Environmental Studies Descriptions

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Advanced coursework and projects will be available in 2020 for students who complete this major.

Environmental Studies major

A major in Environmental Studies requires 48 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level core interdisciplinary project units
(vii) 12 credit points of 3000-level disciplinary selective or interdisciplinary project selective units

Environmental Studies minor

A minor in Environmental Studies requires 36 credit points from this table including:
(i) 6 credit points of 1000-level core units
(ii) 6 credit points of 1000-level selective units
(iii) 6 credit points of 2000-level core units
(iv) 6 credit points of 2000-level selective units
(v) 6 credit points of 3000-level core units
(vi) 6 credit points of 3000-level core interdisciplinary project units

Units of study

The units of study are listed below.

1000-level units of study

Core
GEOS1001 Earth, Environment and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1901 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is the gateway unit of study for Human Geography, Physical Geography, Environmental Studies and Geology. Its objective is to introduce the big questions relating to the origins and current state of the planet: climate change, environment, landscape formation, and the growth of the human population. During the semester you will be introduced to knowledge, theories and debates about how the world's physical and human systems operate. The first module investigates the evolution of the planet through geological time, with a focus on major Earth systems such as plate tectonics and mantle convection and their interaction with the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere and human civilisations. The second module presents Earth as an evolving and dynamic planet, investigating global environmental change, addressing climate variability and human impacts on the natural environment and the rate at which these changes occur and how they have the potential to dramatically affect the way we live. Finally, the third module, focuses on human-induced challenges to Earth's future. This part of the unit critically analyses the relationships between people and their environments, with central consideration to debates on population change, resource use and the policy contexts of climate change mitigation and adaptation.
GEOS1901 Earth, Environment and Society Advanced

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard, Dr Sabin Zahirovic, Dr Bree Morgan, A/Prof Damien Field Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 2 hour practical per week. Prohibitions: GEOS1001 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 or GEOL1001 or GEOL1002 or GEOL1902 or ENSY1001 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: Exam (40%), 2000 word essay (25%), practical reports (15%), presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1001, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
Selective
BIOL1006 Life and Evolution

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Writing task (10%), laboratory report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals. By doing this unit of study, you will develop the ability to examine novel biological systems and understand the complex processes that have shaped those systems.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1906 Life and Evolution (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matthew Pye, A/Prof Charlotte Taylor Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two lectures per week; 11 x 3-hour lab classes; a field excursion Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1996 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent. Assessment: Writing task (10%), project report (20%), laboratory notebook (10%), during semester tests and quizzes (20%), summative final exam (40%) Practical field work: 11 x 3-hour lab classes, a field excursion Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriads of species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. This unit explores how new species continue to arise while others go extinct and discusses the role of mutations as the raw material on which selection acts. It explains how information is transferred between generations through DNA, RNA and proteins, transformations which affect all aspects of biological form and function. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. You will participate in inquiry-led practical classes investigating single-celled organisms and the diversity of form and function in plants and animals.
Life and Evolution (Advanced) has the same overall structure as BIOL1006 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. Students enrolled in BIOL1906 participate in a research project with a focus on developing skills in critical evaluation, experimental design, data analysis and communication.
Textbooks
Knox, B., Ladiges, P.Y., Evans, B.K., Saint, R. (2014) Biology: an Australian focus, 5e, McGraw-Hill education, North Ryde, N.S.W
BIOL1996 Life and Evolution (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark de Bruyn Session: Semester 1 Classes: Lectures as per BIOL1906; one 3-hour practical per week Prohibitions: BIOL1001 or BIOL1911 or BIOL1991 or BIOL1006 or BIOL1906 or BIOL1993 or BIOL1998 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (50%), practical reports (25%), seminar presentation (15%), lab note book (5%), prelaboratory quizzes (5%) Practical field work: null Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Biology is an immensely diverse science. Biologists study life at all levels, from the fundamental building blocks (genes, and proteins) to whole ecosystems in which myriad species interact. Evolution is the unifying concept that runs through the life sciences, from the origin and diversification of life to understanding behaviour, to dealing with disease. Evolution through natural selection is the framework in biology in which specific details make sense. Science builds and organises knowledge of life and evolution in the form of testable hypotheses. The practical work syllabus for BIOL1996 is different from that of BIOL1906 (Advanced) and consists of a special project-based laboratory.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1007 From Molecules to Ecosystems

