Chemistry

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry major

A major in Chemistry requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 18 credit points of 3000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level interdisciplinary project units

Chemistry minor

A minor in Chemistry requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round https://sydney.edu.au/students/bridging-courses.html).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1012 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1XX1 Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1112 Chemistry 1B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Intensive January,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr lecture; 1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviours, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do we develop lotions that don't burn us, how do we measure UV absorption by sunscreens, how can we measure and alter soil pH, how are sticky things made, and how do we determine the concentration of vitamin C in juice? Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1912 Chemistry 1B (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prerequisites: CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or (75 or above in CHEM1111 or CHEM1101) or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1992 Assessment: quizzes, assignments, laboratory attendance and log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Advanced units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how medicines work, the properties of materials and substances, how beer is brewed, and for obtaining forensic evidence. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will further develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through enquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. Chemistry 1B (Advanced) is built on a satisfactory prior knowledge of Chemistry 1A (Advanced). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1B, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1992 Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: 75 or above in CHEM1991 or CHEM1903 or (90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent) Prohibitions: CHEM1002 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1108 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 Assessment: quizzes, assignment, skills-based assessment, final exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Entry is by invitation. This unit of study is deemed to be an Advanced unit of study. Students who commence in semester 2 are strongly advised that you would be better served by taking the mainstream level units in sequence, Chemistry 1A before Chemistry 1B, rather than the Special Studies Program units in the opposite order.
Chemistry transforms the way we live. It provides the basis for understanding biological, geological and atmospheric processes, how food and medicines work, the properties of materials and substances. This unit of study builds upon your prior knowledge of chemistry to further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, industrial processing, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about organic chemistry reactions, structural determination, nitrogen chemistry, industrial processes, kinetics, electrochemistry, thermochemistry, phase behaviour, solubility equilibrium and chemistry of metals. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as a demonstrated aptitude. Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is restricted to students who have gained a Distinction in Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) or by invitation. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1B (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1B and Chemistry 1B (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1B (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)

2000-level units of study

Core
CHEM2521 Molecular Stability and Reactivity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week, 6 x 4hrs no experiential laboratory class Prerequisites: (CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1012 or CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2921 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2921 Molecular Stability and Reactivity (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week for 13 weeks, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2521 or CHEM2991 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quiz (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. Molecular Stability and Reactivity (Adv) differs from CHEM2521 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
CHEM2991 Molecular Stability and Reactivity (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 1 x 1hr SSP seminar/week for 12 weeks, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: A mark of 75 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 75 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2921 or CHEM2521 or CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (7.5%), 2 x 2000 word essay (15%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (52.5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
