Table S Electives - Arts and Social Sciences Descriptions

Electives D-H

Errata
Item Errata Date
1.

The following units is now available as a Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Table S elective

EDGU1002 Youth and Digital Culture
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2, Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 10 wks,2x2-hr media workshops, 7x2-hr tutorials, 6-hrs online learning, 2-3 hours event attendance Assessment: online posts (1500 word equivalent) (20%), 1500wd event reflection (30%), multimedia project (2500-3000 word equivalent) (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
What role does digital media play in society and culture?  How does it shape young people's experiences, values, and learning opportunities? This unit examines the ways in which the lives of children and young adults are shaped by digital culture. By examining this process in historical and contemporary contexts, students will gain insight into how identity is shaped by practices such as social networking, videogame playing, and digital authoring.

EDGU1003 Diet and Nutrition for Health and Sport
Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July, Semester 2, Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/wk for 12 wks, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 12 wks Assessment: multiple choice quizzes (4x15%) and 2000wd dietary analysis assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In a world where nutrition advice is commonplace but not always accurate, learning the basics of good nutrition habits is vital for development and growth at all stages of the life cycle. If  practiced correctly, nutrition can help prevent disease, assist in reaching health goals, influence sports performance and reach academic outcomes. This elective aims to equip students with the knowledge required to make informed food choices and gain skills in analysing their personal diet and nutrition habits. At the conclusion of the elective, each student will be a mythbuster of common diets, supplements and fads touted by the media, and be able to separate fact from fiction. Topics covered in the unit include the anatomy and physiology of digestion, the link between common diseases and nutrition practices, nutrition for sports performance, practical tips for shopping and cooking and the use of food to improve cognition.

EDGU1005 Sports Coaching: Theory and Practice
Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2, Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/wk for 6 wks, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 6 wks, 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 6 wks, 1x2-hr tutorial/wk for 6 wks Assessment: online quizzes (25%), plan and practical coaching session (35%), 2000wd coaching reflection and, evaluation report (40%), Community Coaching General Principles online course (Pass/Fail) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course introduces students to the theoretical and practical aspects of sport and exercise coaching. Through active participation in lectures, tutorials and practical workshops, students will learn how to create a positive sporting environment by utilizing athlete centred coaching strategies. Students will also learn how to evaluate and improve their own coaching performance by applying reflective and evaluative skills. Topics covered include coaching, training and management principles, coaching pedagogy, planning, skill learning and sports psychology. Students will also complete the community coaching general principles course. At the completion of this unit it is hoped that students are more confident and knowledgeable in their coaching practice.

21/6/2019

 

Table S Electives - Arts and Social Sciences

Subject Areas D-H

These units of study are Table S Electives available in the following subject areas:

Digital Culture

ARIN2610 Internet Transformations

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Media Studies or 18 credit points at 1000-level in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2100 Assessment: 3x500wd analytic journal entries (25%), 1x1000wd equiv research presentation (30%), 1x2000wd critical analysis or web feature (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The Internet is at the heart of major digital transformations in industry, society and culture. This unit introduces key skills in analysis and critique of the technologies involved in networked change, exploring internet imaginaries, histories and emerging phenomena.
ARIN2620 Everyday Digital Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Media Studies or 18 credit points at 1000-level in any of Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Philosophy, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2200 Assessment: 1x1250wd take-home exercise 1 (25%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1250wd take-home exercise 2 (25%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How we eat, sleep, talk, love, shop, work, play, learn and die are all shaped by digital media. Everyday digital media focuses on the transformation of self and society through the digital mediation of everyday practices. How do we organise our social lives and engage creatively in online realms? What are the opportunities and risks of sharing and self-presentation in networked publics? How are communities reconfigured in a digital context? This unit introduces theories of digital culture and identity and applies them to our everyday experiences and interactions with social media, participatory culture, locative media, computer games, virtual reality, smart homes and connected cities.
ARIN3610 Technology and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2600 Assessment: 1x1000wd Provocations and report (20%), 1x1500wd Influence analysis (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Technology and Culture analyses the relationships between technological developments and cultural change, with a particular focus on digital media. This unit of study interrogates the changing conceptions of technology in society by tracing the influence of key works in the critical Humanities and social sciences. Through close readings and provocative discussion of advanced texts, students explore the significance of technology in social power, identity, gender, social shaping, class, space, assemblages, actor-networks, experience, thought, time, and the future.
ARIN3620 Researching Digital Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Digital Cultures or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Anthropology, Art History, Computer Science, Design Computing, English, Gender Studies, Cultural Studies, History, Information Systems, Information Technology, Linguistics, Psychology or Sociology Prohibitions: ARIN2000 Assessment: 1x2000wd Research blog (45%), 1x2500wd Research proposal (45%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How do people make and use new media technologies? To answer this question you need to know how to conduct research: a systematic investigation using carefully chosen and ethically sound methods. In this unit students prepare a research proposal to improve knowledge about the social implications of the latest developments in information technologies. They build their methodology by choosing a combination of methods: big data analysis; ethnography, interviews, surveys, online methods, discourse analysis, content analysis and/or case studies.

Econometrics

ECMT1010 Introduction to Economic Statistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Prohibitions: ECMT1011 or ECMT1012 or ECMT1013 or MATH1015 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or STAT1021 or ECOF1010 or BUSS1020 or ENVX1001 or DATA1001 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in this unit have an assumed knowledge equal to or exceeding 70 or higher in HSC Mathematics (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 2 (or equivalent). Assessment: homework (15%), quizzes (30%), assignment (15%) and 1x2hr Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit emphasises understanding the use of computing technology for data description and statistical inference. Both classical and modern statistical techniques such as bootstrapping will be introduced. Students will develop an appreciation for both the usefulness and limitations of modern and classical theories in statistical inference. Computer software (e.g., Excel, StatKey) will be used for analysing real datasets.
ECMT1020 Introduction to Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x2hr workshop/week Prerequisites: ECMT1010 or ECOF1010 or BUSS1020 or MATH1905 or MATH1005 or MATH1015 or DATA1001 or DATA1901 Prohibitions: ECMT1001 or ECMT1002 or ECMT1003 or ECMT1021 or ECMT1022 or ECMT1023 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in this unit have an assumed knowledge equal to or exceeding 70 or higher in HSC Mathematics (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 2 (or equivalent). Assessment: 3x quizzes (25%), workshop questions/homework (10%), assignment (15%) and 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Other than in exceptional circumstances, it is strongly recommended that students do not undertake Introduction to Econometrics before attempting Introduction to Economic Statistics.
This unit is intended to be an introduction to the classical linear regression model (CLRM), the underlying assumptions, and the problem of estimation. Further, we consider hypothesis testing, and interval estimation, and regressions with dummy variables and limited dependent variable models. Finally, we consider different functional forms of the regression model and the problem of heteroskedasticity. Throughout we will try to emphasise the essential interplay between econometric theory and economic applications.
ECMT2130 Financial Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 or ECMT1020 Prohibitions: ECMT2030 Assessment: 2x assignments (2x20%) and 1x2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Over the last decade econometric modelling of financial data has become an important part of the operations of merchant banks and major trading houses and a vibrant area of employment for econometricians. This unit provides an introduction to some of the widely used econometric models for financial data and the procedures used to estimate them. Special emphasis is placed upon empirical work and applied analysis of real market data. Topics covered may include the statistical characteristics of financial data, the specification, estimation and testing of asset pricing models, the analysis of high frequency financial data, and the modelling of volatility in financial returns.
ECMT2150 Intermediate Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 or MATH1905 or MATH1005 or MATH1015) and ECMT1020 Prohibitions: ECMT2110 Assessment: 4x250wd Individual Assignments (20%), 1x1hr Mid-semester Test (30%), 1x2hr Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will provide an introduction to the key issues involved in with the econometrics of cross-section and panel data. The topics this unit will cover include: instrumental variables; estimating systems by OLS and GLS; simultaneous equation models; discrete-choice models; treatment effects; and sample selection. Throughout the unit, emphasis will be placed on economic applications of the models. The unit will utilise practical computer applications, where appropriate.
ECMT2160 Econometric Analysis

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2150 or ECMT2110 Assessment: 4x250wd online quizzes (20%), 1x1hr mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
A proper understanding of econometric methods and estimation techniques is important, as it allows researchers and practitioners to assess economic theorems, predict macroeconomic tendencies, evaluate government policies, etc. After a brief review of probability and statistics, this unit will focus on the econometric analysis of discrete variables, and the econometric analysis of time series data. The lectures and assessments will be application-oriented. Computer software (e.g., Stata, R, Matlab) will be used throughout the unit.
ECMT3110 Econometric Models and Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 or ECMT2160 Prohibitions: ECMT3010 Assessment: assignments (20%), Mid-semester test (20%), 2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit extends methods of estimation and testing developed in association with regression analysis to cover econometric models involving special aspects of behaviour and of data. In particular, motivating examples are drawn from dynamic models, panel data and simultaneous equation models. In order to provide the statistical tools to be able to compare alternative methods of estimation and testing, both small sample and asymptotic properties are developed and discussed.
ECMT3120 Applied Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT3110 or ECMT3010 or (ECMT2150 and ECMT2160) Prohibitions: ECMT3020 Assessment: group project (25%), Mid-semester test (25%), 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Econometric theory provides techniques to quantify the strength and form of relationships between variables. Applied Econometrics is concerned with the appropriate use of these techniques in practical applications in economics and business. General principles for undertaking applied work are discussed and necessary research skills developed. In particular, the links between econometric models and the underlying substantive knowledge or theory for the application are stressed. Topics will include error correction models, unit roots and cointegration and models for cross section data, including limited dependent variables. Research papers involving empirical research are studied and the unit features all students participating in a group project involving econometric modelling.
ECMT3130 Forecasting for Economics and Business

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr lab/week Prerequisites: ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 or (ECMT2150 and ECMT2160) Prohibitions: ECMT3030 Assessment: assignment (20%), group assignment (25%), Mid-semester test (20%) and 2.5hr Final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The need to forecast or predict future values of economic time series arises frequently in many branches of applied economic and commercial work. It is, moreover, a topic which lends itself naturally to econometric and statistical treatment. The specific feature which distinguishes time series from other data is that the order in which the sample is recorded is of relevance. As a result of this, a substantial body of statistical methodology has developed. This unit provides an introduction to methods of time series analysis and forecasting. The material covered is primarily time domain methods designed for a single series and includes the building of linear time series models, the theory and practice of univariate forecasting and the use of regression methods for forecasting. Throughout the unit a balance between theory and practical application is maintained.
ECMT3150 The Econometrics of Financial Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr lab/week Prerequisites: ((ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 or MATH1905 or MATH1005 or MATH1015) and (ECMT2110 or ECMT2010) and (ECMT2130 or ECMT2030)) or (ECMT2130 and ECMT2150 and ECMT2160) Prohibitions: ECMT3050 Assessment: assignment (20%), group assignment (30%), Mid-semester test (15%) and 2.5hr Final exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit studies and develops the econometric models and methods employed for the analysis of data arising in financial markets. It extends and complements the material covered in ECMT2130. The unit will cover econometric models that have proven useful for the analysis of both synchronous and non-synchronous financial time series data over the last two decades. Modern Statistical methodology will be introduced for the estimation of such models. The econometric models and associated methods of estimation will be applied to the analysis of a number of financial datasets. Students will be encouraged to undertake hands-on analysis using an appropriate computing package. Topics covered include: Discrete time financial time series models for asset returns; modelling and forecasting conditional volatility; Value at Risk and modern market risk measurement and management; modelling of high frequency and/or non-synchronous financial data and the econometrics of market microstructure issues. The focus of the unit will be in the econometric models and methods that have been developed recently in the area of financial econometrics and their application to modelling and forecasting market risk measures.
ECMT3160 Statistical Modelling

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2150 or ECMT2110 or ECMT2010 Prohibitions: ECMT3620 or ECMT3720 or ECMT3210 Assessment: 2x500wd assignments (20%), 1x1.5hr mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an accessible foundation in the principles of probability and mathematical statistics that underlie the statistical techniques employed in the fields of econometrics and management science. These principles are applied to various modelling situations and decision making problems in business and economics.
ECMT3170 Computational Econometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr computer laboratory/week Prerequisites: ECMT2160 or ECMT2110 Assessment: 1x2hr Final Exam (50%), 1x1500wd Computer Project (30%), 2x500wd Computer Assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an introduction to modern computationally intensive algorithms, their implementation and application for carrying out statistical inference on econometric models. Students will learn modern programming techniques such as Monte Carlo simulation and parallel computing to solve econometric problems. The computational methods of inference include Bayesian approach, bootstrapping and other iterative algorithms for estimation of parameters in complex econometric models. Meanwhile, students will be able to acquire at least one statistical programming language.

Economics

ECON1001 Introductory Microeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: BUSS1040 or ECON1040 Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in this unit have an assumed knowledge equal to or exceeding 70 or higher in HSC Mathematics (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 2 (or equivalent). Assessment: online quizzes (10%), 1xMid-semester test (30%), 1xEssay (10%) and 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Introductory Microeconomics addresses the economic decisions of individual firms and households and how these interact in markets. It is a compulsory core unit for the Bachelor of Economics and an alternative core unit for the Bachelor of Economic and Social Science. Economic issues are pervasive in contemporary Australian society. Introductory Microeconomics introduces students to the language and analytical framework adopted in Economics for the examination of social phenomena and public policy issues. Whatever one's career intentions, coming to grips with economic ideas is essential for understanding society, business and government. Students are given a comprehensive introduction to these ideas and are prepared for the advanced study of microeconomics in subsequent years. It is assumed that students undertaking this unit will have a prior knowledge of mathematics.
ECON1002 Introductory Macroeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive June,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: Students enrolled in this unit have an assumed knowledge equal to or exceeding 70 or higher in HSC Mathematics (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 1 (or equivalent), or 35 or higher in HSC Mathematics Extension 2 (or equivalent). Assessment: 1500wd written assessments (25%), 1x1hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Introductory Macroeconomics addresses the analysis of the level of employment and economic activity in the economy as a whole. It is a compulsory core unit for the Bachelor of Economics and an alternative core unit for the Bachelor of Economic and Social Sciences. Introductory Macroeconomics examines the main factors that determine the overall levels of production and employment in the economy, including the influence of government policy and international trade. This analysis enables an exploration of money, interest rates and financial markets, and a deeper examination of inflation, unemployment and economic policy. It is assumed that students undertaking this unit will have a prior knowledge of mathematics.
ECON1003 Quantitative Methods in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: MATH1111 or MATH1011 or MATH1001 or MATH1901 or MATH1906 Assessment: in-class tests (25%), Mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides an introduction to the quantitative methods used in economics and business. Emphasis is placed on developing the skills to set up models to study real-world phenomena, using appropriate techniques to manipulate and analyse these models and their economic interpretation. In this unit particular emphasis will be placed on the intuition of the models studied, making extensive use of a range of economic examples and business applications. It is important to note that while mathematical techniques are used in this unit, this unit is not intended as a substitute for mathematics units offered by the School of Mathematics and Statistics. Students wishing to pursue further study in mathematics, such as a major in mathematics, should consult the Faculty of Science Handbook for offerings by the School of Mathematics and Statistics. Note this unit is not available to students from the Faculty of Science.
ECON1005 The Australian Economy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1500wd equivalent Learning Journal (20%), 1x1000wd Essay (20%), 1x1.5hr Final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the Australian economy and introduces students to the application of economic reasoning and techniques to real-world problems. A focus of the unit is how government policy is affected by the influences brought to bear by the both domestic issues and the international environment. Each issue is addressed within an economic framework. The methods of instruction, learning and assessment are designed to develop a range of graduate attributes, with an emphasis on developing communication skills and creative thinking.
ECON1006 The Economics of Everything

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd assignment (25%), 1x1hr mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From school teachers manipulating test scores, to criminal behaviour, economics is increasingly being used to analyse non-market issues. This unit provides insights on these issues using an economic perspective. An underlying premise of this analysis is that people respond to incentives created by rules and institutions, sometimes in perverse or unintended ways. This unit studies real-world cases, including compulsory testing in schools, crime and punishment, corruption, and the role of government in correcting market failures. This unit also considers the implications for traditional economic analysis if information is imperfect and people are not fully rational.
ECON1040 Principles of Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ECON1001 or BUSS1040 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (30%), 1x2hr Final Exam (50%), 2x500wd Written Assignment/Task (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study is designed for students who have an interest in economics and its application to critical issues in everyday life. Students will gain an understanding of how the economy works; how individuals, firms and governments form and shape their decisions using economic principles; and the role of public policy on outcomes including the trade-offs faced in making policy decisions. Students will develop skills to critically analyse real-world issues using the perspective of an economist, and communicate ideas and arguments about economics in a logical, coherent and evidenced based manner.
ECOS2001 Intermediate Microeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or BUSS1040 or ECON1040 Prohibitions: ECON2001 or ECON2901 or ECOS2901 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 2x in-class tests (40%) and 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Certain combinations of Maths/Stats may substitute for Econometrics. Consult the School of Economics Undergraduate Coordinator.
The aim of Intermediate Microeconomics is the development of theoretical and applied skills in economics. It covers applications and extensions of the theory of consumer choice, firm behaviour and market structure. Emphasis is given to the economics of information and choice under uncertainty; industry structures other than monopoly and perfect competition; markets for factors of production; general equilibrium and economic efficiency; market failure and the role of government. This unit provides a basis for the more specialised options that comprise third year economics.
ECOS2002 Intermediate Macroeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1002 or ECON1040 Prohibitions: ECON2002 or ECON2902 or ECOS2902 Assessment: Mid-semester test (30%), assignments (20%) and 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Certain combinations of Maths/Stats may substitute for Econometrics. Consult the School of Economics Undergraduate Coordinator.
This unit of study develops models of the goods, money and labour markets, and examines issues in macroeconomic policy. Macroeconomic relationships, covering consumption, investment, money and employment, are explored in detail. Macro-dynamic relationships, especially those linking inflation and unemployment, are also considered. Exchange rates and open economy macroeconomics are also addressed. In the last part of the unit, topics include the determinants and theories of economic growth, productivity and technology, the dynamics of the business cycle, counter-cyclical policy and the relationship between micro and macro policy in the context of recent Australian experience.
ECOS2004 Money and Banking

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECON1001 and ECON1002) or (ECON1040 and ECON1002) or BUSS1040 Assessment: 3x500wd assignment (20%), 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x1hr mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Students will learn how a modern financial system operates and the relationships between the financial system and the economy, with a particular emphasis on understanding business cycles. We will study how money/capital changes hands between agents over time, both directly and through institutions. We will study how these exchanges affect the economy, and how central banks and other policy institutions monitor, influence and regulate these exchanges. There will be an equal emphasis on understanding the modern financial system and on analysing monetary policy and financial regulation.
ECOS2025 East Asian Economies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or ECON1002 or BUSS1040 or ECON1040 Assessment: 5x200wd equivalent quizzes (25%), 1x70mins mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study analyses the economic experiences and policies of key East Asian countries with significant economic ties with Australia. The unit will first introduce how some of these countries achieved the miraculous post-war economic growth and analyse their growth success using economic models. The unit identifies the key issues and challenges facing these countries in both social and global contexts. Emphasis will be placed on the bilateral and multilateral economic relations of East Asian countries with Australia.
ECOS2201 Economics of Competition and Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or BUSS1040 or ECON1040 Prohibitions: ECON2201 or ECOS3005 Assessment: 2xMid-semester tests (40%) and 2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces new and comprehensive methods for the analysis and formation of business strategy. The unit analyses strategies for developing competitive advantages, including product differentiation, cost advantages and product life cycles; implementing incentives, control, firm boundaries, and internal firm decision-making mechanisms; implementing pricing, auction and signalling practices; assessing industry attractiveness and the regulatory/trade practices environment; and managing industry cooperation and conflict. Students are taught a set of tools that they can bring to bear on new problems. Understanding competitive dynamics and strategic thinking are emphasised. Case studies and problem-solving form an important part of the teaching method.
ECOS2901 Intermediate Microeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECON1001 or BUSS1040 or ECON1040) with a minimum Distinction grade (75%) Corequisites: (ECOS2903 or MATH2070) and (ECMT1010 or BUSS1020 or MATH1905 or MATH1005 or MATH1015) Prohibitions: ECOS2001 or ECON2001 or ECON2901 Assessment: 2x Mid-semester tests (50%) and 2.5hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is comprised of lectures based upon the curriculum for ECOS2001 Intermediate Microeconomics, supported by a seminar for one hour a week. The content of lectures reflect a more analytical and critical treatment of the topics than ECOS2001. The topics, which build on the theory of consumer and firm behaviour and market structure, include game theory, oligopoly, general equilibrium and welfare, externalities and public goods and the economics of information.
ECOS2902 Intermediate Macroeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECON1002 or ECON1040) with a minimum Distinction grade (75%) Prohibitions: ECOS2002 or ECON2002 or ECON2902 Assessment: Essay (20%), Mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit is comprised of lectures based upon the curriculum for ECOS2002 Intermediate Macroeconomics, supported by a seminar for one hour a week. The content of lectures reflects a more intensive treatment of the topics than ECOS2002. Topics covered include: models of the goods, money and labour markets; macro-economic relationships such as consumption, investment, demand for money and labour demand and supply; macro-dynamic relationships, especially those linking inflation and unemployment; exchange rates and open economy macroeconomics; theories of economic growth; productivity and technological change; the dynamics of the business cycle; and the relationship between micro- and macro-economic policy.
ECOS3002 Development Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2002 or ECOS2902 Assessment: 1x1500wd written assessment (30%), 1x1hr mid-semester exam (20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the economic transformation of less-developed countries from microeconomic and macroeconomic perspectives. It covers applied topics such as education, health, nutrition, demographics, labour, agriculture and the private sector, focusing on how policies attempt to overcome market and institutional failures that are particularly acute in the developing world. Focus is given to applying theoretical and empirical tools necessary to conceptualise, analyse and interpret various issues in economic development. Applied examples from developing countries are used throughout the unit.
ECOS3003 Hierarchies, Incentives and Firm Structure