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1907 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: HSC Biology. Students who have not completed HSC Biology (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Biology Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative final exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . You will participate in inquiry-led practicals that reinforce the concepts in the unit. By doing this unit you will develop knowledge and skills that will enable you to play a role in finding global solutions that will impact our lives.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1907 From Molecules to Ecosystems (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claudia Keitel Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material and 12 x 3-hour practicals Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1997 Assumed knowledge: 85 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: Quizzes (10%), communication assessments (40%), skills tests (10%), summative exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and discover how expanding tools have improved our capacity to manage and intervene in ecosystems for our own health and organisms in the environment that surround and support us . This unit of study has the same overall structure as BIOL1007 but material is discussed in greater detail and at a more advanced level. The content and nature of these components may vary from year to year.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
BIOL1997 From Molecules to Ecosystems (SSP)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Emma Thompson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week and online material Prohibitions: BIOL1007 or BIOL1907 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Biology or equivalent Assessment: One 2-hour exam (40%), project report which includes written report and presentation (60%) Practical field work: As advised and required by the project; approximately 30-36 hours of research project in the laboratory or field Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Paradigm shifts in biology have changed the emphasis from single biomolecule studies to complex systems of biomolecules, cells and their interrelationships in ecosystems of life. Such an integrated understanding of cells, biomolecules and ecosystems is key to innovations in biology. Life relies on organisation, communication, responsiveness and regulation at every level. Understanding biological mechanisms, improving human health and addressing the impact of human activity are the great challenges of the 21st century. This unit will investigate life at levels ranging from cells, and biomolecule ecosystems, through to complex natural and human ecosystems. You will explore the importance of homeostasis in health and the triggers that lead to disease and death. You will learn the methods of cellular, biomolecular, microbial and ecological investigation that allow us to understand life and intervene in ecosystems to improve health. The same theory will be covered as in the advanced stream but in this Special Studies Unit, the practical component is a research project. The research will be a synthetic biology project investigating genetically engineered organisms. Students will have the opportunity to develop higher level generic skills in computing, communication, critical analysis, problem solving, data analysis and experimental design.
Textbooks
Please see unit outline on LMS
CHEM1011 Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: There is no assumed knowledge of chemistry for this unit of study but students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February). Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry Bridging Course (offered in February, and online year-round, see http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will equip you with the fundamental knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application. You will learn about atomic theory, structure and bonding, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students whose chemical background is weak (or non-existent). Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit begins with more fundamental concepts, and does not cover, or goes into less detail about some topics. Progression to intermediate chemistry from this unit and Fundamentals of Chemistry 1B requires completion of an online supplementary course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1111 Chemistry 1A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Main Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1911 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: Students who have not completed HSC Chemistry (or equivalent) and HSC Mathematics (or equivalent) are strongly advised to take the Chemistry and Mathematics Bridging Courses (offered in February) Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students who have not completed secondary school chemistry are strongly advised to instead complete Fundamentals of Chemistry 1A in the first semester of the calendar year (unless you require 12 credit points of Chemistry and are commencing in semester 2). You should also take the Chemistry Bridging Course in advance (offered in February, and online year-round http://sydney.edu.au/science/chemistry/studying-chemistry/bridging-course.shtml).
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions like how do dyes work, how do we desalinate water, how do we measure the acid content in foods, how do we get the blue in a blueprint, and how do we extract natural products from plants? Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will understand the 'why' and the 'how' of the natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a satisfactory prior knowledge of the HSC chemistry course.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1911 Chemistry 1A (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures and 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3-hr practical per week for 9 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1991 Assumed knowledge: 80 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, laboratory log book, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for broad application, including further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups of molecules. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry through experiments that ask and answer questions about the chemical nature and processes occurring around you. Through inquiry, observation and measurement, you will better understand natural and physical world and will be able to apply this understanding to real-world problems and solutions. This unit of study is directed toward students with a good secondary performance both overall and in chemistry or science. Students in this category are expected to do this unit rather than Chemistry 1A. Compared to the mainstream Chemistry 1A, the theory component of this unit provides a higher level of academic rigour and makes broader connections between topics.
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
CHEM1991 Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Toby Hudson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3x1-hr lectures; 1x1-hr tutorial per week; 1x3hr practical per week for 12 weeks Prohibitions: CHEM1001 or CHEM1101 or CHEM1901 or CHEM1903 or CHEM1109 or CHEM1011 or CHEM1111 or CHEM1911 Assumed knowledge: 90 or above in HSC Chemistry or equivalent Assessment: quizzes, attendance, presentations, exam Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Chemistry describes how and why things happen from a molecular perspective. Chemistry underpins all aspects of the natural and physical world, and provides the basis for new technologies and advances in the life, medical and physical sciences, engineering, and industrial processes. This unit of study will further develop your knowledge and skills in chemistry for application to life and medical sciences, engineering, and further study in chemistry. You will learn about nuclear and radiation chemistry, wave theory, atomic orbitals, spectroscopy, bonding, enthalpy and entropy, equilibrium, processes occurring in solutions, and the functional groups in carbon chemistry. You will develop experimental design, conduct and analysis skills in chemistry in small group projects. The laboratory program is designed to extend students who already have chemistry laboratory experience, and particularly caters for students who already show a passion and enthusiasm for research chemistry, as well as aptitude as demonstrated by high school chemistry results. Entry to Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is restricted to a small number of students with an excellent school record in Chemistry, and applications must be made to the School of Chemistry. The practical work syllabus for Chemistry 1A (Special Studies Program) is very different from that for Chemistry 1A and Chemistry 1A (Advanced) and consists of special project-based laboratory exercises. All other unit of study details are the same as those for Chemistry 1A (Advanced).
Textbooks
Recommended textbook: Blackman, Bottle, Schmid, Mocerino and Wille,Chemistry, 3rd Edition, 2015 (John Wiley) ISBN: 978-0-7303-1105-8 (paperback) or 978-0-7303-2492-8 (e-text)
ENVI1003 Global Challenges: Food, Water, Climate

