed. McGraw Hill. 2008.
PCOL3021 Drug Therapy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Slade Matthews Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, three 2 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to four 3 hour practicals) Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or [BMED2401 and 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PCOL3921 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, in lecture tests, practical assignment and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study extends on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharnacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of the scientific basis of current and novel approaches to pharmacological treatment for major health challenges of the 21st century. Lecture topics, tutorials and laboratory sessions cover drug treatment of arthritis, cardiovascular disorders, cancer, diabetes and protein misfolding disorders. New approaches to the development of next-generation targeted drugs are also introduced. As part of this course all students will extend the practical skills in understanding scientific literature, statistical analysis, critical problem solving and analytical thinking. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.nt.
Textbooks
Rang and Dale's Pharmacology, 8th Edition. H. P. Rang, J. M. Ritter, R. J. Flower, and G. Henderson, (Elsevier 2016 ).
PCOL3022 Neuropharmacology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jonathon Arnold Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures per week, five 1 hour tutorials, three 3 hour practicals, elective project (equivalent to three 4 hour practicals). Prerequisites: (PCOL2011 or PCOL2021 or MEDS2002) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402 and BMED2405) or (ANAT2010 or ANAT2910) or (PSYC2010 or PSYC2910 or PSYC2015) Prohibitions: PCOL3921 Assessment: One 2 hour theory exam, tutorial presentation, practical report, lecture quizzes and elective project (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study builds on pharmacological knowledge acquired in the 2000 level pharmacology units of study with a major emphasis on gaining an understanding of neuropharmacology. The neuropharmacology of the major neurotransmitters and their role in neuropsychiatric diseases is explored together with the treatment of conditions such as Alzheimer's disease, movement disorders, stroke, depression, anxiety, epilepsy, pain and schizophrenia. Each student will conduct a capstone elective project (laboratory or literature-based) in applied pharmacology supervised by academic members of the department.
Textbooks
Nestler, EJ, Hyman, SE Holtzman, DM and Malenka, RC. Molecular Neuropharmacology: A Foundations for Clinical Neuroscience, 3rd ed. McGraw Hill, 2015.
PHSI2007 Key Concepts in Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Speranza Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: 6cp from [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903] Prohibitions: PHSI2907 or BMED2402 or MEDS2001 Assumed knowledge: Human biology Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks: Integrated Science project task (10%) , Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Physiology plays a central role in the medical sciences, integrating from the molecular and cellular levels through to the whole tissue and organs to understand whole body function. The study of physiology involves learning core concepts and principles that are applied to the various organ systems. You will be able to apply these fundamentals as you learn about other organ systems and how their homeostatic interactions govern human body function. To support your learning, you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well as isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a strong foundational understanding of the homeostatic principles that underpin whole body physiology.
PHSI2008 Integrated Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Bronwyn McAllan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 (1hr) lectures, 1 (1hr) lectorials and either (1) (3 hr) lab or a 2 hour workshop. Prerequisites: [(MEDS1X01 or BIOL1XX8 or BIOL1XX3) or (BIOL1XX7 or MBLG1XX1) or CHEM1XX1 or CHEM1903]} Prohibitions: PHSI2908 Assumed knowledge: Human biology; (PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001)] Assessment: Quizzes (10%), 90 min MCQ exam (30%), Written and other tasks (10%), Laboratory report writing (25%), How Physiology Works (15%), Explaining Physiology (10% group) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The study of physiology is in essence the understanding of the integration of function and homeostasis. In this unit you will extend your learning in MEDS2001/PHSI2X07, applying your understanding of basic physiology to systems-based scenarios in three modules: muscle, sensory and disease complications. This will consolidate your conceptual understanding of physiology and how the homeostatic mechanisms change in disease. The final module on disease will consolidate your understanding by demonstrating how body systems do not act in isolation, but rather how changes in their interdependence lead to homeostatic dysregulation and pathological outcomes. To support your learning you will undertake laboratory activities that involve experiments on humans as well isolated tissues, with an emphasis on hypothesis generation and data analysis. These sessions will consolidate your conceptual understanding with practical application of core physiological principles in an experimental context. Additional workshops and tutorials will develop critical thinking, your understanding of the integrative nature of physiology, and generic skills in scientific writing and presentation. The practicals and tutorials also emphasise group learning and team work. Completion of this unit will provide you with a comprehensive understanding of the complex systems that regulate the human body and provide the platform for undertaking a major in Physiology in third year.
