Table O - Open Learning Environment Descriptions

Errata
Item Errata Date
1. Please note that there are additional fees associated with the following units offered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. Contact the relevant unit of study coordinator for more information.

OLES2137 Experience China
OLES2139 Experience Germany
OLES2141 Experience Indonesia
OLES2143 Experience Italy
OLES2145 Experience Korea
OLES2147 Experience the French-speaking World
OLES2149 Experience the Spanish-speaking World
OLES2153 Experience Japan
11/12/2018
2.

Sessions have changed for the following units offered by the Business School. Sessions are now Feburary Intensive and July Intensive:

OLET1201 Business Entrepreneurship: Business Models
OLET1202 Business Entrepreneurship: Guerrilla Tactics
OLET1203 Business Entrepreneurship: Bootstrap Finance

12/12/2018
3.

The following Faculty of Medicine and Health unit has been cancelled. It will run in 2020:

OLET1516 Health Challenges: Oral Health

12/12/2018
4.

Sessions have changed for the following unit offered by the Faculty of Science. Sessions are now April Intensive and May Intensive only:

OLET2602 Psychology of Crime

12/12/2018
 

Sessions have changed for the following unit offered by the Faculty of Medicine and Health. Sessions are Semester 2 only:

OLET1506 Health Challenges: Allergy and Autoimmunity

24/1/2019

 
 
Two and six credit point OLE units are listed below; the zero credit point units are available in Canvas.
 
 

Table O - Open Learning Environment

This table lists Open Learning Environment (OLE) units of study.
OLE units can be zero, two, or six credit points.
All of the OLE units below have a matching zero credit point version available through Canvas. Standalone zero credit point units are also avalable through Canvas. The zero credit point units are free for any University of Sydney student, completely online and available through out the year.
Two and six credit point units must be taken in their defined session.
All OLE units will comply with the University's [[i||Learning and Teaching Policy 2015]] as regards appropriate assessment and hours of student effort.
Units of study
The two and six credit point units of study available in the Open Learning Environment are listed below, arranged by the faculty of offer. Zero credit point units are available through Canvas.
Arts and Social Sciences
OLET1101 Aboriginal Sydney

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 hour per week online material, 3 x 1hr face to face seminar Assessment: 3x300wd reflective exercises (60%), 1 x1000wd report (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Sydney is a city rich in diverse pre-colonial, colonial and contemporary sites of significance to Aboriginal Peoples. Too often though perceptions about Aboriginal Peoples consign them to an ancient past or perpetuate stereotypical imaginations that Aboriginal Peoples live predominantly in remote communities. Consequently Aboriginal narratives are commonly hidden or marginalised. The development of cultural competence capabilities helps to uncover and examine these hidden and marginalised narratives and experiences. This course explores some of the key themes and capabilities of cultural competence by exploring Aboriginal experiences and narratives of Sydney which are often invisible to non-Aboriginal eyes. Key elements of practicing cultural competence include being able to understand and interrogate context, which in the case of Sydney includes not only learning about the peoples, places and histories of Aboriginal Sydney but to also understand issues about how knowledge is created and how dominant narratives can exclude diverse knowledges and experiences. This unit will develop students' capacity to productively, collaboratively and openly in diverse groups and across cultural boundaries
OLET1103 Cultural Competence: Fundamentals

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 hour per week online material, 3 x 1 hour workshop per semester Assessment: 5 x short answer quizzes(100%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit is delivered in a module format and is designed to encourage students to learn about who they are and how they relate to the world around them. It aims to serve as a starting point in an individual's journey towards being respectful of diversity and encouraging open and inclusive behaviour. The unit will examine the meaning of culture and cultural competence; examine social and emotional wellbeing in a cultural competence context as well as identity formation, worldview, socialisation. The unit will address the importance of building cultural competence capabilities to recognise and address racism. The unit will also help build critical self-reflection skills and a greater understanding of diverse knowledges. The unit helps students explore the implications of being part of a University community that is located on Aboriginal land. The unit will help the development of cultural competence in order to develop students' capacity to productively, collaboratively and openly in diverse groups and across cultural boundaries.
OLET1105 Cultures of Food: Europe

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April,Intensive August Classes: 1x2hr online lecture/week for 4 weeks, 2 x 2hr face-to-face seminars Assessment: 3 xquizzes (30%), 3 x discussion posts (20%), 2 x peer reviews (10%), Final project (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit explores the cultural significance of food in Europe. It introduces the history of food in major European countries. Students will have the opportunity to explore in depth the food culture of one European country and its manifestation in Australia.
OLET1115 (Im)Politeness in Global Society

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr flipped lecture/week Assessment: 6x equivalent to 100wds online quiz (30%), 1x 500wd self-reflection paper (30%), 1x 500wd final report (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
In a multicultural environment, it is easy to come across as rude, or to misunderstand others' behaviour if we don't know their culture. Showing how politeness and behaviour norms function in different cultures, this unit will provide you with skills that give competitive edge in any professional area. The unit does not require any previous knowledge of foreign language.
OLET1133 Understanding Critical Reflection

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Assessment: 3 x MCQ (45%),Workshop tasks x 1000wds (45%), Participation 10% Mode of delivery: Online
Employers have provided clear information about the qualities and skills they require of university graduates to be successful. These include broad skills and knowledge of critical thinking, superior communication, disciplinary expertise, working collaboratively and with diverse groups, while working with integrity, to name a few. This OLE provides students with the knowledge of reflective practices to articulate the development of their graduate qualities. It provides students with the opportunity to create a repository of evidence of their graduate qualities in their ePortfolio thereby commencing their webfolio which they can build on across their course and in future employment.
OLET1135 Disability Awareness and Inclusivity

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online Assessment: Video assignment (equivalent 2,000 words) Mode of delivery: Online
Disability is part of the human condition, and people with disability are an integral part of society. Being able to appropriately communicate and consult with people with disability is an important graduate quality. This unit of study introduces students to issues of language, communication with people with disability, collaboration and consultation, inclusive social and physical environments and spaces. By undertaking this unit, students will increase their understanding of attitudinal and environmental barriers and their impact on the full participation of people with disability in society. The video assignment (2cps) provides students the opportunity to put into practice the core concepts of this unit and relate them to their field of study.
OLET1137 Australian Perspectives: Rugby League

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture; 1 x 3hr field trip; online activities Assessment: 3x Quizzes (25%) 1x 800wd equivalent Integrated quiz (25%) 1x 3000wd (per group of 4 students) Field Trip Group report (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Additional cost for the field trip is approximately $25
This OLE analyses the major Australian sport of Rugby League from three perspectives: sociocultural, sports science and sports management. Critical thinking, ethical reasoning and interdisciplinary effectiveness underpin the online learning activities and a field trip to an NRL First Grade match.
OLET1139 Economics of the Everyday

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive July,Intensive March Classes: 1x2 hour online lecture per week, 1x1 hour workshop/tutorial (online), per week. Assessment: 4 x online quiz (55%), 1 Essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Online
Economics is the science of choice that provides a lens through which interactions between individuals, businesses, governments and organisations can be understood. Students are introduced to the economic way of thinking and by drawing on examples from the 'real world', this unit provides economic insights into everyday behaviours and decisions.
OLET1141 Ethnographic Research Methods

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive August Classes: 3 x 2 hr seminars, 1 hr/week online module Assessment: 3x 5 questions Mini-quiz (15%) 1x 20 questions Major Quiz (10%) 1x Fieldwork log (5%) 1x Field report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Ethnographic methods generate knowledge through immersion in the everyday lives of the people the investigator seeks to understand. This unit of study will introduce students to key concepts, provide some practical tips and guide students through a mini-fieldwork project. Students will conduct fieldwork, create fieldnotes, contextualise their findings and write up.
OLET1143 How Economic Policy Remade Australia

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April,Intensive August Classes: 1x2 hour online lecture per week, 1x1 hour workshop/tutorial (online), per week. Assessment: 4 x online quiz (55%), 1 Essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Online
Since the 1980s Australia has been reshaped by policies that have transformed what we do and our place in the global economy. This unit examines how Australia has been 'remade' Australian through economic policies. The rationale and success of labour market reform, privatization and international trade policies are critically examined.
OLET1231 Community Engagement for Change

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 hr on-line seminars; 1 x 1 hr blog participation; 1 x 5 hr independent study; 1 x 3 hr face to face seminar Assessment: participation (30%); individual presentation (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
Interested in understanding how you might work with communities to bring about social change? This unit, offered in an Open Learning Environment, provides the opportunity for students to gain theoretical and practical tools to support community-based social change. Students will identify, undertake and reflect on social action in community settings. Completion of the unit will build students graduate qualities of influence, interdisciplinarity and cross-cultural competency. This unit challenges the historical tendency of professions to work 'on' rather than 'with' communities which has contributed to ineffective policies, poor outcomes and professional frustration. It seeks to expand students' knowledge and skills in relation to working with the interactions, networks, structures and processes at the community level.
OLET2109 Global Ethics: Migration and Nation