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Stephen Cattle Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two lectures per week, 2-hour computer lab per week, two-day weekend field trip Assessment: 2-hour exam (50%), field trip report (15%), group work presentation (20%), GIS reports (15%) Practical field work: Computer practicals and two-day field trip Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In the 21st century the population of the world will increase both in size and its expectation in terms of food, energy and consumer demands. Against this demand we have a planet in crisis where natural resources are degraded, biodiversity is diminishing and planetary cycles related to climate are reaching points of irreversible change. Management of our precious natural resources is a balancing act between production and conservation as always, but now we have to do this against a background of potential large scale changes in climate. In this unit students will gain an understanding of the key environmental challenges of the 21st century; namely food security, climate change, water security, biodiversity protection, ecosystems services and soil security. In the second half, using Australian case studies, we will explore how we manage different agro-ecosystems within their physical constraints around water, climate and soil, while considering linkages with the global environmental challenges. Management now, in the past and the future will be considered, with an emphasis on food production. This unit is recommended unit for students interested in gaining a broad overview of the environmental challenges of the 21st century, both globally and within Australia.
GEOS1002 Introductory Geography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and eight 2 hour practicals during semester. Prohibitions: GEOS1902 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 2000 word essay, two online quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a geographical perspective on the ways in which people interact with each other and the physical world, focussing on the processes that generate spatial variation and difference. Students will consider the development and characteristics of natural environments across the globe, and will explore how these environments both constrain, and are influenced by, humans. In the process, they will learn about the biophysical, political, economic, cultural and urban geographies that shape contemporary global society. Each of these themes will be discussed with reference to key examples, in order to understand the ways in which the various processes (both physical and human) interact. The unit of study is designed to attract and interest students who wish to pursue geography as a major within their undergraduate degree, but also has relevance to students who wish to learn how to think geographically about the contemporary world.
GEOS1902 Introductory Geography (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson, Dr Dan Penny Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour lecture per week and 8 2 hour practicals per semester, plus independent group work. Prohibitions: GEOS1002 or GEOG1001 or GEOG1002 Assumed knowledge: (ATAR 90 or above) or equivalent Assessment: One 2 hour exam, one 1000 word essay, two online quizzes, one practical report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS1002, but will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments.
AGEC1006 Economic Environment of Agriculture

