Table S Electives - Health Sciences Descriptions

Table S Electives - Health Sciences

Units of study

BACH3146 Cyberpsychology and e-Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour workshop weekly. Prerequisites: completion of 48 credit points Assessment: Proposal for eHealth product (30%) Written Report (30%) Group Video documentary (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
Cyberpsychology and e-health aims to provide an introduction into how digital industries impact human behaviour - specifically how societal and individual health is affected by the internet and other popular technologies. The course will be based on current research and policy guidelines set by the Australian and American Medical Associations, the American Psychological Association and Australian Psychological Society for the use of information technology in the following areas: how types of ICT functions may affect human behaviour; ethics and viability of delivering health resources online; the rise of serious games for health; social media in health; provision of therapy over the internet for general health and mental health; virtual reality use in health and wellbeing; quality control, data security, and assessment of general and specific online health resources; and future directions of information technology and its application to health and wellbeing.
Textbooks
Connolly, I., Palmer, M., Barton, H., and Kirwan, G. (Eds.). (2016). An introduction to cyberpsychology. Routledge.
BACH3128 Health Professionals and Globalisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zakia Hossain Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week for Wk 2-13 Prerequisites: A minimum of 48 credit points Prohibitions: HSBH3009 Assessment: Online assessment (30%), Presentation and partication (20%), and 2 hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
The focus of this unit of study is on the meaning of globalisation and its impact on health. It examines social and cultural shifts and technological advancement and their impact on health and disability and professional practices. The unit examines the key drivers of globalisation and features of the shift from international to global health. The unit also aims to provide understanding of both the direct and indirect impact of global changes on biopsychosocial aspects of health and health care delivery and professional practices. The direct impact includes shifting disease, disability and behaviour patterns. The indirect impacts include those of, international health regulations, globalization of professional ethics and professional practices, global governance, movement of health professions, the advancement of medical technology and internet 'globalisation' on health care service delivery and professional practices. The unit analyses global health challenges such as disability inclusive development, climate change, C and NCDs, pharmaceuticals, and tobacco control from global perspectives. The unit provides students with skills in alaysing multidisciplinary approaches in health, public-private partnership and role of NGOs and community organizations in their profession.
Textbooks
Lee, K. and Collin, J. (eds). Global Change and Health, reprinted 2005,
BACH3147 Health at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: A minimum of 48 credit points Assessment: One 2500 word essay (50%), one 1-hour exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study provides a critical introduction to health at work in the Australian and international contexts. It examines the nature, prevalence, origins, and management of disease and injury in the workplace. Topics covered include the distribution and impact of occupational injury, ill health and disease in Australia; different perspectives on occupational injury and disease causation; the effects of psychosocial factors and work organisation, and the roles of professionals, managers and workers in prevention and management.
CSCD1034 Linguistics and Phonetics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Greg Flannery Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3-hr lectures/wk, tutorials weeks 1-13 Assessment: Transcription exam 1 barrier task (25%) grammar exam 2 barrier task ( 25%), final exam ( 50%) Practical field work: Participation in practical learning Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
Note: Speech Pathology students must pass this unit in order to enrol in clinical units in Year 2. This unit is a prerequisite for CSCD2057 Child Language and CSCD2068 Speech Sound Disorders.