There are over 144 million chemical substances so far identified, a diversity that makes possible the rich fabric of the material and biological worlds. Underpinning this huge diversity are a few fundamental rules of electronic arrangements in atoms and molecules that determine what molecules will be stable and when they will undergo transformation by chemical reaction. This unit will describe these fundamental rules and investigate how electronic rearrangements stabilise molecules by forming covalent bonds. You will investigate the quantum theory of bonding and apply these concepts to establish the rules that govern bond geometries, aromaticity, substitution and elimination reactions. You will investigate the bonding of metal complexes and the relation between magnetism and structure in these compounds. You will learn the fundamentals of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies and how these techniques are used to measure molecular properties. Molecular Stability and Reactivity (SSP) differs from CHEM2921 in that it includes an additional seminar series on three research-led topics in chemistry. By doing this unit you will develop the fundamental understanding of chemical stability and reactivity essential for further work in all chemically related fields and have established a solid foundation for further study in chemistry.
Selective
CHEM2522 Sustainable Chemical Manufacture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2922 or CHEM2532 or CHEM2404 or CHEM2914 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern society is reliant on manufactured chemicals to meet our everyday needs in food production, medicines, clothing and technological applications. Traditional approaches to building molecules have largely ignored the detrimental environmental impacts of the manufacturing processes, but this has changed. In this unit you will study contemporary methods used to create life-changing molecules, from pharmaceuticals and bulk chemicals to polymers in the context of the environmental impact of chemical manufacture and the challenges of ensuring both sustainability of source materials and sustainability of waste treatment. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices of chemical manufacture, the application of catalytic processes, and the methods used to tailor molecular properties, including the spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques of chemical analysis. In this unit you will address the general issues of renewable and non-renewable resources and waste recycling. By doing this unit you will develop an integrated understanding of the challenges of sustainable chemical manufacture and the fundamental basis for continued study in the topics of organic synthesis, environmental chemistry, polymer science and industrial processes. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2532 Concepts in Sustainable Chemical Manufacture but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2922 Sustainable Chemical Manufacture (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week for 13 weeks, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2522 or CHEM2532 or CHEM2404 or CHEM2914 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Modern society is reliant on manufactured chemicals to meet our everyday needs in food production, medicines, clothing and technological applications. Traditional approaches to building molecules have largely ignored the detrimental environmental impacts of the manufacturing processes, but this has changed. In this unit you will study contemporary methods used to create life-changing molecules, from pharmaceuticals and bulk chemicals to polymers in the context of the environmental impact of chemical manufacture and the challenges of ensuring both sustainability of source materials and sustainability of waste treatment. You will gain an understanding of the principles and practices of chemical manufacture, the application of catalytic processes, and the methods used to tailor molecular properties, including the spectroscopic and spectrometric techniques of chemical analysis. In this unit you will address the general issues of renewable and non-renewable resources and waste recycling. Sustainable Chemical Manufacture (Adv) differs from CHEM2522 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop an integrated understanding of the challenges of sustainable chemical manufacture and the fundamental basis for continued study in the topics of organic synthesis, environmental chemistry, polymer science and industrial processes. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2532 Concepts in Sustainable Chemical Manufacture but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2523 Chemistry of Biological Molecules