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6hrs of online work/week, plus a 5hr Saturday intensive Assessment: Participation (20%), Multiple Choice Questionnaire (15%), 300 wd reflection (25%), Short essay 800 wd (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Semester 1 This course runs over a 4-week period, from Week 5-8, with a face-to-face intensive on Saturday 13 April. Semester 2 This course runs over a 4-week period, from Week 5-8, with a face-to-face intensive on Saturday 21 September.
This unit examines the global movement of people, animals and things to Australia. Australia's landscapes, peoples, animals, food cultures and diseases have been shaped by migratory flows. This unit equips students working in diverse fields to understand the challenges and uncertainties of a rapidly changing, diverse and complex world.
OLET2111 Global Ethics: Philosophy

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x2hr intensive seminars Assessment: 1x 1250wd Short answers (35%), 1x 750wd Critical analysis (55%), 1x Participation in intensives (10%), 1x Quiz (0%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit addresses ethical questions that arise in a globalised world. Should we care for all humans equally, or give priority to people from our own culture or nation? Should we tolerate people who are intolerant? What do we owe to future generations? Why protect the environment? If one person can't make a difference, do my actions matter?
OLET2113 Global Ethics: The Great Barrier Reef

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr tutorial /week for 4 weeks Assessment: 1 x quiz (15%), 1 x 500 word reflection (25%), 1 x 1000 word reflection (40%), Participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit explores how communities past and present have intersected with the Great Barrier Reef and how the effects of climate change, and policies designed to ameliorate its effects, impact both the reef and its communities. It will also introduce students to the idea of the Anthropocene as a framework for understanding our ethical responsibilities in a globalised world.
OLET2117 Power and Identity in a Global Era

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive May Classes: 1x2hr flipped lecture/week for 4 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial/week for 4 weeks Assessment: 4 x300wd discussions (20%), Multiple Choice Questionnaire (20%), Long answer 800 wds (45%), Participation (15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This intensive unit of online video lectures and in-person tutorials will explore how thinkers in a contemporary global era have analysed forms of domination and have sought to theorise pathways for change. It will focus on key theories of power and identity including feminism, disciplinary power, hegemony, and post-colonialism.
OLET2119 Professionalism in the Workplace

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April Classes: 1 x 1hr tutorial per week for 4 weeks Assessment: Networking site profile (50%), 9 x MCQ (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE teaches research-based, practical strategies for improving the persuasiveness of key self-promotion documents, and successful interview strategies. You will learn to write credible online profiles for professional networking sites such as Linked-in, and effective applications for scholarships, grants, and employment opportunities.
OLET2123 Understanding the Arab World

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 hr/week (online) Assessment: 3 x MCQ (20%), 500wd reports (40%), 500 wd reflection (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
What should I know about the Arab world, as a young professional who aspires to a global career? Who are the Arabs? What is Islam? What the main political debates in the Arab World? This Unit answers to these and other questions, promoting an up-to-date understanding of the relation between the Arab world and Australia.
OLET2125 Understanding Europe

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr flipped lecture/week Assessment: 4x equivalent to 250wds quizzes (50%), 4x equivalent to 250wds discussion board activity (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces you to the European Union. Individual modules cover 1) History and Institutions; 2) Trade and Foreign Policy; 3) Security and Human Rights; 4) Diversity and Integration. Modules must be completed consecutively within one semester.
OLET2127 Wiki Writing for the Web

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive March Classes: 1 x 2hr online seminar per week for 4 weeks Assessment: 10 x MCQ(20%),3 x Information/source verification (40%), 2 x Proofreading/copy editing tasks (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Using Wikipedia as a writing platform, you will learn to write for a global readership that constitutes a large proportion of the world's population. Your digital and critical literacies will improve as you proofread and copy edit, and evaluate the quality and reliability of information and sources.
OLET2133 Culture and Urban Environmental Design

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6 x1hr online modules, 2hr research sharing, 1x5hr seminar Assessment: 2x online Multiple Choice Quiz (15%) 1x Discussion paper (45%) 1x Practical design solution (30%) 1x Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Global cities are facing urgent ecological challenges and socio-economic inequalities. This unit considers new interdisciplinary and creative responses to living urban in precarious times. Following the introductory content learned in the 0 credit point unit, this unit analyses a particular problem, namely the intensifying phenomenon of room sharing in Sydney. You will be able to develop your own creative response through guided 'design thinking'.
OLET2135 Economic Strategy and Negotiation

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive May,Intensive September Classes: 1x2hr online lecture/week, 1x1hr online tutorial/week over 4 weeks Assessment: 2x online quiz (25%) 2 x written assignment/problem set (30%) 1x 1hr Final exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Online
Businesses face many difficult choices when deciding how best to compete with their rivals. What prices should they charge for their product? And what product should they sell? Firms need to make decisions about RandD, investments and where they should locate. In this OLE we introduce a set of analytical (game theoretic) tools that can be used to study business and negotiation strategy. Students will apply these tools to real-world business decisions, such as: bargaining; pricing and quantity strategies; product choice; capacity competition; and strategic investment and innovation. This analysis helps us understand the day-to-day problems faced by firms, their decision-making process and the wider implications in the market of their choices.
OLET2136 Indigenous Histories

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive September Classes: 2x1hr (one hour online; one hour face to face) lecture, 2x1hr mediated discussion (one hour online; one hour face to face) Assessment: 3 x multiple choice quiz (25%), Discussion board participation (10%), Digital project (30%), Essay (35%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will explore the dynamic interrelationships between Indigenous histories, peoples, cultures and place. Through an interdisciplinary approach and multi-modal delivery it will examine the lived experience of place and country, struggle, resistance, and identity.
OLET2138 Presentation Skills: Public Speaking

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April Classes: 1x2hr seminar/ week, 1x1hr online lecture/week for a four week intensive Assessment: Online Quizzes (15%) Self-assessment exercises (10%) Peer assessed topic talk (20%) Public Speech (35%) Online postings (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This OLE encourages and enables students to draw on their own areas of expertise in order to speak out in public fora beyond the University classroom. It teaches students to reflect on questions relating to audience, situation and self-presentation (including dress and gesture) which will facilitate communication orally in a culturally competent manner. These skills are crucial to effective and influential communication in a world where oral communication continues to play a central role in protecting the interests of the disempowered; in driving change and innovation, and in achieving personal and professional goals.
OLET2140 Presentation Skills: Speaking in Class

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive March Classes: 1x2hr seminar/ week, 1x1hr online lecture/week over a four week intensive Assessment: 10x Quizzes (15%) Self-assessment exercises (10%) 3 x Peer assessed topic talk (35%) Online postings (20%) Self-assessed reflective journal (10%) Class Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This OLE explains what it means to 'participate' in University-level learning. It equips and empowers students to participate in their tutorials, seminars and classroom experiences at tertiary level. Participation is a routine part of tertiary level assessment and yet, for many students, participation is daunting and new. This unit teaches students to reflect on questions relating to content, audience and situation which will facilitate communication orally in a culturally competent manner. It presents different expectations about participation drawn from a variety of teaching situations and from faculties across the University.
OLET2142 Sacred Feasts. Ritual Food and Drink

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive September Classes: 5 x 1 hour online lectures 4 x 1 hour tutorials 2 hours of workshopping the Case Study assignment Assessment: 10x Quizzes (25%) 3x Field Report (30%) 1x Case Study (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Sacred food and drink is part of the lived reality of contemporary religions. The unit commences with the introduction of the concept of sacred food restriction, feasts and fasting. The unit then explores "sacred feasts" including the Christian Communion service of bread and wine; banquets served at Chinese New Year (noodles for longevity, dumplings for wealth); "cakes and ale" consumed after modern Pagan rituals; the solemn and joyous Jewish Passover Seder; and sweets eaten at the Hindu Ganesh Chaturthi.
OLET2146 The Global Economy in Australia

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April,Intensive September Classes: 4x1hr tutorial/week for 4 weeks; online activities Assessment: 3x multiple choice quizzes (55%) 1x essay (45%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The course aims to explain and evaluate the significance of globalisation for the Australian economy. It is intended for students seeking a broad understanding of how globalisation has changed the Australian economy and society. The course will examine globalisation and the economic, distributional and political consequences for Australia. Students will learn about how global dynamics of economic development and change shapes work and life in Australia. WEEK 1 - Globalisation and the Australian economy WEEK 2 - State and society in Australia WEEK 3 - Global production and consumption in Australia WEEK 4 - Power and change in Australia and the world
OLET2148 Thinking Critically

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April,Intensive September Classes: 2 x 2 hrs intensive tutorials; online activities Assessment: 5 x online quizzes (70%), 1 x final exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
In this unit students will develop their intellectual autonomy: their ability to think for themselves. By learning how to distinguish rational argument from mere rhetoric, how to seek evidence and test hypotheses, how to use analogies, and how to detect fallacies, students will gain skill and confidence in critical thinking.
OLET2151 Understanding the USA