Students will explore the nature of language: introduction to phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics and orthographic systems, , with a clinical focus. Particular emphasis on grammar, phonetics and articulation assessment and intervention. Analysis of language for clinical purposes (especially grammar transcription and phonetic transcription skills). This unit of study prepares students with the necessary background knowledge to undertake phonology, language and clinical units later in the course.
Textbooks
Fromkin, V., Rodman, R., Hyams, Amberber, M., Cox, F., Thornton, R. (2015). An Introduction to Language (Australia and New Zealand 8th edition) Thomson Educational, Victoria.
HSBH1005 Human Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week and weekly 1-hr tutorials Assessment: Quiz (20%), Essay (40%), and Exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study considers the important bio-psycho-social and functional changes that occur across the lifespan. Understanding bio-psycho-social factors associated with healthy human development is important for addressing our major national health priority areas. Areas discussed include healthy child development, the families impact on health, adolescent risk taking behaviour, mental health, social relationships and social support, dementia, healthy ageing and chronic diseases across the lifespan.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings as provided
HSBH1012 Introduction to Health and Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH1006 or HSBH1008 or HSBH1009 Assessment: seminar presentation (20%), essay (35%), 1 x 2-hr exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit will develop students' broad understanding of the different approaches to health (e.g. biomedical, psychological, sociological). This would include understanding the different factors which impact health; how different approaches may lead to different strategies for developing and evaluating health solutions; and different ways of measuring health. Students are then enabled to consider how these different approaches to health are reflected in health systems both locally and internationally. Students would explore the different healthcare systems and engage with current and future challenges for health systems and health policy in Australia and abroad.
Textbooks
Readings will be drawn from a variety of journals, government reports and textbooks. The reading list will be available to students through the unit of study outline and learning management system
HSBH1013 Society and Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nikki Wedgwood Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Assessment: short answer assessments (30%), presentation (20%), take home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
In this unit, students will examine the main social determinants of health and the meaning of health for different populations. Students will also consider how health is delivered and by whom. This includes the breadth of the health workforce (both paid and unpaid) and health consumers. Embedded in this unit will be considerations of ethics and legal concerns for health professionals, cultural awareness and interdisciplinarity.
Textbooks
Readings will be drawn from a variety of journals, government reports and textbooks. The reading list will be available to students through the unit of study outline and learning management system.
HSBH2008 Physical Activity and Population Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leigh Wilson Session: Intensive March Classes: 9 x 2-hr lectures/sem (Wk 2 to 9), 8 x1-hr practical project activity /sem, 4 x1-hr tutorials/sem and 1 x 2-hr prac/sem Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: Individual Project Report (30%), Group Presentation (30%), Final Project report (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to develop an up-to-date critical understanding of the role of physical activity for the health of the population as well as the most promising principles that underpin mass-level physical activity interventions. Students will examine in detail the population's participation patterns and barriers to be physically active and has a primary focus on every-day incidental (non-sporting) physical activity for the prevention of physical and mental chronic disease. The unit is largely multi-disciplinary and it goes beyond disease prevention, to explore themes like positive wellbeing/happiness and maintenance of functional ability and independence to an older age.