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2923 or CHEM2533 or CHEM2403 or CHEM2913 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All known life is based on four extraordinary families of molecules: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and the nucleic acids. While the chemistry of these molecules within living cells is the subject of biochemistry, this unit of study explores the chemistry beyond that of normal biological function to provide the foundations for drug design, development of bio-sensors and programmed self-assembly. This unit of study will cover the fundamental chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. You will learn about the spontaneous organisation of these molecules into larger structures - globular proteins, DNA helices, and lipid membranes - and the new properties that emerge as a result. You will explore how metal ions interact with proteins to produce a variety of catalytic and molecular binding sites. Powerful modern techniques such as fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy will be explained and their capacity to provide deeper insights in biological and medical applications explored. By doing this unit you will develop a fundamental understanding of the properties of biological molecules and a firm foundation for further studies in drug design, food and cosmetic science, advanced bio-sensing and the growing field of chemical applications based on biological materials. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2533 Concepts in Chemistry of Biological Molecules but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2923 Chemistry of Biological Molecules (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week for 13 weeks, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2523 or CHEM2533 or CHEM2403 or CHEM2913 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
All known life is based on four extraordinary families of molecules: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and the nucleic acids. While the chemistry of these molecules within living cells is the subject of biochemistry, this unit of study explores the chemistry beyond that of normal biological function to provide the foundations for drug design, development of bio-sensors and programmed self-assembly. This unit of study will cover the fundamental chemistry of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and nucleic acids. You will learn about the spontaneous organisation of these molecules into larger structures - globular proteins, DNA helices, and lipid membranes - and the new properties that emerge as a result. You will explore how metal ions interact with proteins to produce a variety of catalytic and molecular binding sites. Powerful modern techniques such as fluorescence and cryo-electron microscopy will be explained and their capacity to provide deeper insights in biological and medical applications explored. Chemistry of Biological Molecules (Advanced) differs from CHEM2523 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop a fundamental understanding of the properties of biological molecules and a firm foundation for further studies in drug design, food and cosmetic science, advanced bio-sensing and the growing field of chemical applications based on biological materials. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2533 Concepts in Chemistry of Biological Molecules but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2524 Chemical Physics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002 ) Prohibitions: CHEM2924 or CHEM2534 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical physics is the study of how the laws of physics gives rise to the complexity of molecular behavior and the extraordinary variety of materials and properties - from liquid crystals to tungsten carbide - that result when large numbers of atoms or molecules interact with each other. To trace the connection between fundamental physical laws and their diverse material outcomes you will apply computational techniques and gain experience in the modelling tools used in material design and technological development. You will address the fundamentals of structure in materials including symmetry and crystal stability, defects, porous structures and emergent properties such as magnetism. You will explore the statistical origins of thermodynamic stability and chemical kinetics, concepts fundamental to battery, fuel cell, sensor, and capacitor technologies. Modern experimental methods for structural determination (e. g. neutron diffraction) and dynamics (e. g. pulsed laser spectroscopy) will be covered. By doing this unit you will develop a deep insight into the physical basis of complex chemical systems and a firm foundation for future studies in physical and computational chemistry, materials science, and device design. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2534 Concepts in Chemical Physics but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.
CHEM2924 Chemical Physics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter Harrowell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1hr lecture/week for 13 weeks, 1 x 1hr tutorial/week for 13 weeks, 6 x 4hrs laboratory class Prerequisites: A mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1001) and a mark of 65 or above in (CHEM1112 or CHEM1912 or CHEM1992 or CHEM1012 or CHEM1102 or CHEM1902 or CHEM1904 or CHEM1002) Prohibitions: CHEM2524 or CHEM2534 or CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 Assessment: 2 x in-semester test (10%), 13 x pre-lecture quizzes (10%), 4 x laboratory reports (18%), 2 x laboratory presentations (7%), final exam (55%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Chemical physics is the study of how the laws of physics give rise to the complexity of molecular behavior and the extraordinary variety of materials and properties - from liquid crystals to tungsten carbide - that result when large numbers of atoms or molecules interact with each other. To trace the connection between fundamental physical laws and their diverse material outcomes you will apply computational techniques and gain experience in the modelling tools used in material design and technological development. You will address the fundamentals of structure in materials including symmetry and crystal stability, defects, porous structures and emergent properties such as magnetism. You will explore the statistical origins of thermodynamic stability and chemical kinetics, concepts fundamental to battery, fuel cell, sensor, and capacitor technologies. Modern experimental methods for structural determination (e. g. neutron diffraction) and dynamics (e. g. pulsed laser spectroscopy) will be covered. Chemical Physics (Advanced) differs from CHEM2524 in that the laboratory consists of open-ended discovery-oriented exercises. By doing this unit you will develop a deep insight into the physical basis of complex chemical systems and a firm foundation for future studies in physical and computational chemistry, materials science, and device design. These same lectures are also covered in CHEM2534 Concepts in Chemical Physics but with the laboratory program replaced by a series of classroom workshops and assignments.

