Design Descriptions

Table S - Design major

A major in Design requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core unit
(iii) 12 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 6 credit points of 3000-level core unit
(v) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Design minor

A minor in Design requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 12 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core unit
(iii) 12 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(iv) 12 credit points of 3000-level selective units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level

Core
DESN1000 Principles of Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: case study reports (60%), design exercise (30%) and quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study allows students to develop an understanding of the foundation of human factors upon which much successful design is based. Students learn about the basic physical and cognitive principles (ergonomics, heuristics, human-centredness) incorporated in successful designs across a wide variety of different sectors. Students are provided with the tools to evaluate existing designs according to widely accepted design principles. They learn to apply these principles in practice in order to improve the usability, clarity and overall quality of their own designs. Through a series of academically researched case studies they reflect upon how these principles are applied in existing designs. To further develop their understanding of the design principles, they then complete a small re-design exercise. The case studies are chosen to cover a range of different domains, including products, systems, organisations, and services.
DESN1001 Design Theory and Culture

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leigh-Anne Hepburn Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; workshop 2 hrs/week Assessment: research report (30%), analysis report (30%), synthesis report (30%) and quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study helps students develop a theoretically grounded understanding of what design is, and the full spectrum of different disciplines that this term entails (product, graphic, urban planning, graphic, fashion, interaction, etc.). Using academic sources, they will investigate dominant historical and contemporary models of the design process, and learn about the cognitive basis of design thinking and how this differs from key skills in other disciplines. Students will research major design movements and schools of thought that have influenced the design sector over the last century (e.g. Bauhaus, eco-design, ergonomics, mass consumerism and built-in obsolescence). The unit teaches students about current foci in design (such as service design and experience design) and provides an outlook of upcoming trends and futures. Students will be able to develop these skills through studying a design movement, analysing case studies of designs, and applying design movements to specific design tasks.

2000-level

Core
DECO2016 Design Thinking

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mrs Madeleine Borthwick Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1006 Assessment: submitted work (70%), in-class assessments (10%) and quizzes (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Not available to students in the Bachelor of Design Computing and the Bachelor of Architecture and Environments.
This unit of study provides an introduction to design methods and their application in a human-centred design process. The unit structure follows the stages of a typical design process, which are: define, understand, ideate, prototype, evaluate and reflect. A series of lectures and tutorial sessions are dedicated to each of these stages, allowing students to gain a deep understanding of and experience with design thinking methods. Students will learn how to balance convergent and divergent thinking at various stages throughout the design process, and how to use these methods to respond to a design brief requiring both analysis and synthesis. Students will learn to build empathy with users, identify the problem space, develop value-driven design concepts and persuasively communicate design proposals with an emphasis on the user experience through visual storytelling.
Selective
DECO2101 Fundamentals of Visual Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1015 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is for students who are not enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing. Students from the Bachelor of Design Computing should enrol in DECO1015.
This unit of study introduces students to the principles of visual design, including graphic design, colour theory and typography. Students will develop an understanding of how to successfully combine visual elements to effectively communicate an idea or concept, to describe a product, and to represent visual user interface elements in an interactive product. Using digital image manipulation tools, such as Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator and InDesign, students will learn how to develop design concepts and how to turn concepts into visual communication materials in the form of digital images.
DESN2000 Programming for Designers

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: computer lab 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1012 Assessment: design assignments (70%) and quizzes (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides an introduction to the development of software in design and the creative industries. It teaches the fundamentals of computational thinking as well as skills in the design and implementation of software for creative expression and prototyping. It introduces students to tools for building interactive design applications through programming assignments; knowledge of programming concepts; and knowledge of the Javascript programming language. Key concepts covered in this unit include: variables; functions; control flows; and algorithmic thinking. Students learn how to design through the development of code, allowing them to incorporate programming into their own design projects as well as to collaborate effectively with software developers.
DECO2015 Design for Innovation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assessment: analysis report (35%), project work (35%) and quizzes (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and/or DESN1000 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit of study introduces students to design strategies and techniques for developing alternative points of view and exploring multiple solutions iteratively. Through the analysis of real-world case studies students will develop an understanding for how to use design-thinking methods to tackle complex problems. The unit will discuss how design can be used as a method and as a way of thinking to drive innovation for products, services and processes. In the tutorial component, students will apply design strategies and techniques through small group exercises and develop a deeper understanding of them through the assessment items, which capture theory, analytical reflection and the practical application of methods.
DECO2102 Introduction to Web-based Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: seminar 3 hrs/week Prohibitions: DECO1016 Assessment: submitted work (80%) and in-class assessments (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: This unit is for students who are not enrolled in the Bachelor of Design Computing. Students from the Bachelor of Design Computing should enrol in DECO1016.
This unit introduces students to web design and modern web technologies for the purpose of designing and prototyping web-based user interface solutions. Students will learn about design principles and patterns for the web and apply them in practical exercises that involve designing and creating interactive user interfaces. The unit will introduce interface sketching and wire-framing tools and techniques. A variety of media and platforms, such as desktop computers and mobile devices, will be discussed, with a focus on interaction design. Students will develop an understanding of web technologies and their role in user experience and interaction design, including the use of web technologies for prototyping user interfaces. Prototyping techniques covered in this unit include interface sketching and wire-framing to develop dynamic content and interactive designs.

