HIV, STIs and Sexual Health

 

For the most up to date unit of study information, please use the Find a Course search.
Enter the unit of study code and select "Units of Study" from the drop down list.

Errata
Item Errata Date
1

The following unit has been updated:

SEXH5409 Medical Management of Interpersonal Violence Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Katherine Brown and Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online plus block/intensive mode: 2 days, (9am-5pm) at Camperdown/Darlington campus. Assessment: workbook (60%); participation and workshop presentation on campus (10%); case study (15%); completion of 1 expert certificate (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
 
Interpersonal violence has been recognised as a significant problem in Australia. This includes family violence, sexual assault and physical assault. Whilst health professionals are aware of the issue they often lack the requisite skills to examine patients with a view to documenting injury and preparing court reports and expert certificates in relation to the interpretation of injury. General practice and emergency departments are two common locations for the victims of interpersonal violence to present with injury. This unit of study is designed to equip the learner with the knowledge and skills required to respond to the clinical needs of a person who has experienced interpersonal violence and to document the findings in a manner that would be useful for medico-legal reports. The learning process will include readings and self-directed learning activities relevant to the learner’s working environment and geographical location. The course will deal primarily with the physical effects of violence with limited emphasis on the management of psychological trauma. The course includes epidemiology, interpretation of injury, basic forensic science and toxicology, legal issues such as consent and the presentation of an expert certificate for the court.

 