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Prohibitions: ECON3003 or ECOS2306 Assessment: 1x250wd equivalent problem set (10%), 1x750wd written assignment (15%), 1x1hr mid-semester exam (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit deals with the coordination and motivation problems faced by firms. More specifically this unit examines: whether firms use price or command mechanisms to allocate resources within firms; the problems associated with designing incentive contracts; the principles of efficient contract design and; the real world applications of those principles. The final section deals with the manner in which the coordination and motivation problems faced by firms determines their financial, vertical and horizontal structure.
ECOS3004 History of Economic Thought

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2002 or ECOS2902 or ECOP2011 or ECOP2001 or ECOP2012 or ECOP2002 Assessment: Essay (20%), Mid-semester test (30%) and 70min Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Where do the current beliefs - theories, doctrines, postulates and attitudes - of modern economics come from? If current theories and doctrines have a definite historical beginning, what schools of thought did they supplant? Are there alternative or dissident views which subsisted alongside mainstream economics in the twentieth century - and if so, what are they and where did they originate from? This unit seeks to answer these questions, as well as others. It provides an overview of the development of economic ideas from the seventeenth to the twentieth century, combined with a more intensive focus on the thought of certain key figures in that history. The particular topics covered include: the formation of economics to 1776; Adam Smith; classical economics from Smith to J.S. Mill; the rise of marginalist economics; John Maynard Keynes; and orthodox and heterodox currents in twentieth century economics.
ECOS3005 Industrial Organisation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Prohibitions: ECOS2201 Assessment: Mid-semester test (35%), problem sets (5%) and 2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines the nature of inter-firm rivalry in industries with market power. It explores the various ways in which firms can increase their market power by: extracting more surplus from consumers, by colluding with rivals or by excluding entrants. The unit also analyses the international competitiveness of industries in the context of industry assistance and the prevalence of foreign multinationals. Competition policy is also discussed.
ECOS3006 International Trade

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: problem sets (5%), Mid-semester test (35%) and 2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study provides a systematic analysis of the theory of international trade and trade policy. Initially differences between countries are emphasised as the source of trade and the gains from trade. Models that are examined include the Classical-Ricardian model, the Heckscher-Ohlin model and the Specific-Factors model. Next economics of scale and imperfect competition are introduced as sources of trade and gains from trade. The unit concludes with an examination of empirical studies aimed at testing trade theories. The analysis of trade policy begins with a discussion of the instruments of trade policy, in particular, tariffs and quotas and their effect on welfare. This discussion is then extended to the case of imperfect competition and strategic trade policy.
ECOS3007 International Macroeconomics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2002 or ECOS2902 Assessment: assignments (20%) and Mid-semester test (20%) and 1x2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit studies macroeconomic theory and policy in a global trading world. The microfoundations of the various sectors are examined in the context of an open economy. The evolution of international money and capital markets is described, the operation of the foreign exchange market is examined, showing how its microstructure affects its macro performance. Theories and tests of the efficiency of international capital markets are surveyed, as well as core theories and tests of exchange rate and asset price determination. The unit develops the macroeconomic implications of monetary and fiscal policies for small and large open economies for different regimes.
ECOS3008 Labour Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: Essay (25%), Mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit aims to provide an understanding of labour markets and related issues such as work conditions, pay and employment levels. Labour supply and demand, theories of wage determination, labour mobility and discrimination are examined. It also analyses the role of trade unions and labour market contracts. These topics are applied to current issues in Australian labour markets such as enterprise bargaining, the role of centralised wage fixing systems, training and other labour market programs. Policies designed to improve the functioning of the labour market are examined and particular attention is given to the problem of persistent unemployment.
ECOS3010 Monetary Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2002 or ECOS2902 Prohibitions: ECON3010 Assessment: multiple choice test (30%) and written paper (20%) and 70min Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an overview of the main elements of monetary economics, with emphasis upon macroeconomic issues - analysis of economic processes in which money enters the picture in an essential manner. The content primarily concerns economic principles and theory, but there is also considerable focus on the Australian monetary system and monetary policy in particular. The particular topics covered include: functions of money; the concept of 'liquidity'; money demand; determinants of money supply changes; financial crises and the 'lender of last resort' function of central banking; the Reserve Bank of Australia and the Australian Prudential Regulation Authority; term and risk structures of interest rates; alternative theories of the level of the rate of interest; the monetary policy transmission mechanism; monetary policy instrument choice; central bank credibility; policy reaction functions; the global monetary system; and Reserve Bank market operations.
ECOS3011 Public Finance

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: Mid-semester test (20%), assignment (30%) and 3hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Public Finance is about the taxing and spending decisions of governments. The unit covers a wide range of public finance topics. After an introduction to welfare economics and the role of government in the economy, the unit focuses on the revenue side of the budget: tax incidence, efficient and equitable taxation, the Australian system of revenue raising, issues of tax reform and the theory and practice of public utility pricing. It then focuses on the expenditure side of the government budget: public goods, externalities, and programs aimed at redistribution. It also introduces techniques of policy evaluation.
ECOS3012 Strategic Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Prohibitions: ECOS3901 Assessment: Mid-semester test (35%), online quizzes (20%) and 2hr Final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
To think and act strategically, one needs to evaluate the effect of one's actions on the actions of others. As most economic decisions are strategic, such as the decision to lower a price or introduce a new tax, economics, if it is to avoid simplistic models, requires a theoretical framework capable of illuminating strategic behaviour. This unit offers a comprehensive, critical introduction to the theory which purports, not only to satisfy this theoretical need, but also potentially to unify the social sciences: game theory. After examining important concepts of game theory, the unit investigates the repercussions for the theory of bargaining and for the evolution of social institutions.
ECOS3013 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2003 or RSEC2031 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (25%), 1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The natural environment is invariably affected by production and consumption in our modern economy. In particular, environmental outcomes are important in the presence of market failures (externalities and public goods). This unit focuses on developing a student's detailed understanding of the economic techniques used by policymakers to address environmental issues. These techniques include: Pigovian taxes and subsidies; regulation with asymmetric information; marketable permits; pricing contributions for public goods; optimal damages; and the allocation of property-rights and market failures.
ECOS3015 Law and Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: assignments (20%), Mid-semester test (30%) and 2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Law and economics examines the economic role of law and legal institutions on the actions of economic agents. The economic analysis of law is founded on models of human behaviour and examines how decision making is affected by different legal regimes. The behavioral approach gives rise to a set of principles that can be applied widely across disparate areas of the law, and is becoming increasingly important world-wide, as such analysis is often utilized in courts and public policy forums. The unit begins with a revision of relevant tools of economic analysis. Subsequently, it studies the economics of various branches of law such as: property; contract; nuisance; accident and liability law; and, criminal law
ECOS3016 Experimental and Behavioural Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1hr15min mid-semester test (25%), 1x1000wd written assignment (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Experimental economics uses experimental methods to evaluate the performance of economic models, institutions and policies. Behavioural economics combines experimental and field evidence with insights from neighbouring disciplines such as psychology, to develop richer economic models of decision-making. This unit will develop the key research methods and major findings of each of these fields, and explore both theoretical and practical implications. Students will read a number of seminal research papers in both experimental and behavioural economics, and will have opportunities to participate in classroom experiments.
ECOS3017 Health Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (25%), 1x1hr mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The purpose of this unit is to introduce the student to the methods of health economics and demonstrate how these methods can be applied to analyse issues in health policy and management. This unit will teach the student to use economic analysis to understand critical issues in health care and health policy. Topics covered include the institutions of the Australian system of health care and health statistics, evaluation techniques, production of health, demand for health care and technology, moral hazard and adverse selection in health insurance markets, health labour markets, including physician-patient interactions, managed care, regulation and payment systems for providers, comparative health systems, the pharmaceutical industry, health policy and social insurance.
ECOS3018 Economics of Growth

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECOS2901) and (ECOS2002 or ECOS2902) Assessment: 2x in-class tests (40%) and 1.5hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
At the heart of an understanding of the dynamics of market or capitalist economies is an understanding of economic growth. This unit is an introduction to the analysis of economic growth including a comparison of competing explanations within formal growth theory. It considers the connection between growth and distribution, growth and technical progress, the role of economic policies and economic institutions in promoting growth as well as the limitations on growth associated with exhaustible natural resources. Lectures also provide some consideration of the empirical evidence on different explanations of growth.
ECOS3020 Special Topic in Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ((ECOS2001 or ECON2001) and (ECOS2002 or ECON2002)) or ((ECOS2901 or ECON2901) and (ECOS2902 or ECON2902)) Assessment: Assessment dependent on topic Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must seek written permission from the School of Economics Undergraduate Coordinator to enrol in this unit.
Study of a special topic in Economics. Topics will vary from semester to semester according to staff availability and the presence of visitors. If taught in both semesters, the topic in Semester 2 will be different to that of Semester 1.
ECOS3021 Business Cycles and Asset Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECOS2901) and (ECOS2002 or ECOS2902) Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x1000wd Empirical report (25%), 1x2hrExam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit of study provides theoretical and empirical training in analysing macroeconomic fluctuations and the interactions between the real economy and asset markets. The unit of study will introduce theoretical models of the business cycle to identify sources of economic fluctuations. It then provides a theoretical framework in which the asset market-the real economy can be analysed. In addition to theoretical analysis, the unit will develop empirical tools for analysing economic and financial indicators as well as evaluating the performance of theoretical models. The role of government policy will also be discussed by taking both Australian and global episodes.
ECOS3022 The Economics of Financial Markets

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (ECOS2001 or ECOS2901) and (ECOS2002 or ECOS2902) Assessment: problem sets (20%), Mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr Final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Financial assets play a vital role coordinating the actions of savers and investors; consequently, they play a crucial role in creating wealth and facilitating economic activity. The aim of this unit is to explore the economic principles underlying: the pricing and development of financial assets; the trade-off between risk and return and the how investors construct portfolios in response to this trade-off. The focus is on the economics of financial markets: the factors of demand and supply; risk and uncertainty; incomplete contracts and renegotiation; and asymmetric information and its implications. We will emphasize the key aspects of markets for financial assets and the main differences to markets for consumption goods. The unit also examines the development of financial institutions and current issues in financial markets.
ECOS3023 Personnel Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: Problem sets (10%), 1x1000wd assignment (20%), 1x1hr mid-semester test (20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Personnel economics deals with the analysis of human resource issues within organisations. Throughout the unit of study, students will be introduced to economic concepts and analytical tools that provide a rigorous framework with which to analyse these relationships. Topics covered include recruitment and hiring decisions; turnover of staff; remuneration and motivation schemes designed to enhance productivity; and, the analysis of team production within the modern business organisation. Empirical studies that test theoretical predictions will also be considered throughout the unit.
ECOS3024 Economic History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 or ECOS2002 or ECOS2902 Assessment: 1x1200wd essay (20%), 1x1hr mid-semester test (30%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit covers topics in economic history from the advent of European 'modernity' in the 17th century to the late 20th century. A major focus is identifying the main social, institutional and economic forces that explain the unprecedented development of the world economy over the past 300 years. Topics include the first industrial revolution in Britain, the industrialization of Western Europe and the United States, the 1930s Great Depression and recovery, post-World War II reconstruction and 'golden era' of growth, and East Asia's meteoric growth performance.
ECOS3025 The Economics of Regulation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 500wd equivalent problem sets (10%), 1x1.5hr mid-semester test (40%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Market outcomes can be undesirable when self-interested firms reduce welfare for consumers and society. This unit of study focuses on the regulation of firms in markets with imperfect competition. We analyse regulation of natural monopolies, focusing on the key issue of asymmetric information between the regulator and the monopolist. In this unit we also examine oligopoly markets in which firms can reduce welfare through collusion, price fixing and vertical restraints. Emphasising real-world examples, we examine competition policy and merger regulation.
ECOS3026 Economics of Crime

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1500wd policy paper (30%), 1xresearch paper presentation (1000wd equivalent)(20%), 1x2hr final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study applies economic concepts and theory to analyse criminal behavior. This unit will provide an overview of core issues and recent advances in the economics of crime. In the unit students will critically analyse topics related to the criminal justice system, including incarceration, policing, gun ownership and regulation of illicit drugs. Within an economic framework, the unit will also consider the role that social programs and other social conditions -- such as education, poverty, family structure and even environmental factors (such as lead exposure) -- play in affecting crime and violence.
ECOS3027 Economics of the Family

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x200wd Online Discussion Post (10%), 1x1000wd Essay (30%), 1x1hr Mid-semester Test (20%), 1x2hr Final Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit applies economic concepts and theory to analyse the family. The unit explores the empirical support for the theories, evaluates explanations for recent demographic and labour market trends, and examines the implications of using the family as the foundation of analysis of economic activity in society. Topics covered include family formation, trends in educational attainment, the changing roles of men and women in the labour market and the household, and the effects of government policies on the family.
ECOS3901 Advanced Microeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2901 with a minimum distinction grade (75%) or ECOS2001 with a minimum High Distinction grade (85%) Corequisites: ECMT2150 or ECMT2110 Prohibitions: ECOS3012 Assessment: Mid-semester test (30%), problem sets (10%) and 2.5hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students intending to proceed to fourth year economics honours must also complete at least one additional 3000-level ECOS unit during their degree, except where both ECOS3903 and ECOS3904 are selected.
ECOS3901 Advanced Microeconomics is the second unit of study in the microeconomics sequence in the Economics Honours program. The goal of the unit is to provide a working knowledge and understanding of the most powerful methods of analysis and discourse in modern microeconomic theory. We build on the foundations of ECOS2901 and ECOS2903 to continue progress toward the frontier of microeconomics.
ECOS3902 Advanced Macroeconomics Honours

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECOS2902 with a minimum distinction grade (75%) or ECOS2002 with a minimum High Distinction grade (85%) Corequisites: ECMT2150 or ECMT2110 Assessment: Mid-semester test (30%), Take-home assignments (10%) and 2hr Final exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students intending to proceed to fourth year economics honours must also complete at least one additional 3000-level ECOS unit during their degree, except where both ECOS3903 and ECOS3904 are selected.
ECOS3902 Advanced Macroeconomics is a third year honours unit of study in macroeconomics. Its main objective is to develop a framework for thinking about macroeconomic questions. This unit is designed for the students enrolled in the Economics Honours stream. ECOS2901, ECOS2902, ECOS2903 and ECOS3901 are prerequisites and the corequisite is ECOS3903,or ECMT3110 plus one of ECMT2120, ECMT3120, ECMT3130, ECMT3160 or ECMT3170.
ECOS3903 Applied Microeconometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2150 with a minimum Distinction grade (75%) Assessment: assignments (10%), referee report (15%), Mid-semester test (25%) and 2hr Final examination (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit of study is designed to provide students with various topics in applied microeconomics. Estimation of the labour supply elasticity, returns to schooling, and returns to training programs are examples of topics this unit will cover. Various empirical topics in international trade, environmental economics, and health economics will also be discussed. Students will explore econometric methodologies extensively used in applied microeconomics (e.g., instrument variables, generalise methods of moments, panel data methods, probit and logit models, Tobit model, and sample selection model).
ECOS3904 Applied Macroeconometrics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECMT2150 with a minimum Distinction grade (75%) Assessment: 1x1hr Mid-semester test (20%), computer assignments (30%) and 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides an introduction to econometric theory and methods that can be useful for understanding applied (mostly macroeconomic/finance) models and research. It also aims to provide students with the necessary analytical tools for undertaking applied research using time series data and discusses how time series techniques can be applied to other areas of economics such as international trade, energy economics, economics of terrorism. This unit can be both complementary to and substitutive for Applied Microeconometrics, which focuses on empirical methods in applied microeconometrics.

Education

EDUF1018 Education, Teachers and Teaching

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Debra Hayes and Dr Victoria Rawlings Session: Semester 1 Classes: 36 hours face-to-face, 1x1-hr mentoring seminar/wk for 4 wks Prohibitions: EDUF1011 Assessment: 2000wd critical reflections on lectures (40%), 1800wd essay (40%), seminar presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study is the first of five units that make up the program of Education Studies. This program is the core curriculum for students enrolled in initial teacher education courses. Units within this program are also of relevance to students enrolled in other courses. This first unit provides an introduction to key issues in education, including: the complexity of teachers' work, the contested nature of knowledge, and the multiple ways that formal learning functions in society. Equity and social justice are key themes that are examined by drawing upon concepts derived from the sociology of education, cultural studies, curriculum theory, and educational research. In the first four weeks, students participate in a peer-mentoring program conducted by senior students. At the conclusion of the unit students should have developed and demonstrated a critical understanding of education, teachers and teaching.
EDUF1019 Human Development and Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Minkang Kim Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/wk for 12 wks, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 12 wks Prohibitions: EDUF1012 Assessment: (all parts compulsory) 30min seminar presentation (30%) and 2000wd reflective report (30%) and 2400wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit EDUF1019, which is the second part of Education I, introduces students to the study of human development, including a critical overview of current theory, research and practice in human development, with particular emphasis on the development of early childhood through to adolescence. A core assumption of the unit is that the study of human development is inter-disciplinary, and that developmental theories, past and present, are open to question and debate. Students are therefore encouraged to engage in this study with critical and creative minds. The content of the Unit focuses on the processes and products of human development, related to neurobiological, cognitive, emotional, social, cultural, and language development. The classical theories are considered and examined in the light of contemporary theory and research. The seminar programme of the Unit is concerned with the teaching of values in schools and early childhood education settings, including the creation of values-based learning environments, and with each participant's development as a human self, focusing in particular on the development of participants' professional skills and personal values.
EDGU2000 Teaching English Internationally 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Marcella Robertson Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/wk for 12 wks Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Prohibitions: EDSE5014 Assessment: Micro-teaching (25%), 1xlanguage analysis (10%),900 wd min contributions to online discussion (5%),in class preliminary reflective lesson observation Report (5%), 1x900 wd reflective observation report (25%) and 1x2400wd (equivalent) portfolio of activities (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The rapid expansion of English as a global language has led to a demand for graduates across a range of disciplines to have skills and expertise in English language teaching. This unit aims to introduce the theory and practice of teaching English both in Australia to international students and overseas. The unit is run in conjunction with the Centre for English Teaching and involves lectures by CET staff, lesson observations and practical teaching.
Textbooks
Harmer, J. (2015) The practice of English language teaching (With DVD) 5th Edition. Pearson Longman, UK.
EDUF2006 Educational Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Paul Ginns Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/wk for 12 wks, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 12 wks Prerequisites: (EDUF1018 and EDUF1019) or 30 junior credit points Assessment: 3 concept map quizzes (20%), 2000wd essay (40%), 1500wd per member group report (30%) with peer evaluations (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study is the first part of Education II. Its aim is to provide a general introduction to educational psychology, surveying a range of individual and social influences on learning This unit plays an important role in supporting later teaching and curriculum studies in the Bachelor of Education degree. At the end of this unit of study, students will have made substantial progress towards understanding the utility of research in psychology for educators. They will have the capacity to describe learning and teaching activities in terms of their psychological efficacy, especially as it relates to young people. Similarly they will have been introduced to the theory and practice of assessment and evaluation in educational settings, and the impact of assessment on learning and motivation. They will have had training in two Department of Education and Community policies, Good Discipline and Effective Learning, and Student Welfare.
Textbooks
McInerney, D.M (2015). Educational Psychology: Constructing learning (6th ed). Frenchs Forest: Pearson.
EDUF2007 Social Perspectives on Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew A.M. Thomas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 12wks, 1x2-hr workshop/wk for 12wks Prerequisites: (EDUF1018 and EDUF1019) or 30 junior credit points Assessment: presentation (25%), critical policy analysis (25%), summative project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is part of the Education I-IV program which provides students with a foundation in the social scientific study of education. The aim of this unit is to critically examine the social, political and economic contexts of education. Key issues concerning difference and inequality in education are explored through sociological and historical approaches. These include social class, gender and cultural diversity in education, as well as the schooling market, school systems, and globalisation. At the end of this unit of study, students should have the capacity to discuss the impact of a range of educational practices and policies on schools, students and families. Similarly, students will be familiar with broad movements in contemporary educational reform and their association with national and global economic change. As a result of working on a substantial project students will develop a range of analytical skills. Through policy analysis tasks and workshop activities, students will be familiar with NSW Department of Education and Communities policies and procedures relating to gender, Indigenous education, and cultural diversity.
EDUF3023 Sport: Contemporary Educational Issues