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5 x online modules 1 x 1 hour online discussion participation per week Assessment: 5x online Multiple Choice Quiz (25%) 1x Research Essay (65%) Ongoing participation and discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit introduces students to the politics, culture, economy and society of the world's most powerful nation. This unit expands on five distinct facets of the USA: Regionalism, Politics, Culture, Society and Money. Students will learn what makes the United States different, what makes it rich, what makes it poor and what makes it weird. They will learn how race, religion, capitalism and celebrity culture shape American life. They will find out why the US has such influence in the world, and how it uses that influence. They will gain a greater understanding of the US-Australia relationship, from Australian gangsters in gold-rush San Francisco to American bases in the Northern Territory outback. This unit will be useful to students who want to visit the US, live in the US, do business with the US, or simply understand the US. It will give them what they need to know to further explore America, whether on their own or through future study.
OLET2153 World Cultural Heritage

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive August Classes: Approximately 35 hours of self-guided study and 1 x 2hr final tutorial. This will include set activities recorded lectures, documentaries, and set readings. Assessment: 2x online multiple choice quiz (25%) 1x online quiz incorporating both multiple choice and short answer questions (35%) 1x report (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
World Heritage List nominations originate at state level, with an annual limit per state. Valuable cultural and natural sites are often claimed for the purpose of nation-building, though owing to different motivations, and the backdrop to the nomination of sites will be explored in this light.
OLES2107 Digital Influence through Social Media

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr online lecture/week, 1x2hr online seminar/week, 4x3hr face to face intensives/semester Assessment: Social media project (60%),Social media design brief (30%), Participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores social media as an increasingly important space across a broad and diverse range of industries and organisations. It will highlight developments within this communication space, while also providing a wide range of new and exciting employment contexts that include specific social media communication skills. The unit offers a unique interdisciplinary approach to provide theoretically informed and up-to-the-minute training in social media communication.
OLES2129 Writing for the Digital World

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar per week Assessment: 1x 250wd Quiz: Editing and Referencing (10%), 1x 250wd Quiz: Creative Commons (10%), 2x 1000wd equivalent Editing Exercises (40%), 1x 2000wd equivalent Article Creation (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit you will produce knowledge for Wikipedia audiences around the globe. You will write across networks, negotiate various discourse communities, and contribute to and draw from creative commons resources while increasing the number of diverse voices that contribute to networked knowledge.
OLES2137 Experience China

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December Classes: 52 hours in country (classroom and excursion) 5 hours pre-departure (online) 3 hours return (classroom and online) Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Chinese language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in China. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2139 Experience Germany

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July Classes: 5 hours pre-departure (5 online modules to be completed before departure) and 55 hours in country (40 hours of face-to-face teaching and cultural activities of up to 15 hours) Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to German language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in Germany. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2141 Experience Indonesia

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: 52 hours in country (classroom and excursion) 5 hours pre-departure (online) 3 hours return (classroom and online) Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Indonesian language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in Indonesia. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2143 Experience Italy

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July Classes: 52 hours in country (classroom and excursion) 5 hours pre-departure (online) 3 hours return (classroom and online) Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Italian language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in Italy. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2145 Experience Korea

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January Classes: 52 hours in country (classroom and excursion) 5 hours pre-departure (online) 3 hours return (classroom and online) Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Korean language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in Korea. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2147 Experience the French-speaking World

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive July Classes: 60 hours in total: 52 hours in country, 5 hours pre-departure, 3 hours return. Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to French language and Francophone culture through an intensive program at a partner university in France or a Francophone Country. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2149 Experience the Spanish-speaking World

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 60 hours in total: 52 hours in country, 5 hours pre-departure, 3 hours return. Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 1000wd equiv project report (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Spanish language and Spanish or Latin American culture through an intensive program at a partner university in Spain or a Latin American country. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2151 Experience the Arab World

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive July Classes: 60 hours in total: 52 hours in country, 5 hours pre-departure, 3 hours return Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 100wd equiv cultural learning project (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Arabic language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in an Arab country. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
OLES2153 Experience Japan

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive December,Intensive January,Intensive July Classes: 52 hours in country (classroom and excursion) 5 hours pre-departure (online) 3 hours return (classroom and online) Assessment: 3 x pre-departure quiz, 1 x 3500wd equiv in-country assessment (80%), 1 x 1500wd equiv cultural learning project (20%) Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The in-country study unit introduces students to Japanese language and culture through an intensive program at a partner university in Japan. It places particular emphasis on understanding cultural differences in authentic contexts. Students will have practical language lessons and receive an introduction to contemporary culture and society. They will participate in cultural activities such as visits to museums, theatres and memorial sites and have the opportunity to interact with local people. The units will develop skills in cross-cultural communication through direct contact.
Business School
OLET1201 Business Entrepreneurship: Business Models

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x 8hr intensive workshop over one or two days Assumed knowledge: OLEO1200 Assessment: Individual assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may wish to pursue related OLE units, OLET1202 and/or OLET1203.
Where the 0 credit point Business Entrepreneurship unit provides students with a theoretical perspective on business entrepreneurship, this for-credit upgrade provides an opportunity for students to apply this knowledge, and to refine their understanding. To this aim, students are presented with entrepreneurial challenges, and are assisted to develop viable prototypes of services or products that address the challenges. With the help of research-based entrepreneurship literature, students analyse the market potential of the prototypes, formulate a suitable value proposition for their prototypes, and develop a business model that enables them to progress from idea to venture. Through this experiential exercise and the accompanying literature on business models and prototyping, students develop relevant prototyping and analytical skills, an understanding of the role and nature of business models, and learn how to combine both toward the goal of venture growth.
OLET1202 Business Entrepreneurship: Guerrilla Tactics

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x 8hr intensive workshop over one or two days Assumed knowledge: OLEO1200 Assessment: Individual assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may also wish to pursue related OLE units, OLET1201 and OLET1203.
In this second upgrade to the 0 credit point Business Entrepreneurship unit students learn how to take a minimally viable product or service to market, while drawing on the ubiquitous digital environment to develop customer insights. These guerrilla tactics prove valuable in a business environment where a new venture may appear to possess little legitimacy and credibility among established organisations and customers. This intensive module uses problem-based learning, practical examples, and academic literature to ensure students acquire knowledge and develop skills to overcome the challenges of novelty.
OLET1203 Business Entrepreneurship: Bootstrap Finance

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x 8hr intensive workshop over one or two days Assumed knowledge: OLEO1200 Assessment: Individual assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students may also wish to pursue related OLE units, OLET1201 and OLET1202.
In the third upgrade to the 0 credit point Business Entrepreneurship unit, students learn about bootstrap finance. Colloquially, the term 'bootstrap finance' describes the feat of pulling yourself up by your shoelaces, by obtaining rudimentary funding from friends and family for a new business venture, and creating the conditions that might allow the venture team to later obtain business angel or venture funding. In this upgrade, students acquire theoretical knowledge of the valuation of a new business idea and venture, learn how to analyse a case, and formulate a perspective on the structure of the financial sources and models available. This intensive unit employs experiential learning, and provides students with a business case, and hands-on tasks to develop the necessary skills and insights into early venture funding.
OLET1205 Business Ethics: Interactive Cases

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive July Classes: 1x 8hr intensive workshop over one or two days Assumed knowledge: OLEO1204 Assessment: Individual assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Where the 0 credit point Business Ethics unit provides a theoretical perspective on business ethics, this for-credit upgrade provides the opportunity for students to practise and expand their understanding in a problem-based, intensive mode. Students work interactively to resolve a staged ethical dilemma. This format, which is frequently used in business organisations for the ethics training of staff, allows students to unpack the different roles, rules, norms, politics, and power relationships in companies, to appreciate the intricacies of human interaction and decision making, and to search for an ethically satisfying resolution of the staged dilemma. Additional literature on the types of dilemmas faced helps students further refine their understanding.
Engineering and Information Technologies
OLET1301 Managing and Analysing Data with SQL

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online
Data is the gold of the 21st century. Across all disciplines it is crucial to be able to effectively share and analyse large data collections. Managing data in spreadsheets however only works for small data sets and easily ends in 'Excel Hell'.
This OLE introduces databases for scientists and other non-IT disciplines, and will teach the SQL database query language with a focus on developing practical skills for data analysis. Database systems (for example SQL Server or MySQL) are widely used in industry and academia, and are essential for effective sharing of large data collections. The SQL language is a powerful tool for analysing big data without the need to programming.
The OLE will be delivered using an interactive online tutorial platform with auto-grading support, and (for 2CP students) online guidance from a human tutor. It is complementary to other OLEs about data-focused computation and programming for data analysis.
OLET1303 Understanding Web Skeletons and Skins

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE unit provides an opportunity to learn the basic structure of a web. It has the emphasis of separating content from display. Hence, students will use HTML, a markup language, to structure the content and CSS, a style sheet approach, to format and to decorate the content. The end result is a static website with a single source of formatting rules to ensure the consistency of presentation of a web system.
OLET1305 Coding Literacy