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: AGEC1003 or AGEC1004 Assumed knowledge: HSC Mathematics Assessment: 1x2hr exam (55%) and 1x50 min mid-semester exam (25%) and workshop papers (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is designed to give an understanding of some basic economic principles and to introduce the characteristics of the economic environment in which Australian agriculture operates. Topics to be covered include the structure, nature and history of the agricultural industries in Australia; agricultural adjustment in the world economy; introductory principles of production economics and farm management; elementary price theory and the factors affecting the demand, supply and prices of agricultural commodities.
Textbooks
HE Drummond and JW Goodwin, Agricultural Economics, 3rd edn (Prentice-Hall, 2011)

2000-level units of study

Core
GEOS2121 Environmental and Resource Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sophie Webber Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hour lecture; one hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: 6 credit points of first year Geosciences units or ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOS2921 Assessment: One exam, one essay, one report, tutorial attendance (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
We are in the midst of an unprecedented global ecological and climatological crisis, and consequently need to transform our social, political and economic systems. This crisis - its causes, its effects, and its solutions - are geographically unevenly distributed and situated. Therefore, this unit of study uses geographical concepts to consider what has caused this global crisis, how we should think about the relations and interactions between humans and their environments, and what some strategies are for managing our environment and resources to negotiate this predicament. Using examples focused in Australia, Asia, and the Pacific region, students will learn how to integrate environmental, economic, political, social and cultural considerations and perspectives, and how to evaluate environmental and resource management policies and ideas.
GEOS2921 Environmental and Resource Management (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sophie Webber Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hour lecture; one hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: A mark of 75 in a 6 credit point Junior Geosciences unit of study or a mark of 75 in ECOP1001 or ECOP1002 Prohibitions: GEOS2121 Assessment: One exam, one essay, one report, tutorial attendance (100%) Practical field work: Seminar, maximum of four hours Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Advanced students will receive the same core lecture materials as for GEOS2121 but have a separate seminar and are required to complete alternative written work.
Selective
GOVT2228 Environmental Politics

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: 12 credit points at 1000 level in Politics or 12 credit points at 1000 level in International Relations or 12 credit points at 1000 level in Government and International Relations Prohibitions: GOVT2208 Assessment: 1x1000wd Short Essay (20%), 1x2000wd Major Essay (40%), 1x1.5hr Examination (30%), 1xTutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Environmental issues pose increasingly difficult challenges to our societies. What is the nature of these challenges? Where have they come from? How have political institutions adapted to them, at the national and international levels? What further changes might be necessary to better meet them? How might these changes come about? What effects might they have on the future of politics? This unit of study will engage these kinds of questions as an introduction to some theoretical and practical dimensions of environmental politics.
AREC2003 Concepts in Enviro and Resource Economics

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: ECON1001 or ECON1040 or AGEC1006 or AGEC1102 Assessment: 1x50min Mid-semster test (20%), 2x1000wd Assignments (30%), 1x2hr Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit builds on the concepts in microeconomics to provide insights into efficient and sustainable resource management. The primary focus of this unit is analytical. Emphasis is placed on the importance of property rights structures, cost-effective regulations and dynamic considerations in managing natural resource stocks and environmental assets. Some introductory material on economic valuation of environmental assets and benefit cost analysis is included.
GEOS2111 Natural Hazards: a GIS Approach