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Steve Georgakis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/wk for 8 weeks, 1x3hr seminar/wk for 8 wks, 1x4hr fieldtrip Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: research seminar presentation (25%) and 5x1,000wd written responses (75%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Understanding sport is central to understanding Australian culture and Australians' sense of who they are in the world. Sport is part of day-to-day discourse and a central part of Australian culture, yet receives comparatively little attention as an area of serious academic study at Australian universities. This unit of study therefore dissects the role played by youth sport and sport in Australian society from an historical and socio-cultural perspective. Youth sport in this unit encompasses physical education and school sport, organised community sport as well as any organised youth physical activity. This unit endeavours to place greater emphasis on theories that have emerged regarding youth sport and sport issues. These include how youth sport and sport in general have been constructed over time and how each relates to themes such as class, gender, age, ethnicity, sexuality, social identity, policy, politics, commercialism, nationalism, disability and racism. The unit is structured in a way to encourage the development of arguments and ideas through weekly responses and a research presentation. This unit of study is designed to encourage student-based multi-disciplinary inquiry as laid out by the Education III design. It is designed also to encourage students to become informed citizens and life-long learners.
EDUF3026 Global Perspectives, Poverty and Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alexandra McCormick and Dr Matthew Thomas Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 9 wks, 1x1-hr online tutorial/wk for 9 wks, 1x2 hour workshop for 9 wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: Online tutorial postings (25%), 500wd essay plan (10%) and 2000wd major essay (20%), 2000wd critical review of an education program (25%), Workshop group presentation with group handout (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores relationships between education, poverty and international development in multi-level contexts. It acknowledges the importance of a broad-ranging view of international development, including its economic, political, and cultural dimensions. The unit examines key indicators related to poverty and education, and explores the educational implications of global social policies like Education for all, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We investigate the roles of multilateral, bilateral and non-state agencies in educational development to discuss the multiple actors in global development and the politics of aid. Using case studies of educational development processes in specific countries and regions, we contextualise the key issues explored in the unit and provide students with an understanding of how international development reforms are experienced and contested at local, regional, and national levels. The unit is especially designed for those who have an interest in international and global dynamics, particularly those identified as 'developing' countries, who may be teaching or writing about international development issues, or who may be interested in careers in international and development education, whether in Australia or overseas.
Textbooks
McCowan, T. and E. Unterhalter (2014) Education and International Development: An Introduction, Bloomsbury (available as an ebook)
EDUF3027 International Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Nigel Bagnall Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 12 wks, 1x2-hr workshop/wk for 12 wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: 1x 600wd workshop paper (10%), workshop presentation (20%), 1-hr take home exam (30%), 2400wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit emphasis is on the underpinning global education trends of the developed world. A number of themes are dealt with in this global context. These include Indigenous education issues in Australia, the USA and New Zealand, the emergence of international curriculum and assessment and a number of education system case studies. These case studies will include the education systems of France, Great Britain, Brazil, China and India. The unit will appeal to students who are likely to work in organizations such as UNESCO, the OECD or the World Bank. It is a unit also of particular interest to students wishing to teach outside of Australia at some stage in their career.
EDUF3028 Mentoring in Educational Contexts

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Debra Talbot Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/wk for 9wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: 2500wd individual literature review assignment (40%), 3500wd group assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Mentoring is a complex activity which juxtaposes support and challenge in both transitional situations and in on-going learning of both the mentee and the mentor. In schools, mentoring is a critical attribute of professional teaching practice. It is integral to leading the provision of quality classroom teaching and learning through the essential support for ongoing professional learning of preservice, beginning and more experienced teachers. Students who have a specialisation in a particular learning area of strategic importance, for example primary mathematics or science, will be well placed to mentor the ongoing professional learning of their colleagues.
This unit of study will examine dispositions and skills necessary for the mentoring of enriched pedagogical practices in schools. Students use a range of sociological theories and constructs and engage in intensive reading of research in order to develop a critical understanding of mentoring as professional practice and to devise a mentor program suitable for implementation in an educational setting related to their area of specialisation. Models of distributed leadership and collaboration play an important part in effective mentoring. For this reason the learning and teaching in this unit of study is facilitated through collaborative teams. These teams promote interdependence between members of the team. They also emphasise individual accountability as each student is required to develop the leadership qualities required to lead their peers toward critically engaging with learning about their practice.
EDUF3029 Psychology of Learning and Teaching

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Paul Ginns Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/wk for 9wks, 1x1-hr tutorial/wk for 9wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units, and EDUF2006 Assessment: take home exam (30%) and 2000wd essay (40%) and group poster presentation (20%) with peer evaluations (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines research on information processing and the design of instructional materials and activiities which have significant implications for enhancing learning outcomes. In addition to lectures, students present the results of their collaborative self-directed research in a series of presentations held in the last two weeks of the unit of study. At the completion of the unit students should be able to analyse, synthesise, and draw conclusions from theory and research, derive educational implications and applications for an educational level (e.g. primary, secondary), demonstrate the skills involved in collaborative and self-directed learning, and demonstrate competence in oral and written communication skills.
EDUF3030 Australian Schooling Systems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicole Mockler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 9 wks, 1x2-hr seminar/wk for 9 wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: 1500wd reading guide (30%) and 2500wd essay (45%) and 1000wd take-home examination (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How can we explain the ideas, practices and institutions which make up the modern Australian school? This unit looks for the answers in the history of Australian education and educational ideas more broadly. Why is schooling compulsory? Why are there separate primary and secondary schools? Why do teachers need university degrees? Why do so many children and young people attend religiously-affiliated schools? What are the origins of current school funding regimes? Understanding the histories of current educational arrangements helps us better understand the present and offers useful knowledge for shaping the future of schooling. The unit looks at the history of Australian schooling within an international context, with a particular emphasis on the period from the 1950s to the early C21st.
EDUF3032 Curriculum and Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Print Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/wk for 12 wks, 1x2-hr tutorial/wk for 12 wks Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: 1000wd analysis of curriculum document (20%) and 500wd seminar presentation (40%) and 2500wd related paper on a curriculum phenomenon (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Curriculum is an essential component to all schools and all education systems. Understanding what, why and how curricula are constructed is an important skill for all teachers. The unit also examines controversial issues in curriculum including an alternative curriculum [the International Baccalaureate], the teaching of values in schools and the role of values education documents for NSW schools. Many recent developments in curriculum are reviewed including NAPLAN, national assessment and MySchool. Evaluation and assessment are often misunderstood concepts. Cultural, social and political influences drive decisions about who, what and how will be evaluated. Evaluation and assessment are often conflated with large scale testing regimes because they can lead to easily quantifiable results. A broader and more accurate understanding of these terms is important for all educators.
EDUF3037 Creativity, Learning and Teacher Artistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alison O'Grady Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x2-hr seminars and 3 x 7 hour site-based taught workshops and 1 x 7 hour assessment expo. Prerequisites: 42 credit points of units Assessment: i) 2000 word Critical analysis of Creativity and Teacher Artistry (30%), 1000 word Tutorial discussion presentation on key theoretical readings (20%) , iii) 3000 word Critical Analysis Creativity and Learning Experiences (50%) Practical field work: site specific attendance and participation Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Creativity is central to progress and innovation in teaching and learning. This unit explores the critical role of purposeful and dynamic creativity for 21st century learners. Creativity, learning and teacher artistry explores through rigorous analysis how the use of performances, site specific workshops, international case studies, theoretical discussions and site based opportunities can activate an understanding of the place of creativity and teacher artistry in learning, curriculum and schools. Throughout this unit students will be given the opportunity to practically engage with ideas of creativity, learning and teacher artistry to develop theory and practice for 21st century schooling. Through seminars led by experts and artists, international case studies and intensive site based workshops students will have the opportunity to develop their own practices in creativity and teacher artistry to support student learning and knowledge creation across the curriculum.
Textbooks
Jefferson, M., and Anderson, M. (2017). Transforming schools: Creativity, critical reflection, communication, collaboration. London; New York, NY;: Bloomsbury Academic, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing Plc.
EDUF3038 International Experience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wayne Cotton Session: Intensive December,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x3-hr pre trip workshops, 1x3-hr post trip workshop Prerequisites: 96 credit points of units Assessment: 2000wd report (40%), journal (20%), 2000wd reflection report (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The benefits of international experiences during a student's degree have long been recognized; consequently the University of Sydney has specific initiatives which include developing international opportunities for its students. This Unit provides the framework and support to direct and maximize the learning from a multi-week international experience. Additional costs for the international experience will be covered by the student.
EDUF3135 Aboriginal Community Engagement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cathie Burgess Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1x4-hr tutorial/fieldwork weeks 1 to 9 Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: 1800wd critical analysis (30%), 1800wd e-Learning resource (30%), 2400wd educational program (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The focus of this UoS is exploring, experiencing and reflecting upon the transformative effect of Aboriginal community engagement on schools, early childhood education settings, curriculum and pedagogy. Students will learn on country by participating in local Aboriginal cultural and social activities and explore how local Aboriginal ways of knowing, doing and being reflects the diversity, vibrancy and resilience of Aboriginal peoples and cultures. They will consider the role of community cultural wealth in developing and designing culturally responsive relationships-focussed schooling to 'close the gap' between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities. Students will critically analyse diverse representations and deficit discourses about Aboriginal people, culture and communities in the project of developing their activist professional identity to transform teaching and learning, schools and early childhood education settings in socially just ways.
EDUF3136 Research with Young Children

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marianne Fenech Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/wk, 1x2hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: 3000wd online postings (40%), 1x 2000wd essay (30%), 1x1000wd presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Contemporary educational paradigms and pedagogies advocate theories of learning that conceptualise education as a process of participatory research, where children are active agents and teachers are facilitators and co-constructers of meaning. As such, it is critical that teachers are well versed in child-focused research. This unit investigates the ways teachers can engage in and critique ethical and political research with children birth - eight years. Underpinned by social justice principles of participation, inclusion and equality, this unit aims to provide students with knowledge about a) critical research theories; b) participatory methods, instruments and processes for researching with young children; c) ethical considerations in conducting research with diverse and/or marginalised children; d) research as a mechanism for social justice and social change in early childhood education, that is, the role of teachers as researchers in informing public policy, advocacy and activism; and e) research as an evaluative toolkit for reflection, accountability, and sustainable early childhood teaching.

English

ENGL1002 Narratives of Romance and Adventure

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x1000wd Assignment (20%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the art of narrative from Greek and Roman antiquity to the present. What makes Homer's Odyssey and Ovid's Metamorphoses defining texts for the history of narrative? Why are the early masters of English narrative so compelling? How does a film like O Brother, Where Art Thou? fit in? Issues of particular relevance include: genre, epic and myth; the unfolding of adventure and gender relations; intertextuality and the nature of humankind.
ENGL1007 Language, Texts and Time

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x500wd assignments (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%), 1x1.5-hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study equips students with some general tools for the close analysis of literary language. Grammatical concepts will be introduced and applied to the description of prose, poetry and drama, and students will explore the changing relations between form and meaning in English from the earliest times up to the present. A number of key strands in contemporary language study will also be presented, including semiotic theory, rhetoric and discourse studies and theorizations of the relationship between texts and subjectivity.
ENGL1011 Introduction to Film Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x800wd exercise (20%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How do form and style structure our experience of film? This unit provides a critical introduction to elements of film making and viewing, moving through an exploration of formal components of film to consider film aesthetics in relation to the history of film scholarship. We will consider films in a variety of cultural and historical contexts, from early cinema to youtube, and introduce a series of "case studies" to explore historical, cultural and material contexts of film production and consumption.
ENGL1012 The Gothic Imagination

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x500wd close reading exercise (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the Gothic, a transgressive literary mode that imagines haunted or hostile social worlds. Beginning with the early Gothic craze and ending with its popular on-screen renewal, we consider the aesthetics of horror and terror, and investigate the questions these texts raise about identity, place, and the imagination.
ENGL1013 Global Literatures in English

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial /week Assessment: 1x1000wd close reading (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Global Literatures in English is a transnational and cross-period unit that examines how literary and cultural works from different periods from across the world engage with world historical events and social political structures operating on a global scale, with a particular emphasis on the representation of Empire and its legacies.
ENGL1014 Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd reading response task (20%), 1x1000wd creative writing draft (20%), 1x 2500wd creative writing portfolio (50%), workshop participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Creative writing, reading and thinking are core skills. This unit offers a practical and critical introduction to the development of a reflective creative writing practice across a range of different literary forms. Students will be guided through the process of generating ideas, drafting, workshopping, editing and revision to produce a portfolio of creative writing. The unit will emphasise creative writing as a dynamic mode of engaging with forms and ideas.
ENGL1026 Constructing the Fictive Self

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd Assignment (15%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x2hr Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What makes the subject of identity so compelling? How are we ourselves involved in the construction of such identity? This unit explores the topic of self in literary and cinematic texts. It will provide an opportunity for students to analyse and creatively explore the construction of self in a variety of social contexts by focusing on textual representations of sexuality, race and gender in ways that are relevant to being and living in today's world.
ENGL2605 Literary Theory: An Introduction

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in English or 6 Junior credit points in English and AMST1001 Prohibitions: ENGL3910 or ENGL3920 or ASLT3602 or ENGL3962 Assessment: 1x750wd critical analysis assignment (17%), 1x1500wd assignment (33%), 1x2250wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit approaches literary theory and criticism as such in three ways, synoptically, historically, and polemically. First, a generous sampling of kinds of theory and criticism establishes the ambit of the field. Second, a more concentrated sampling explores the history and importance of a particular period or mode of theory and criticism. Third, another such sampling evaluates the nature and significance of a matter of current theoretical and critical controversy.
ENGL2611 Jane Austen, Then and Now

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in English or 6 Junior credit points from English and AMST1001 Prohibitions: ENGL2011 Assessment: 1x1500wd research exercise (35%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x500wd equivalent online discussion task (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Jane Austen is an iconic figure, both within the academy and without. In the discipline of English, her novels consolidate generic traditions that are both forward and backward looking. This unit examines Austen's novels in their historical and critical context in order to understand the place of her works, then and now. We will analyse how these novels engage the literary, social and political debates of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. We will also assess the interpretative traditions her work inaugurated in subsequent centuries.
ENGL2613 Literature, Politics and Modernity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Prohibitions: ENGL2013 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (35%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit considers the creative interplay between literature and politics in the modern period (1789-1945), introducing and examining how authority, social structures and individual autonomy have been represented and analysed in real and imagined settings. Using an array of forms including novels, poems, documents, essays and film, we look at topics such as revolution, equality, imperialism, the environment and utopias. We track historical changes in how political power has operated and been challenged at the personal, national and global levels.
ENGL2617 Postmodernism

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hour lectures Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in English or 6 Junior credit points in English and AMST1001 or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1076 or HSTY1023)) or 18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011 Prohibitions: ENGL2017 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd equivalent Tutorial presentation (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What was postmodernism? This unit will explore the most interesting and innovative theoretical, literary and multimedia texts of the last half century to think about what aesthetic texts brought to arguments about politics, identity, truth and knowledge. We will examine the relationship between modernism and postmodernism, movements, communities and subcultures, experimentalism and activism, popular and high culture, and the rise of identity politics, the 'culture wars,' and queer theory.
ENGL2627 Screening Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Kate Lilley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Film Studies Prohibitions: ENGL2027 Assessment: 1x1500wd word essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%), 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the relationship between cinema and sexuality in classic films through detailed, historicised readings. Questions to be investigated include the erotics of cinematic genre and form; the sexual politics of representation and spectatorship; stardom, scandal and cult appreciation; cinema and sexuality as technologies of modernity; cinema, sexuality and pedagogy.
ENGL2638 Literature and Cinema

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in English or (6 Junior credit points from English and AMST1001) or 18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011 Prohibitions: ENGL2038 Assessment: 1x500wd Oral Presentation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (50%), 1x1500wd Take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will examine issues arising from a comparative study of literature and cinema, including: the continuities and discontinuities between the two mediums; the cultural and historical contexts of literary and cinematic texts; authorship, auteurism and aesthetic authority; adaptation and intertextuality; the figurative styles of literature and cinema; narrative and narration in literature and cinema; genre study.
ENGL2640 Shakespeare

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English. Prohibitions: ENGL2040 Assessment: 1x500wd metaphor exercise (20%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an intensive study of plays by Shakespeare in a variety of genres, particularly focusing on current critical interventions, as well as the detailed reading of Shakespeare's dramatic language. Current approaches to Shakespeare read his texts as a way of thinking about ideas of urgent concern in the twenty first century: the environment and ideas of the natural; sexuality and gender; scepticism and belief. Watching film versions of the plays will form an integral part of our study.
ENGL2650 Reading Poetry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Prohibitions: ENGL2050 Assessment: 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2000wd essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
A range of poetry will be offered each year concentrating on an historical period, an individual poet, and a close study of a poetic form. Readings of individual poems will involve both intensive study of technical and linguistic characteristics, as well as of the broader historical, social, ideological and personal contexts and issues which they reflect. As well, there will be discussion of on-going literary-critical debate about poetry and its function.
ENGL2653 Western Theories of Language

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nick Riemer Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in English or (6 Junior credit points in English and AMST1001) or (12 junior credit points in Linguistics) Prohibitions: ENGL2053 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial notes (10%), 1x2000wd essay (50%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
An introduction to the history of Western ideas about the structure, origin and use of language, with a particular focus on theories of English grammar and on the main theoretical developments of the 20th century. Students will consider the evolution of grammatical and rhetorical thought with reference both to the inherent constraints on linguistic theorizing, and to the varying ideological currents that have shaped Western ideas on language structure and use from antiquity to the present.
ENGL2654 Novel Worlds

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Assessment: 3x750wd written exercises (60%), 1x2250wd take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores the rise of novel reading in English as an educative, aesthetic and passionate practice from the 17th century to the present. The unit moves chronologically to examine how novels and the world came to be understood as mutually constitutive, how novels create and sustain attachments amongst their readers, how the genre of the novel became available for interrogations of national, gendered, "racial", sexual and class identity, of liberty and intellectual emancipation, and of pleasure.
ENGL2657 Myths, Legends and Heroes

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in English or (6 Junior credit points in English and AMST1001) Assessment: 1x1000wd Essay (15%), 1x1500wd Essay (35%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Students will study (in modern English translation) the literature of the peoples who lived in Britain in the Early Middle Ages -- Britons, Anglo-Saxons, Vikings and Normans. Lectures and tutorials will cover the literature, history, religion and language of these cultures, focusing on representations of the heroic ideal, as this is embodied in mythic, legendary and historical writing. Texts to be studied include Beowulf, The Wanderer, selections from the Edda, and early Arthurian material.
ENGL2660 Reading the Nation: American Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x500wd in-class exercise (15%), 1x1500wd reader response (40%), 1x2500wd essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit, we study a variety of American literary and visual texts to consider what it means to read "nationally". We first examine the rise of literary nationalism to look then at the ways in which exigencies of empire, race and ethnicity, and gender and sexuality, for example, have exerted pressure on the fantasy of a cohesive national culture. We will also consider the transnational turn of recent decades to understand the nation's function in a global context.
ENGL2661 Camelot: text, stage, screen

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr online lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Assessment: class participation (5%), 3x160wd blog posts (15%), 1x520wd equiv class presentation (10%), 1x1000wd essay (20%), 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From Geoffrey of Monmouth's Caerleon to the Kennedy White House, Camelot represents the glittering apogee of chivalry and courtliness. Or does it? Students will consider the legend's political and cultural transformations from medieval texts to musical, film, graphic novel and fantasy adaptations.
ENGL2664 Transpacific American Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ((12 junior credit points from English) or (6 junior credit points from English and AMST1001)) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076) and (ENGL2617 or ENGL2660)) Assessment: 1x2hr exam (30%), 1x500wd presentation (10%), 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x2000wd research essay (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study will consider ways in which American Literature has engaged with the opening up of Pacific space. Questions to be considered will be the nature of westward expansion, the opening up of California and it's engagement with Mexico, the relation of native peoples to U.S. Nationhood both on the mainland and Pacific Islands, and the legacy of World War Two. A representative range of poets and prose writers will be studied.
ENGL2665 The Victorian Novel

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Assessment: 1x500wd Assignment (10%), 1x1800wd Essay (45%), 1x2200wd Take-home Exercise (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The novel was the preeminent literary form of the Victorian period, unrivaled in its aesthetic influence and cultural importance. In this course, we'll read a representative selection of the most notable Victorian novels in order to understand what 'the Victorian novel' is, why it rose to prominence during a period of rapid societal change, and how its narrative techniques and thematic concerns continue to shape the genre today.
ENGL2666 Creative Writing:Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1 x 2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Assessment: 1x1000wd creative writing draft (25%), 1x1000wd online writing task (25%), 1x2500wd portfolio and exegesis (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit fosters students' practice and knowledge of creative writing through interactive workshops, seminars and lectures led by established writers and academics. Exploring the theoretical and practical dimensions of developing a personal creative writing practice, the unit emphases writing as a mode of intellectual, historical and aesthetic engagement with the contemporary.
ENGL2667 Reading Drama

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr equivalent online task/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points in English) or (6 Junior credit points in English and any of AMST1001, PRFM1601 or PRFM1602) Assessment: 1x1000wd scene analysis (25%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit, you read some great plays and develop skills in reading dramatic texts. Looking at four or five plays in detail, we consider issues such as: what it means to read dramatic text; the relationship between text and performance; 'personation' and the establishment of dramatic character.
ENGL2668 Australian Gothic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Prohibitions: ASLT2619 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
ENGL2669 Australian Stage and Screen

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Studies Prohibitions: ASLT2616 Australian Stage & Screen Assessment: 1x 5-10 minutes/500wd (based on textual analysis of selected text/passage) oral presentation/summary (20%), 1x 2000wd essay (40%), 1x 2000wd take-home exercise (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Australian theatre and cinema have lively, at times intersecting, histories, and have played significant roles at both national and international levels, from the depiction of various local 'types' on stage and screen, to the work of Australian actors, directors and cinematographers overseas. This unit examines selected plays and films over the last century or so through a number of thematic focuses, including: race, gender and national identity; comic traditions; Australia and the world; modernity and innovation.
ENGL2670 Revolutionary Writing: 1960s and Beyond

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Prohibitions: ASLT2602 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
ENGL2671 Australian Writing in the Postmodern Age