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Classes: lectures, tutorials Prohibitions: INFO1103 OR INFO1110 OR INFO1910 OR INFO1903 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Computer programming (aka coding) in digital era has been increasingly as important as literacy and numeracy. This OLE unit is designed for students who do not have any background of coding, but want to gain fundamental knowledge and skills of coding. It covers core coding concepts including statement, variable, flow control, and functions through digital media, such as graphics, animation, and sound, and interaction. Students are able to unleash their creativity through coding in this unit.
OLET1307 Beginner Programming for Data Analysis

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Prohibitions: INFO1903 OR DATA1002 OR DATA1902 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE will provide the fundamentals of computer programming with a focus on developing skills for data ingesting, quality/format validation, format conversion, and summarization. It will teach these skills in Python, an easy-to-learn yet powerful, general-purpose scripting language used widely in industry and academia, especially for data science projects.
OLET1309 Interactive Web Pages with JavaScript

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online
Students have the opportunity to learn writing simple (scripts) programs using Javascript. It is one of the scripting languages used in web pages to enable a more interactive experience for a web user. Students will start with learning basic programming skills. The unit moves on to focus on the specific issues to write scripts that link to different elements in the source code of a web page.
OLET1311 Managing Your Project

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1 Classes: E-Learning Assessment: through semester assessment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students in this OLE must be enrolled in and nominate another Unit of Study in which they are required to undertake a project based assessment.
This Project Management OLE is designed to provide foundational knowledge, practical guidance and basic planning templates to support and monitor the work flow of project based and interdisciplinary units of study. The OLE provides guidance for students to assist them in effectively scoping out their project, managing engagement with internal and external stakeholders in a planned and professional manner and developing team participation and leadership skills that encourage effective contribution from all team members.
The OLE is designed to be completed by students engaged in project based and interdisciplinary assignments in other Units of Study.
Health Sciences
OLET1401 Radiological Interpretation: the Chest

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online modules (15-20 hrs), 2 x 2-hr in-class seminars, 1-hr in-class assessment Prohibitions: MRTY2102 or MRTY2106 Assessment: online anatomy assessment (20%), online quiz (20%), in-class test (60%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Students will gain an insight into radiological anatomy of the chest through x-rays and CT. They will explore anatomical relationships in the chest as visualised with medical imaging. This unit blends online and in-class learning to facilitate students learning how to interpret radiological images of the chest. The anatomy, search skills and problem solving necessary for interpretation of chest radiographs will be taught using a case based approach. Students will demonstrate radiographic interpretation skills by completion of a summative and graded online, as well as in-class, assessments based on information provideded.
OLET1403 Student Leadership: Community Engagement

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Self-paced online modules, no timetabled classes, on-line activities for student engagement Assessment: One leadership critical reflection assignment (500 words) and a Wiki page or Video (500 words or 5 minutes) Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE aims to give students theoretical and practical underpinning for their leadership aspirations and provide students with the opportunity to develop and practise relevant skills. The curriculum includes provision of foundational areas to support and inform study into leadership skills, the opportunity to broadly apply leadership skills and a strong focus on personal development and communication. The UoS comprises of a core 0 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Core and a 2 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Community Engagement, whereby the focus is on leadership in the community, workplace and industry and with different groups of people including clients, organisations and patients. The attributes of key community leaders will be discussed and evaluated. Students wishing to extend their leadership knowledge can undertake related Student Leadership OLEs in Representation and Peer Mentoring, each of 2 credits points, to scaffold student achievement.
OLET1404 Student Leadership: Peer Mentoring

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Sarah Lewis Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Self-paced online modules, no timetabled classes, on-line activities for student engagement Assessment: Critical reflection assignment 1000wds (70%), on-line activities/quiz (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE aims to give students theoretical and practical underpinning for their leadership aspirations and provide students with the opportunity to develop and practise relevant skills. The curriculum includes provision of foundational areas to support and inform study into leadership skills, the opportunity to broadly apply leadership skills and a strong focus on personal development and communication. The UoS comprises of a core 0 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Core and a 2 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Peer Mentoring whereby the focus is on students building effective leadership skills to lead a peer group or facilitate peer activities. Students wishing to extend their leadership knowledge can undertake related Student Leadership OLEs in Representation and Community engagement, each of 2 credits points, to Excluded From Module Registration:
Description: This OLE aims to give students theoretical and practical underpinning for their leadership aspirations and provide students with the opportunity to develop and practise relevant skills. The curriculum includes provision of foundational areas to support and inform study into leadership skills, the opportunity to broadly apply leadership skills and a strong focus on personal development and communication. The UoS comprises of a core 0 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Core and a 2 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Peer Mentoring whereby the focus is on students building effective leadership skills to lead a peer group or facilitate peer activities. The attributes of successfiul student-led mentoring will be explored. Students wishing to extend their leadership knowledge can undertake related Student Leadership OLEs in Representation and Community engagement, each of 2 credits points, to scaffold student achievement.
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OLET1405 Student Leadership: Representation

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr online lecture/week, 1-hr online tutorial/week for 4 weeks, and self-paced online modules Assessment: student leadership: core - mastery auto-marked quiz (pass/fail), critical reflection assignment 500wds (70%), quiz (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE aims to give students theoretical and practical underpinning for their leadership aspirations and provide students with the opportunity to develop and practise relevant skills. The curriculum includes provision of foundational areas to support and inform study into leadership skills, the opportunity to broadly apply leadership skills and a strong focus on personal development and communication. The UoS comprises of a core 0 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Core and a 2 CP UoS called Student Leadership: Representation whereby the focus is on leadership in representative scenarios such as committees, networking groups and education organisations. Students wishing to extend their leadership knowledge can undertake related Student Leadership OLEs in Community Engagement and Peer Mentoring, each of 2 credits points, to scaffold student achievement.
OLET2401 Cancer Survivorship

Credit points: 2 Session: Semester 2 Classes: online Assessment: 1 x 1500wd written assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Online
Cancer is a highly prevalent health issue in the community and survival rates are increasing for many cancer survivors. Because of its impact, cancer is also a national health priority and is a key research area at the University. The primary aim of this unit of study is to introduce students from a range of disciplinary backgrounds to the common issues experienced by cancer survivors. Other aims include understanding the experience of a cancer diagnosis and its management; exploring the common problems experienced by cancer survivors; and understanding the stages of cancer survivorship - prevention, detection, diagnosis, interventions, rehabilitation, survivorship and palliative care.
OLET5401 Presenting your research

Credit points: 2 Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive November Classes: online Assumed knowledge: Participation in a research project or degree Assessment: provision of feedback to other students; submission of a short video of a research presentation Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE will teach the basic skills of presenting your research to an audience of researchers with a focus on oral presentation skills. Students completing the OLE will learn how to present to specialist and generalist audiences. Topics will include effective use of eye contact, voice, posture and gesture, language and visual materials to instruct, inform and entertain an audience. Students will critique video of existing presentations, upload their own practice presentations and give feedback to fellow students on their presentations. After completing this OLE students will be in a good position to enter the 3MT competition where research students describe their research in a 3 minute presentation.
Medicine and Health
OLET1501 Health Challenges: Cardiovascular Disease

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Simone Schoenwaelder Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Online
OLET1504 Health Challenges: Diabetes

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Thorn Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Online
OLET1506 Health Challenges: Allergy and Autoimmunity

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Barbara Fazekas de St Groth Session: Semester 1 Classes: The online self-directed learning component of this course will require up to 28 hours to complete. Each of the 8 online modules includes 1-1.5hr of online content, while additional online resources including videos and further reading will require 16 hours in total. Completion of this unit will also involve 10 hours of face-to-face contact and group work. Face-to-face contact time will consist of one 2 hour tutorial and a 2 hour session in which student groups will deliver a short presentation to their cohort. Preparation of the group work component of the course is expected to take 6 hours to complete. Assessment: Assessment for this unit will require approximately 2 hours to complete, consisting of online tutorial quizzes (10-15 mins per module), and a short group presentation. Mode of delivery: Online
This Open Learning Environment unit of study is designed to introduce students to one of the major chronic health challenges of the 21st century, namely the increasing burden of allergies and autoimmune diseases. The unit will cover, at a basic level, what allergies and autoimmune diseases are, how they are treated, how they impact on the lives of individuals and the community, why they are becoming more common as living standards rise and what we might do to prevent them in future. Basic knowledge in high school biology is recommended for interested students. This unit of study has been developed by academics in the University's Charles Perkins Centre, an interdisciplinary education and research hub where researchers produce novel solutions to chronic disease.
Textbooks
There is no dedicated textbook for this unit. The unit is hosted through the University's Learning Management System (LMS) where all the resources are available, including videos, links to published papers, summaries and factsheets, and podcasts.
OLET1508 Health Challenges: Evolution, Health and Disease