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hour lecture; two hour practical/tute/lab Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Junior Geosciences units Prohibitions: GEOS2911 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Staff will organize a non-compulsory half-day weekend field excursion to explore local Sydney hazards for interested students.
The unit provides an essential framework for understanding the environmental response to short- and long-term geologic, oceanic and atmospheric processes. This Unit of Study introduces students to a variety of natural phenomena that affect society with impact levels ranging from nuisance to disastrous. The discussion of each hazard focuses on: (1) the process mechanics, (2) hazards and risk, and (3) methods for mitigation. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are used by scientists, planners, policy-makers and the insurance industry alike to address many issues relating to natural hazards. This Unit of Study will introduce students to the major concepts relating to GIS and provide practical experience in the application of GIS techniques to hazard mapping, risk assessment and mitigation.
Textbooks
No prescribed textbook
GEOS2911 Natural Hazards: A GIS Approach (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Dale Dominey-Howes Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two hour lecture; two hour practical/tute/lab Prerequisites: A mark of 75 in a 6 credit point Junior Geosciences unit of study Prohibitions: GEOS2111 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, three reports (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Staff will organize a non-compulsory half-day weekend field excursion to explore local Sydney hazards for interested students.
This unit has the same objectives as GEOS2111 and is suitable for students who wish to pursue aspects of the subject in greater depth. Entry is restricted and selection is made from the applicants on the basis of their performance to date. Students who elect to take this unit will participate in alternatives to some aspects of the standard unit and will be required to pursue independent work to meet unit objectives.
Textbooks
No set textbook

3000-level units of study

Core
ENVI3111 Environmental Law and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: One 2 hour lecture and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3911 Assessment: Essays, in-class tests, tutorials, exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Environmental regulation and governance plays an important role in regulating human impacts on the environment. This unit provides an introduction to environmental regulation. We investigate key environmental issues through an examination of environmental policies, legislation and case law at a variety of scales (international, national and state/local). The ethics component helps students develop thoughtful and informed positions on issues in environmental ethics. The aim of this Unit is to enable students to understand the broad principles of environmental law and ethics and to apply this understanding to contemporary environmental problems.
ENVI3911 Environmental Law and Ethics (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Two 1 hour lectures and one 1 hour tutorial per week. Prerequisites: Distinction average across 12 credit points of Intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3111 Assessment: Essays, tutorial attendance, exam (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This advanced unit of study will cover the same core lecture material as for ENVI3111, but students will be required to carry out more challenging practical assignments based on a fieldtrip activity.
Core Interdisciplinary project
ENVI3888 Environmental Studies Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Phil McManus Session: Semester 2 Classes: lectures 2hrs week x 6, project based worik 2hrs x 5 then 4hrs x 4, presentations 1x4 hours (depending on student numbers) Prerequisites: GEOS2X21 and (GOVT2228 or AREC2003 or GEOS2X11) Prohibitions: ENVI3112 or ENVI3912 Assessment: Literature review (individual, 2000 words) 20%, Report (group, 3000 words) 60%, Presentation (group, 15 minutes plus questions) 20% Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Understanding and being able to undertake Environmental Assessment is a challenge for graduates of many academic disciplines. This unit will investigate the history, strengths, weaknesses and potential of various forms of environmental assessment through an integrated project that enables students to build on their disciplinary knowledge, work in cross-disciplinary teams and develop an interdisciplinary approach and knowledge. You will learn the methods of environmental assessment, and to understand critically the theory and practice of Environmental Assessment from both positive (scientific) and normative (value) perspectives. The positive perspective will focus on the scientific aspects of the assessment process, the quality of science in Environmental Assessment, mitigation measures. By doing this unit, you will develop teamwork skills, decision-making skills, research and communication skills and a knowledge of environmental assessment relevant for future employment. There will also be involvement from organisations that are potential employers of graduates from this major.
Disciplinary Selective
ENVI3114 Energy and the Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Arne Geschke Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hour lecture and 1 hour seminar per week; field trips Prerequisites: 12 credit points of Intermediate units Prohibitions: ENVI3001 or PHYS3600 Assumed knowledge: Junior Physics units or Intermediate Environmental Science units Assessment: Essay (50%), quantitative assessment (20%), seminar talk (20%), quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers many aspects of energy and the environment: energy resources and use; electrical power generation including fossil fuelled and alternate methods; environmental impacts of energy use and power generation including greenhouse gas emissions; transportation and pollution; energy management in buildings; solar thermal energy, photovoltaics, wind power and nuclear energy; embodied energy and net emissions analysis and, importantly, socio-economic and political issues related to energy provision.
GEOS3014 GIS in Coastal Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1 hour lectures and 1x3h practical/week Prerequisites: Either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115, GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)] Prohibitions: GEOS3914 or MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, two project reports, quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Coastal Management is about how scientific knowledge is used to support policy formulation and planning decisions in coastal environments. The course links coastal science to policy and practice in management of estuaries, beaches and the coastal ocean. The principles are exemplified through specific issues, such as coastal erosion, pollution, and impacts of climate-change. The issues are dealt with in terms of how things work in nature, and how the issues are handled through administrative mechanisms. These mechanisms involve planning strategies like Marine Protected Areas and setback limits on civil development in the coastal zone. The coastal environments and processes that are more relevant to coastal management including: rocky coasts; beaches, barriers and dunes; and coral reefs will also be introduced. At a practical level, the link between science and coastal management is given substance through development and use of 'decision-support models'. These models involve geocomputing methods that entail application of simulation models, remotely sensed information, and Geographic Information Systems (GIS). The course therefore includes both principles and experience in use of these methods to address coastal-management issues. (It thus also involves extensive use of computers.) Although the focus is on the coast, the principles and methods have broader relevance to environmental management in particular, and to problem-solving in general. That is, the course has vocational relevance in examining how science can be exploited to the benefit of society and nature conservation.
GEOS3914 GIS in Coastal Management (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Eleanor Bruce Session: Semester 2 Classes: Two hours of lectures, one 3 hour practical per week comprising one 1 hour practical demonstration and one 2 hour practical Prerequisites: Distinction average in either 12 credit points of Intermediate Geoscience units or [(GEOS2115 or GEOS2915) and (BIOL2018 or BIOL2918 or BIOL2024 or BIOL2924 or BIOL2028 or BIOL2928)]. Prohibitions: GEOS3014 or MARS3104 Assessment: One 2 hour exam, project work, two practical-based project reports, fortnightly progress quizzes (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: A distinction average in prior Geography, Geology or Marine Science units of study is normally required for admission. This requirement may be varied and students should consult the unit of study coordinator.
Advanced students will complete the same core lecture material as for GEOS3014 but will carry out more challenging projects, practicals, assignments and tutorials.
ECOS3013 Environmental Economics