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Studies Prohibitions: ASLT2609 Assessment: 5x 200wd Online posts (10%), 1x 1500wd Essay (40%), 1x 2000wd Take-Home Exercise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Is one country's postmodernism the same as another's? Concentrating on works produced since the 1980s this unit looks at some of the early texts of Australian postmodernism, thinking about the range of local, domestic and international contexts with which they engage. It asks whether Australian postmodernism has any distinguishing features, trying to explain what these might be, and how they might have come about, and how it has developed in the contemporary era of digital and social media.
ENGL2672 Postcolonial Modernisms/Modernities

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 1000 level in English Studies Assessment: 3 x 500wd Reader Response (30%), 1x 1000wd Interpretive Analysis (20%), 1x 2000wd Research Project (35%), 1x Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines literary and cultural expressions of modernism/modernity in sites that were or continue to be colonised. We will study how notions such as race, gender, class, sexuality, nation, and religion shape ideas of being modern, and how 20th and 21st century aesthetic works register the contradictory yet interconnected experiences of modernity.
ENGL2673 Television Fictions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the English major Assessment: 1x500wd or equivalent Class presentation (10%), 1x1500wd Textual Analysis (35%), 1x2500wd Research Paper (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will consider how systems of meaning have been generated in TV narratives. It will address theoretical questions regarding production and authorship, but most of this unit will focus on how particular aesthetic forms underwrite the construction of television fictions across factual narratives (news, sport), drama, comedy and serials.
ENGL3603 Contemporary British Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points from any of (English or Australian Literature) Assessment: 1x4000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (30%), 1x500wd in-class oral presentation and report (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines literary texts produced in Britain in the past two decades, exploring their relationship to significant social and political changes occurring in Britain over that period. We will investigate a variety of literary, social, and cultural issues, each of which have contributed to contemporary British culture.
ENGL3607 Modern Irish Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points from English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x500wd annotated bibliography (12%), 1x1500wd Essay (38%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study charts the development of Irish literature from the late nineteenth century to the present day, in the form of drama, short fiction, novels, poetry, biography and autobiography. Prominent themes include: the emergence of the modern Irish nation through resistance, civil war, and independence from Britain; Northern Ireland and the Troubles; expatriation and exile; wit and verbal dexterity; the fate of specifically "Celtic" sensibilities; and the relation of writing to history (ancient, colonial, the Famine, Republicanism).
ENGL3608 Transpacific American Literature

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
ENGL3611 Issues in the Semiotics of Language

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL3915 Assessment: 1x2000wd (35%), 1x4000wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines some key historical and theoretical topics in the semiotics of language. We begin with an investigation into the structuralist legacy, concentrating on exegetical and theoretical questions raised by Saussurean "valeur" and "difference". We then discuss analyses of lexical polysemy and alternatives to the Saussurean paradigm provided in the Humboldtian and Soviet traditions and in Relevance Theory. The course ends by assessing the desirability and difficulties of accommodating emotion in theories of linguistic signification.
ENGL3616 Reading Contemporary America

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (18 Senior credit points from English or Australian Literature) or (ARHT2656 and 6 credit points from (ARHT2652 or ARHT2653 or ARHT2655 or ARHT2657 or ASNS3616 or ENGL2627 or ENGL2638 or ENGL3604 or FILM2601 or HSTY2608 or ICLS2637 or MUSC2663)) Prohibitions: ENGL2035 or ENGL2635 Assessment: 4x500wd reading response exercise (30%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%), seminar particiaption (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit we will investigate the most interesting and engaging cultural work done in the US over the last decade, focusing on intellectual and aesthetic cultural engagement with cultural and political diversity. In particular we will be considering: how 'quality' televisions reconfigures the aesthetic ecology, how protests movements (Black Lives Matter, Occupy) affect the aesthetic representation of citizenship, how LGBTIQ concerns are reflected in new and familiar aesthetic domains, and what reading does to your brain.
ENGL3623 The 18th Century: Scandal and Sociability

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2659 Assessment: 1x1500wd research report (40%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), 1x500wd discussion paper (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In eighteenth-century Britain, authors were brought into new relation with readers. Commercial publication, now central to literary production and dissemination, meant texts reached an anonymous and potentially limitless readership. How did awareness of this new public dimension shape literary texts? Students will evaluate the constitutive role of scandal and sociability in the period's most important texts. We will focus on the development of the novel as a sociable form, and assess recent theories addressing public engagement in eighteenth-century literature.
ENGL3633 Introduction to Old English

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 2x1hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Celtic Studies Prohibitions: ENGL3621 or ENGL3622 or ENGL3631 or ENGL3632 Assessment: 1x1000wd translation exercise (20%), 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Old English was the language of England from the fifth century until the twelfth. This earliest phase of the English literary tradition evolved against a background of cultural encounters: as the Anglo-Saxons encountered the culture of Rome, as they adopted and adapted the Christian religion, and as they reflected on their origins on the European continent. This unit introduces students to the language spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons, and presents the opportunity to translate and read Old English texts.
ENGL3635 Old Norse

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Linguistics or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Celtic Studies Prohibitions: ENGL3631 or ENGL3632 or ENGL3622 or ENGL3621 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
ENGL3642 Medieval Literature: Dreams and Visions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Celtic Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will study the literature of dreams and visions of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern period against a range of literary and social backgrounds. The unit will begin with a survey of the classical and biblical background to works which may be defined as dreams or visions, as well as examining the relationship between the two genres and their transformations from the Middle Ages into the Renaissance.
ENGL3651 Christopher Marlowe

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Liam Semler Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 senior credit points in English or Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL3922 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Christopher Marlowe was a radically creative dramatic and poetic genius whose blockbuster plays changed the course of English drama and paved the way for Shakespeare. His daring themes put Renaissance taboos such as atheism, necromancy, homoeroticism and current politics on stage for public debate. These themes, combined with his trademark obsessive protagonists, mighty poetic line and aesthetics of violence, continue to impress audiences and scholars. This unit is an advanced study of Marlowe's body of work in the context of his times and modern scholarship.
ENGL3655 The Literary in Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2000wd Seminar presentation of research proposal (30%), 1x4000wd Research essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will introduce students to significant movements in modern and contemporary literary theory to think about what it means to speak of the literary. The unit of study begins by examining the question of "literariness" through its exposition and defence by a number of scholars. We will pursue the applications of their arguments through a selection of theoretical models, including queer and gender theory, psychoanalysis, and race theory, to consider the cultural and ideological work imaginative literature undertakes.
ENGL3657 The Brontes

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points in English or Australian Literature Assessment: 1x2000wd assignment (40%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x3500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The novels of the Bronte Sisters are among the most enduringly popular Victorian texts, yet they have an ambiguous critical status. The perception that the Brontes are labile and cloistered writers, best interpreted psychoanalytically, raises questions about the relationship between biography and literature, and the ways in which notions of social and historical relevance play into judgments about literary value. We will think about canonical and popular literary status, biography and authorship, gender and writing, and Victorian society.
ENGL3695 Medieval Tales of Wonder

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Prerequisites: 18 Senior credit points each in either (English or Australian Literature) or Celtic Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd annotated bibliography (25%), 1x3000wd research essay (60%), Class Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Medieval Romance includes narratives of adventure and ideals of courtly love within a context infused with wondrous potential. In this unit students will explore a selection of romance texts, exploring themes of gender, the fantastic and literary history. Students will analyse recent developments in theoretical approaches to Medieval romance, including monster theory and affect theory. Texts will be studied in Middle English with class support.
ENGL3696 Advanced Creative Writing

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: ENGL2666 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 1x1000wd outline of project (20%), 1x2000wd draft of project (30%), 1x3000wd final project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on ENGL2666 Creative Writing: Theory and Practice, offering students the opportunity to complete a creative project. Student may complete projects in fiction, poetry, creative non-fiction, writing for performance, or by combining any of the above.
ENGL3697 Imagining Jerusalem

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1a Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Assessment: 4x500wd reader responses/blog posts (30%), 1x4000wd research essay (60%), seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Jerusalem has long fascinated travellers, artists, and pilgrims, both as a real and as an imagined city. For some, this fascination lies in the religious symbolism of the city, while in the contemporary period Jerusalem is also increasingly shaped by the role it plays in the conflict in the Middle East. This unit focuses on how literature and film from Australia, Europe, Israel, North America, and Palestine imagines Jerusalem as a past, present, and future city.
ENGL3701 Major Australian Authors: Depth Study

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies Prohibitions: ASLT3608 Assessment: 1x 2000wd Short essay (40%), 1x 4000wd Long essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides students with the opportunity to undertake in-depth study of the life, work, career and reception of one or more major Australian writers, such as Peter Carey, Helen Garner, Alex Miller, H.H. Richardson, Christina Stead, Patrick White or Judith Wright. While focusing on close reading of texts that have come to be regarded as outstanding both nationally and internationally, students will also use methodologies that include career biography, reception history, and analysis of key works of literary criticism and the economy of literary prestige.
ENGL3703 Writing Australian Nature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies Prohibitions: ASLT2620 Assessment: 6x 250wd Online Writing Tasks (10%), 1x 2000wd Critical Concepts Journal (40%), 1x 2500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How is 'nature' represented in Australian texts and from whose perspective? Recognising the complex meanings of 'nature' (Williams), we will trace its significance in Australian texts and contexts. How do novelists, poets and others depict Australian landscapes and ecologies? How do different cultural perspectives shape representations of nature? This unit examines Indigenous and non-Indigenous texts, introducing key approaches from ecocriticism and the ecohumanities, and asking how literature shapes an environmental consciousness.
ENGL3706 African American Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x 1000wd Close-reading exercise (30%), 1x 500wd Essay Plan (20%), 1x 3000wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We examine a range of African American-authored texts, including films, from the 18th century to the present to consider the relationship of race and writing, and the ways African American cultural expression contributes to and interrogates American cultural history. Issues covered include enslavement and freedom, and segregation and Civil Rights.
ENGL3707 Text, Action and Ideology

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian literature or 12 credit points at 2000 level in English Studies Assessment: 1x 2500wd Essay (40%), 1x 3500wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study explores text-production as a social and ideological act, with particular reference to English-speaking contexts. We will ask how competing social and political interests shape specific textual practices, and consider the ideological influences impinging on theoretical discourse about language and textuality.
ENGL3709 Global Literature and Times of Perpetual War

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: Participation (15%), 1x3000wd Research Project (55%), 3x500wd Reader Responses (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores how literary and cultural works address the state of perpetual war of the historical present. Focusing on Third World decolonisation contexts, we will consider how writers and artists interrogate the gender, racial, and national ideologies that fuel violence, and how literary, cultural analysis contributes towards understanding the global, unevenly distributed effects of war.
ENGL3710 Utopias and Dystopias: Literature; Films; TV

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Assessment: 4x500wd Response/Blog Post (40%), 1x4000wd Essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit critically explores modern and contemporary utopias and dystopias in literature, tv and cinema. It examines the history, aesthetics and politics of utopias and dystopias, focusing on questions of the development of new spaces and social orders, technology, the environment, surveillance, the post-human and IT. It assesses different conceptions of the future in relation to the present and the past. The unit addresses questions about the representation of the future in different media, and asks students to imagine the future as both dream and nightmare.
ENGL3711 Travellers' Tales

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in English or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Australian Literature Prohibitions: ENGL2648 or ENGL2048 Assessment: 1x3500wd essay (50%), 1x500wd essay plan (10%), 4x500wd blog posts (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores travel writing as both historical genre and creative practice. Ranging from Homer to contemporary travel blogs, it considers how the archetypal journey story is reshaped in particular cultural and political contexts. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate their learning via both critical and creative assessment.

European Studies

EUST1001 European Identity in the 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 2x1000wd assignment (40%), 1x750wd quiz (15%), 10x 75wd discussion board (15%), 1x1000wd test (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The European Union is the world's most progressive supranational power. In this unit we discuss contemporary Europe, focusing on the regions and ethno-national identities. We look at the EU and the socio-cultural and political forces both holding it together and pulling it apart. We study contemporary materials including films and novels in order to enter into the realities of life in Europe now. No language other than English is required.
EUST1002 Civil Society in Contemporary Europe

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x500wd quiz (15%), 10x100wd discussion board (15%), 1x1000wd test (30%), 1x2000wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Over the past two decades the face of Europe has changed dramatically. In this unit we examine the new ways in which European nations and the European Union negotiate issues of co-operation and co-existence, focusing on aspects of civil society, social change and cultural diversity. Case studies include the implications of Brexit, the re-emergence of the far right, immigration and multiculturalism, generational change, and other latest developments in Europe.
EUST2005 Institutions of the European Union

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A or 12 credit points at 1000 level in European Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd annotated bibliography (20%), 1x1000wd presentation and written copy (20%), 1x4000wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The European Union is currently the world's largest economy and a major player on the international stage in humanitarian policies. It is also the world's most complex supranational political organisation consisting of 28 nation-states, each with its distinct culture, political life and social reality. This unit explores the European Union through the study of its integration processes, bodies of governance, and the main policies instituted over the last seven decades with the ultimate goal of a European federation.
EUST2010 Migrations and Asylum in the EU

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 1x1000wd group class presentation (20%), 1x1000wd group case study report (15%), 1x1500wd media analysis (25%), 1x2500wd essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will focus on mobilities, migrations and political asylum in the European Union. It will consider both intra-EU migrations and migrations to and from the EU and associated countries, as well as the increasingly vexed issue of political asylum. The unit will study the impacts of skilled mobilities, gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, culture, language and religion in migration patterns, as well as the impact of internal and external geopolitical tensions such as East/West divides, wars and terrorism.
EUST2020 Screening Europe: After 1989

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: 1x1000wd Assignment (30%), 1x1000wd Class presentation (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Cinema was born on the eve of a century of conflict in Europe. Celebrated as an avant-garde art form, it was also used for political propaganda and popular entertainment during the 20th century. Most recently European cinema has taken on another function, contributing to the creation of modern European identities through critical self-representation. This unit focuses on a range of recent films in order to study social and cultural change in the new Europe of the past two decades.
EUST2111 Europe: Regionalism and Identity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Table A Prohibitions: EUST2612 Assessment: 2x 2500wd Essays (80%), 2x 500wd Essay Plans (10%), Class Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will introduce you to the nature of regional identities in Europe and the role of regional institutions within the EU and the individual nation-states. It examines regionalism and nationalism at levels below the nation-state and considers the relationships between central and regional powers in case studies.
EUST2606 Europe and the Balkans

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Morgan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in at least one of the following subject areas: European Studies, European, Middle Eastern or Classical Languages or Studies, English, Government, History, Political Economy, Sociology, Media and Communication Assessment: 1x1500wd critical analysis (30%), 1x3500wd essay (50%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Europe and the Balkans focuses on the development of the Balkans as a geo-political space in the broader context of Europe. The unit begins with a critical overview of the terms and definitions used for this part of South-Eastern Europe, and continues with detailed analysis of individual cultural, social and political identities, particularly in the 20th century. Literature and film are used as the primary means of understanding the main issues determining ethnic and national identities.
EUST2611 European and Middle Eastern Myth and Legend

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week and 1x1hr online/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (European Studies, International and Global Studies, Sociology, Arabic Language and Cultures, French Studies, Germanic Studies, Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Greek Studies, Spanish, Latin American Studies, GOVT1104, GOVT1105, GOVT1202, ENGL1009, ENGL1026, ENGL1011, HSTY1045, HSTY1032 or HSTY1044) Assessment: 2x2000wd Essays (66%) and 1x1000wd presentation (34%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces some major myths and legends that constitute the foundations of Western European and Middle Eastern cultures. We consider how legends such as the Grail have evolved cross-culturally from the earliest times to the present day, with recent manifestations like the Da Vinci Code. We also examine the transformation of mythical archetypes such as the Quest (seen also in the voyages of Odysseus and Sindbad) and binary pairs (for instance in Ancient Greek and Arabic myth).
EUST2613 Romanticism and Revolution

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Françoise Grauby Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: At least 18 junior credit points from Table A of which 12 credit points are from one subject area or 12 credit points at 1000 level in European Studies Assessment: 2x2000wd essays (2x45%), 1x500wd class presentation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will examine the impact of the Romantic Movement across Europe by examining the historical and cultural connections between three European countries (Germany, England and France) during the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We will consider the different national contexts separately, look at their influence on each other and at the influence of Romantic thought throughout European society, identifying ways in which Romantic ideas and values revolutionised social, cultural and aesthetic ideas, transformed worldviews and shaped the future of Europe.
EUST2617 Europe's Religions: Cultures and Beliefs

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from Table A Assessment: Tutorial presentation and paper 1000wd (20%), Essay 2000wd (30%), Essay 3000wd (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The new millennium witnessed a 'return to religion' in European political, social and cultural life. Europe's Religions explores this development through an examination of the dynamic interaction between the three monotheistic religions in the European context. We focus on the relation between religion and political power that has so deeply contributed to the shaping of European civilisation. Investigating where and how religious and political ideologies meet, the unit illuminates the persistent influence of religious ideas in the contemporary European landscape.
EUST3001 Europe: Contemporary Issues

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weeks 1-6, 11-13: 1x2hr lecture-seminar. Weeks 7-10: 1x30-minute research supervision meetings. Prerequisites: 12 Senior credit points of units in European Studies Assessment: 1x250wd Research Proposal (5%), 1x250wd Annotated Bibliography (5%), 1x500wd Presentation (20%), 1x5000wd Research Essay (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The fate of the European Union hangs in the balance. But the crisis is about more than economics. Do Europeans feel ""European""? Or is Europe just a collection of states with a history of close interactions and devastating wars? Will Europe overcome its dilemmas? How are contemporary social theorists responding to the political, social and cultural questions raised by the crisis? We probe these issues in order to deepen our understanding of Europe in the context of contemporary social theory.
EUST3003 Europe: Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in European Studies Prohibitions: ITLN3695 Assessment: 10x100wd weekly reading reflections (20%), 1x500wd research proposal (15%), 1x500wd annotated bibliography (15%), 1x4000wd research project (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Europe leads the global response to climate change and has sought, for some time, to create a single energy market. This unit explores the political economy and socio-cultural history of European environmental and energy issues. Europe's evolving energy dependencies and ecological degradation are examined with reference to European and national institutional and policy responses, the roles and activities of big business and social movements, and social consequences such as energy poverty and unequal ecological spatial impacts.
EUST3004 European Studies Internship for Credit

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3hr intensive seminar or equivalent at beginning of semester, 1x preliminary meeting with partner organisation accompanied by supervisor, 3x individual meeting (half hour) or small group meeting (one hour) with supervisor or equivalent. minimum of 90 hours working with partner organisation. total maximum student workload (including on-campus meetings, meetings with partner organisation, time spent working in partner organisation and time spent preparing asessable tasks): 120-150 hours. Prerequisites: Students must have obtained a credit average in at least 24 cp at 2000 or 3000 level in European Studies, French Studies, Germanic Studies, Italian Studies, Modern Greek Studies, Spanish and Latin American Studies, or Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies. Assessment: 3x600wd internship journals (30%), 1x800wd report outline and bibliography (15%), 1x2600wd internship report (40%), 1xshort oral presentation (800wd equivalent)(15%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit, which is available to students in European Studies and can be counted towards a major in other approved programs, takes the form of a short-term internship with a European partner organisation. Students will have the opportunity to develop their knowledge and skills working on specific projects in practical contexts, supported by assessments and teaching designed to help connect theory to practice.
EUST3005 European Studies Internship Extension

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar or equivalent at beginning of internship 90-110 hours working with partner organisation 1 x progress meeting with partner organisation accompanied by supervisor 1 x meeting (minimum) with supervisor or equivalent during the internship, duration at least one hour. 1 x 2hr seminar at which the intern will present a 20-minute seminar paper to staff and students in the school of languages and cultures. total maximum student workload (including on-campus meetings, meetings with partner organisation, time spent working in partner organisation and time spent preparing asessable tasks): 150 hours maximum. Corequisites: EUST3004 Assessment: 1x1500wd seminar paper (25%), 1x3000wd research essay (50%), 1x1500wd final internship report (25%) Mode of delivery: Professional practice Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an extension of EUST3004 European Studies Internship for Credit. It must be taken in conjunction with EUST3004 for longer internships with the same partner organisation, for a total of 12 credit points on completion of both Units of Study. Students will have the opportunity to further develop their knowledge and skills working on specific projects in practical contexts, supported by assessments and teaching which will build on those completed for EUST3004.
EUST3111 Political Extremism in Europe

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in European Studies Assessment: 1x 1500wd class presentation (25%), 1x 1500wd textual analysis (25%), 1x 3000wd research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Contemporary Europe is marked by political extremism, notably the increased legitimation of far- to extreme-right party families at national and European levels, and Islamist terrorism. However, many, even most, of these movements have emerged from longstanding activist or intellectual traditions. Moreover, political extremism has not always been confined to the right: radical left movements have also marked contemporary European history. In this unit we study these various political extremisms, and responses by national governments and the European Union.
EUST3112 Socialism, Dictatorship and Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in European Studies Assessment: 1x 1000wd written assignment (15%), 1x 3500wd research essay (75%), x class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Literature played an important role in 20th century European socialism as a force of public education, a medium of ideology, and a means of communicating dissident ideas. In this unit we study the policy of socialist realism and the literary cultures that developed in the socialist and dictatorial environments of Central and Eastern Europe. Attention will be paid to the role of the intelligentsias, to censorship, and to problems of dissidence and free expression in authoritarian, closed, and totalitarian societies.
EUST3113 The European Imagination and Modernity

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture-seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in European Studies Assessment: 1x 1000wd written assignment (20%), 1x 3500wd research essay (70%), x tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Can the imagination can be a tool for social change? This idea has been influential in Europe. Writers and thinkers since the beginning of modernity have imagined ideal solutions to the problems of social and political change, conflict and war. In this unit we study the speculative, ideal, and futuristic imaginative constructs which have influenced the development of European modernity. Texts such as More's Utopia, Marx's Communist Manifesto and the modern dystopias of politics and the scientific imagination have changed the way we think and live.

