Criminology

Criminology

Exemption from core units of study should not be assumed to be automatic. Formal approval must be obtained from the University of Sydney Law School prior to enrolment.
Master of Criminology
For the award of the Master of Criminology, students must complete 48 credit points, comprising:
(i) 12 credit points of core units of study; and
(ii) 36 credit credit points of elective units of sutdy.
Graduate Diploma in Criminology
For the award of the Graduate Diploma in Criminology, students must complete 24 credit points, comprising:
(i) 6 credit points of core units of study; and
(ii) 18 credit points of elective units of study.

Core

Master of Criminology
Master of Criminology students are required to complete the two core units of study listed below.
LAWS6032 Crime Research and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Judith Cashmore Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 2000wd research problem (30%) and 4000wd research proposal (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students. Elective unit for GradDipCrim students who commenced on or after 1 Jan 2019. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit provides an examination of research methods in the context of criminology. The relationship between theory and methodology is explored. The production of knowledge about crime is critically assessed. Sources and forms of crime data are discussed and their significance is assessed. Research design, evaluation and analysis are also studied.
LAWS6048 Explaining Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jennifer Bargen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: take-home exam (30%), class presentation (10%) and 3500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students and co-requisite for other criminology elective units. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit examines the relevance of theory to the process of explaining crime as a social phenomenon. It will selectively analyse the history of criminological thought. Special attention will be given to the cross-disciplinary nature of efforts to understand crime, criminality and their causes. A significant section of the unit will deal with contemporary approaches to criminological explanation including the influence of feminism and postmodernism. Contemporary theorists such as Foucault, Garland and Braithwaite will also be considered. The unit will endeavour to make explicit the links between criminological theory and the development of public policy.
Graduate Diploma in Criminology
Graduate Diploma in Criminology students are required to complete the core unit of study listed below.
LAWS6048 Explaining Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jennifer Bargen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: take-home exam (30%), class presentation (10%) and 3500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students and co-requisite for other criminology elective units. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit examines the relevance of theory to the process of explaining crime as a social phenomenon. It will selectively analyse the history of criminological thought. Special attention will be given to the cross-disciplinary nature of efforts to understand crime, criminality and their causes. A significant section of the unit will deal with contemporary approaches to criminological explanation including the influence of feminism and postmodernism. Contemporary theorists such as Foucault, Garland and Braithwaite will also be considered. The unit will endeavour to make explicit the links between criminological theory and the development of public policy.

Electives

LAWS6856 Anti-Terrorism Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Ben Saul Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 23, 24 & Apr 30 & May 1 (9-5) Prohibitions: CISS6011 or LAWS3483 Assumed knowledge: Students should have either completed LAWS6243 International Law I or have an understanding in at least one of the following areas: public or a specialised area of international law or criminal law or criminology or human rights or security and conflict studies acquired through university studies and/or relevant professional experience. Assessment: Option 1: assignment (40%) and 5000wd essay (60%), Option 2: 8000wd essay (100%) or Option 3: assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php
This unit explores how international law has confronted terrorist violence from the mid-19th century to the present, including under transnational and international criminal law, the law on the use of military force, the law of armed conflict, human rights law, measures adopted by the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly, and the law of state responsibility. It considers controversies about the (in)adequacy of the law in areas such as `targeted killings' (or extrajudicial assassinations?), aerial drones, detention and trial of suspects, `irregular renditions' (illegal abductions?), `enhanced interrogation' (torture?), `shoot to kill' policies, foreign terrorist fighters and citizen stripping, mass surveillance and privacy, and public emergency laws. Selected regional laws (in Europe, the Americas, Asia and Africa) and national laws (particularly in Australia, the UK and the US) implementing international obligations are also considered. The study of terrorism, and the law's response to it, is ultimately a study of when violence is justified, against whom, and for what purposes ¿ whether it is `freedom fighters' or `state terrorism', or extreme religious challenges to secular norms, at issue.
LAWS6105 Child Sexual Abuse: Diverse Perspectives