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Paul Griffiths Session: Semester 1 Classes: As this unit is an Open Learning Environment unit of study and is completely online, there are no attendance requirements. Assessment: (45%) Two Written Assignments, (55%) Tutorial Quizzes Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study has been developed by academics in the University's Charles Perkins Centre, an interdisciplinary education and research hub where researchers produce novel solutions to chronic disease. Chronic diseases are the leading cause of death, disability and reduced quality of life across the world. Generating innovative solutions to combat these global health challenges requires us to rethink our traditional approaches to their causes, where medical or biological factors are considered in isolation from their societal, and environmental contexts. In this OLE, students will learn how an approach to these challenges using evolutionary thinking can generate new ways of identifying potential solutions. Global leaders in the field will provide an insight into the topics: introduction to evolutionary thinking; life history and health; materno-fetal conflict and its longer-term health consequences; the evolution of nutrition; human variation and its health consequences, exemplified by the evolution of skin pigmentation; and an overview of the many other topics in the physiology and medicine of chronic disease that can be addressed from an evolutionary perspective. By the end of this OLE students will be able to utilise evolutionary thinking for a truly multidisciplinary approach to hypothesis development to address health challenges.
Textbooks
There is no dedicated textbook for this unit. The unit is hosted through the University's Learning Management System (LMS) where all the resources are available, including videos, min-lectures and links to published papers.
OLET1510 Health Challenges: Sleep

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Peter Cistulli Session: Semester 2 Classes: This is a 2-credit point unit of study and will require roughly 40-50 hours of student effort online. Assessment: Assessments will take the form of module quizzes and a short reflective essay. The purpose of the module quizzes is formative, they aim to promote learning by testing students' understanding at the end of each module and encourages students to revise content. The written assessment encourages students to reflect on how their discipline can help solve a problem related to sleep and circadian rhythms. For the written assessment, students will be asked to appraise the written work of 2-3 of their peers to develop interdisciplinary understanding. Students' contributions to class discussion and peer assessment will not be assessed, but involvement in these activities will be a necessary part of progression and completion. Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study has been developed by academics in the University's Charles Perkins Centre, an interdisciplinary education and research hub whose mission is to develop real-world solutions for chronic disease. Our sleep and circadian rhythms are integral to our health and wellbeing, but they are often at odds with our technology-filled, caffeine-fuelled, and 24-hour world. This unit introduces how the sleep and circadian rhythms work and their impact on health and society. Examples include jetlag, shiftwork, sleep deprivation, and insomnia. You will gain insight into your own sleep and circadian rhythms, to help optimise your wellbeing and performance. The unit will show how different disciplines contribute to a fuller understanding of the world and help to provide new solutions to complex problems like those encountered in sleep and circadian science. The content will be founded in science, medicine, and health but will include perspectives and examples from physics, engineering, sociology, and history. You will be asked to reflect on your own discipline and how it can contribute to solving problems in sleep and circadian science.
Textbooks
There is no dedicated textbook for this unit. The unit is hosted through the Canvas Learning Management System (LMS) where all the resources are available, including videos, links to published papers, summaries and factsheets, and podcasts.
OLET1512 Health Challenges: Pain and Society

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: This OLE is delivered fully online. You engage with the module content and discussion activities on a weekly basis. At the end of each module you complete a formative quiz in order to progress to the next module. It is anticipated that each module will require the equivalent of 4-5 hours independent study and 1-2 hours collaborative study via the discussion board (initiating, reading and responding to discussion posts). Assessment: (50%) Online Discussion, (50%) Written Assignment Mode of delivery: Online
This Open Learning Environment will develop your understanding about pain and its impact on society. It is designed for a broad audience, but it will be particularly interesting for those studying health, law, psychology, business, ethics, economics, science or social science, as well as anyone who has personally experienced, or knows someone living with, persisting pain. Specifically, this OLE explores the 1) complex and individual-specific nature of pain, 2) impact of pain on society, 3) roles of culture, gender, and life-stages in the pain experience, and 4) ethical and legal considerations for its management. Why is chronic pain important? It is a major, but strangely, unrecognised health problem. Persisting or chronic pain affects around 1 in 5 people in Australia. A global research initiative on chronic diseases has identified Chronic Low Back Pain as the most disabling condition (on the planet) in years lived with disability (Lancet, 2012). It may not end your life but it can end your enjoyment of life. In terms of costs, there are major direct (e. g. health care, work) and indirect costs (e. g. quality of life) to individuals, families, and society generally. The predicament of those with chronic pain can be complicated by social factors, including medico-legal and insurance uncertainties, as well as by common treatments (e. g. opioids). Unfortunately, ignorance of chronic pain and its appropriate treatment is widespread across the community broadly, and the growing opioid epidemic is a clear example of the problem. This ignorance represents a major barrier to helping chronic pain sufferers.
Textbooks
No text books will be required. A number of core readings will be sourced and be made available via the e-Reserve in the library.
OLET1514 Health Challenges: Physical Inactivity

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Emmanuel Stamatakis Session: Semester 2 Classes: As this unit is an Open Learning Environment unit of study and is completely online, there are no attendance requirement Assessment: (60%) Tutorial Quizzes, (40%) Written Essay Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study has been developed by academics in the University's Charles Perkins Centre, an interdisciplinary education and research hub where researchers produce novel solutions to chronic disease. Physical activity is an inseparable part of human biology and evolution. Lack of it causes chronic disease. Sadly we are still a population that doesn't embrace physical activity and its potential to have a transformative impact on chronic disease prevention and improve the quality of life into old age. This unit of study will provide students with an opportunity to develop an up-to-date understanding of the role of physical activity and exercise for the health of the population as well as the most promising principles for encouraging more people to become physically active. The unit is largely multi-disciplinary and goes beyond disease prevention to explore themes like positive wellbeing and maintenance of functional ability and retaining independence and how the environment determines our physical activity behaviour. Particular attention is given to physical activity as a behaviour that is not merely a lifestyle "choice"; but rather the outcome of a complex web of societal, cultural, economic, political and individual circumstances that lead to the formation of personal habits across the lifespan. Students will work individually and collaboratively and be encouraged to discuss, debate, and critically evaluate the evidence.
Textbooks
No text books will be required. A number of core readings will be sourced and be made available via the e-Reserve in the library.
OLET1516 Health Challenges: Oral Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Joerg Eberhard Session: Semester 2 Classes: As this unit is an Open Learning Environment unit of study and is completely online, there are no attendance requirements. Assessment: (70%) Online Assessment, (30%) Formal Assesment Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study has been developed by academics in the University's Charles Perkins Centre, an interdisciplinary education and research hub where researchers produce novel solutions to chronic disease. This Open Learning Environment will further deepen your understanding about the importance of oral health and its substantial impact on general health and society. This is something you may not think in a first instance when you think of teeth, dental decay and bleeding gums. This OLE is designed for a broad audience, but it will be particularly interesting for those studying health, law, psychology, business, ethics, economics, science or social science. This OLE will extend for you the interactions between local oral diseases and medical conditions, and how health burdens challenge science and society. This OLE is worth 2 credit points and builds on knowledge gained while completing the credit point OLE. Why is understanding oral health important? Poor oral health is a global burden and is linked to global health burdens including cardiovascular disease, and diabetes mellitus, but also medical conditions including adverse pregnancy outcomes. Oral health is embedded in a complex interrelationship with various physiological processes modulating chronic disease development, its prevention and its therapy. The management and understanding of chronic health burdens, including poor oral health, is a challenge for health practitioners, researchers and social systems. You will learn how to: 1. Explain basic characteristics of good and poor oral health 2. Describe how local disease affects medical conditions 3. Explain the mutual interactions between chronic diseases and populations, social systems and health care 4. Use their knowledge for the interpretation of and application to health care and diseases in societies and political systems By doing this OLE you will develop an understanding of how chronic diseases contribute to the health burdens, their interactions and implications for health care and the impact this has on society as a whole.
Textbooks
There is no dedicated textbook for this unit. The unit is hosted through Canvas - the University's Learning Management System (LMS) where a repository of resources will be housed that will be available to all enrolled students. Currently existing online resources will be sourced through Youtube, Khan Academy TedEd and recognised health organisations. Other resources will be created with the assistance of a dedicated educational designer; these will include quizzes, videos (presentations, interviews, case studies), links to published papers, summaries and factsheets, and podcasts.
OLET2502 Toxicological Evaluation