This unit takes a lifespan approach and actively promotes an understanding of the direct and distal implications of physical inactivity at each life stage. Particular acknowledgement is given to physical activity as a behaviour that is not merely a lifestyle 'choice' as it is often thought by medicine and other individual-centred disciplines; but rather the outcome of a complex web of societal, cultural, economic, political and individual circumstances that lead to the formation of personal habits across the lifespan.

The entire unit will be largely interactive and will encourage students to discuss, debate, and critically evaluate the evidence, and provides the opportunity to have a project that will assist in future employment. At the start of the unit the students will be provided with an accessible and user-friendly set of skills and tools (e.g. statistics, physical activity measurement) to enable them to make the most of the learning experience.
HSBH2009 Innovations in eHealth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melanie Keep Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 48 credit points Prohibitions: HSBH1010 Assumed knowledge: HSBH1012, HSBH1013 Assessment: Reflection task (25%), health project (30%), skills modules (5%), job application/eportfolio (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
Digital technologies are changing the health landscape from consumers having access to Dr Google to clinicians using virtual reality as part of treatment. This unit of study explores the impact of digital technologies on our health and wellbeing and includes consideration of how these devices and software interact with the healthcare system, affect attitudes towards health and healthcare providers, and change the discussions about health ethics, and health equity. Students will engage in practical, hands-on learning experience and complete authentic assessments such as designing innovations, creating an ePortfolio, and applying for a job.
Textbooks
Readings will be drawn from a variety of journals, government reports, and textbooks. The reading list will be available to students through the unit of study outline and learning management system
HSBH3003 Health Service Strategy and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: (HSBH1007 or HSBH2007) OR 12cp of 2000-level units of study Assessment: Tutorial/workshop activities (10%), online activities (15%), 1x15-min group project plan presentation (15%), 1x2500wd group project report (60%) Practical field work: 1x2-hr workshop Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study offers students an insight into the larger picture of how a nation sets priorities for health services. The importance of evidence-based health policy development in planning health services and strategies for increasing the cost-effectiveness of delivering health services will be covered. Students will gain skills in health service needs assessment, measuring cost-effectiveness, macroeconomic evaluation of health services and systems, and health equity assessment. It is envisaged that students will develop a capacity to understand the concept of health policy and its relevance to the delivery of health care services and to take a problem-oriented approach to analysing and evaluating current policy provisions and strategies in the Australian context.
HSBH3004 Health, Ethics and the Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jennifer Smith-Merry Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lectures/week, 1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%), research report (40%) and final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study engages students in interdisciplinary experiences that provide an introduction to ethics and law in relation to the Australian health system. The unit explores fundamental ethical principles in relation to health and health services. It also provides a basic introduction to medico-legal aspects of health and healthcare. Topics of focus include mental health, health complaints, reproductive technologies, the start and end of life, disability, public health and genetic technology. Students will develop their own ethical thinking and an understanding of professionally acceptable behaviours appropriate to practice in a wide range of disciplines and health professions, including policy. Learning is interactive and scenarios are used to develop ethical thinking. Students will develop a written or multimedia research project based on an ethical and legal issue of their choosing.
Textbooks
Kerridge, I., Lowe, M., and Stewart, C. (2013). Ethics and law for the health professions. Leichardt: The Federation Press.
HSBH3008 Interdisciplinary eHealth

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melanie Keep Session: Intensive October Classes: 5x5-hr lecture/semester, online modules Prerequisites: 48 CP Prohibitions: HSBH2009 or HSBH1010 Assessment: Reflection task (20%), case study (35%), eHealth portfolio (45%) Mode of delivery: Block mode Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study aims to provide senior students with a range of eHealth experiences on which they can make evidence-based decisions. In particular, this unit will provide students with opportunities to examine: how emerging technologies affect patient-centred, interdisciplinary communication and healthcare; strategies for interacting with patients and clients using different technologies; how technology affects health care in different Australian health contexts by drawing upon their clinical experiences and research literature; issues surrounding eHealth practice; innovations in eHealth including designing health apps for mobile devices; the role of technology in healthcare management. Students will develop skills identified as key for future clinicians and create an ePortfolio to showcase their learning to potential employers. This unit will also enhance students as learners by providing them with reflective learning skills, interdisciplinary health experiences and opportunities to integrate their clinical and university learning experiences through case-based learning.
HSBH3010 Health and Lifelong Disability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Wayland Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week. Prerequisites: HSBH1007 or HSBH2007 Assessment: On-line activities (20%), essay 2000wd (35%) and case study (45%) . Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit of study explores the roles and responsibilities of health professionals who work with children, adolescents and adults with lifelong disabilities, and their families. Using an inter-professional lived experience curriculum, students will examine the nature of lifelong disability; factors which affect the participation of persons with lifelong disability in everyday life activities including education, leisure, and employment; and strategies for increasing their participation in these activities. Students will be supported to critique research literature, to examine the roles and responsibilities of allied health professionals in the context of working with persons with lifelong disability, and to develop practical strategies for interacting and working collaboratively and successfully with children, adolescents, and adults with lifelong disabilities, their families and fellow professionals. It is expected that through a combination of face-to-face teaching and online learning activities, this unit will assist students in preparing to work with individuals with lifelong disabilities in a range of workplace settings.
HSBH3014 Workplace Injury Prevention/Management