3000-level

Core
DESN3002 Experience and Service Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week and workshop 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO2016 Prohibitions: DECO2014 Assessment: design assessments (80%) and tutorial activities (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Services surround us, and our engagement with them can be a frustrating or rewarding experience. This unit introduces students to principles and methods relevant to the user experience of a product or service. Students will develop an understanding of the concept of 'user experience' and its role in the design of a service to ensure the experience is meaningful and targeted towards users' needs and abilities. Students will learn about methods for designing the user experience in a range of different contexts, such as mobile devices, wearables and interactive environments. The unit will give students an opportunity to apply the principles and methods of user experience design in the context of a design project. At the conclusion of the unit students will have a well-developed understanding of methods for gathering user requirements and translating requirements into design solutions that emphasise the user experience of the final product.
Selective
DECO3101 Innovation Design Studio

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week; tutorial 2 hrs/week Assessment: reflection report (30%), design project (45%) and tutorial activities (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and DECO2015 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit of study provides a format for deep engagement with design and innovation methods. Students will develop responses to a real-world design problem that requires the application of students' existing disciplinary skills combined with knowledge in an interdisciplinary context. Projects are student-led, allowing students to identify projects that are linked to their interests and discipline-specific career paths. Through interactive group work, facilitated by experienced design mentors, students will learn how to negotiate interdisciplinary requirements and boundaries. All projects developed in this unit of study are expected to address some element of innovation in an existing product, service or process. Students will be able to apply methods acquired in other units of study, and will learn about new methods through weekly project work and reviews.
DESN3003 Design for Social Impact

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 1 hr/week and workshop 2 hrs/week Prerequisites: DECO2016 Assumed knowledge: Knowledge of design thinking methods and processes Assessment: design project (60%), reflective report (20%) and tutorial activities (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gets students to consider the broader application of design thinking as a way of informing and creating social outcomes. Design for social impact aims to design solutions to meet social needs in a better way than the existing solution. Students will have the opportunity to develop their design thinking competency through the application of a real-world social problem. Students will address prevailing or emerging social issues through the design of products, services and experiences. Students will be guided through the design thinking process of understanding user and stakeholder needs, defining problems, ideating solutions, prototyping and testing design solutions. This unit gives students the opportunity to tackle the challenges of 21st Century life through the exploration of new technology and current practices to design the future they want to live in.
DESN3000 Design Thinking for Health and Medicine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 1 Classes: lecture 2 hrs/fortnightly; tutorial 4 hrs/fortnightly Assessment: case study (20%), design project (60%) and tutorial activities (20%) Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: It is recommended students first complete either DECO2016 or DECO1006 and/or DESN1000 before selecting this unit of study.
This unit is an introduction to human-centred design methods, specifically in the context of future challenges of the type you will face in careers health and medicine. You will learn design principles and practices through evaluating current health and medical devices, processes and systems. Through the analysis of real-world case studies, you will apply design thinking methods to address the complex health and medical issues facing society. The unit will also introduce you to how design-led strategies can support healthy behaviour or be used to improve medical technologies and processes. You will develop your skills by using design exercises to demonstrate the strategic and practical applications of such methods and approaches.
DESN3001 Health and Medicine Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Karla Straker Session: Semester 2 Classes: lecture 1 hr/fortnightly; tutorial 5 hrs/fortnightly Prerequisites: DECO1006 or DECO2016 or DESN3000 Assessment: case study report (30%), design exercise (30%) and health design project (40%) Campus: Westmead, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study focuses on the development of design solutions for the complex needs of a healthy society into the future. Through weekly teaching of design in the health and medical contexts, you will be exposed to various methods, techniques and approaches to achieve patient-centric solutions. You will apply your skills to address a health or medical challenge by creating a project based on translating a discovery into a device or process in the real world. The project will require you to work in multi-disciplinary teams to allow you to harness the relevant skill sets that are required to best navigate multifaceted challenges prevalent in health and medical sectors. All solutions designed and developed in this unit of study are expected to take the form of either a product, service, or system. You will learn how to identify problems, how to use ideation for developing patient-centric solutions and how to translate ideas into prototypes. Along this journey you will also navigate disciplinary boundaries and communicate with various stakeholders, including the health and medical professions. This will allow you to assess and test your solutions on your target audience.
ARCH3108 Industry and Community Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Wendy Davis Session: Intensive February,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: seminars, online contact and group work Assumed knowledge: Upper-level disciplinary knowledge Assessment: Group work 2500wd plan (10%); Group Presentation (20%); Evaluative/Reflective Task (20%); Group Project 5000wd Report (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for third year students to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application.