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive January,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: AREC2003 or RSEC2031 or ECOS2001 or ECOS2901 Assessment: 1x1500wd Essay (25%), 1hr Mid-semester test (25%), 1x2hr Final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The natural environment is invariably affected by production and consumption in our modern economy. In particular, environmental outcomes are important in the presence of market failures (externalities and public goods). This unit focuses on developing a student's detailed understanding of the economic techniques used by policymakers to address environmental issues. These techniques include: Pigovian taxes and subsidies; regulation with asymmetric information; marketable permits; pricing contributions for public goods; optimal damages; and the allocation of property-rights and market failures.
GEOS3520 Urban Citizenship and Sustainability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 1 hour tutorial per week, six 2 hours practical sessions. Prerequisites: 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study, including 6 credit points from the following (GEOS2112 or GEOS2912 or GEOS2123 or GEOS2923 or GEOS2115 or GEOS2915 or GEOS2121 or GEOS2921 or SOILS2002 or LWSC2002) Prohibitions: GEOS3920 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report (100%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
More than half the world's population now live in cities. The contemporary growth of cities, however, is attached to profound political and environmental questions about what it means to be urban, what 'being urban' means for the planet, and how we might produce more just and sustainable urban spaces and experiences. This Unit provides grounding to these crucial questions by examining urban environments from the dual perspectives of citizenship and sustainability. The Unit has three modules. Module 1 examines the intersection of urban environmental change with questions of citizenship and justice. Module 2 considers key urban environmental issues such as energy, transport and food, and how cities and citizens might address stresses and shocks in these systems. Module 3 studies new models for governing emergent urban environmental challenges. Throughout the semester, a Practical Project will involve a research project with real-world partners to introduce key skills related to working in collaboration with external organisations.
GEOS3920 Urban Citizenship and Sustainability (Adv)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kurt Iveson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 hour lecture and 2 hour tutorial per week Prerequisites: Distinction average in 24 credit points of Intermediate units of study including 6 credit points from one of the following units: GEOS2112, GEOS2912, GEOS2123, GEOS2923, GEOS2115, GEOS2915, GEOS2121, GEOS2921, SOIL2002, LWSC2002 Prohibitions: GEOS3520 Assessment: One 2hr exam, one 2000w essay, one 2000w group-based prac report. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
GEOS3920 has the same thematic content as GEOS3520 however with elements taught at an Advanced level
GEOS3053 Asia-Pacific Field School