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Slade Matthews Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Roughly 40-50 hours of total student effort (including face-to-face and online as well as independent student effort) are required Assumed knowledge: PCOL3011 or OLEO2501 Assessment: (20%) Individual Readiness assessment, (20%) Presentation, (60% Individual Assignment Mode of delivery: Online
This Open Learning Environment unit of study is designed to introduce you to an underrepresented discipline within the university sector and to support your development of critical thinking and the scientific approach to problem solving. Concurrent with increasing understanding of the toxicology of materials in society has been an increase in the regulatory importance of toxicology. In this OLE unit you will learn the key elements contributing to toxicological outcomes, including routes of exposure, dose-response, target end-points and vulnerable populations. You will learn how to interpret toxicological data and make predictions about health effects of given levels and types of chemical exposure. This OLE unit will use a problem-based approach with examples of critical analysis of toxicological factual matrices to presage toxicological evaluation and analysis.
Textbooks
There is no dedicated textbook for this unit. The unit is hosted through Canvas - the University's Learning Management System (LMS) where a repository of resources will be housed that will be available to all enrolled students.
OLET2503 Global challenges: Planetary Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Joel Negin Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop, plus online discussion Assessment: 1 x photo plus short written assignment - 150wds (20%), participation and discussion (15%), newspaper opinion piece - 800wds (20%), case study analysis - 2500wds (45%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Climate change, loss of biodiversity and toxic pollution of ecosystems pose serious threats to the lives and livelihoods of future generations. We cannot tackle these critical global challenges by solely understanding narrow disciplinary issues; the challenge the global community faces requires a broader, multidisciplinary lens. Planetary Health builds on the University of Sydney's commitment to multidisciplinary research and education. It drives research, education and leadership on the relationships between ecological, economic and social change and the health and wellbeing of future generations. Put simply, planetary health is the health of human civilisation and the state of the natural systems on which it depends. This unit will introduce undergraduate students to global challenges and the wide range of perspectives needed to understand and act given the complexity of global systems. This will be done using a case study approach to explore a variety of issues that challenge student thinking and force them to go beyond their disciplinary lenses. For example, a case study on urban waste brings in issues such as soil pollution, human health, consumption, economics, the food system and urban development. This OLE will bring together academics from across the University in a collaborative model of education.
Textbooks
readings and other resources will be available through the elearning site
Science
OLET1601 Analysing and Plotting Data: R

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Intensive August Classes: On-line 1 hour consultation per week Prohibitions: ENVX1002 or LWSC2002 or AFNR5512 or STAT5003 or MATH1005 or MATH1905 or MATH1015 or OLET1603 Assessment: Four on-line quizzes (50%), 1-hour final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit is a gentle on-line OLE introduction into coding using the popular script language R for students who do not receive these skills in junior units of study. Through working through examples in on-line exercises and regular assessment and support hours, the students will develop hands-on skills. In particular the unit will teach analysis of text based data, numerical data and categorical data, constructing plots and developing summaries. Note that the unit only runs in the first 5 weeks of the main Semester 2 teaching period.
OLET1603 Analysing and Plotting Data: Python

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Willem Vervoort Session: Intensive August Classes: On-line 1 hour consultation per week Prohibitions: INFO1903 or COMP5310 or DATA1002 or OLET1601 Assessment: Four on-line quizzes (50%), 1-hour final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit is a gentle on-line OLE introduction into coding using the popular script language Python for students who do not receive these skills in junior units of study. Through working through examples in on-line exercises and regular assessment and support hours, the students will develop hands-on skills. In particular the unit will teach analysis of text based data, numerical data and categorical data, constructing plots and developing summaries. Note that the unit only runs in the first 5 weeks of the main Semester 2 teaching period.
OLET1605 Communication in STEM

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alice Williamson and Tom Gordon Session: Semester 2 Classes: online module 1hr/week for 4 weeks distributed throughout the semester Assessment: 4 x short multiple choice quiz (10%),1x draft of STEM communication activity (10%),1x final summative STEM communication activity (60%) and 1x peer review of final summative STEM communication activity (20%) Practical field work: Workshops 2hr/week for 2 weeks distributed throughout the semester Mode of delivery: Online
What is STEM? Why is it essential that scientists learn to communicate effectively about Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics to a variety of audiences? What makes for engaging communication about STEM? How does the style of communication need to change for different audiences? What styles, techniques and approaches can be used to greatest effect for each communication activity? What are the nuts and bolts of good STEM communications? This OLE will first introduce you to the fundamentals, definitions and techniques of STEM communication. You will learn that good communication is essential both within the sciences and for our broader society. Complex topics, concepts and issues need to be communicated effectively in order to promote an understanding of science, an appreciation of its strengths and limitations, and to avoid misunderstandings and miscommunications. You will be introduced to various forms of STEM communication appropriate to different audiences. You will outline, develop and present examples of STEM Communication. You will also be asked to critically evaluate and identify examples of effective communication of STEM ideas.
OLET1607 Cultural Competence in Natural Science

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Jaime Gongora Session: Intensive September Classes: Face to face: a single block consisting of lectures - two hours; tutorials two hours; and group work hour hours, total 8; online work -10 hours Prohibitions: AVBS4003 Assessment: Assignment, quiz Mode of delivery: Block mode
Cultural competence is a congruent set of values and principles that are reflected in behaviours, attitudes, policies, structures, and practices in a system, organisation, professional or researcher and facilitate work and effective interactions with clients and environments in cross-cultural situations (modified from Kiefer et al 2013). The unit will introduce undergraduate students to general principles in cultural competence awareness and provide a learning space to reflect on some overall values, behaviours, attitudes and practices that will enable them to work and interact effectively with their clients, co-workers, communities and environments crossculturally during their research, placements and professional practice. Part of this OLE will also be tailored to the student's interests by providing an opportunity for reflection on the impact of some cultural competence aspects on the research, professional placements and extramural rotations/practice of their disciplines when applied to cross cultural settings.
OLET1610 GIS: Geographic Information Systems

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Intensive April Classes: podcast lectures (10 x 10-20 mins) Assumed knowledge: A general awareness and understanding of human and environmental interactions is assumed. Assessment: quizzes, skills-based assessment, assignments Practical field work: Computer based practicals x 10 (90-120 mins) Mode of delivery: Online
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has a critical role in addressing major challenges facing humanity, including our environmental futures (applications involve the measurement of biodiversity loss, ocean acidification, land degradation, natural hazards planning); our future social lives ('smart' and 'digital' cities); water, food and energy security, and the role of local environments for population health, (e.g. in debate on healthy neighbourhoods and epidemiology) and in corporate responsibility. GIS is an emergent technological platform with broad application across natural and social sciences. It involves the practices of producing and negotiating geographic knowledge through the representation, manipulation and analysis of geospatial data using digital technologies. In this foundation level OLE, students will examine GIS based methods to investigate spatial patterns in social, environmental and health data and query the processes underlying these trends. The technologies behind GIS, geospatial data structures, map projections and different methods for querying and analysing geographic data will be introduced through multidisciplinary case studies.
OLET1616 The Science of Health and Wellbeing

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Margaret Allman-Farinelli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: online unit Assessment: Quizzes, assignments Mode of delivery: Online
This Open Learning Environment unit of study is designed to increase students' knowledge and skills regarding personal and community health and wellbeing. In this unit of study, students will learn about the latest health research and scientific evidence across the key domains of wellbeing: nutrition; physical activity; sleep; mental wellbeing; alcohol and other drugs. This unit of study will also allow students to develop skills in critical thinking relating to health information and how to implement healthy behaviours. The unit has been developed by eminent researchers in each domain to ensure the most up-to-date evidence is incorporated. This unit of study is multidisciplinary and designed to stimulate students' thinking about issues relating to physical and mental wellbeing. The knowledge is to benefit students in their own wellbeing for maximising academic performance and university experience as well as to give them skills to demonstrate leadership in health in their future work environments.
Textbooks
Online resources available
OLET1618 Data Science in Astronomy: Algorithms