3000-level units of study

Selective
CHEM3110 Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3910 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
DNA, proteins and carbohydrates represent three classes of essential biomolecules present in all biological systems. This unit will cover the structure, reactivity and properties of biomolecules and the building blocks from which these molecules are assembled. Interactions between biomolecules and metalions, small molecules and other biomolecules will be covered and the chemical tools for studying biomolecules highlighted. The design and synthesis of small molecules which mimic the functions of biomolecules will also be illustrated.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3910 Biomolecules: Properties and Reactions Adv

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3110 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
DNA, proteins and carbohydrates represent three classes of essential biomolecules present in all biological systems. This unit will cover the structure, reactivity and properties of biomolecules and the building blocks from which these molecules are assembled. Interactions between biomolecules and metal ions, small molecules and other biomolecules will be covered and the chemical tools for studying biomolecules highlighted. The design and synthesis of small molecules which mimic the functions of biomolecules will also be illustrated. CHEM3910 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3110 students but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3111 Organic Structure and Reactivity

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3911 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The structure and shape of organic molecules determines their physical properties, their reaction chemistry as well as their biological/medicinal activity. The determination of this structure and understanding its chemical consequences is of fundamental importance in chemistry, biochemistry, medicinal and materials chemistry. This course examines the methods and techniques used to establish the structure of organic molecules as well as the chemistry which dictates the shapes that they adopt. The first part of the course examines the use of modern spectroscopic methods (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy) which are used routinely to identify organic compounds. The second part of the course examines the chemical consequences of molecular shapes in more depth and looks at the inter-relationship between molecular shape and the processes by which bonds are made and broken (the reaction mechanism). An understanding of these processes allows the outcome of reactions to be predicted, which is an essential tool enabling the construction of complex molecules from simple starting materials.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3911 Organic Structure and Reactivity (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3111 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The structure and shape of organic molecules determines their physical properties, their reaction chemistry as well as their biological/medicinal activity. The determination of this structure and understanding its chemical consequences is of fundamental importance in chemistry, biochemistry, medicinal and materials chemistry. This course examines the methods and techniques used to establish the structure of organic molecules as well as the chemistry which dictates the shapes that they adopt. The first part of the course examines the use of modern spectroscopic methods (nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy) which are used routinely to identify organic compounds. The second part of the course examines the chemical consequences of molecular shapes in more depth and looks at the inter-relationship between molecular shape and the processes by which bonds are made and broken (the reaction mechanism). An understanding of these processes allows the outcome of reactions to be predicted, which is an essential tool enabling the construction of complex molecules from simple starting materials. CHEM3911 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3111 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3112 Materials Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3912 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course concerns the inorganic chemistry of solid-state materials: compounds that possess 'infinite' bonding networks. The extended structure of solid materials gives rise to a wide range of important chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Consequently such materials are of enormous technological significance as well as fundamental curiosity. In this course you will learn how chemistry can be used to design and synthesise novel materials with desirable properties. The course will start with familiar molecules such as C60 and examine their solid states to understand how the nature of chemical bonding changes in the solid state, leading to new properties such as electronic conduction. This will be the basis for a broader examination of how chemistry is related to structure, and how structure is related to properties such as catalytic activity, mechanical strength, magnetism, and superconductivity. The symmetry of solids will be used explain how their structures are classified, how they can transform between related structures when external conditions such as temperature, pressure and electric field are changed, and how this can be exploited in technological applications such as sensors and switches. Key techniques used to characterise solid-state materials will be covered, particularly X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and physical property measurements.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3912 Materials Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3112 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course concerns the inorganic chemistry of solid-state materials: compounds that possess 'infinite' bonding networks. The extended structure of solid materials gives rise to a wide range of important chemical, mechanical, electrical, magnetic and optical properties. Consequently, such materials are of enormous technological significance as well as fundamental curiosity. In this course you will learn how chemistry can be used to design and synthesize novel materials with desirable properties. The course will start with familiar molecules such as C60 and examine their solid states to understand how the nature of chemical bonding changes in the solid state, leading to new properties such as electronic conduction. This will be the basis for a broader examination of how chemistry is related to structure, and how structure is related to properties such as catalytic activity, mechanical strength, magnetism, and superconductivity. The symmetry of solids will be used explain how their structures are classified, how they can transform between related structures when external conditions such as temperature, pressure and electric field are changed, and how this can be exploited in technological applications such as sensors and switches. Key techniques used to characterise solid-state materials will be covered, particularly X-ray diffraction, microscopy, and physical property measurements. CHEM3912 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3112 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3113 Catalysis and Sustainable Processes