PHSI3009 Frontiers in Cellular Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof David Cook Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 1 hr/ week lectures and 6 x 2 hr large class tutorials (CBL) per semester Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or [BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2405 or BMED2406)] Prohibitions: PHSI3905 or PHSI3906 or PHSI3005 or PHSI3006 or PHSI3909 Assessment: one mid-semester exam (MCQ), one 2 hr final exam (MCQ), two presentations for challenge-based learning and 1 practical class report Practical field work: 3 x 2-4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: We strongly recommend that students take both (PHSI3009 or PHSI3909) and (PHSI3010 or PHSI3910) units of study concurrently
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of cellular physiology. There will be a detailed exploration of the signals and pathways cells use to detect and respond to environmental changes and cues. Important signalling systems and homeostatic regulators will be discussed in the context of biological processes and human diseases. Challenge-based learning sessions will explore these diseases with student-led teaching. Practical classes will explore physiological techniques for investigating cell signalling and the biophysical properties of cells. Large class tutorials will focus on graduate attribute skills development in the context of reinforcing material discussed in the lectures and practical classes. This unit will develop key attributes that are essential for a science graduate as they move forward in their careers.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science
PHSI3011 Frontiers in Whole Body Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Philip Poronnik Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1 hr lectures weekly, 1 x 1 hr masterclass lecture, 5 x 2 hr class tutorials per semester (Weeks 2, 3 and 12) Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or (BMED2401 and BMED2402) Prohibitions: PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3911 Assessment: one mid-semester exam, one 2hr final exam, two tutorial reports, 3 practical class reports Practical field work: 4 x 4 hr practicals per semester Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: BMedSc degree students: You must have successfully completed BMED2401 and an additional 12cp from BMED240X before enrolling in this unit.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate homeostasis throughout the whole body with a particular focus not only on the interplay between major organ systems, but also variability amongst individuals. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. Our current understandings of how we function will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body levels. This is detailed knowledge that is key to understanding the transitions that occur from health to disease. Hands on practical classes will explore the physiology presented in the lectures and tutorial sessions will investigate what 'normal' is in terms of whole body physiology.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science; Siverthorn D, Human Physiology: an integrated approach. 7th Edition Pearson.
PHSI3012 Physiology of Disease

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Naylor Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 x 1hr lectures, 12 x 1hr tutorials, 1 x 6hr practical Prerequisites: (PHSI2X05 and PHSI2X06) or [(PHSI2X07 or MEDS2001) and PHSI2X08] or 12cp from (BMED2402 or BMED2403 or BMED2404 or BMED2406) Prohibitions: PHSI3007 or PHSI3008 or PHSI3907 or PHSI3908 or PHSI3912 Assessment: one mid-semester MCQ exam, one 2hr final exam, two problem-solving learning tutorials, 2 practical class reports Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with advanced knowledge of whole body physiology. Lectures will provide insight into the mechanisms that regulate normal homeostasis throughout the whole body and how defects in these processes can lead to significant human disease. The emphasis in this unit is on recent advances at the frontiers of human physiology. The processes leading to cancer, cardiovascular and metabolic disease will be explored at the molecular, cellular and whole body level. Problem-based learning will focus on cancer and cardiovascular disease and practical classes will utilise both wet lab and online resources to dissect the processes by which normal physiological processes become aberrant leading to human disease.
Textbooks
Alberts, B. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 5th edition. Garland Science