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Murphy Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 weeks of online tutorials, programming activities and online video lectures Assumed knowledge: Students should have strong programming skills in Python 3, with a good understanding of loops, decisions and user-defined functions. Assessment: online quizzes and a computational exam Mode of delivery: Online
Science is undergoing a data explosion, and astronomy is leading the way. Modern telescopes produce terabytes of data per observation, and the simulations required to model our observable Universe push supercomputers to their limits. To analyse this data scientists need to be able to think computationally to solve problems. In this course you will investigate the challenges of working with large datasets. How to implement algorithms that work and how to think about scaling to large datasets. The focus is on practical skills - all the activities will be done in Python 3, a modern programming language used throughout astronomy. This will be run as a 0 cp + 2 cp unit of study. Students should have strong programming skills in Python 3, with a good understanding of loops, decisions and user-defined functions.
Textbooks
None
OLET1620 Data Science in Astronomy: Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Murphy Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 weeks of online tutorials, programming activities and online video lectures Assumed knowledge: Students should have strong programming skills in Python 3, with a good understanding of loops, decisions and user-defined functions. Assessment: online quizzes and a computational exam Mode of delivery: Online
Science is undergoing a data explosion, and astronomy is leading the way. Modern telescopes produce terabytes of data per observation, and the simulations required to model our observable Universe push supercomputers to their limits. To analyse this data scientists need to be able to think computationally to solve problems. In this course you will learn how to manage your data with databases, and use the SQL language to ask questions about your data. You will also learn how to explore your data with machine learning tools. The focus is on practical skills - all the activities will be done in Python 3, and modern programming language used throughout astronomy. This will be run as a 0 cp + 2 cp unit of study. Students should have strong programming skills in Python 3, with a good understanding of loops, decisions and user-defined functions.
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OLET1622 Numbers and Numerics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tara Murphy Session: Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 weeks of online tutorials, programming activities and online video lectures Prohibitions: COSC1003 or COSC1903 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: online quizzes and a computational exam Mode of delivery: Online
Computational science underpins modern science, engineering and finance. It provides numerical solutions to problems that can't be solved analytically, and explores problems that are not amenable to experiments. This unit focuses on the foundation of numerical computing: how numbers are represented and manipulated by computers. Understanding the representation of integers and real numbers, and their fundamental limitations is critical for accurate numerical calculations. For example, if you add the value 0.1 a total of one million times, the exact answer is 1,000,000 x 0.1 = 100,000. However, when you do this on a computer the answer might be 100,958.3. This is a limitation of the floating-point representation of numbers in every modern computer - but most people are unaware of it! In this Unit you will learn about number systems and binary, two's complement representation for integers; fixed and floating-point representations for real numbers; precision and overflow, rounding and truncation errors. We will illustrate these with practical examples, and show how mistakes in computational calculations can result in catastrophes such as the explosion of the Ariane 5 rocket. All activities will be done in Python 3, a widely used modern programming language.
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OLET1625 Reading and Writing Mathematics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Oded Yacobi Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: online; 2x3-hr workshop Assessment: Essay (60%); practical exercises (20%); presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
In the modern world it is increasingly important to be able to read and write logically and coherently. Whether one is designing computer algorithms, writing a legal argument, advocating for social or environmental causes, or doing research in basic sciences, clear and effective communication is critical. The aim of this unit is to identify and practice logical argument through mathematical writing. Key components of good writing and common pitfalls will be identified, and students will contribute writing samples and engage in peer-review. Students will be exposed to elegant writing samples and beautifully simple mathematical gems. For instance we read an essay on the notion of dimension: What is a 26 dimensional space? What does it mean for a fractal to have dimension 1.2619? Or we might read about Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem, which has bearing on the limits of attainable knowledge. In the process students will also learn how to write and read mathematical proofs.
OLET1630 Symmetry

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Stephan Tillmann Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: online; 2x3-hr workshop Assessment: Essay (60%); practical exercises (20%); presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Online
The principle of symmetry appears in architecture, in the arts, in nature. It is often understood as harmony of proportions. But what is the philosophical or mathematical significance of the idea of symmetry? This unit will help clarify this significance by developing the geometric concept of symmetry and by conveying the sensibility to recognise and categorise symmetries in different contexts. The richness, diversity, connectedness, depth and pleasure of the systematic study of symmetry, and indeed of mathematical thinking, is central to this unit. It will not involve grinding through formulas, but instead emphasise the process of thinking, comparing, analysing, understanding and inventing.
OLET1632 Shark Bites and Other Data Stories

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Warren Session: Intensive February,Intensive July Classes: online; 3x3-hr labs Assessment: Written report (60%); presentation (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This OLE gives students a simple, transferable approach to the exploration of multivariate data in everyday life. You will investigate the relationship between variables in spreadsheet like data, learning what questions to ask, what techniques to use, and what mistakes to avoid. Focused on concepts, not formulae, the OLE is accessible for students from any discipline. You will focus on three main case studies: How does the Australian public respond to shark bites? Is mobile phone usage related to higher incidence of brain tumors? How is the unemployment rate changing?
OLET1634 Anxiety and its Disorders

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marianna Szabo Session: Intensive October Classes: 8 modules delivered online Assumed knowledge: This is an introductory level unit, no prior knowledge is required. Assessment: Assessment will include brief online quizzes (10% each quiz) which will assess learning outcomes of each of the 8 modules of the unit. A 500 word written assignment (20 %) will assess application of knowledge gained. Mode of delivery: Online
Anxiety is a normal emotion that evolved to ensure our survival. It is experienced when a person perceives that a situation is potentially harmful. However, some people experience so much anxiety that it interferes with their everyday lives. Anxiety disorders are common, and many of them begin during adolescence or young adulthood. How and why anxiety is experienced, how does it become a problem, and what can be done about it? This unit will introduce current scientific knowledge about anxiety and related disorders. We will consider recent empirical research concerning the nature and management of normal experiences of anxiety as well as the causes and treatment of anxiety disorders, for example, specific phobias, social anxiety disorder, or generalised anxiety disorder. Obsessive-compulsive and trauma-related disorders will be briefly introduced as well. You will learn about foundational concepts and methods in psychology, as well as practical skills that help manage anxiety in everyday life. By completing this unit you will increase your general mental health literacy to be able to identify and evaluate information about managing anxiety and maintaining good mental health in general.
OLET1636 Astronomy: from Earth to Exoplanets

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof John O'Byrne Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: reading, videos and online quizzes 4 hrs/week; lecture 2 hrs/week; tutorial 1 hr/week; viewing session 3 hrs Prohibitions: PHYS1500 Assessment: On-line Quizzes (40%), Tutorials (10%), Viewing report (10%), Final Examination(40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Several thousand planets orbiting other stars (exoplanets) have been discovered in recent years. This unit of study introduces our rapidly changing understanding of the place of the Earth in a universe where we now know that planets are common. You will learn about the characteristics and age of the Earth and other planets of the solar system and how they compare with exoplanets. What does this tell us about planetary formation and the number of Earth-like planets? You will also learn the criteria for 'habitability' and the prospects for finding habitable worlds in the near future. What is the relevance of these discoveries to other sciences such as geology, biology and chemistry? You will gain an appreciation and understanding of the methodology and techniques of modern astronomy, especially the technology of astronomical observation. The challenging nature of exoplanet observations will illustrate the need to carefully judge the reliability and significance of scientific data and conclusions. The unit also includes opportunities for day and night observing sessions.
OLET1638 Astronomy: from Stars to Black Holes

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof John O'Byrne Session: Intensive April,Intensive September Classes: reading, videos and online quizzes 4 hrs/week; lecture 2 hrs/week; tutorial 1 hr/week; viewing session 3 hrs Prohibitions: PHYS1500 Assessment: On-line Quizzes (40%), Tutorials (10%), Viewing report (10%), Final Examination(40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study explores the lives of the stars, leading some to explosive ends and the formation of a black hole. You will learn about the life cycle of a star from its birth in the interstellar medium to its fate as a stellar remnant - as a white dwarf, neutron star or perhaps a black hole. You will work with simulations to gain an appreciation and understanding of the methodology and techniques of modern astronomy, especially astronomical spectroscopy that allows us to measure the composition, physical state and motion of the stars. These measurements also reveal the extreme properties of stellar remnants. More recently, observations of gravitational waves have opened a new window on the universe, allowing us to study the merger of neutron stars. Our study of spectroscopic and gravitational wave observations of extreme environments will clearly illustrate how modern astronomy depends on advancing technology leading to new instrumentation and observational capabilities. The unit also includes opportunities for day and night observing sessions.
OLET1640 Astronomy: from Big Bang to Darkness

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof John O'Byrne Session: Intensive May,Intensive October Classes: reading, videos and online quizzes 4 hrs/week; lecture 2 hrs/week; tutorial 1 hr/week; viewing session 3 hrs Prohibitions: PHYS1500 Assessment: On-line Quizzes (40%), Tutorials (10%), Viewing report (10%), Final Examination(40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The theory and observations of modern cosmology have revolutionised our view of the universe in recent years. This unit of study explores the big picture of the expanding universe in which we live, where around 96% of its content is revealed but invisible to us! You will learn about the galaxies that are the visible signposts in the universe, the dark matter hiding within and around them, and the dark energy that must also be present to explain the distribution of mass and its motion in the universe on the largest scales. How do we know? How do we even measure distance on these scales? What does this tell us about the history of the universe and its fate? You will gain an appreciation and understanding of the methodology and techniques of modern astronomy that allow us to probe the universe across vast distances and times since the Big Bang and into the future. In doing this unit you will confront the challenging scientific and philosophical questions posed by our cosmological picture. The unit also includes opportunities for day and night observing sessions.
OLET1644 How we make decisions

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Bruce Burns Session: Intensive September Classes: 12x1 hour online modules. 3x1 hour face-to-face tutorials. Assessment: Online quizzes (25% total); mastery quizzes (10%); written assignment (25%, 750 words); final in-class exam (40%, 25 minutes) Mode of delivery: Block mode
We like to believe that decision making involves simply weighing up the pros and cons of the different options before selecting the best one, so when people fail to do this (as they often do) they are viewed as irrational. However this viewpoint has been shown to be inaccurate even for important decisions. This unit will provide an introduction to how short-cuts, biases and emotion are integral to human decision making. These factors are often systematic, so we are expectedly irrational. You will first learn to recognize the common heuristics (short-cuts) and biases that have been identified by evaluating existing research and through demonstrations. From this foundation you will explore decision making more deeply and develop an understanding of the broader frameworks for comprehending it. You will then focus on the implication this has for improving your own decision making and how we can better present information and options to improve other people's decision making. From a public policy point of view these insights can be used to help nudge people towards beneficial choices, though advertisers also capitalize on these biases to influence human behaviour.
OLET1652 How to Estimate Anything