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Rita Shackel, Prof Judith Cashmore Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: 4500wd essay (60%) and critical review comprising oral presentation (20%) and written paper (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit of study examines the socio-legal complexities of responding to child sexual abuse in society. The unit presents students with a theoretical and multidisciplinary framework for understanding and evaluating contemporary issues relevant to child sexual abuse. More specifically the unit of study will analyse the nature of child sexual abuse and the underlying dynamics of such victimisation. Students will critically evaluate different strategies and models directed at identification and prevention of child sexual abuse and critically analyse legal responses to child sexual victimisation.
LAWS6032 Crime Research and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Judith Cashmore Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: class participation (10%), 2000wd research problem (30%) and 4000wd research proposal (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Core unit for MCrim and GradDipCrim students. Elective unit for GradDipCrim students who commenced on or after 1 Jan 2019. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit provides an examination of research methods in the context of criminology. The relationship between theory and methodology is explored. The production of knowledge about crime is critically assessed. Sources and forms of crime data are discussed and their significance is assessed. Research design, evaluation and analysis are also studied.
LAWS6986 Criminal Justice Internship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Garner Clancey Session: Intensive October Classes: Aug 1 & Nov 7 (9-5) Assessment: 2500wd reflective journal (30%), 2500wd organisational analysis (30%) and organisational task (40%) Practical field work: practical field work at a variety of criminal justice organisations for one day a week for the semester Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is offered to students enrolled in the MCrim and GradDipCrim only. Interested applicants must submit an Expression of Interest (maximum two typed pages) clearly outlining reasons for applying, details of previous internships undertaken (where applicable), perceived benefits of completing the internship, preferred placement agency/agencies and steps that the applicant will undertake to organise a placement. Those applicants demonstrating the greatest interest in and perceived benefit from the Internship will be accepted. The Expression of Interest must be submitted to A/Prof Garner Clancey E: garner.clancey@sydney.edu.au (Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php) by Monday 3 April 2020. Successful applicants will be formally notified of the outcome of their Expression of Interest and enrolment procedures explained approximately two weeks from the submission date. Successful applicants will then work with A/Prof Clancey to arrange placement at preferred host organisations. Please note that placement may be subject to permanent Australian residency in a number of organisations.
The Criminal Justice Internship provides an opportunity to experience the working environment of criminal justice agencies. Experience gained through placement with a relevant agency will be complemented by attendance at intensive seminars. These seminars will provide opportunities to reflect on the role of the host agency, the policy context within which the host agency operates, the ethical challenges associated with the work of the agency and the specific skills and knowledge gained through the Internship. The Internship will be especially beneficial to those students with limited work experience or those pursuing or contemplating a career change.
LAWS6193 Criminal Justice: Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Garner Clancey Session: Intensive April Classes: Mar 13, 14 & 27, 28 (9-5) Assessment: 1500wd seminar paper (35%) and 5000wd essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit examines responses to crime and crime prevention with reference to shifting notions of crime and responsibility for crime. It encourages a critical appreciation of the limitations of criminal justice system responses to crime and the necessity to develop a broader approach to crime prevention policy which responds to economic, social and cultural issues. The unit examines different ways of thinking about criminal justice, such as a means of order maintenance, dispute resolution, or risk management, and the shifting focus towards the prevention of future harms. Specific topics may include: restorative justice specialist courts, privatisation and contractualism, security, policing, and approaches to crime prevention and community safety.
LAWS6889 Death Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Cameron Stewart Session: Intensive June Classes: May 14, 15 & 28, 29 (9-5) Assessment: class presentation (20%) and assignment or 7000wd essay (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
Western attitudes toward death have undergone a remarkable transformation in the last century. For many, death now takes place in the hospital or the hospice following the decision of a doctor to cease providing treatment. As the management of death has passed from the family to health care professionals, it now makes sense to regard the moment and circumstances of death as largely medical phenomena. Moreover, as 'autonomy' has taken a dominant place amongst ethical values, it also makes sense to describe and measure death in terms of its 'acceptability' both to the dying person and his or her survivors. In tandem with these changes, technological innovations have transformed the dead or dying body into a potential source of valuable (and recyclable) biological material. These developments have thrown up new and urgent challenges for legal understandings about the timing of, and criminal responsibility for causing, death both within and outside medical settings. These developments have also disturbed conventional understandings of the corpse as sacred. Topics to be covered may include: death in contemporary Australia, the legal definition of life and death, medical futility and the concept of 'lives not worth living', euthanasia (with and without request), physician-assisted suicide, refusing and withholding life-prolonging treatment in adults and children, the Shipman/Patel scandals, ownership of the corpse and body parts, dead donor organ transplantation, organ sale and theft, posthumous reproduction, 'mercy' killing outside medical settings and the jurisdiction of the Coroner. The unit will interrogate these and other contemporary challenges for the law relating to death and dying both within Australia and, where appropriate, other selected comparator jurisdictions (US, UK and Canada). These will be mapped against socio-historical understandings of the changing meaning of death, dying and serious disability in Western societies, and students will be encouraged to reflect on the broader legal implications of these developments.
LAWS6358 Digital Criminology: Tech and Crime