French and Francophone Studies

FRNC1601 Introductory French 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July,Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 2x2hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: FRNC1621 or FRNC1631 or FRNC1101 or FRNC1201 or FRNC1301 or FRNC1501 or FRNC1611 or HSC French Extension or HSC French Continuers or HSC French Beginners or IB standard or IB ab initio. Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x1000wd in-class test 1 (20%), 1x1000wd in-class test 2 (20%), 1x 750wd equiv group project (15%), 1x 750wd equiv oral test (15%), 1x500wd equiv peer evaluation of group project (10%), 1x500wd equiv online work (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study is designed for students with little or no formal experience in French. It aims to provide students with the tools to develop independent language learning skills. Through the introduction of authentic material in French, students will develop a mastery of the basic grammatical structures of the language, as well as awareness and understanding of the French and Francophone cultures. Upon completion of the unit, students are expected to reach the equivalent of A1.1. level of the Common European Framework for Languages in the four key skills: listening, speaking, reading and writing.
FRNC1602 Introductory French 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1601 or FRNC1611 Prohibitions: FRNC1612 Assessment: class participation (10%), 1x1000wd in-class test 1 (20%), 1x1000wd in-class test 2 (20%), 1x 750wd equiv group project (15%), 1x 750wd equiv oral test (15%), 1x500wd equiv peer evaluation of group project (10%), 1x500wd equiv online work (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
FRNC1602 Introductory French 2 is the continuation of FRNC1601 Introductory French 1. It is designed to further students' understanding of French and Francophone cultures, and strengthen their speaking, reading, writing and listening skills. Upon completion of the unit, students should reach the full A1 level of the Common European Framework for Languages.
FRNC1631 Junior French 5 (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: French Continuers (80-94%) or (French Continuers + Extension (less than Band 6 Continuers and less than Band 4 Extension) or IB Standard or Higher Level (Grade 4-6) Assessment: 2xequivalent to 2000wds total written tests (30%), 1x10mins, equivalent to 1000wds oral presentation in pairs (15%), 1xequivalent to 500wds peer evaluation (10%), 1x5mins, equivalent to 500wds individual oral test (15%), 4xequivalent to 500wds online grammar quiz (15%), tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Students who have achieved 95+ in French Continuers or (90+ in French Continuers and 45+ in French Extension) or (Grade 7 in IB Standard French) or (IBHigher level French (Grade 6-7)) should enrol in FRNC2633
This unit is designed for advanced-level students who have completed HSC Continuers or IB French. FRNC1631 will focus on consolidation of existing grammar, extension of vocabulary and development of communication skills. Students will be introduced to independent learning strategies essential for successful progression through French Studies at University of Sydney. An understanding of contemporary French society and culture will be enhanced through study of authentic written and audiovisual materials, including short stories and novel extracts. IB Standard Level (Grade 7), IB Higher Level (Grade 7), French Continuers (95+) or French Continuers (Band 6) plus Extension (Band 4) should enrol in FRNC2633.
FRNC1632 Junior French 6 (Advanced)

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr tutorial/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1631 or FRNC1301 Prohibitions: FRNC1612 or FRNC1622 or FRNC1102 or FRNC1202 or FRNC1302 or FRNC1501 Assessment: 2x2000wd writing task (50%), 2x1750wd aural comprehension (20%), 1x oral presentation (5mins, equivalent to 750wd) (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is a continuation of the Semester 1 unit FRNC1631. FRNC1632 focuses on reinforcing oral and written communication skills, consolidating essential university learning strategies introduced in Semester 1 (Oral Presentation, textual commentary) and introducing Essay-writing structure and independent research techniques. Students will also build on literary analysis techniques introduced in Semester 1, this time through the study of a contemporary novel.
FRNC2001 Intermediate French 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSC French Beginners or HSC French Continuers below 80% or IB Ab Initio Grade 4-6 Prohibitions: 80% or higher in HSC Continuers or HSC Extension or FRNC1621 Assessment: 3x equivalent to 1500wds grammar test (30%), 1x equivalent to 750wds in-class written comprehenion (15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds in-class written composition (15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds in-class listening comprehenion (15%), 1x equivalent to 750 wds final oral test (15%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit is designed for students who have studied some French at high school or equivalent. Students will focus on developing their knowledge of French society and culture, revise and consolidate their knowledge of French grammar, and extend their vocabulary and communication skills through interactive activities and online and in-class exercices.
FRNC2002 Intermediate French 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2001 or FRNC1621 Prohibitions: FRNC3631 or FRNC3623 or FRNC1631 or FRNC1632 or FRNC1622 Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will provide a systematic review of spoken and written French as well as grammatical concepts, building on students' previous experience of the language. As active participants in the learning process, students will be required to research and present on a topic relevant to a cultural aspect of a number of French-speaking countries.
FRNC2010 Franco / Asian Encounters

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC2628 Assessment: 1xResearch Presentation (equiv to 1000wds) (40%), 1x1000wd Weekly Reading Reflections (20%), 1x3000wd Research Project (20%), 1xVoice-over Powerpoint (equiv to 1000wds) (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the cultural encounters between France and Vietnam. It first presents an overview of the French presence in Vietnam since the 1880's, with the creation of French protectorates, to the end of the colonial period in 1954. Class work will involve a research project on Vietnamese communities in Paris and in Sydney today.
FRNC2603 Introductory French 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1602 or FRNC1612 or FRNC1102 Prohibitions: FRNC2611 or FRNC2612 or FRNC2621 or FRNC2622 or FRNC1631 or FRNC1632 or FRNC1622 or FRNC2103 or HSC French Continuers Assessment: 1x750wd equiv in-tutorial test 1 (20%), 1x1000wd equiv oral activity (20%), 1x500wd equiv oral test (15%), 1x750wd equiv in-class written composition (15%), 1x750wd equiv in-tutorial test 2 (20%), 3x short written compositions (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit follows FRNC1602. Students will consolidate their use of grammar points covered in FRNC1602, and extend their written and oral skills particularly in narration, through activities based on a series of authentic short written texts and audiovisual clips.
FRNC2604 Introductory French 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2603 or FRNC2611 Prohibitions: FRNC1621 or FRNC1622 or FRNC2104 or FRNC2612 or FRNC2621 or FRNC2622 or FRNC1631 or FRNC1632 or FRNC3621 or FRNC2623 or FRNC2611 with 65% or greater, or HSC French Continuers Assessment: 2x in-tutorial grammer tests (equiv to 1000wd)(35%), 1x in-tutorial writing test (equiv to 1000wd)(20%), 1x aural/oral assignment (equiv to 1500wd)(25%), 1x oral test (equiv to 1000wd)(20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit follows FRNC2603. It will focus on complex sentence construction (including reported speech) and on consolidating and developing strategies for speaking. Students will also be encouraged to reflect on what cross-cultural competence means by reading a series of short texts and conducting an information gathering exercise of their own on which they will later report.
FRNC2623 Senior French 5

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1622 Prohibitions: FRNC2611 Assessment: 2xwritten tests in French (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), 1xwritten tests in French (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1x30 minute aural test (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), 1x4-5 minute oral test in French (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This semester, students will focus on the notion of identity and identities in France: the symbols of the Republic, its cultural and ethnic minorities and its regional vs. urban identities. They will work more on register (situationally appropriate language), develop listening skills through listening to the news and develop French writing skills through an introduction to short Essay writing in French.
FRNC2625 Textes et Société 1: Identités en France

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1602 Prohibitions: FRNC2002 or FRNC3002 or FRNC2627 Assessment: 2x each equivalent to 2000wds research project (40%), 1xWritten text analysis equivalent to 1000wds (25%), 1xGroup Tutorial presentation equivalent to 1000wds each (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is required for the major in the introductory language stream. We will study the development of French national and cultural identity in modern times, with an emphasis on the social transformations France has undergone in the twentieth century and the political challenges it confronts in redefining its role in Europe and the world. The unit will also develop reading, analytical and critical skills through close study of a variety of authentic texts.
FRNC2626 Textes et Société 2: Littérature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2625 Corequisites: FRNC2604 Prohibitions: FRNC2615 Assessment: 1x dramatised oral presentation (8min, equivalent to 1800wds)(30%), 4x journal entries (equivalent to 1800wds total) (30%), 1x essay (equivalent to 1800wds) (30%), tutorial participation (equivalent to 600wd) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit focuses on contemporary French and Francophone literature and is required for the major in the Beginners language stream. The objective is to develop skills in reading, analyzing and speaking French. The selected text will equip students with essential cultural, historical and literary knowledge that are considered foundational for French speakers throughout the world.
FRNC2627 French Contemporary History and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2002 or FRNC1622 Prohibitions: FRNC2625 or FRNC3002 or FRNC1602 Assessment: 1x Research Plan (equiv to 1000wds) (20%), 1x Research Report (equiv to 2000wds) (30%), 1x1hr Written Class test (30%), 1x Oral Interaction in French (equiv to 1000wds) (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is required for the major in the intermediate stream. It will introduce students to the study of French and Francophone contemporary history and social issues and the development of French national and cultural identity in modern times. The unit will also develop listening, reading, writing and analytical skills through close study of a variety of authentic audiovisual and written texts.
FRNC2628 French Contemporary Text and Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2627 and FRNC2623 Prohibitions: FRNC2614 or FRNC2615 Assessment: 1x 1000wd dramatised oral presentation (15%), 4x 500wd journal entries in French (30%), 1x1000wd written commentary in French (15%), 1x 2000wd essay in French language (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit follows and complements FRNC2627. It is required for the major in the intermediate stream. Through the study of literary writing, students will strengthen their speaking, reading and listening comprehension skills, and expand their vocabulary. Audio-visual texts will be used to further develop students' cultural knowledge. Research and critical analysis skills will also be consolidated following their introduction in FRNC2627
FRNC2630 Diversity in the French Speaking World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 26 hours online instruction and activities per semester Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in any of French Studies, European Studies, International and Global Studies Prohibitions: FRNC1631 OR FRNC2625 OR FRNC2627 Assessment: 7x100wd discussion board posts (14%), 4x200wd journal reflections (12%), 1x1200wd mini research project (20%), 1x2400wd major research project (40%), 1x oral presentation (10mins, equivalent to 900wds)(14%) Mode of delivery: Online Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This online unit taught completely in English complements your French language studies, offering an overview of the cultural diversity in the French-speaking world. You will acquire the foundations of Francophone culture through modules designed around themes such as popular culture; race, gender and identity in the French diaspora; politics; history; literature; cinema; contemporary French society.
FRNC2633 Senior French 9

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC2622 or French Continuers (95+) Prohibitions: FRNC3621 or FRNC3631 or FRNC2303 or FRNC2304 or FRNC3625 Assessment: 1xwritten composition (equivalent to 2000wds) (35%), 1xwritten class test (equivalent to 1000wds) (30%), 1x15-minute group presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Prerequisites: IB Standard Level (Grade 7) or IB Higher Level (Grade 7) or French Continuers (Band 6) plus Extension (Band 4)
This unit is designed for advanced-level students (refer to prerequisites for further details). This unit will emphasise social relationships in France through looking at the world of work, current social and cultural debates, and the issue of social exclusion. It will consolidate oral and written communicative skills through language activities. Students will apply advanced linguistic skills to a range of authentic material drawn from written and audiovisual media and occasional literary sources.
FRNC2656 French Sociolinguistics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC3002 or FRNC3633 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or (FRNC3626 and FRNC2627) or (FRNC3606 and FRNC2625) Prohibitions: FRNC3634 or FRNC3631 or FRNC3655 Assessment: 1xtutorial presentation in French language equiv to 2000wds (30%), 2x written questionnaires in French language each equiv to 750 wds (10%), 1xannotated bibliography in French language equiv to 750 words (10%), 1xresearch based essay in French language equiv to 2500 words (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The focus of this unit of study is French language. It will familiarise you with the status and profile of the main varieties of French within and outside France as well as current issues in language policy in the French speaking world, while introducing you to key concepts such as register, linguistic variation (according to gender, age, social origin, etc.), or issues of multilingualism and diglossia. Through critical reading and practice, you will learn how to design, conduct and report research projects regarding French language.
FRNC2666 Research in French and Francophone Studies

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC2615 or FRNC1302 or FRNC2502 or FRNC2626 or FRNC2628 Assessment: 1x10-15 minute Class presentation in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (30%), 1xresearch methodology project in French (equivalent to 3000wds in English) (60%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces research methodologies and interdisciplinary approaches to French Studies and provides students with the critical tools for carrying out original research in the field. Students will have the unique opportunity to develop their own individual research project.
FRNC2675 Nouveaux Médias et Francophonie

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar (some delivered online) Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC3002 or FRNC3621 or FRNC2633 or FRNC3633 or FRNC2626 or FRNC2628 Assessment: online posts and commentaries (equivalent to 1500wds) (30%), 1x2500wd group online presentation (35%), 1x2000wd individual research assignment (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
With the world dominance of Facebook, is there a role for French-speaking social media? This unit examines the social media phenomenon in France and Francophonie: its cultural specificities and unique development, its place in youth and minority cultures, its impact on the French language and social and political interactions, as well as its problematic relationship with French legislation. Online communications and the 'practice' of one of the main French language social media will be an important part of the course.
FRNC2680 French Popular Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC2626 or FRNC2615 or FRNC2628 Prohibitions: FRNC3805 or FRNC3806 or FRNC3682 Assessment: tutorial participation (10%), 1x15 minute oral presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) ( 20%), 1xwritten task (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), 1x3000wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What does 'Popular Culture' mean? In this unit we will examine the origins, definitions and distinctions of French and Francophone Popular Culture. By examining a wide variety of media, the elements that define and characterise popular culture will be viewed in their historical and socio-cultural environments. Popular culture's social, ideological and psychological roles, based on the studies of the theories of Barthes, Baudrillard, Bourdieu and Lipovetsky, will be analysed and discussed. This will lead to a more reflective understanding of culture.
FRNC2681 French Narrative Cinema

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 Prohibitions: FRNC2802 Assessment: 1x10 Minute Tutorial presentation equivalent to 1500wds in English (25%), 1x1000wd written class assignment (15%), 1xResearch essay equivalent to 3500wds in English (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will explore the ways in which French cinema and society have interacted since WWII. It will examine how French society has been represented in fiction films and how major socio-political events have shaped French cinema. We will explore some basic concepts in French film theory and analytical methods derived from them. Film screenings are an integral part of the unit, and students must arrange their timetable so that they can watch each film at least once.
FRNC2688 Nouvelles textualités

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC3002 or FRNC3633 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or (FRNC3626 and FRNC2627) or (FRNC3606 and FRNC2625) Assessment: 1x15 minute Oral Presentation (equivalent to 1500wds) (20%), 1x1500wd written task (20%), 1x3000wd Essay (50%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study will examine the French literary field, its traditions and its innovations. The approach will be both literary and sociological. Major theoretical and cultural issues related to literature studies, such as the "death of the author", the emergence of new literary genres and textualities ("bandes dessinees", writers' blogs, fiction online) and the future of the book (literary agencies, creative writing workshops, awards and competitions) will be viewed in their socio-cultural environment.
FRNC2689 Le Polar à Paris

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC3002 or FRNC3633 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or (FRNC3626 and FRNC2627) or (FRNC3606 and FRNC2627) Assessment: participation (10%), 1x 15min oral presentation (30%), textual analysis (1x2000wd or 4x500wd)(50%), 5x online quiz (1000wd equiv)(10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
According to many scholars, the roots of the French "polar" that have influenced its development into a unique and popular literary genre are partially found in the American detective fiction of the interwar years, as well as in the 19th century French "roman populaire". This unit of study traces the history of the French detective fiction novel and the elements common to the genre. It exposes students to a variety of texts with a common setting: Paris. The unit addresses why the French capital has often been chosen as a setting for the genre, and how the representation of Paris varies from one "polar" to another.
FRNC2693 Le Quotidien: Writing the Daily

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC2626 or FRNC2615 or FRNC2628 Assessment: Reading journal equiv to 2000wds (30%), 1x15min tutorial presentation equiv 1500wds (30%), 1xessay equivalent to 2500wds (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will investigate the historical forms of daily writing in France, and how such forms have contributed to the structuring of private and public identity. It will examine the links between technological innovation and the emergence of daily writing in the late seventeenth century, the rise of early forms such as the 'livre de raison', 'journal de voyage' and 'journal intime' and the developments in the public 'journal' (newspaper) in the nineteenth century.
FRNC3001 Advanced French 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: French Continuers 80% or more or French Continuers + Extension or IB Standard or Higher Level Assessment: preparation and participation (15%), 1x900wd equiv written test (15%), 1x1000wd take-home exercise (15%), 1x10min paired oral presentation (15%), 1x350wd peer evaluation (10%), 3x250wd grammar quiz (15%), 1x7min individual oral test (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Designed for students who have completed HSC Continuers or IB French, FRNC3001 will focus on consolidation of grammar, extension of vocabulary and development of communication skills. Students will be introduced to independent learning strategies essential for successful progression through French Studies at University of Sydney. An understanding of contemporary French society and culture will be enhanced through study of authentic written and audiovisual materials.
FRNC3002 Advanced French 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC3001 or FRNC1631 Prohibitions: FRNC1632 Assessment: 2x1250wd writing task (50%), 2x250wd listening comprehension (20%), 1x 5mins individual oral presentation (15%), 4x125wd grammar quiz (10%), preparation and participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is a continuation of the Semester 1 unit FRNC3001. FRNC3002 focuses on reinforcing aural, oral and written communication skills, consolidating essential university learning strategies introduced in Semester 1 (oral presentation, textual commentary) and introducing essay-writing structure and independent research techniques. Students will also build on literary analysis techniques introduced in Semester 1, this time through the study of a contemporary novel and its film adaptation.
FRNC3605 Introductory French 5

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Marie-Therese Barbaux Session: Intensive January,Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC2604 Prohibitions: FRNC2623 or FRNC2624 or FRNC1631 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2623 Assessment: 2xequivalent to 1500wds in English written tests in French (30%), 1xequivalent to 1000wds in English written test in French (20%), 1xequivalent to 1000wds in English aural test (20%), 1xequivalent to 1000wds in English oral test in French (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
French cinema will be used to gain knowledge about French history and culture. Each film will involve studying vocabulary, translation, grammatical exercises, reading literary or cultural texts. Students will develop listening skills through listening to the news and develop writing skills through short essays in French.
FRNC3606 Introductory French 6

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Marie-Therese Barbaux Session: Intensive February,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC3605 Prohibitions: FRNC2623 or FRNC2624 or FRNC1631 or FRNC1632 Assessment: 2xequivalent to 1500wds in English written tests in French (30%), 1xequivalent to 1000wds in English written test in French (20%), 1xequivalent to 1000wds in English aural test (20%), 1xequivalent to 1000wds in English oral test in French (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This semester, students will learn about the world of French and Francophone literature and the arts and develop an understanding of some key cultural references. They will read and discuss a variety of short literary texts and in doing so, develop their vocabulary range and consolidate their knowledge of grammatical tenses. Essay-writing skills will be consolidated and students will work in teams on small projects to be presented to the class.
FRNC3623 Intermediate French 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1622 or FRNC2002 Prohibitions: FRNC2623 Assessment: 3x 2500wds written tests (50%), 1x 1000wd listening test (20%), 1x 1000wd speaking test (20%), 1x participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit the study of the French language will be organised around the notion of identity and identities in France: the symbols of the Republic, its cultural and ethnic minorities and its regional vs. urban identities. Particular emphasis will be put on the development of academic writing skills as well as listening skills through listening to authentic French audio and audiovisual documents. Students will work in individual and group activities in order to develop individual and collaborative learning strategies and a level of learning autonomy appropriate to university studies.
FRNC3624 Intermediate French 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC3623 or FRNC2623 Prohibitions: FRNC2624 or FRNC2611 or FRNC2612 Assessment: 3x 2500wds written tests (50%), 1x 1000wd group oral presentation (20%), 1x 1000wd speaking test (20%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit follows FRNC3623. This semester, students will learn about the world of French literature and the arts and develop an understanding of some key cultural references. They will read and discuss a variety of short literary texts and in doing so, develop their vocabulary range and consolidate their knowledge of grammatical tenses. Essay-writing skills will be consolidated and students will work in teams on small projects to be presented to the class.
FRNC3625 Intermediate French 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC3624 or FRNC2624 Assessment: 3xwritten class tests (equivalent to 3000wds) (60%), 1x30 minute listening test (equivalent to 500wds) (10%), 1x4-5 minute speaking test (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Intermediate French 5 focuses on contemporary French society. Through close study of a wide range of authentic material, the unit will give students an opportunity to consolidate their oral and written communication skills (toward B1+ in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages), develop their cultural awareness and enhance their analytical and critical skills.
FRNC3626 Intermediate French 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC3625 Assessment: 3xwritten class tests (equivalent to 3000wds) (60%), 1x30 minute listening test (equivalent to 500wds) (10%), 1x4-5 minute speaking test (equivalent to 1000wds) (20%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Intermediate French 6 aims to develop students' deeper understanding of contemporary French society and culture. Through close study of a wide range of authentic material (newspaper and magazine articles, interviews, paintings, songs, etc.), the unit will give students an opportunity to strengthen their oral and written communication skills (toward B2 in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages), develop their cultural awareness and enhance their analytical and critical skills.
FRNC3633 Advanced French 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC1632 or FRNC3002 Prohibitions: FRNC2633 Assessment: 1x equivalent to 2000wds written composition (35%), 1x equivalent to 1000wds written class test (30%), 1x equivalent to 1500wds 15-minute group presentation (25%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Designed for advanced-level students, this unit will emphasise social relationships in France through looking at current social and cultural debates, and the issue of social exclusion. It will consolidate oral and written communicative skills through language activities. Students will apply advanced linguistic skills to a range of authentic material drawn from written and audiovisual media and occasional literary sources.
FRNC3634 Advanced French 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: FRNC3633 or FRNC2633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC3625 Prohibitions: FRNC3631 or FRNC2303 or FRNC2304 Assessment: 1x900wd oral presentation (20%), 1x video recording of news (2300wds) (40%), 4x225wd written exercises (20%), 1x400wd final written task (10%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit of study, students will develop further their oral and written skills, and their understanding of French culture. Emphasis will be placed on developing an argument with rigor and precision, and improving students' fluency, spontaneity and accuracy. A range of authentic material will be used, drawn from written, audio-visual media and literary sources.
FRNC3644 Pédagogie du français langue étrangère