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3913 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
At present rates of consumption, the resources of 5 planets would be needed for everyone on earth to enjoy our standard of living. Since so much of our consumption and waste involves chemical processes in some way, more efficient chemical processes are needed in a sustainable tomorrow. Catalysis is and will increasingly be at the heart of these sustainable processes. This unit examines the fundamentals of catalysis and its use to design sustainable processes. The course will initially focus on the organometallic fundamentals in order to show how they can be used to understand and design homogeneous catalytic processes from a molecular perspective, which, in turn, leads on to biocatalytic conversions where the enzyme is treated like a large ligand with a special surface, pointing towards the surface chemistry involved in supported catalysts - the next topic. Within this general discussion, the special case of the three-dimensional surface found in zeotypes will be developed and the acid/base and redox catalysis (the mainstay of the majority of industrial processes) in such confined spaces of molecular dimensions will be examined. The course will continue with examining the production of polymers as an example of a major industrial process. An introduction on polymer chemistry and polymer properties will be given, followed by the examination of the various synthetic routes and processes that yield to the production of polymers. The recent advances in polymer synthesis and the design of new materials of improved properties and function will be reviewed. The last part of this section will explore the various approaches designed to improve the sustainability of polymer synthesis, in particular for the specific case of free radical polymerization, with an emphasis on the design of novel catalysts. The course will conclude by examining a variety of case studies. All the preceding topics find their way into the discussion of the key role of catalysts in the design of sustainable chemical processes, rationalizing the choices behind catalyst design.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3913 Catalysis and Sustainable Process (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3113 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
At present rates of consumption, the resources of 5 planets would be needed for everyone on earth to enjoy our standard of living. Since so much of our consumption and waste involves chemical processes in some way, more efficient chemical processes are needed in a sustainable tomorrow. Catalysis is and will increasingly be at the heart of these sustainable processes. This unit examines the fundamentals of catalysis and its use to design sustainable processes. The course will initially focus on the organometallic fundamentals in order to show how they can be used to understand and design homogeneous catalytic processes from a molecular perspective, which, in turn, leads on to biocatalytic conversions where the enzyme is treated like a large ligand with a special surface, pointing towards the surface chemistry involved in supported catalysts - the next topic. Within this general discussion, the special case of the three-dimensional surface found in zeotypes will be developed and the acid/base and redox catalysis (the mainstay of the majority of industrial processes) in such confined spaces of molecular dimensions will be examined. The course will continue with examining the production of polymers as an example of a major industrial process. An introduction on polymer chemistry and polymer properties will be given, followed by the examination of the various synthetic routes and processes that yield to the production of polymers. The recent advances in polymer synthesis and the design of new materials of improved properties and function will be reviewed. The last part of this section will explore the various approaches designed to improve the sustainability of polymer synthesis, in particular for the specific case of free radical polymerization, with an emphasis on the design of novel catalysts. The course will conclude by examining a variety of case studies. All the preceding topics find their way into the discussion of the key role of catalysts in the design of sustainable chemical processes, rationalizing the choices behind catalyst design. CHEM3913 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3113 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3114 Metal Complexes: Medicine and Materials