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Intensive February Classes: Three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Prohibitions: GEOG3201 or GEOS3953 Assessment: Group participation; one major essay; one seminar report; one blog post. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study uses classroom and field-based learning to introduce students to the application of geographical concepts and methods to environmental and development problems in Asia-Pacific countries. The location and timing of this unit may change from year to year in accordance with the availability of lecturers and climatic considerations. In 2019, it will be run over two to three weeks in February, in India. This unit can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator, and involves mandatory atttendance at pre-departure briefings. You will learn skills and knowledge about: (1) India's environmental and development challenges at a national scale (2) processes of rural social, environmental and economic change; (3) the challenges of sustainable urbanisation; (4) social transformations in India, specifically relating to gender, migration and mobility, and class. The unit is conducted in partnership with pre-eminent Indian universities, who provide guest lectures as appropriate in addition to those by the unit of study coordinator. The unit will also expose students to civil society groups working on issues of geo-political, economic and environmental importance. By doing this unit you will develop skills and knowledge that are highly relevant to research and careers in the Asia-Pacific.
GEOS3953 Asia-Pacific Field School (Advanced)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Bill Pritchard Session: Intensive February Classes: Three weeks in-country intensive involving lectures, fieldwork and field-based methods training, readings and small group discussions. Prerequisites: 6 credit points of Intermediate units of study in Geography. Prohibitions: GEOS3053 Assessment: Group participation; one major essay; one seminar report; one blog post. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students must contact the unit coordinator no later than September in the year before taking this unit.
The unit of study uses classroom and field-based learning to introduce students to the application of geographical concepts and methods to environmental and development problems in Asia-Pacific countries. The location and timing of this unit may change from year to year in accordance with the availability of lecturers and climatic considerations. In 2019, it will be run over two to three weeks in February, in India. This unit can be taken only with prior permission from the unit of study coordinator, and involves mandatory atttendance at pre-departure briefings. You will learn skills and knowledge about: (1) India's environmental and development challenges at a national scale (2) processes of rural social, environmental and economic change; (3) the challenges of sustainable urbanisation; (4) social transformations in India, specifically relating to gender, migration and mobility, and class. The unit is conducted in partnership with pre-eminent Indian universities, who provide guest lectures as appropriate in addition to those by the unit of study coordinator. The unit will also expose students to civil society groups working on issues of geo-political, economic and environmental importance. By doing this unit you will develop skills and knowledge that are highly relevant to research and careers in the Asia-Pacific.
Interdisciplinary Project Selective
SCPU3001 Science Interdisciplinary Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Pauline Ross Session: Intensive December,Intensive February,Intensive January,Intensive July,Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: The unit consists of one seminar/workshop per week with accompanying online materials and a project to be determined in consultation with the partner organisation and completed as part of team with academic supervision. Prerequisites: Completion of 2000-level units required for at least one Science major. Assessment: group plan, group presentation, reflective journal, group project Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed for students who are concurrently enrolled in at least one 3000-level Science Table A unit of study to undertake a project that allows them to work with one of the University's industry and community partners. Students will work in teams on a real-world problem provided by the partner. This experience will allow students to apply their academic skills and disciplinary knowledge to a real-world issue in an authentic and meaningful way. Participation in this unit will require students to submit an application to the Faculty of Science.