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC3002 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC2626 or FRNC2615 or FRNC2628 Prohibitions: FRNC2644 Assessment: 1x 2000wd research project (20%), 1x equivalent 1500wd oral presentation individual (20%), 1x equivalent to 500wd peer evaluation individual (10%), 1 long or 4 shortx 2000wds written textual analysis (40%), x seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Introduces authentic French material for use in a foreign-language classroom setting. Cultural component includes textual analysis in a variety of political, historical and social contexts. From a practical perspective students develop research expertise and enhance their French communication skills
FRNC3684 Récits de vie: Life Writing in French

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: FRNC3002 or FRNC3633 or FRNC1632 or FRNC2633 or (FRNC3626 and FRNC2627) or (FRNC3606 and FRNC2625) Prohibitions: FRNC3811 Assessment: 1x20min class presentation (30%), 2x750wd short written exercises (20%), 1x research essay (equivalent to 2500wds in English) (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Our life stories are never wholly our own. This course will focus on the various ways in which recent French life writing explores the boundaries between self and other, the individual and the collective, the personal and the social. Students will be familiarised with the development of autobiographical writing in France and introduced to recent autobiographical theory. They will be encouraged to dialogue with both autobiographical and theoretical texts through discussion and written exercises.
FRNC3690 French Political Cinema

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr seminar/week and film screening Prerequisites: FRNC2633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC3626 Assessment: 1x2400wd presentation (30%), 1x3000wd research project (50%), 1x600wd peer assessment (10%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will focus on a type of filmmaking that shows political and social awareness by depicting socio-political events, contemporary social realities in France and issues of marginality and difference. It will consider the contexts in which various trends of political films have emerged, the influence of post-war film history and contemporary events. The unit will explore issues of cinematic representation of marginality, ethnicity, sexuality and difference. Film screenings are an integral part of the course.
FRNC3693 Intellectual Movements Since 1945

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (FRNC2633 or FRNC3633 or FRNC3621 or FRNC3626 or FRNC3634) and any one of (FRNC2644, FRNC2651, FRNC2655, FRN2656, FRNC2657, FRNC2671, FRNC2675, FRNC2680, FRNC2681, FRNC2688, FRNC2689, FRNC2692, FRNC2693, FRNC3644, FRNC3684, FRN3690) Assessment: 1xTutorial presentation equivalent to 500wds (20%), 2x Research assignments equivalent to 2500wds each (60%), 1x500wd peer assessment (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines intellectual movements in France and Francophone countries since World War II, in particular existentialism, feminism, post-structuralism and postcolonialism, through the study of key French and Francophone texts and films.

Gender Studies

GCST1601 Introduction to Cultural Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1xonline reflective learning journal equivalent to 2000wds (40%), 1xgroup presentation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Cultural studies explores everyday life, media and popular culture. It shows us how we can make sense of contemporary culture as producers, consumers, readers and viewers, in relation to our identities and communities. How do various cultural texts and practices convey different kinds of meaning and value? Drawing upon key approaches in the field, students will learn how to analyse cultural forms such as advertising, television, film and popular music.
GCST1602 Introduction to Gender Studies

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture, 1x1hr tutorial Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x1300wd Tutorial presentation task (15%), 1x1200wd short Essay (35%), 1x1500wd long Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
How does gender organise lives, bodies, sexualities and desires? How does gender relate to sex and sexuality? Are there really only two genders? How and why is gender such an integral part of how we identify ourselves and others? This unit introduces students to foundational concepts in the study of gender and critically engages with questions of identity, sexuality, family, the body, cultural practices and gender norms in light of contemporary gender theories.
GCST1603 Screen Cultures and Gender: Film to Apps

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Media analysis journal (online) (50%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit traces the history of screen cultures from film to apps, focusing on how popular media is used to produce and represent masculinity and femininity. Students will consider cinema, television, videogames, the internet and mobile devices, asking how changing media forms and practices impact on our gendered identities and everyday lives.
GCST1604 Introduction to Diversity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 1x 1000 Close Reading of Real World eg. (25%), 1x 1000 Close Reading of academic text (25%), 1x 2500 Final Case Study (40%), nax na Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Diversity has become one of the most important issues in contemporary society. Increasingly communities and workplaces encourage us to support diversity. This unit introduces students to a range of diversity issues informed by race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality and dis/ability and the importance of cultivating understanding and respect for difference. It will appeal to students interested in social, economic and cultural marginalisation.
GCST2603 Animal/Human Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Cultural Studies Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x500wd tutorial question task (15%), 1x1500wd short essay (35%), 1x2000wd long essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The idea of the 'animal' infuses western knowledge about what constitutes the 'human'. From 'humanism' to 'posthumanism', this unit teases out various animal/human connections; classifying, seeing, domesticating, eating, making pets, writing, thinking about rights, rhetoric and representation. How do gender, race and class play out in the realm of the animal/human? What cultural formations support and also challenge the line between animal and human?
GCST2605 Representing Race and Gender

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Cultural Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Gender Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Diversity Studies Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x500wd group presentation (15%), 1x400wd journal (15%), 1x1000wd midterm Essay (25%), 1x2200wd final Research essay (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces students to cultural theories about race and ethnicity and uses these theories to examine representations of racial minorities across a range of media such as film, literature and performance within multiple national contexts. In particular, it interrogates the relationship between these representations and those of gender and sexuality. In so doing, it provides a complex understanding of how 'race' and 'gender' as institutional forces and lived experiences help shape perceptions of ourselves and others.
GCST2607 Bodies, Sexualities, Identities

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Gender Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Diversity Studies Prohibitions: WMST2007 Assessment: Tutorial participation and exercises (10%), 1x1500wd Essay (40%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit of study we will examine the ways in which feminist and other cultural theories have used bodies and sexualities in order to theorise difference and identity. The body and sexuality have been shown to be a major site for the operation of power in our society. We will look at how bodies and sexualities have given rise to critical understandings of identity. The unit of study will be devoted to working through some of the major theories of sexuality and embodiment, and the analysis of cultural practices.
GCST2609 Masculinities

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture in even weeks, 1 x 2hr seminar in odd weeks Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from (Gender and Cultural Studies, Anthropology, Sociology, ENGL1008, ENGL1026, PHIL1011 or PHIL1013) Prohibitions: WMST2009 Assessment: 1x2000wd close reading of film clip (30%), 1x oral/visual presentation (1000wd equivalent) (15%), 1x3000wd essay (40%), participation seminars/online (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Although it originated in the study of women¿s oppression in male-dominated cultures, gender studies increasingly considers masculinity an effect of power rather than its means. Via a range of case studies we consider the changing expectations around masculinity in practices of production, consumption, embodiment, domesticity and intimacy. This unit makes frequent reference to the representation of masculinity in various genres of popular culture that deal with boyhood, adolescence, initiation, manhood, romance, athleticism, heroism, crime, vulnerability, submission, depression and defeat.
GCST2610 Intimacy, Love and Friendship

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Gender Studies Prohibitions: WMST2010 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x1500wd Essay (30%) and 1x2000wd final Essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the representation and practices of intimate relations focusing especially on the intersection between intimacy and constructions of gender. Divided into three sections, the unit will examine theories of love and friendship, contemporary cultural representations of love, desire and friendship, and the ethics and politics of erotics. This unit will also examine new technologies of intimacy, and discuss their implications for gender and sexuality.
GCST2612 Youth and Youth Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Cultural Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Gender Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Diversity Studies Prohibitions: WMST2012 Assessment: 1x500wd close reading exercise (10%), 1x1500wd Short Essay (30%), 1x2500wd Take-home Exercise (50%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines academic, public and popular ideas about youth and practices of youth culture. It will introduce students to some of the current parameters for studying the experience of youth and youth cultural forms and practices. We will pay particular attention to the ways young lives are gendered and the role gender plays in the institutions and other contexts in which young people live. Other points of focus include changing conceptions of youth, relationships between policy and youth, images of youth and youth culture, and discourses on (im)maturity, training, and identity.
GCST2630 Consumer Cultures

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x1.5hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Cultural Studies Prohibitions: GCST3603 Assessment: 2x500wd journal exercise (25%), 1x1500wd critical analysis (30%), 1x500wd final project outline (10%), 1x2000wd final project (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Consumerism is a contradictory cultural formation. It is a source of meaning, pleasure and identity, but also a cause of environmental degradation, social injustice and, for some, individual alienation. This unit sets out some of the ethical, environmental and social problems associated with consumerism, and examines in detail some of the creative, ingenious and determined responses to these problems.
GCST2631 Gender and Environment

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Gender Studies Assessment: 1x1500wd reflective essay (30%), 1x500wd final project outine (15%), 1x2500wd final essay/project (45%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Understanding our place in a changing environment is a 21st century priority. This unit uses feminist frameworks to investigate how environmental problems are shaped by intersecting factors of gender, race, sexuality, ability, economic status, and colonialisms. Drawing on examples such as climate change, toxic contamination, water privatisation, and resource extraction, this unit examines the material and conceptual links between human and non-human natures, and cultural, political, economic and social forces.
GCST3604 Using Cultural Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 credit points at 2000 level Gender and Cultural Studies) or (12 credit points at 2000 level Digital Cultures) Assessment: 2x 750 Critical Exercise (50%), 1x3000 Essay or Take-home Exercise (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Cultural Studies was widely discussed as one of the "New Humanities" in the 1990s, but a long history of debates about and theories of culture precede the discipline, and the processes of deciding what are the key texts and concepts of Cultural Studies is ongoing. This unit overviews foundational and emerging critical concepts and writers in the field. Students will also undertake reading and analysis exercises designed to help them come to grips with using "theory" in their own work.
GCST3630 Everyday Life: Theories and Practices

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Cultural Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Gender Studies Prohibitions: GCST2613 Assessment: 1x1000wd close reading task (20%), 1x1500wd (equivalent) fieldwork presentation (40%), 1x2000wd case study essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Our knowledge of everyday life is often taken for granted and yet cultural studies has developed some fascinating approaches to critically and creatively exploring the ordinary and extraordinary details that make up everyday life. Through case studies of everyday practices, spaces and experiences (waste, fashion, dreaming, eating, shopping, 'selfies') the unit explores key thinkers of the everyday as well as a range of research and writing methods (observation, thick description, close reading) that have helped to illuminate everyday life.
GCST3631 Gender, Communities and Belonging

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Gender Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Cultural Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Diversity Studies Prohibitions: GCST2613 or GCST2611 Assessment: 1x1000wd critical close reading task (20%), 1x2000wd research project (40%), 1x1000wd Take-home exercise (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit students will apply advanced methods from gender and cultural studies to examine experiences of belonging and formations of community. Students will analyse how power produces and regulates communities, identities and belonging. They will question the assumption that community is based on the unity and similarity of citizens and their location in specific cultures and places, and critically examine alternatives such as difference, diaspora, and other forms of sociality. Students will evaluate different theories of community in local, national and international contexts, and in relation to feminism, democracy, cosmopolitanism and hospitality.
GCST3633 Sexualities and Cultural Transformation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture in odd weeks, 1x2hr seminar in even weeks Prerequisites: 12 senior credit points of Gender Studies Assessment: 1x 4000wd research essay/dossier (50%), 1x 1000wd research plan (20%), 1x1000wd oral/visual presentation (15%) and seminar/online participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit draws on and extends prior learning in gender studies and enables students to formulate innovative research projects in a variety of areas relating to sexualities and their transformation, including the history of sexuality, theory, sexual research methods, narrative, archives, affect, kinship and space. The unit engages those research perspectives and interdisciplinary methodologies from across the social sciences and humanities that coalesce as queer theory.
GCST3634 The Social Life of Policy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Gender and Cultural Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Diversity Studies Prohibitions: GCST2632 Assessment: 10x 150 wd Reading synopses (25%), 1x 1500wd Close reading of a policy (25%), 1x 500wd equivalent draft final project presentation (10%), 1x 2500wd Final research project (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the idea of public policy as a major cultural force which shapes the way we live, how we are socially categorised, how we act, who and what we can become. Students also learn how they might influence public policy and of alternatives to policy for enacting social change.
GCST3636 Sex, Violence and Transgression

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Gender Studies or Cultural Studies Prohibitions: GCST2604 Assessment: 1x 1000 Close Reading of Media Example (25%), 1x 1000 Close Reading of Formal Text (25%), 1x 2500 Case Study (40%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Violence is one of the most prevalent themes in popular culture and public discourse today. It shapes our lives in all sorts of ways, both real and imagined. This unit examines the different ways we construct knowledge of violence and how representations of violence may be both compelling and confronting. It focuses on the interconnections between categories of sex and violence within culture.

Germanic Studies

GRMN1001 German 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July,Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GRMN1111 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total (15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds speaking and listening test (15%), 1x equivalent to 1000wds grammar, listening, reading test (20%), 1x 2 hours exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
These practical language classes are designed to develop listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills in German, as well as cross-cultural competency. By the end of the unit you will have acquired the basic skills and vocabulary needed to deal with everyday situations in German. Activities in the classroom also introduce you to the cultures of the German-speaking world.
GRMN1002 German 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN1001, or GRMN1111 Prohibitions: GRMN1122 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total(15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds speaking and listening test (15%), 1x equivalent to 1000wds grammar, listening, reading test (20%), 1x 2 hours exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The practical language classes in this unit build on GRMN1001. By the end of the unit you will be able to communicate in a variety of simple and routine situations in German. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world.
GRMN2003 German 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: HSC Beginners >70, or HSC Continuers <80, or GRMN1002, or GRMN1122 Prohibitions: GRMN1211 or GRMN2611 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total (15%), 1x equivalent to 675wds oral presentation (15%), 1x equivalent to 900wds grammar, listening, reading test (20%), 1x equivalent to 2250wds final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The practical language classes in this unit build on GRMN1002. By the end of the unit you will be able to communicate in a variety of simple and routine situations in German. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world.
GRMN2004 German 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN2003, or GRMN1211, or GRMN2611 Prohibitions: GRMN1222 or GRMN2612 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total (15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds oral presentation (15%), 1x equivalent to 1000wds grammar, listening, reading test (20%), 1x 2 hours exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The practical language classes in this unit build on GRMN2003. By the end of the unit you will be able to communicate in most situations likely to arise while travelling in a German-speaking country. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world
GRMN2005 Reading German Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN1002 or 12 credit points at 1000 level of European Studies Assessment: 1x equivalent to 2500wds final exam (40%), 1x equivalent to 1000wds book review presentation (20%), 1x 2500wd learning journal (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit introduces you to the history, literature, and culture of the German-speaking world from the nineteenth century to the present. Through the lens of literature and media, you will encounter the major cultural trends and events that have shaped German-speaking societies over the past two hundred years.
GRMN2633 Topics in German Film

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prerequisites: (12 Junior credit points of Germanic Studies) or (18 Junior credit points including ENGL1011) or (6 Senior credit points in ICLS) Prohibitions: GRMN2455 Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (50%), 1x1500wd written tutorial paper (25%), 1x1500wd class presentation (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study will explore German film from the perspectives of film theory and historical culture. Discussions will situate films within the German political and cultural context of their time and study them from the perspective of contemporary cross-cultural critique. The unit may concentrate on the works of a specific director, a period or a genre, or deal with key social and political issues within a selection of German films.
Textbooks
German film course pack to be purchased from the University Copy Centre
GRMN3005 German 5

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: GRMN2004, or GRMN1222, or GRMN2612 Prohibitions: GRMN2613 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total(15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds oral presentation (15%), 1x equivalent to 1000wds grammar, listening, reading test (20%), 1x 2 hours final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
These practical language classes build on GRMN2004. By the end of the unit you will be able to communicate on a range of more complex issues, both verbally and in writing. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world.
GRMN3006 German 6

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr tutorials/week Prerequisites: GRMN3005, or GRMN2613 Prohibitions: GRMN2614 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total (15%), 1x equivalent to 750wds oral presentation (15%), 1x 1000wd short essay (20%), 1x 2 hours final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
These practical language classes build on GRMN3005. By the end of the unit you will be able to communicate on a range of complex texts and situations, and to express yourself in German with a degree of fluency. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world.
GRMN3007 German 7

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSC Continuers >80, or HSC Extension, or German IB GRMN3006, or GRMN2614 Prohibitions: GRMN2617 or GRMN2618 or GRMN3008 or GRMN3009 or GRMN3010 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total (10%), 1x equivalent to 675wds oral presentation (15%), 1x equivalent to 900wds short essay (25%), 1x equivalent to 2250wds final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
These practical language classes build on GRMN3006. By the end of the unit you will be able to understand the main ideas of complex texts and situations, and to express yourself in German with ease and spontaneity. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world.
GRMN3008 German 8

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN1311 or GRMN2615 or GRMN3007 Prohibitions: GRMN1322 or GRMN2616 Assessment: 12x Weekly online homework exercises equivalent to 750wds total (10%), 1x equivalent to 750wds oral presentation (15%), 1x 1000wd short essay (25%), 1x 2 hours final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
These practical language classes build on GRMN3007. By the end of the unit you will be able to understand the main ideas of complex texts and situations, and to express yourself in German fluently and spontaneously. You will be able to express and justify your views on topical issues, both verbally and in writing. Using authentic materials in the classroom will also enable you to improve your cultural competency and deepen your knowledge of the German-speaking world.
GRMN3009 German Language and Society

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN3008, or GRMN2616, or GRMN1322 Assessment: 1x equivalent to 500wds listening comprehension (15%), 1x equivalent to 500wds reading comprehension (15%), 1x equivalent to 1500wds oral presentation (30%), 1x 2000wd project essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit enhances your language skills while enabling you to study contemporary German society. Using materials drawn from contemporary print and (audio-)visual media, you will expand your capacity for written and spoken expression by engaging with key social and cultural issues in the contemporary German-speaking world.
GRMN3010 Translating German Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr tutorial/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRMN3008, or GRMN2616 Assessment: 1x 500wd bilingual glossary (15%), 1x 2500wd translation project (50%), 1x 1500wd commentary (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit allows you to enhance your language skills by studying translation. Using a range of materials, you will put into practice basic translation concepts and techniques, enabling you to build your knowledge of German language and culture.
GRMN3011 Power and Protest: 20th Century Germany

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level of Germanic Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level of European Studies Assessment: 1x 1500wd manifesto (25%), 1x equivalent to 1500wd online discussion (25%), 1x 3000wd research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From 1968 to 1989, divided Germany was pulled between forces of power and protest. In this unit, you will study the major trends in late twentieth-century German society and culture. Using a variety of media, you will explore how demands for freedom and democracy, as well as forces of conservatism and repression, shaped Germany East and West during this period.
GRMN3015 Gender and Sexuality in German Culture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level of Germanic Studies or 12 credit points at 2000 level of European Studies Assessment: 1x 1500wd tutorial paper (25%), 1x 1500wd presentation (25%), 1x 3000wd research essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Reading works by some of the most important modernist authors, this unit explores discourses of gender and sexuality in German and Austrian culture at the turn of the twentieth century.