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3914 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coordination compounds, with bonds between a central metal atom and surrounding ligands, play critical roles in biology, biochemistry and medicine, controlling the structure and function of many enzymes and their metabolism. They play similarly vital roles in many industrial processes and in the development of new materials with specifically designed properties. Building on the foundation of crystal field theory, this course offers a comprehensive treatment of the structures and properties of coordination compounds, with a qualitative molecular orbital description of metal-ligand bonds, and their spectroscopic, magnetic and dynamic effects. The exploitation of these properties in medicine and materials will be emphasized. Medical topics include descriptions of the essential and toxic elements of the Periodic Table, metal complexes as anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs, and their use as tumour imaging and radiotherapeutic agents. Materials topics include metal directed self assembly into unique structures, ligand design and control of the synthesis of nanoporous materials with new electronic and magnetic properties and applications in catalysis and molecular separations.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3914 Metal Complexes: Medic. and Mater. (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3114 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coordination compounds, with bonds between a central metal atom and surrounding ligands, play critical roles in biology, biochemistry and medicine, controlling the structure and function of many enzymes and their metabolism. They play similarly vital roles in many industrial processes and in the development of new materials with specifically designed properties. Building on the foundation of crystal field theory, this course offers a comprehensive treatment of the structures and properties of coordination compounds, with a qualitative molecular orbital description of metal-ligand bonds, and their spectroscopic, magnetic and dynamic effects. The exploitation of these properties in medicine and materials will be emphasized. Medical topics include descriptions of the essential and toxic elements of the Periodic Table, metal complexes as anti-bacterial, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer drugs, and their use as tumour imaging and radiotherapeutic agents. Materials topics include metal directed self assembly into unique structures, ligand design and control of the synthesis of nanoporous materials with new electronic and magnetic properties and applications in catalysis and molecular separations. CHEM3914 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3114 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3115 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3915 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The development of new pharmaceuticals fundamentally relies on the ability to design and synthesize new compounds. Synthesis is an enabling discipline for medicinal chemistry - without it, the development of new drugs cannot progress from design to implementation, and ultimately to a cure. This unit will tackle important factors in drug design, and will highlight the current arsenal of methods used in the discovery of new drugs, including rational drug design, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. We will develop a logical approach to planning a synthesis of a particular target structure. The synthesis and chemistry of heterocycles, which comprise some 40% of all known organic compounds and are particularly common in pharmaceuticals, will be outlined. Examples will include important ring systems present in biological systems, such as pyrimidines and purines (DNA and RNA), imidazole and thiazole (amino acids and vitamins) and porphyrins (natural colouring substances and oxygen carrying component of blood). Throughout the course, the utility of synthesis in medicinal chemistry will be illustrated with case studies such as anti-influenza (Relenza), anaesthetic (benzocaine), anti-inflammatory (Vioxx), antihypertensive (pinacidil) and cholesterol-lowering (Lovastatin) drugs.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3915 Synthetic Medicinal Chemistry (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3115 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The development of new pharmaceuticals fundamentally relies on the ability to design and synthesize new compounds. Synthesis is an enabling discipline for medicinal chemistry - without it, the development of new drugs cannot progress from design to implementation, and ultimately to a cure. This unit will tackle important factors in drug design, and will highlight the current arsenal of methods used in the discovery of new drugs, including rational drug design, high throughput screening and combinatorial chemistry. We will develop a logical approach to planning a synthesis of a particular target structure. The synthesis and chemistry of heterocycles, which comprise some 40% of all known organic compounds and are particularly common in pharmaceuticals, will be outlined. Examples will include important ring systems present in biological systems, such as pyrimidines and purines (DNA and RNA), imidazole and thiazole (amino acids and vitamins) and porphyrins (natural colouring substances and oxygen carrying component of blood). Throughout the course, the utility of synthesis in medicinal chemistry will be illustrated with case studies such as anti-influenza (Relenza), anaesthetic (benzocaine), anti-inflammatory (Vioxx), antihypertensive (pinacidil) and cholesterol-lowering (Lovastatin) drugs. CHEM3915 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3115 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3116 Membranes, Self Assembly and Surfaces

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3916 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Away from the covalent and ionic interactions that hold molecules and solids together is the world of fragile objects - folded polymers, membranes, surface adsorption and stable molecular aggregates - held together by weak forces such as van der Waals and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for stable aggregates with interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, many of which still wait to be explored. In this course we will examine the molecular interactions that drive self assembly and the consequences of these interactions in supramolecular assembly, lipid membrane formations and properties, microemulsions, polymer conformation and dynamics and range of fundamental surface properties including adhesion, wetting and colloidal stability.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3916 Membranes, Self Assembly and Surfaces(Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3116 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Away from the covalent and ionic interactions that hold molecules and solids together is the world of fragile objects - folded polymers, membranes, surface adsorption and stable molecular aggregates - held together by weak forces such as van der Waals and the hydrophobic effect. The use of molecules rather than atoms as building blocks means that there are an enormous number of possibilities for stable aggregates with interesting chemical, physical and biological properties, many of which still wait to be explored. In this course we examine the molecular interactions that drive self assembly and the consequences of these interactions in supramolecular assembly, lipid membrane formations and properties, microemulsions, polymer conformation and dynamics and range of fundamental surface properties including adhesion, wetting and colloidal stability. CHEM3916 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3916 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3117 Molecular Spectroscopy and Quantum Theory