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carolyn McKay Session: Intensive May Classes: Apr 3, 4 and May 1, 2 (9-5) Assessment: 3000wd essay (40%), 5000wd case study research project (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
New digital technologies are rapidly emerging as conduits for criminality as well as tools of policing and criminal procedure, and in the infrastructure of punishment. In this unit of study, students will learn about the impacts of technologies on crime and justice: in the commission of new crimes, in law enforcement and regulatory challenges, national security, and digital transformations in court procedure and court space, algorithmic risk assessments, corrections, and in the supervision of offenders. This unit of study draws from socio-legal literature and the emerging field of Digital Criminology to understand the profound shifts occurring in the move from terrestrial to digital environments, and from human 'reality' to augmented, virtual and artificial platforms in the criminal justice system.
LAWS6066 Discretion in Criminal Justice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adj Prof Nicholas Cowdery Session: Intensive November Classes: Oct 9, 10 & 23, 24 (9-5) Assessment: take-home exam (60%) and essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit looks at the ways in which the exercise of discretionary judgment arises for consideration in the course of the criminal justice process and the ways in which that judgment should be exercised at each step. It deals with each stage from the reporting or observation of crime, through investigation, arrest, charging, bail, plea, hearing, appeal, retrial and publicity. It describes how actors at each step (citizens, police, prosecutors and judges) confront decision making, the laws (legislation, common law) and rules (prosecution guidelines, memoranda and procedures) that apply and provides examples of the exercise of such discretions. It also looks at the place of public commentary (personal, the media and political) in the process. The unit explores nuances in the conduct of any criminal prosecution aside from the application of the letter of the law.
LAWS6970 Forensic Psychology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr H Paterson, Dr Celine Van Golde Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Prohibitions: PSYC1001 or PSYC3020 Assessment: class participation (10%), 3500-4000wd essay (40%) and 2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
Forensic psychology is the application of psychological knowledge and theories to all aspects of the criminal and civil justice systems. It is currently one of the fastest developing and most popular aspects of psychology. In this unit we will draw upon psychological evidence to explain and understand some of the people and processes involved in the legal system. Through a series of interactive seminars we will discuss topics such as lie detection, profiling, interviewing, jury deliberation, eyewitness memory, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and police officers.
LAWS6034 Gender, Violence and the Criminal Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Graeme Coss Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week Assessment: 3000wd essay (50%) and 2hr exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
Note: The unit replaced LAWS6034 Criminal Liability. Core unit for MCrim students who commenced before 1 January 2019. This unit is an introduction to aspects of criminal law for non-lawyers, and for law students from non-common law jurisdictions. It is therefore not available to students who have completed a law degree in a common law jurisdiction. Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-visitors.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
In this unit, students will examine the ways in which criminal liability is established, analysing the ingredients of particular personal violence offences (assault, sexual assault, the homicides) and related defences (provocation and self-defence, 'insanity' and substantial impairment, automatism, infanticide, intoxication, necessity and duress) from historical, theoretical and practical context perspectives. In the process, students will gain an appreciation of how gender impacts the ways that the criminal law and justice system contend with accused persons and their victims. The Law's claims to equality and neutrality will be scrutinised, as will perceptions of discrimination based on gender.
LAWS6877 Mental Illness: Law and Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: To be advised Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 17, 18 & Sep 7, 8 (9-5) Assessment: 3000wd assignment (40%) and 4500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/our-people.html. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit deals with the law relating to mental health issues in Australia including human rights principles. Background material on the nature and incidence of mental illness, psychiatric and medical issues, as well criminological and public policy literature will be considered where relevant. The unit covers substantive issues from civil treatment, welfare law, and criminal law. Topics covered will include: the social context of mental illness and the current and historical approaches to treatment of the mentally ill; contemporary State, Territorial and Federal involvement in mental health policy and legislation; the present framework of NSW mental health law and related welfare law including the Mental Health Act, Guardianship Act, Protected Estates Act and Mental Health (Criminal Procedure) Act; the process of scheduling persons with a mental illness; review mechanisms including the roles of the medical superintendent, magistrates, the mental health review tribunal and the Supreme Court; longer term detention of the mentally ill; community treatment and community counselling orders; protected estates and guardianship orders; electroconvulsive therapy; consent to surgery and special medical treatment; the defence of not guilty on the grounds of mental illness, the review of forensic patients and the exercise of the executive discretion; the issue of unfitness to be tried; the involuntary treatment of prisoners in the correctional system; and proposals and options for reform.
LAWS6197 Policing: Crime, Control and Security