Greek (Ancient)

GRKA1600 Introduction to Ancient Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GRKA1001 or GRKA2611 or GRKA2620 or HSC Classical Greek Assessment: Weekly language assignments equivalent to 1250wd (30%) Weekly quizzes equivalent to 1250wd (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Greek literature, philosophy, culture, and history. No previous knowledge of any foreign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introduces the basics of Greek through the study of grammar, and is valuable for students interested in all aspects of European history, archaeology, language, literature and philosophy.
GRKA1601 Introduction to Ancient Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRKA1600 Prohibitions: GRKA1002 or GRKA2612 or GRKA2621 Assessment: Weekly language assignments equivalent to 1250wd (30%) Weekly quizzes equivalent to 1250wd (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in GRKA1600, enabling students to read Greek texts in the original. It concentrates particularly on additional morphology, reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Greek, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of selected extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts.
GRKA2600 Intermediate Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSC Greek or GRKA1601 or GRKA2621 Prohibitions: GRKA2603 Assessment: Weekly assignments equivalent to 2500wd in total (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit consolidates the knowledge of Greek acquired in GRKA1601, GRKA2621 or by advanced study of Greek at school. It involves both formal language study, including practice in unseen translation and prose composition, and the close reading of extended extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts. Increasing attention will be paid to the literary qualities, style, generic and socio-historical background of the texts, as well as to their grammar and syntax.
GRKA2601 Intermediate Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA2600 Assessment: Weekly assignments equivalent to 2500wd in total (50%), 1x2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds further on language knowledge and translation skills acquired in GRKA2600, and develops skills in the literary study of Greek texts. It will involve the close reading of extended extracts from classic works of Greek prose and/or poetry, as well as practice in writing in Greek. Attention will be paid to style, literary and narrative technique, and the generic and socio-historical background of the texts, as well as to the intricacies of grammar and syntax.
GRKA2620 Learn to Read Ancient Greek 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: GRKA1600 or GRKA1001 or GRKA2611 or HSC Classical Greek Assessment: Weekly language assignments equivalent to 1250wd (30%) Weekly quizzes equivalent to 1250wd (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides senior-level students with the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Greek literature, philosophy, culture, and history. No previous knowledge of any foreign language is assumed and all grammatical concepts encountered will be explained. The unit introduces the basics of Greek through the study of grammar, and is valuable for students interested in all aspects of European history, archaeology, language, literature and philosophy.
GRKA2621 Learn to Read Ancient Greek 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: GRKA2620 or GRKA1600 Prohibitions: GRKA1601 or GRKA1002 or GRKA2612 Assessment: Weekly language assignments equivalent to 1250wd (30%) Weekly quizzes equivalent to 1250wd (30%), 1x2hr exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in GRKA2620, enabling senior-level students to read Greek texts in the original. It concentrates particularly on additional morphology, reading skills and the syntax of the sentence, while also introducing further grammatical concepts and constructions. Grammatical knowledge is reinforced by translation from and into Greek, while reading skills are further consolidated through the study of selected extracts from Greek prose and/or verse texts.
GRKA3007 Later Greek Poetry

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in Ancient Greek Assessment: 1x2hr examination (45%), 1x2000wd essay (45%), 4x 125wd unseen translations (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The Hellenistic period was a time of great literary innovation and refinement coupled with intense experimentation and intertextual dialogue with the authors and masterworks of the Classical past. In this unit we will advance the study of Greek literary language and form through the close study of selections from the epic, elegiac, and melic poetry of the post-Classical period.
GRKA3008 Greek Comedy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRKA2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 4x125wd Unseen translations (10%), 1x2hr Final Exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Of the vast production of ancient Greek comic drama only a few plays of two poets survive nearly intact. Aristophanes and Menander each represent a distinct style and phase of comic production in antiquity and became the opposed prototypes for virulent political satire or subtle comedies of manners for all subsequent ages of European drama and literature. In this unit we will read one or more plays by Aristophanes and Menander to examine their distinctive language, form and dramaturgical style.
GRKA3009 Early Greek Poetry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr seminar/week Prerequisites: GRKA2601 Prohibitions: GRKA3606 Assessment: 4x125wd Unseen translations (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (45%), 1x2000wd Exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Sometimes called The Age of Lyric Poetry, the late seventh to mid fifth century BC set the standard in Graeco-Roman antiquity for a wide variety of poetic genres: iambus, elegy, hymn, melic poetry, epigram and epinician. We will read representative pieces in a variety of genres from the work of Archilochus, Alcman, Alcaeus, Sappho, Pindar, Simonides, Bacchylides and others. We will explore the language, form and performance contexts of these genres as well as the social context that gave rise to so great and diverse an outburst of creative activity.
GRKA3600 Advanced Greek

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA2601 or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Ancient Greek Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 10x200wd language assignments (45%), class participation (450wd equivalent) (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit offers advanced study in the literature and language of ancient Greek. Reading and translation skills will be honed by classes in which a wide selection of prose and poetic authors will be studied, and through regular translation of unseen passages. Short exercises in translation into Greek will further develop knowledge and appreciation of literary Greek. The unit will involve close reading and analysis of classic works of Greek prose and/or poetry, paying close attention to style and diction, to literary and narrative technique and to aspects of versification.
GRKA3601 The Language of the Greek Bible

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA2600 or (MGRK2675 and MGRK2676) or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient Greek or 12 credit points at 2000 level in Biblical Studies and Classical Hebrew Corequisites: Recommended Co-requisites: GRKA2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd Essay (50%) and 1x2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Students wishing to do a Greek (Ancient) major or honours are advised to take this unit concurrently with GRKA2601.
This is a unit designed for those who have already completed at least two semesters of Greek, whether Ancient or New Testament. We will focus on extending grammatical knowledge and syntax, in addition to reading selections from a number of important biblical texts. Interpretation as well as translation will play a major part in the unit.
GRKA3602 Greek Epic

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: GRKA2600 Corequisites: GRKA2601 Assessment: 1x2000wd essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (50%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The Iliad, the Odyssey and the poems of Hesiod are the classics of the classics. This unit offers an introduction to the language, style and content of the Greek epics which served as the foundations of Greek cultural identity and are the primary textual sources for Bronze Age, Geometric and Archaic Greek language, religion, history and thought.
GRKA3603 Greek Literature and History

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1hr seminars/week Corequisites: GRKA3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd Essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The histories of Herodotus, Thucydides and Xenophon and the speeches of Antiphon, Andocides, Lysias, Isocrates, Demosthenes, Aeschines, Lycurgus, and Demades are our primary sources for the political and social history of Athens and Greece in the fifth and fourth centuries BC. This unit offers a close reading of historical and rhetorical texts and detailed analysis of the rhetorical and ideological construction of truth in Classical Athens. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation.
GRKA3604 Greek Literature and Philosophy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Corequisites: GRKA3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit offers a close reading in the original Greek of select classics of Greek philosophy with particular attention to the genres of philosophical expression and the linguistic, cultural and ideological background to Greek philosophical thought. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation.
GRKA3605 Greek Tragedy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1hr lectures/week Prerequisites: GRKA3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 4x125wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd Essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides have a performance tradition in antiquity of nearly a thousand years and remain the enduring classics of the modern theatre. This unit offers a close reading in the original Greek of one or more Greek plays and an introduction to the literary, social and performance contexts of the ancient theatre, its language and its genres. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation.
GRKA3606 Classics of Greek Literature

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr seminars/week Corequisites: GRKA3600 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (45%), 5x100wd unseen translation exercises (10%) and 1x2000wd essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit we undertake advanced study of select genres of Greek literature, such as choral lyric, epinician, mime and the novel. It is intended for students with a firm command of Greek literary language and close familiarity with two or more other poetic or prose genres. Language skills will continue to be tested and developed by periodic exercises in unseen translation. Texts will be advised in advance on the Department of Classics and Ancient History website.

Hebrew (Modern)

HBRW1011 Foundations of Modern Hebrew 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prohibitions: HBRW1301 or HBRW1101 Assessment: 2x50wd quizzes (10%), 7x100wd assignments (25%), 1x1.5hr mid-semester in-class test (25%), 1x 2min oral presentation (5%), 1x 2hr final exam (30%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides an introduction to Modern Hebrew. It is intended for students who have little or no previous knowledge and practice of the language. The unit fosters the development of oral communication skills relating to everyday topics. It includes learning the Hebrew alphabet and basic reading and writing skills as well as the introduction of basic vocabulary and language functions. It is imperative that all prospective students contact the coordinator to arrange for a placement test upon enrolment.
HBRW1102 Foundations of Modern Hebrew 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1011 Prohibitions: HBRW1302 Assessment: 2x50wd quizzes (10%), 7x100wd assignments (25%), 1x1.5hr mid-semester in-class test (25%), 1x2min oral presentation (5%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW1011. It further develops the language skills acquired previously. This unit involves a range of learning styles that assist you to further develop and consolidate your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills.
HBRW1111 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prohibitions: HBRW1311 or HBRW2631 Assessment: 1250wd grammar short quizzes (25%), 1250wd Bible text short quizzes (25%), 1x1000wd grammar in-class test (20%), 1x1000wd Biblical text in-class test (20%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit, for those beginning the study of Hebrew, brings students from their first acquaintance with the Hebrew alphabet to an understanding of the Hebrew language used in the Biblical texts. The unit is devoted to the study of the grammar and the principles of translation.
HBRW1112 Introduction to Biblical Hebrew 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1111 Prohibitions: HBRW1312 or HBRW2632 Assessment: 1250wd grammar short quizzes (25%), 1250wd Biblical quizzes and assignments (25%), 1x1000wd grammar in-class test (20%), 1x1000wd Biblical text in-class test (20%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit continues the study of grammar and classical Hebrew (Biblical) texts.
HBRW2603 Using Modern Hebrew in the Here-and-Now

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1102 Prohibitions: HBRW2103 Assessment: 2x50wd quizzes (10%), 7x100wd assignments (25%), 1x1.5hr mid-semester in-class test (25%), 1x2min oral presentation (5%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW1102. It consists of an intensive study of spoken Modern Hebrew with emphasis on communicative skills that enable students to communicate in simple Hebrew for everyday situations. Simple literary texts and language components, which are orientated around relevant themes, are dealt with. A variety of different methods are used to explain grammatical structures, morphology and syntax and to provide examples in their use.
HBRW2604 Modern Hebrew in Everyday Context

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: HBRW2603 Prohibitions: HBRW2104 Assessment: 6x150wd assignments (25%), 2x2min oral presentations (10%), 1x1200wd mid-semester in-class test (25%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is an extension of the work done in HBRW2603. It uses a communicative approach to language learning. Students' active participation through teamwork, role-playing and other interactive techniques is an essential aspect of all classes. It is expected that by the end of this unit students will be able to take part in simple everyday Hebrew conversation.
HBRW2623 Hebrew Classical 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Assessment: 1000wd equiv weekly short quizzes (30%), 1x1.5hr in-class test (30%), 1x2000wd research essay (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The books of the Hebrew Bible are studied in the light of their setting and their literary and linguistic features. The course consists of: set classical texts; and special background area study: Mishnaic Hebrew.
HBRW2625 Hebrew Classical 5

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2632 or HBRW2402 or HSC Hebrew Assessment: 2x1hr exams (60%), assigned preparation of text for class [equivalent to 500wds] (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The books of the Hebrew Bible are studied in the light of their setting and composition history. The course consists of: set classical texts, and special background area study: Ancient Inscriptions.
HBRW2631 Reading Hebrew 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points from any of (Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies, Ancient History, Anthropology, Archaeology, History, English, Linguistics, Philosophy, Studies in Religion or Arabic Studies) Prohibitions: HBRW2401 Assessment: 1250wd equiv grammar short quizzes (25%), 1250wd equiv Bible text short quizzes (25%), 1x1000wd grammar in-class test (20%), 1x1000wd Biblical text in-class test (20%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides senior-level students with the essential linguistic foundation to the study of Hebrew language and literature. It brings students from their first acquaintance with the Hebrew alphabet to an understanding of the Hebrew language. No previous knowledge is assumed. The unit is devoted to the study of the grammar and the principles of translation.
HBRW2632 Reading Hebrew 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2401 or HBRW2631 Prohibitions: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 Assessment: 1250wd equiv grammar short quizzes (25%), 1250wd equiv Bible quizzes and assignments (25%), 1x1000wd grammar in-class test (20%), 1x1000wd Biblical text in-class test (20%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the knowledge and skills acquired in HBRW2631, enabling senior-level students to study Hebrew sources in their original language. It forms a bridge between Reading Hebrew 1 and other senior Hebrew units. It focuses on increased competence in Hebrew grammar and independent ability to translate Hebrew.
HBRW2651 Syriac 1

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW1112 or HBRW2402 or HBRW2632 or HSC Hebrew Prohibitions: HBRW2911 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), weekly assignments, exercises and Tutorial participation (40%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
For those beginning the study of Syriac this is a preparation for more advanced study of Syriac language and literature. It concentrates on the study of elementary Syriac grammar, prose composition and an introductory study of selections of texts from the Old and New Testament Peshitta.
HBRW2652 Syriac 2

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2911 or HBRW2651 Prohibitions: HBRW2912 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (60%), weekly assignments, exercises and Tutorial participation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the foundation of Syriac 1. It concentrates on the study of advanced Syriac prose composition and selections of texts from the Old and New Testament Peshitta.
HBRW3601 Hebrew Classical Advanced 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2632 or HBRW2623 or HBRW2625 Prohibitions: HBRW2116 or HBRW2624 Assessment: 1000wd equiv short quizzes (30%), 1x1000wd equiv in-class test (30%), 1x2500wd essay (30%), class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit students will apply advanced linguistic skills to complex biblical and extra-biblical texts. Students will analyse the poetic and linguistic features of the book of Psalms, and will evaluate the historical, social and linguistic background of the Dead Sea (Qumran) Scrolls.
HBRW3602 Hebrew Classical Advanced 6

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2632 or HBRW2623 or HBRW2625 Prohibitions: HBRW2626 Assessment: 1x1000wd Poetry written test (25%), 1x1000wd Medieval Hebrew written test (25%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), Seminar participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit students will apply advanced linguistic skills to complex biblical and extra-biblical texts. Students will analyse the poetic and linguistic features of biblical poetry outside the Psalms, as well as the linguistic features of Medieval Hebrew used by Jewish Biblical commentators, especially those features that differentiate Medieval from Biblical Hebrew.
HBRW3610 Modern Hebrew, a Living Language

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HSC Modern Hebrew Continuers or HBRW2604 or HBRW2632 Prohibitions: HBRW1301 or HBRW2607 Assessment: 6x150wd assignments (25%), 2x2min oral presentations (15%), 1x1200wd major written assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is designed for students who have successfully completed HSC Modern Hebrew Continuers, HBRW2604, HBRW2632, or have reached a similar level of knowledge. In this unit students will advance their proficiency of using the four interlinked language skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing. As well, engaging in a variety of text-types, students will gain a deeper understanding of issues of social, cultural and historical importance to Modern Hebrew speaking communities
HBRW3611 Modern Hebrew for Life

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: (HBRW2607 or HBRW3610) or HBRW2632 Prohibitions: HBRW1302 or HBRW2608 Assessment: 6x150wd assignments (25%), 2x2min oral presentation (15%), 1x1200wd major written assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is designed for students who have successfully completed HBRW3610. In it students will build on their previous experience of the language. They will further develop their communicative capabilities whilst increasing their knowledge of vocabulary, grammar and syntax. As well, students will increase their ability to analyse the content and language of a variety of Modern Hebrew texts. On successfully completing this unit, students will achieve a proficiency level equivalent to the Hebrew University third level of instruction.
HBRW3612 Texts and Sub-texts in Modern Hebrew

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2608 or HBRW3611 Prohibitions: HBRW2303 or HBRW2609 Assessment: 6x150wd assignments (25%), 2x2min oral presentations (15%), 1x1200wd major written assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is designed for students who have successfully completed HBRW3611. In this unit students will encounter a productive language-learning environment aimed at supporting both their oral and written language production. Students will engage in range of contemporary Modern Hebrew text-types that reflect social and cultural issues covering the period from the 19th century to the present time.
HBRW3613 Israeli Culture as Reflected in Text

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2609 or HBRW3612 Prohibitions: HBRW2304 or HBRW2610 Assessment: 6x150wd assignments (25%), 2x2min oral presentations (15%), 1x1200wd major written assignment (20%), 1x2hr final exam (30%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit is designed for students who have successfully completed HBRW3612. In this intensive language-learning environment students will be focusing more closely on the contextual and linguistic features of Modern Hebrew as it is expressed in mediums such as the media, film, and internet. On successfully completing this unit, students will achieve a proficiency level equivalent to the Hebrew University fourth level of instruction.
HBRW3653 Syriac 3

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW2912 or HBRW2652 Prohibitions: HBRW3911 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), 1x2500wd essay (30%), continuous assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit continues the study of Syriac texts begun in Syriac 1 and 2. This unit concentrates on the study of selections of advanced Syriac Peshitta, Patristic texts, etc.
HBRW3654 Syriac 4

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr seminars/week Prerequisites: HBRW3911 or HBRW3653 Prohibitions: HBRW3912 Assessment: 1x2hr exam (50%), 1x2500wd essay (30%), continuous assessment (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit builds on the foundation of Syriac 3. This unit concentrates on the study of more advanced Syriac Patristic and Hagiographical texts, etc., as well as a brief survey of the history of Syriac literature.

History

HSTY1001 History Workshop

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x1000wd source-based assessment (20%), 1x500wd essay proposal (10%), 1x500wd essay plan (10%), 1x2500wd essay (45%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
A new British empire emerges from a year of scandals on the southern tip of Africa. Maori debate conscription in World War I. Shanghai erupts in protest and repression in 1927. The Great Depression re-shapes race relations in Sydney. In this unit you study a significant episode in history in a semester-long seminar with an expert in the field. This experience introduces you to key aspects of historical thinking that have broad applications: evidence, change, and context.
HSTY1002 Age of Empires

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 6x 500 wds (3000wds total) Short paper (50%), 1x 1500 wds Exam (40%), x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit you will develop the analytical skills to understand historical change. We will examine political, economic, social and cultural trends in a range of regions across a large span of time, c. 1000-1750 AD. Topics covered include Christianity and Islam, varieties of states and empires, and political transformations. We will examine the significance of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Enlightenment, and consider what these episodes look like in a global context.
HSTY1003 Forging of the Modern World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: 6x 500 wds (3000wds total) Short paper (50%), 1x 1500 wds Exam (40%), x Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit critically examines the emergence of the modern world, from the eighteenth century to the present. We explore the making of the modern world in diverse locations, including Asia, Europe, the Americas, and Australia, relating social, cultural, political and economic factors. Is there one definition of modernity, across these different places?
HSTY1004 History Workshop: Premodern

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Essay plan (10%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x1000wd Source-based assessment (20%), Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Jerusalem during the first Crusade. Paris the year Louis XIV took the throne. The birth of the ghetto in Venice. In this unit you study a significant episode in medieval or early modern history in a semester-long seminar with an expert in the field. You'll develop skills in assessing evidence and understanding events and issues in context.
HSTY1005 History Workshop: Modern/Contemporary

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Essay plan (10%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x1000wd Source-based assessment (20%), Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Parisians at the dawn of the twentieth century re-make art, politics, and sexuality. A hunger strike at a supermax prison in California in 2013 spirals into a coordinated protest against mass incarceration. In this unit you study a moment in history that has a bearing on the world we live in today in a semester-long seminar with an expert in the field. You'll develop skills in assessing evidence and understanding events and issues in context.
HSTY1006 History Workshop: Americas

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Essay plan (10%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x1000wd Source-based assessment (20%), Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
New York at the end of slavery. Chicago during the protests of 1968. Charleston, South Carolina, as the revolution teeters on the brink of collapse when British forces inflict one of the worst defeats on rebellious colonists and threaten to retake all of the American south. In this unit you study a significant episode in American history in a semester-long seminar with an expert in the field. You'll develop skills in assessing evidence and understanding events and issues in context.
HSTY1007 History Workshop: Europe

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week, 1x1hr lecture/week Assessment: 1x2500wd Essay (45%), 1x500wd Essay plan (10%), 1x500wd Essay proposal (10%), 1x1000wd Source-based assessment (20%), Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The Hague at a pivotal moment in the history of human rights. Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee as a window onto the British empire near the peak of its global influence. In this unit you study a significant episode in European history in a semester-long seminar with an expert in the field. You'll develop skills in assessing evidence and understanding events and issues in context.
HSTY1090 The Chinese World

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: ASNS1101 Assessment: 1x500wd Tutorial Paper (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (35%), 1x1.5hr Exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to the Chinese world over a 4,000-year period, both looking at big issues and making time for ordinary people's lives. Through the study of primary sources we will seek to understand the meanings of religion, ritual, empire and war, among others, within Chinese society.
HSTY2304 Imperialism, 1815-2000

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x250wd Essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x2hr exam (40%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Empire is one of the key topics in human history, and we continue to live with the consequences of Europe's imperial age. This unit will examine imperialism, resistance to foreign rule, and decolonisation from 1815 to the present. It will look at particular cases of expansion (especially the French and British examples), and examine the theories used to understand imperialism. Among specific themes that will be covered are the ideologies of empire and culture, gender, race, the environment, and imperialism and nationalism.
HSTY2607 Palestine, Israel and the Middle East

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Dirk Moses Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in History, Arabic and Islamic Studies, Hebrew, Biblical and Jewish Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Arabic Language and Culture or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture Prohibitions: JCTC2008 or GOVT2772 Assessment: 5x200wd lecture posts (15%), 2x750wd film review (30%), 1x2000wd take-home exercise (45%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit provides a historical grounding in the region of the Middle East and its conflicts. It identifies the causes of conflict and attempted avenues for peace, as well the politicised scholarship on the subject. The unit commences in the Ottoman period, and includes the emergence of Zionism and Palestinian nationalism, colonial interests, the role of diasporas, and subsequent geopolitical developments until the present day. It covers political, social, and cultural history, and takes account not only of the official narratives but also of the voices from below. Visual arts, film, and literary texts will be considered as part of the historical narratives about Israel and Palestine.
HSTY2608 European Film and History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr film screening/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Though and Culture Prohibitions: HSTY2008 Assessment: 2x1250wd short essays (40%), 1x2hr final exam (50%), participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Taking European cinema over the past 100 years as its focus, this unit examines films in which directors confront the legacies of Europe's dramatic and traumatic twentieth century as well as overtly historical films that transform ideas about the past.
HSTY2609 African-American History and Culture

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x500wd Essay Proposal and Bibliography (10%), 1x2500wd Research essay (45%), 1x1.5hr Exam (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From fashion, food, and music, to speech patterns and protest methods, African-American culture has had a profound effect both on America and the wider world. In this unit, we survey race relations after the end of slavery, focusing on the emergence of black communities across the North and South; the spread of black music, literature, and film; the history of the civil rights and black power movements, and the role of race in the contemporary America.
HSTY2611 America in World Affairs: A History