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Prohibitions: CHEM3917 Assessment: Assignment, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will cover the fundamentals of molecular spectroscopy as a modern research tool and as a theoretical basis with which to understand everyday phenomena. This course is aimed at the student wishing a rigorous understanding of the fabric of nature -- electronic structure -- and the interaction between light and matter. The course teaches the quantum theory needed to understand spectroscopic phenomena (such as the absorption of light) at the empirical and deeper levels. A student completing this course will take with him/her an understanding of spectroscopy as both a phenomenon and a research tool. The course teaches application and theory, with descriptions of applied spectroscopic techniques. Alongside the coverage of modern spectroscopy, the course provides an accessible treatment of the science behind vision, flames, solar cells and photochemical smog.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
CHEM3917 Mol. Spectroscopy and Quantum Theory (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two 1-hour lectures per week, one 1-hour seminar per week, and two 4-hour practicals per week for half of semester. Prerequisites: [(65 or greater in (CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915)) AND (65 or greater in (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916))] OR (65 or greater in (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991)) Prohibitions: CHEM3117 Assessment: Assignments, prac reports and oral, final examination (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This course will cover the fundamentals of molecular spectroscopy as a modern research tool and as a theoretical basis with which to understand everyday phenomena. This course is aimed at the student wishing a rigorous understanding of the fabric of nature -- electronic structure -- and the interaction between light and matter. The course teaches the quantum theory needed to understand spectroscopic phenomena (such as the absorption of light) at the empirical and deeper levels. A student completing this course will take with him/her an understanding of spectroscopy as both a phenomenon and a research tool. The course teaches application and theory, with descriptions of applied spectroscopic techniques. Alongside the coverage of modern spectroscopy, the course provides an accessible treatment of the science behind vision, flames, solar cells and photochemical smog. CHEM3917 students attend the same lectures as CHEM3117 students, but attend an additional advanced seminar series comprising one lecture a week for 12 weeks.
Textbooks
See http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/undergraduate/senior-chemistry.shtml
Interdisciplinary Project
CHEM3888 Chemistry Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Matthew Todd Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture + 1 x 2hr workshop for 7 weeks then 1 x 2 hr guided workshops for 6 weeks. Prerequisites: [(CHEM2401 or CHEM2911 or CHEM2915) AND (CHEM2402 or CHEM2912 or CHEM2916)] OR (CHEM2521 or CHEM2921 or CHEM2991) Assessment: Discipline Project Written Report (10%), Proposal Report (30%), Proposal Presentation (10%), Interdisciplinary Report (30%), Interdisciplinary Presentation (10%), Teamwork participation and evaluation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit, you will adopt a multi-disciplinary approach to solve a real-world problem in one of three research areas: i) Functional Energy Materials, ii) Self-assembled Nanomaterials and iii) Molecular Innovations in Health. You will apply your discipline expertise in chemistry to understand the challenge, design potential solutions to the problem, and then work collaboratively with students in other disciplines (science, government, business, law, marketing, engineering) to consider solutions to the problem from a broader perspective and how these could positively impact the community. This unit will allow you to understand the challenge through stories of scientific endeavour that led to the discovery of chemistry-based solutions to societal challenges, then extend that knowledge through collecting and analysing data on new technologies as you move to design innovative approaches. You will learn to work in interdisciplinary teams and communicate your findings to a broad audience. You will build key skills in problem solving, team work and written/oral communication that will equip you for future research and professional pathways in science, technology, health, business and public policy.
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Pauline Ross Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of a team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.