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Lee Session: Intensive March Classes: Mar 6, 7 & 20, 21 (9-5) Assessment: class discussion leadership (20%), essay (50%) and group scenario exercise (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit critically examines the power relations that are policing (public and private). It recognizes and builds upon the essential and often problematic role of policing in crime control and security. Major aspects of police work and the discretion on which it depends, are analysed in order to understand the dynamics of social control in an age of risk and security.
LAWS6888 Risk, Fear and Insecurity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Murray Lee Session: Intensive June Classes: May 8, 9 & 22, 23 (9-5) Assessment: topic summary (compulsory but not assessed) and 3000wd essay (40%) and 4000wd policy assessment assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
This unit considers the significance of anxiety, 'fear of crime', risk and insecurity in the late modern world. It uses sophisticated analytical tools to discuss both the supposed growth in 'fear of crime' and the emergence of an array of technologies aimed at the reduction of crime risks. It also critically examines just what 'fear of crime' might actually be and how newspapers, security products, and insurance can be sold to us using the hook of our own anxieties. It also examines the anxieties related to terrorism and threats to national security and sovereignty.
Textbooks
Lee, M (2007) Inventing Fear of Crime, Willan, Devon
LAWS6192 Young People, Crime and the Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Assoc Prof Garner Clancey Session: Intensive September Classes: Aug 28, 29 & Sep 25, 26 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6069 Assessment: class presentation (10%), 3000wd essay (40%) and take-home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Academic Profile https://sydney.edu.au/law/about/people/list.php. The unit is also available on a Continuing Professional Development basis https://sydney.edu.au/law/study-law/continuing-professional-development.html
The unit aims to provide a broad overview of the functioning of the juvenile justice system and its relationship to juvenile offending. There is a specific emphasis on NSW in terms of understanding the operation of a particular system, however reference is frequently made to the wider Australian and international context. The unit analyses the historical development of a separate system of juvenile justice and the system of ideas about juvenile delinquency as distinct entities separable from broader notions of criminality and criminal justice. The unit also analyses the contemporary nature of juvenile crime and specific issues in relation to offending, policing, community-based corrections and detention centres. Social relations which mediate between the juvenile justice system and young people will be investigated through a focus on gender, race and class. The broader political determinants surrounding the operation of the juvenile justice system and moral panics in relation to juvenile offending will also be examined. The unit aims to develop a critical understanding of the link between theory and juvenile justice policy, and to develop an appreciation of the multi-disciplinary nature of criminological explanation.
Master of Criminology
The following elective units are only available to students undertaking the Master of Criminology
LAWS6233 Criminology Research Project A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Supervised by an appointed Sydney Law School academic staff member Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LAWS6234 Assessment: 15,000 to 20,000wd research project (100%) due on 15 June (Semester 1) or 15 November (Semester 2) of the final semester in which a student is enrolled in the research project Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Applications close on 30 November (Semester 1) and 30 May (Semester 2). Applications should only be lodged after the completion of at least 24 credit points. Late applications may be accepted from those with incomplete results. Students must complete both LAWS6233 and LAWS6234 within one or over two semesters. For further information, please visit https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/4533/pages/postgraduate-coursework-research-projects#research-projects or contact E: law.postgraduate@sydney.edu.au
The goal of this unit of study is to provide Master of Criminology students with an opportunity to pursue advanced research in an area of their choosing, under the limited supervision of a School member. The unit is only available in special circumstances, and with the approval of the Program Coordinator.
LAWS6234 Criminology Research Project B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Supervised by an appointed Sydney Law School academic staff member Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: LAWS6233 Assessment: 15,000 to 20,000wd research project (100%) due on 15 June (Semester 1) or 15 November (Semester 2) of the final semester in which a student is enrolled in the research project Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Applications close on 30 November (Semester 1) and 30 May (Semester 2). Applications should only be lodged after the completion of at least 24 credit points. Late applications may be accepted from those with incomplete results. Students must complete both LAWS6233 and LAWS6234 within one or over two semesters. For further information, please visit https://canvas.sydney.edu.au/courses/4533/pages/postgraduate-coursework-research-projects#research-projects or contact E: law.postgraduate@sydney.edu.au
Please refer to LAWS6233 Criminology Research Project A.