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points of History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x3000wd essay (60%), 1x1500wd historiography assignment (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines the ideas and ideological assumptions that have shaped America's approach to the world from the Revolution until the presidency of Barack Obama. It explores how the leading politicians and policymakers in Washington have projected power overseas, and how their decisions have played out in the public sphere. Key topics include: isolationism and internationalism; Communism and the Cold War; the challenge of unipolarity; terrorism; and the underlying historical forces shaping US policy, especially American national mythology.
HSTY2613 Russia's Revolutions: 1905 to Present

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12cp at 1000 level History units Assessment: 1x250wd Essay Proposal (5%), 1x250wd Bibliography (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (45%), 1x1500wd Take-home Exercise (35%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This course surveys the history of the revolutionary project in Russia from the first clash with tsarism in 1905, through the twin revolutions of 1917, Stalin's dictatorship and World War II, and the break-up of the Soviet Union in the 1990s. Out of the Russian empire the Bolsheviks claimed to be building a new socialist utopia, a scene of radical social and cultural experimentation. How successful were they, and what legacy have they left for the post-Soviet world?
HSTY2616 The Human Rights Revolution

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd Bibliography and Proposal (15%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What accounts for the spectacular rise of human rights movements and norms from 1945 to the present? This unit investigates the causes and consequences of this radical global transformation in transnational activism, foreign policy and international law. The first portion of the unit explores the early history of natural rights, minority rights, women's rights and humanitarianism. The second portion examines the impact of domestic politics, gender politics and geopolitics on the postwar 'human rights revolution'.
HSTY2618 The Age of the Crusades

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points in History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2018 Assessment: 1x500wd research bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the history of the high medieval Mediterranean world during the Crusades era (c1050-c1300). Topics include the struggle for influence between the Latin West, Byzantium and Islam, and the multi-faceted social, economic and cultural contacts connecting the regions of the Great Sea.
HSTY2626 Fascism and Antifascism

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Judith Keene Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in History, Ancient History or Asian Studies or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture Prohibitions: HSTY2026 Assessment: 1x2500wd research essay (50%) and 1x1000wd tutorial paper (20%) and 1x1hr formal exam (20%) and tutorial participation (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will examine the origins and development of the movements of the New Right that emerged in Europe after World War One paying particular attention to their political, social and cultural manifestations as well as the movements on the left that attempted to confront what was seen as a new political phenomenon. The unit will use primary material of literature, diaries, cinema and photography as well as the more conventional sources of political and historical analysis.
HSTY2629 Sex and Scandal

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2,Winter Main Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2029 Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd proposal (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%) and 1hr exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
What makes a scandal? This unit examines a number of sensational case studies from England, America and Australia, beginning with the outrage surrounding Marie-Antoinette and then weaving through the increasingly strait-laced nineteenth century, in which scandals abounded, destroying reputations, rulers and families. It was not behaviour itself, but the ever-changing interpretations of behaviour that gave rise to condemnation and scandalised indignation. Examining occasions when social rules have been flouted allows us to consider the ways in which such rules are themselves constituted, maintained and challenged.
HSTY2631 Sin City? A History of Sydney

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Socio-legal Studies Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd Research essay bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Research essay outline (5%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), 1x1hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
From its beginnings as a convict colony, Sydney had to deal with an unsavoury reputation. This course explores the history of the city we live in, its people and its places. Distinct communities and neighbourhoods emerged as battles were fought over who belonged in Sydney, and how they should behave. Topics include Aboriginal resistance, convict scandals, poverty and plague, the 'Razor Gang Wars', Mardi Gras protests, the 'Emerald City' excesses of the 1980s, and the Cronulla riots.
HSTY2638 Modern China's Wars, 1895-1953

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or 12 Junior credit points of Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Research Exercise and Commentary (10%), 1x2500wd Research Paper (40%), 1x1.5hr Exam (40%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Much of modern China's early twentieth century history was inevitably tied to war. Ranging from humiliating wars against foreign imperialism to the protracted domestic struggle between Mao Zedong and Chiang Kai-shek, war became inextricably linked to ideas of nationhood and survival among the Chinese population at large. Through discussion of case studies between 1895 and 1953, this unit will consider the ways in which war shaped China's political, social and cultural history.
HSTY2640 Twentieth-Century China

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points each in either History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3071 or HSTY3072 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (10%), 1x250wd research bibliography (5%), 1x250wd Essay outline (5%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (30%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In the 1920s, China was likened to a sleeping lion - one whose roar would shake the world when it awoke. This prediction has already proved true more than once. Why was China ever said to be "asleep"? How did a whole nation awaken, to what, and with what results? This unit of study traces the forces of nationalism and revolution through China's tumultuous twentieth century. We focus upon making sense, in Chinese terms, of events that outsiders have found baffling.
HSTY2647 Renaissance Italy

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points each in either History or Ancient History Prohibitions: HSTY2047 Assessment: 1x500wd bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x1hr exam (20%) and Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit uses a special study of Florence to investigate the extraordinary cultural flowering that occurred in Italy between the 14th and 16th centuries. Major themes embrace parallel developments in Venice, Rome, Siena and other city-states; the social context of art; neighbourhood; community; gender; sexuality; the family; poverty; rebellion; religion; and intellectual life. Students use a wide variety of textual and visual sources to critique the concept of the Renaissance, its modern image and its impact on our own age.
HSTY2648 Australian History on Screen

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: Participation (10%), 1x2hrs Exam (50%), 2x1250wd Short essays (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores cinema that depicts Australian history and its impact on thinking about the nation's past. Periods and genres include colonial melodrama, Ealing Studio's 'Australian Westerns', the nationalist new wave of the 1960s and 1970s, and the recent work of Indigenous filmmakers.
HSTY2652 Genocide in Historical Perspective

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Jewish Civilisation, Thought and Culture Assessment: 1x1000wd essay draft (20%), 1x2000wd research essay (40%), 1x1500wd take-home exercise (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Under what conditions do genocides occur? What motivates their perpetrators? And how do societies recover from their genocidal past? This unit traces the history of genocide across the modern era. We will compare incidents around the globe and their aftermaths to determine how they may be related to one another.
HSTY2654 Pacific Ties: Australia, China, America

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History or (completion of 24 credit points) Assessment: Participation (15%), 1x10 minutes Tutorial presentation (15%), 1x2500wd Research essay (40%), 1x1000wd Tutorial paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit will be delivered in Guilin, China. Additional travel-related costs will apply.
This unit traces dynamics between race, labour, migration, trade and diplomacy in US-Chinese-Australian relations. It examines the promises and perils of using history to inform contemporary debates on the triangular relationship.
HSTY2656 A House Divided: The American Civil War

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x500wd essay proposal (10%) and 1x2000wd research essay (40%) and 1x2000wd take-home exam (35%) and tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The Civil War had momentous consequences for America - realigning the nation's political culture, ending slavery and forever transforming millions of lives. This unit analyses the social, cultural and political history of the Civil War and Reconstruction. We begin by looking at combat experience, civilian mobilization and state formation, the war's effects on gender and race relations and the causes for Reconstruction's failure, and we end by focusing on how and why this war continues to resonate in American culture.
HSTY2659 American Slavery

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY2059 Assessment: 1x500wd essay proposal (10%), 1x3000wd essay (50%), take-home exercises (30%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit traces the history of slavery in the New World, from the 16th century to its eventual abolition in the 19th. We'll begin in Africa and with the slave trade itself, and devote most attention to the British colonies and then the United States, but we will place events there in a broader hemispheric context, paying attention to Saint Domingue, Cuba, Brazil. How much of slave life can a historian recover? How important was slavery in the economic development of the US? What role does the memory of slavery play in American culture?
HSTY2666 American Revolutions

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Michael McDonnell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1 hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (12 junior credit points in History or 12 junior credit points in Ancient History) or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) Prohibitions: HSTY2066 Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (15%) and 1x3000wd research paper (45%) and 1x1000wd take-home exercise (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit will explore the series of rebellions, wars, independence movements and revolutions that rocked the Atlantic World between 1750 and 1825. Though we will focus on the American Revolution in particular, we will put that event in a larger Atlantic context, from the Native American resistance movements of the 1750s and 1760s, through to the Spanish American independence movements of the early nineteenth century. We will also explore connections with the Haitian and French Revolutions and slave rebellions more generally.
HSTY2670 Black Manhattan

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in Ancient History or (AMST1001 and (HSTY1023 or HSTY1076)) or 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Assessment: 1x500wd essay outline (10%), 1x500wd essay biblography (10%), 1x2500wd essay (50%), 1x1000wd take-home exercise (20%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In the twentieth century Harlem was the black metropolis, the black capital of the world. This unit will explore the history of African Americans in New York City, from its beginnings as a Dutch settlement down to today. We will look at the people, images and events that defined Black Manhattan, paying particular attention to everyday life in Harlem in the twentieth century.
HSTY2672 Britain and the World: C.1837-1914

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%), 1x2000wd final essay (40%), 1x1500wd take home exam (30%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the political, social and cultural significance of Britain's foreign engagements c.1837-1914, including war (e.g. Crimean War, Afghan Wars, Maori Wars, Boer War), 'gunboat diplomacy' (e.g. the Royal Navy in the Pacific) and colonial rule (especially India, Ireland and Australia). Special emphasis will be given to the role these engagements played in fostering or challenging a sense of British identity among a wide range of men and women, both in Britain and the wider world.
HSTY2677 Australia: Politics and Nation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credt points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History Assessment: 1x1000wd Short Paper on Research Skills (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (40%), 1x1hr Exam (30%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the intersection between political culture and nationalism in Australia, with particular attention to the question of when (and if?) Australia became an 'independent' nation. It examines the content and character of British race patriotism in Australia before 1945 and the gradual unravelling of this British myth in the post-war period. Among other issues, the unit explores the end of 'White Australia', the rise of multiculturalism, engagement with Asia, Aboriginal reconciliation and republicanism.
HSTY2689 Civility and Squalor: 18 C. British Isles

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cindy McCreery Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1-hr lectures/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in junior History, Ancient History or Asian Studies Prohibitions: HSTY3699 Assessment: 1x1000wd draft essay (20%) and 1x3000wd essay (60%) and 1x500wd tutorial presentation (10%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Eighteenth-century British and Irish society displayed stark contracts: conspicuous consumption jostled with abject poverty, humanitarian campaigns co-existed with capital punishment, and major treatises on political liberty were published alongside drinking manuals. This unit uses contemporary sources like newspapers, magazines, cartoons and pamphlets to trace major cultural, political, economic and social themes in Britain and Ireland, eg aristocratic leadership and decadence, political liberty and repression, religious faith and doubt, women's private and public lives, urbanization and unemployment, fashion and leisure.
HSTY2693 Frontier Violence in Modern Memory

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: "2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x1500wd exam (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (50%), in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The myth of the frontier is a foundation stone of national identity in the United States, where it gave birth to a global film genre, the Western. In Australia, where 'history wars' are waged over the level of violence and the legality of colonial expansion, the very existence of a frontier is disputed rather than romanticised. This unit compares the significance of the frontier in each country's history and popular memory from the perspective of both settlers and indigenous peoples.
HSTY2696 The Empire Strikes Back

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week and 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 Junior credit points of History or Ancient History Assessment: 1x500wd Film/Book Review (10%), 1x1000wd Reflective Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Research Essay (40%), 1x1hr Final Exam (20%), Tutorial Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In the 20th century, millions of people fought to overthrow oppressive colonial regimes. In this unit we will study the global history of decolonisation, mainly from the perspective of formerly colonised and indigenous peoples. We will examine case studies from Asia, Africa and the Pacific, and end by asking: what would decolonisation in Australia look like?
HSTY2700 What Do We Want? Protest in Australia

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial /week Prerequisites: 12 junior credit points in HSTY or ANHS Assessment: 1x750wd essay outline (10%), 1x2250wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (40%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The unit follows Australian protest movements across the last century. We will examine struggles over labour rights and working conditions in the 1900s, women's suffrage, Aboriginal land rights, race relations and the White Australia Policy, homelessness during the Great Depression, freedom of speech during the Cold War, the Vietnam Moratorium and sexual liberation in the 1970s, the environmental movement, refugees and asylum seekers, and LGBT rights today. In the process we will explore changing ideas about government, community and identity while conducting individual research projects through local archives.
HSTY2701 Spies in the Archive

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Assessment: 1x500wd tutorial paper (15%), 1x2500wd research essay (40%), 1x1.5hr exam (35%), tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Historians love spies, whose clandestine collection of information in the service of states and as a weapon of war has created irresistible archival records. This course traces the history, culture and changing technologies of espionage and surveillance, from the Spanish Inquisition to Cold War Australia, from Russian empire to neighbourhood spy networks in interwar Britain and current debates over terrorism and social media. Can we use such material without becoming complicit in the voyeurism and implied violence of its collection?
HSTY2702 Gender and Medicine in Modern America

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in American Studies Prohibitions: HSTY2619, HSTY2697 Assessment: 1x 1.5 hours final exam (35%), 1x 500 wds essay proposal (10%), x tutorial participation (10%), 1x 2500 wds research essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit explores the evolution of scientific and popular ideas of female and male bodies and minds in modern America. It addresses questions such as: How did the sex binary develop? In what ways do social norms about gender inform medical understandings of health and disease? How has the female body in particular been medicalised and regulated?
HSTY2703 Convicts and Capitalists

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Ancient History Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x 1000 wds Short paper (20%), 1x 2000 wds Essay (40%), 1x 1500 wds Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Dregs of a vicious society, wretched victims of industrial capitalism, or boastful capitalists themselves: convicts have always held a special place in the drama of Australia's past. This unit explores lively debates, then and now, about their place in the making of colonial society.
HSTY2704 Vikings of the Sunrise

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x 500 wds Blog entry (10%), 1x 500 wds Proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x 2000 wds Research essay (40%), 1x 1.5hrs Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The largest ocean in the world is a sea of interconnected islands, peopled for over 40,000 years by some of the most intrepid navigators the world has known. In this unit, we will examine histories of the Pacific from diverse perspectives, focusing on the making and re-making of people, environment, and knowledge in this storied space.
HSTY2705 History of Capitalism

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Assessment: 1x 3000 Research essay (50%), x 0 Participation/discussion (15%), 1x 500 Research Proposal (15%), 1x 1000 Tutorial Paper (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit studies capitalism as a contingent mode of organising a variety of social, cultural, and political developments across diverse historical societies. Our purpose is to explore the histories that have come together to produce the economic world we live in and often take for granted as natural.
HSTY2706 France in Modern Europe and Beyond

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in History Prohibitions: HSTY2658 Assessment: Ongoingx Participation (10%), 1x 500 Proposal and bibliography (10%), 1x 2500 wds Research essay (50%), 1x 1500 wds Final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The history of France since the 19th century is marked by tumultuous social and political social transformations; by clashes of ideologies, classes and cultures, disastrous wars, colonialism and decolonisation. In this unit you will study these phenomena, their immediate legacies and their larger impact on France's search for identity in the context of migration and globalisation.
HSTY2709 The Chinese World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the History major Prohibitions: ASNS1101 or HSTY1090 Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x1500wd Exam (40%), 1x2250wd Essay Paper (35%), 1x250wd Essay Outline (5%), 1x500wd Primary Source Commentary (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study introduces you to the Chinese world over a 4, 000-year period, looking both at big issues and making time for ordinary people's lives. Through the study of primary sources we will seek to understand the meanings of religion, ritual, empire and war, among others, within Chinese society.
HSTY2710 Renaissance and Reformation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY1031 Assessment: Participation (10%), 1x2hr Final Exam (40%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd Essay Outline (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
We start with the brilliant history of Renaissance Italy: courts, republics, scholars, and artists. We then examine the religious revolution known as the Reformation, whose theologians and preachers transformed Europe. We travel the oceans to explore Europe's age of expansion, and conclude with France's religious wars and England's revolution.
HSTY3700 The East is Red: China 1949-1997

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x1.5hr Final Exam (30%), 1x2250wd Research Essay (40%), 1x500wd Essay Proposal (10%), 1x250wd Research Bibliography (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit of study examines the emergence of the People's Republic of China and the role played by the Chinese Communist Party in its creation. By looking at top-down party politics and grassroots movements from below we seek to understand the ways in which revolution defined both daily life and China's new position in the world.
HSTY3702 Century of Crisis? England 1603-1688

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Assessment: 1x500wd equivalent Tutorial presentation (10%), 1x1hr Exam (20%), 1x2500wd Research essay (50%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), Tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Stretching from the death of Elizabeth I in 1603 to the Glorious Revolution of 1688, this unit examines England's tumultuous seventeenth century, focusing on political instability, religious extremism, popular culture, household and family, gender and sexuality, consumerism, and material culture.
HSTY3704 American Indian Holocaust?

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY2663 Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x2000wd Take-home exercise (35%), 1x3500wd Research Paper (45%), 1x500wd Tutorial Paper (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
The collision of European and Native American cultures initiated a profound transformation in world history, altering the way we think, live, and even eat today. Yet for many the confrontation can only be seen as a period of traumatic genocide. We will examine the debate over the consequences of these encounters and explore how different groups of Indians responded to challenges between 1492 and 1800. We'll try to comprehend the tremendous changes during this period, but also the resurging presence of Indians today.
HSTY3705 Reconquest? A history of medieval Spain

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY2695 Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x1.5hr Final Exam (30%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%), 1x500wd Research bibliography (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Spain's medieval history was shaped by warfare between Christianity and Islam, but also by more peaceable relations. From this complex story emerged the opposing myths of 'Reconquest' and 'convivencia', still resonating in Spanish society today. This unit reassesses both notions and explores the fascinating dynamics of the Iberian medieval world.
HSTY3706 Venice Floating City: Myth and History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY2645 Assessment: Participation (10%), 1x1000wd Exam (20%), 1x2500wd Essay (50%), 1x500wd Essay bibliography (10%), 1x500wd Essay outline (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Venice is famous for grandiose spectacle and cultural achievement; and notorious for vice, the sexual licence of Casanova, for cinematic imaginings of horror and death. This unit traces Venice from medieval origins in a muddy Adriatic lagoon, through the rise and decline of its mighty early-modern empire, to emergence as a 21st-century global tourist Mecca. It investigates Venice's extraordinary impact on everything from republican thought to understanding of how human beings inhabit the city environment.
HSTY3707 France 1500-1800

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Assessment: Tutorial Participation (10%), 1x2000wd Essay (40%), 1x500wd Essay Outline (10%), 1x500wd Bibliography (10%), 1x1500wd Short Prose Assessment (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
France was a political, cultural, and economic powerhouse. We examine the growth of French influence under the Renaissance kings; the kingdom's fracture in a series of religious wars; the age of Louis XIV and the Enlightenment; and the Revolution. Along the way we meet philosophers, scientists, and artists, and we see France spread its power across the globe.
HSTY3708 Australia: Environmental History

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY 2615 Assessment: 1x3500wd major research essay (75%), 1x1000wd literature review (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit offers students the opportunity to understand the environmental history of Australia in a way that will deepen their understanding of contemporary debates around environmental issues. What is environmental history? How did Indigenous ideas of country differ from settler concepts of the environment? What is the historical importance of the environment to ideas of belonging and national identity? What of the history of fire and drought? How, when and why did an environmental consciousness emerge in Australia?
HSTY3710 Contemporary Europe

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Prohibitions: HSTY2605: Contemporary Europe Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), 1x1500wd Take home exercise (35%), 1x2000wd Research essay (40%), 1x1000wd Essay draft (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
Today, Europe is a region faced with growing challenges that threaten to undermine its economic and political achievements since the Second World War. This unit surveys European history after 1945, from post-war reconstruction, decolonisation, and the Cold War to recent debates over social justice, immigration, terrorism, and the European Union.
HSTY3711 History and Grand Strategy

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in the History major Assessment: Participation (10%), 1x1hr Final Exam (20%), 1x2000wd Historiographical review (30%), 1x3000wd Research Essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
This unit examines the relationship between history and statecraft in the 20th/21st centuries in Britain, Europe, the US and Asia. Bringing to life the history-policy nexus, topics include the power of the Munich and Vietnam analogies, the use of history in marshaling support for war and humanitarian interventions, and the role of historical thinking in decision making.
HSTY3901 History in the Making

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x750wd Project Draft (10%), 1x4500wd Research Project (60%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit you will independently frame, research and write an original work of historical analysis, based on primary sources and drawing on your knowledge of any period, place or culture examined in history units previously completed. The weekly lectures will guide you through the stages of framing a historical problem, conducting research, choosing a methodology or approach, shaping an argument or narrative, and editing your final work. In tutorials we will workshop every stage of your project.
HSTY3902 History Beyond the Classroom

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x1250wd Project Diary (15%), 1x4000wd Research Project (55%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit you will frame, research and produce an original project based on an engagement with communities and organisations outside the University. You will explore history in action in a variety of contexts and think about different ways of creating and disseminating history that will interest and inform a public audience. Lectures and field trips will help you to frame relevant community-based questions, adopt appropriate methodologies, and explore new ways of presenting your arguments or narratives.
HSTY3903 History and Historians

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 2000 level in History Assessment: 1x250wd Project Proposal (5%), 1x500wd Research Bibliography (10%), 1x750wd Project Draft (10%), 1x4500wd Research Project (60%), Tutorial participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Arts and Social Sciences
In this unit you will independently frame, research and write an original Essay analyzing how historians have written about the past. In choosing your topic you may draw upon historical issues, approaches and debates encountered throughout your previous studies in history. The lectures and tutorials introduce you to new methodologies and approaches to the past, and guide you through the stages of identifying an issue or debate, researching and understanding its different aspects, and shaping your own argument in response.