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week (Wk -1 to 8) Prerequisites: 48 credit points and (BIOS1168 and EXSS1018) Assessment: Workplace assessment (group task) (40%), quiz (10%), 1x2hr end of semester exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides a framework for exploring the role of health professionals in the field of workplace rehabilitation and occupational health and safety, with a focus on work injury prevention and early injury assessment and management. This unit will develop students' knowledge and skills in assessing the physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands of work and explore workplace modifications and functional restorative strategies to assist people with injuries and disability return to meaningful and productive employment. An evidence-based, approach will be used to explore the patterns, causation and management of workplace injury and illness, and associated legislation in NSW. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and practice of ergonomics, workplace assessments and functional evaluations and how these can be applied to the prevention and management of work injuries. To this effect, the role of the health professional as a consultant in the workplace will be discussed.
HSBH3015 Mental Health Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: 2x online assessments (20%) ,1x2000wd essay (50%) and participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Online Faculty: Health Sciences
Poor mental health poses a major challenge to our society, and health care professionals, among others, are charged with 'making a difference'. To do so, they need to be equipped with the most up-to-date knowledge of effective mental health approaches and interventions. This unit will overview major mental health conditions and significant social, philosophical, and historical influences on health care service delivery and reform to provide a context for contemporary rehabilitation practice. Students will be introduced to the goals, values and guiding principles of psychiatric rehabilitation and to practices that aim to address the culture of stigma and low expectations by society of people with mental health conditions. Rehabilitation interventions that have demonstrated efficacy in promoting recovery by reducing obstacles to participation for people with mental health conditions will be examined. Local and international research underpinning best practice in rehabilitation management and service delivery will be reviewed and consumer perspectives and experiences explored.
HSBH3017 Disability, Sport and Social Inclusion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nikki Wedgwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1hr tutorial week Prerequisites: (HSBH1003 OR HSBH1013) and complete a minimum of 48 credit points Assessment: 2 x short answer assignments (2x15%), 1500wd written assignment (40%), Group Presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
Note: Students must have completed 48 credit points to enrol in this unit.
The primary goal of this unit is to inform the understandings and practices of our future allied health professionals and health policymakers about: 1) sports participation from a disabled as well as able-bodied perspective (via reverse integration); 2) the dominant medical model of disability and how that shapes the approach of health professions towards people with impairments; 3) the social model of disability; 4) the potential role of sport, not just in the physical, but also the psychological and social rehabilitation, of people with impairments; 5) sport, not just as a physical activity, competition or leisure activity but as a social institution, which arises out of particular social and historical contexts in accordance with the interests of dominant social groups (ie able-bodied, medical profession); 6) how sporting practice is heavily shaped by social structures like gender and ableism but also that people who facilitate sport (like health professionals) are not completely constrained by these structures because ableism is ultimately either reproduced or challenged by everyday practices, attitudes and behaviours; 7) the role of sport in either promoting or reproducing the social inclusion and/or exclusion of people with impairments; 8) how sport can be emancipatory at the lived/embodied level; and 9) the role of sport in the lives of people with an intellectual disability.
REHB2026 Fundamentals of Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Roxanna Pebdani Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prerequisites: A minimum of 48 credit points Assessment: Weekly MCQ Quizzes (40%), News Article Reflection Paper (x2) (30%), Film reflection Paper (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day Faculty: Health Sciences
This unit introduces students to broad definitions pertinent to both disability/disadvantage and rehabilitation. This unit provides unique opportunities to learn about disability and both the individual and systemic factors that explain disability and disadvantage. The unit surveys international perspectives on the disability process with a disability-human rights perspective. Students will learn about disability as it is seen through the lens of society. The various models of disability, language related to disability, and power, oppression, privilege, and intersectionality as they relate to disability will be discussed. Students will also learn about other holistic aspects of disability including accessibility, sexuality, and disability culture.
Textbooks
Text book list will be provided