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Wheatland Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 4 weeks of online tutorial material including videos Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics (2 unit) Assessment: Online MCQs and quantitative problems (40%); in-person final exam (60%). Mode of delivery: Online
How many hairs are there on a human head? What is the probability of intelligent life elsewhere in the Universe? What is the GDP of a small nation? Remarkably, it is possible to answer these questions more-or-less accurately, with minimal information. The ability to do this - to estimate - is a valuable life skill. In this unit you will learn systematic approaches to estimation, which allow order-of-magnitude answers to be provided for any quantitative question. You will also learn to evaluate the uncertainties in your estimates. Examples will be drawn from across the sciences and the humanities. The unit connects theoretical knowledge with practical application, and seeks to develop the ability to critically evaluate quantitative information from a broad variety of sources.
OLET1654 Pseudoscientific Thinking

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Micah Goldwater Session: Intensive April Classes: 8 hours of online lectures Assessment: Research Paper on Belief Change (40%), 8x Interactive reading exercises (15%), Group analyses/criticisms (15%), Final Exam (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Peudoscientific thinking is a pervasive problem. This unit will provide students with an understanding of how people come to form beliefs that appear scientifically sound but are not supported by evidence, and why those beliefs can be resistant to change. Specifically, there will be a focus on beliefs about human health, with a view to explaining how common and potentially harmful misconceptions have become so prevalent, such as the efficacy of homeopathy for cancer treatment. Psychological principles will be applied to specific examples of common pseudoscientific beliefs. Students will learn about basic theories of causal learning and belief revision, and will be encouraged to use them to devise methods for challenging false beliefs in everyday contexts. Students will be encouraged to reflect on how learning biases may impact their own beliefs and assumptions, and understand the commonalities and differences in their own beliefs and beliefs across cultures. The knowledge gained will provide students with critical thinking skills that are applicable to evaluating evidence in any field of study or presented in the media and thus will be beneficial to their future studies and lives more generally. Students will do research into a particular pseudoscientific health practice or false belief and propose research about how to change people's practices and beliefs.
OLET2602 Psychology of Crime

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Celine van Golde Session: Intensive February,Intensive January Classes: 8 cases studies, 2 per week, for 4 weeks (accounting for approx 50 hours of student involvement) Assessment: This OLE requires you to complete 8 automated quizes, assessing in-depth knowledge and application of the provided theory and research literature Mode of delivery: Block mode
Psychology of Crime investigates the interplay between psychology and the criminal legal system. In particular, it focusses on an array of topics including: perpetrators and defendants, interviewing, false confessions, jury deliberation, eyewitness memory, fitness to stand trial, rehabilitation of offenders, and expert evidence. This unit aims to provide you with an introduction to a selection of topics studied in this field. Importantly, by doing this unit, you will be able to describe and critically evaluate key empirical studies and theories in forensic psychology.
OLET2612 GIS: Thinking Spatially

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Intensive August Classes: lecture podcasts (10-20 mins x 9) Assumed knowledge: It is assumed students already have an understanding of basic GIS concepts and analysis methods which can be acquired through OLEO1609 GIS: Geographic Information Systems (0 cp). Assessment: quizzes, assignments Practical field work: Computer based practicals (90-120 mins x 9) Mode of delivery: Online
Rapid advances in space and aerial-borne remotely sensed technologies and the proliferation of geo- referenced data, through location-enabled devices, have dramatically transformed the way geographic information is produced and shared. This presents exciting opportunities for exploring geographical pattern in environmental and social landscapes. This growing 'geocyberspace' of information comprises diverse aspects of society and the environment. As this information is often utilised in understanding processes and addressing critical social and environmental problems there is an increased demand for modelling and advanced analysis approaches that handle geospatial data. This unit will provide the conceptual background to more advanced GIS analysis applications and spatial reasoning methods in the context of contemporary environmental and social issues. The course is designed to provide an introduction to spatial analysis techniques available within a GIS environment, explore a diversity of both social, health, business and environmental applications. In addition the unit aims to address key issues currently emerging from GIS applications including spatial data analytics, techniques for managing data uncertainty, GIS ethics and participatory GIS.
OLET2614 GIS: Problem Solving

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Intensive August Classes: podcast lectures (2 hrs); online tutorial (5 hrs); blackboard collaborate focus group sessions (4 hrs) Assumed knowledge: It is assumed students already have an understanding of basic GIS concepts and analysis methods which can be acquired through OLEO1609 GIS: Geographic Information Systems (0 cp). Assessment: 2 assignments Mode of delivery: Online
This OLE unit explores the role of GIS as a cross-disciplinary 'enabler' for solving environmental and societal problems and recognising future alternatives. Spatial thinking as a framework for understanding complex social and environmental system interactions involves concepts of space, tools of representation and processes of reasoning. Material presented in this unit will encourage research enquiry through multidimensional visualization, analysis and modelling of empirical data that is informed by deep subject-specific knowledge and spatial reasoning. Example topic themes: Sustainability GIS; GIS in Archaeology; Social GIS; Land management GIS; Marine GIS
OLET2628 Research Data Management

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Floris van Ogtrop Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 12 online modules; four 1-hour drop in sessions Assessment: 10 online quizzes; two online assessment tasks Mode of delivery: Online
This unit will give you an insight into the exciting world of data. More and more we are bombarded with concepts like big data, open source data, and sensitive data. Data management is what links these concepts. Much of the development in data management has come from research in the physical, biological, and social sciences, research in languages, finance, law, and medicine, and many more. In all cases it is critical to ensure that data is safe and accessible. Importantly, lessons learnt from research are also applicable to managing our own data. Therefore, this unit introduces key concepts of data management delivered through 12 interactive online modules. The modules will initially define research data and explore the various flavours of research data. Then you will discover what can go wrong when you don't manage your data and explore ways which you can best store your data. You will look at using open source data, and how to best access and share data. And finally you will look at how to manage sensitive data and explore what big data is.
OLET5604 Health Literacy for Better Lives

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Haryana Dhillon Session: Intensive April,Intensive June,Intensive September Classes: 4x 1 hour lectures (online content delivery); 4x2 hr tutorials (online course); 1x4 day intensive face to face workshop Assessment: Assessment for this course will involve three online quizzes Two quizzes will include 15 questions each and be worth 25% of your mark One quiz will include 30 questions and be worth 50% of your mark Mode of delivery: Block mode
An individual's health literacy has a major impact on their health and wellbeing across their life. Health literacy comprises the cognitive and social skills which determine the motivation and ability of an individual to gain access to, understand, and use information to promote and maintain good health. People of lower health literacy commonly engage less frequently with the healthcare system, presenting later with illnesses, have lower adherence to medical advice and treatments, and higher mortality rates. In this unit you will learn about health literacy, how it can adversely impact populations, its measurement and applications in healthcare, and an understanding of approaches to increase health literacy. You will develop skills to use within the healthcare system and with external partners to increase levels of health literacy.
Sydney Conservatorium of Music
OLET1801 Music Theory and Notation Essentials

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Matthew Hindson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: up to 2hrs of video lectures per week, plus 1 hour tutorial per week, which can be either live in-person or online. Assessment: Weekly set tasks and quizzes (50%), final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This Online Learning Environment unit (OLE) provides a grounding in music notation and music theory. It is designed for those without a background in these areas. The music theory relates to our contemporary western music notation system. An understanding of how music theory works is extremely useful to a range of diverse disciplines that engage with music. Examples include games and user interface designers, film and drama studies students and those who have learnt musical practice from an aural rather than notated tradition, such as contemporary popular musicians and singers.
OLET1803 Digital Communication: Sound

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Humberstone Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: up to 2hrs of video lectures/week, 1 x 1hr problem based learning/week Assessment: 4 x peer reviews to the equivalent of 250wds (40%), 1 x presentation (10%), 1 x project (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit focuses on how sound can be used to present information effectively. It deals with audio recording techniques, and the creation of original music to add emotional weight to presentations, using sampling and synthesis techniques.
OLET1901 Presentation Skills: Speaking Formally

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Narelle Yeo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour seminar plus 1 hour tutorials Corequisites: OLEO1900 Assessment: 4 quizzes (100% for 0cp: 40% for 2cp; 10% online participation 2cp only; 50% mini ted talk 2cp only) Mode of delivery: Online
The development of public presentation skills in a formal environment is integral to success in professional life. Students are taught to express ideas, knowledge and passion in a formal setting this unit that stacks on top of the FASS units on presentation skills to create a 6 cp set if required. The focus of this unit is the development of the skills, personal style and confidence to present authoritative content, on a topic that the student has passion for, or special knowledge of. Developing physical skills, an ability to curate their material and the use of appropriate visual technologies leads to superior presentations. Students develop a unique and individual style of presenting, cognizant of their own physicality, verbal skills and talents. Building on skills established in the 0cp course, the 2 cp version further extends creative strategies for presenting in public via the preparation of a mini-ted talk.