Unit of study descriptions

BMRI5006 Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Adam Guastella Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture week 2, 9am-5pm Wednesday weeks 4, 8 and 11 Assessment: Online quiz (20%), case study analysis (40%), extended response questions (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based psychotherapy for a range of psychological disorders, with strong foundations in cognitive science and now increasingly in neuroscience. This unit provides a solid foundation in the theoretical and clinical underpinnings of the therapy, with a specific focus on the neuroscience of CBT as applied to various conditions. It demonstrates techniques of CBT, including case assessment, formulation, and therapy components. Students will develop a neurobiological understanding of CBT interventions and examine practice through case examination and group exercises.
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
HPOL5000 Introduction to Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block mode with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x 2-day workshops, online lectures and discussions Assessment: 1 x 1500wd written assignment (30%); 1 x 3000wd written assignment (50%); Online learning quiz (5%); online problem based learning exercise (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy. It gives an overview of the political choices and frameworks - national and global - that shape policymaking.
Learning objectives: By the end of this unit students will be able to: (i) Define the boundaries and key features of health policy; (ii) Understand the basic history and features of the Australian health system; (iii) Identify policy instruments and how they function; (iv) Understand the main frameworks used for analysing policy; (v) Understand the factors influencing how policy issues are prioritized in health; (vi) Demonstrate the capacity to apply these understandings in particular settings through case studies.
Content: This unit explores the main structures and institutions that make health policy. The unit examines debates over policy frameworks, and the evidence and advocacy in setting priorities. Conflicts over health policy will be placed in broader contexts - comparing different health systems and assessing global influences. Case studies will be used to examine the relationships between policy and practice.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other recommended reading materials will be available on the unit's eLearning site
INIM5001 Fundamental Immunology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Scott Byrne Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week and 1x4hr practical class and/or tutorials or seminars/week Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate immunology, undergraduate bacteriology and virology; basic concepts of epidemiology Assessment: Progressive assessment (50%) including written, practical, and oral based assessment tasks as well as 1x 2hr formal examination (50%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Immunology is the study of defence mechanisms that protect individuals against infections and cancers. Studies in immunology are leading to advances in clinical medicine, including understanding allergies, transplant rejection, cancer and autoimmune diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and insulin-dependent diabetes, as well as the development of new vaccines. This unit of study will provide an understanding of the components and functions of the immune system at the molecular and cellular level, the mechanisms of pathological immune processes and immune system dysfunction, mechanisms of immune responses to microorganisms and immunological techniques used in clinical diagnostic and research laboratories. The unit components will be delivered so as to develop skills in problem-solving, evaluation of scientific literature, and oral and written communication. Lectures will provide an overview of the immune system and an update of fundamental facts. Problem/case-based scenarios together with invited guest/specialized lectures, hands-on practical work, literature research and group discussions ('tutorials') will provide in-depth analysis of particular chosen topics.
Textbooks
Abul K Abbas, Andrew H Lichtman & Shiv Pillai. Basic Immunology: Functions and Disorders of the Immune System. 4th 5th Ed. 2016. Although this is the recommended text, other texts are equally sound. We suggest you discuss with the unit coordinator, A/Prof Scott Byrne, before making a textbook purchase.
INIM5002 Virology and Cell Technology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Barry Slobedman Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week; 1x4hr practical/tutorial class/week Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate Microbiology or Infectious Diseases Assessment: One 2-hour exam covering lecture material, one 2-hour theory of practical exam, written assignment and oral presentation (100%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to equip graduates with an in-depth knowledge of medical virology and cell technology that will enable them to work effectively as laboratory personnel in relevant hospital laboratories, clinics or research institutions. Students will develop skills in evaluation of scientific literature, in problem-solving and in scientific communication that will enable them to develop careers as administrators or policy-makers in hospitals, health care organisations or government bodies. The core of the program is a series of lectures, given face-to-face and/or available online. Practical classes will focus on the identification of viruses and cell culture technology, and on techniques used in research investigations and will be conducted in an appropriately equipped student laboratory.
Textbooks
Introduction to Modern Virology, N.J Dimmock, A.J, Easton and K.N Leppard, Blackwell Publishing, 6th Edition. Knipe and Howley. Fields Virology. 6th Edition 2013. Available freely as an electronic resource from the University of Sydney library.
INIM5011 Advanced Medical Bacteriology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jim Manos Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week; 2x2hr practical classes or tutorials or student presentations/week Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate Microbiology or Infectious Diseases Assessment: 1x2hr closed-book (Theory) exam, and 1x1.5hr closed book (Theory of Practical) exam Value: Theory exam (50%) Progressive assessment (50%) including class tutorial/presentations (25%), practical exam (15%) and laboratory book assessment (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study aims to build on the student's basic knowledge of microbiology to provide an awareness of modern concepts and the latest knowledge of medical bacteriology relevant to the susceptibility and response of the host to pathogenic bacteria, with special emphasis on the host-pathogen relationship at the cellular and molecular levels regarding symptoms, virulence factors, pathogenesis, diagnosis, treatment, control and prevention. The practical component will allow candidates to become familiar with modern molecular-based bacteriological techniques used to identify the characteristic genetic features of bacterial species that cause infections. The unit will provide the advanced scientific and intellectual basis to augment knowledge and understanding, at a postgraduate level, in a career involving medical microbiology or in a related subject area. Lectures will be used to impart knowledge and understanding as well as review key themes of the module, and many of these will be given by experts in the current field. Tutorials will utilise activities such as journal review and topic presentation which enable develop their skills by presenting research on a range of issues including advances in knowledge on bacterial pathogenesis, identification and treatment in Australia and worldwide. The use of case studies will enable candidates to examine breakouts of disease and their investigation by the clinical laboratory. Laboratory sessions will enable students to apply the theoretical concepts of laboratory investigation at the molecular level using advanced molecular techniques of DNA, RNA and protein purification and analysis.
Textbooks
While all material for examination is contained within the lectures, tutorials and practical classes, students who wish to learn more can undertake further reading. Recommended texts for further reading: Bacterial Pathogenesis: A Molecular Approach, Third Edition; Brenda A. Wilson, Abigail A. Salvers, Dixie D. Whitt, and Malcolm E. Winkler ASM Press 2011. Bacterial-Epithelial Cross-Talk: Molecular Mechanisms in Pathogenesis Ed. Beth A McCormick Cambridge University Press UK 2006. Although these are recommended, other texts are equally sound. We suggest you discuss with the unit coordinator, Jim Manos, before making a textbook purchase.
INIM5012 Infection Control and Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Peter McMinn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lectures/week; 2x 1.5hr practical classes/week Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate Microbiology or Infectious Diseases Assessment: 1x2hr examination (60%), progressive assessments including a practical exam and a written assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to equip graduates to use hospital laboratory services and the research literature in the recognition of individual cases of communicable disease, trace the source of outbreaks and provide a scientific basis for development of institutional infection control policies. There are four specific learning objectives: to know how to estimate the risk of transmission of infection and to assess the value of control measures; to understand the methods used to determine the efficacy of antimicrobial drugs both for treating individual patients and in terms of policy guidelines; to understand the scientific basis of vaccination and its value and limitations in the field; to appreciate the human factors involved in achieving effective infection control. The core of the program is a series of lectures, practical classes and tutorials based on important current or historical examples of epidemic infectious diseases.
Textbooks
Recommended Reading: Infection Prevention and Control: Applied Microbiology for Healthcare, 2nd Edition, Gould, D and Brooker, C. Palgrave McMillan 2008; ISBN 978-0-230-50753-1. Red Book: 2006 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases, 27th Edition, Pickering, LK, Baker, CJ, Long, SS, McMillan, JA (Eds). American Academy of Pediatrics; 2006.ISBN 978-1-58110-194-2. Although these are recommended reading, other texts are equally sound. We suggest you discuss with the unit coordinator, Peter McMinn, before making a textbook purchase.
INIM5022 Global Control of Infectious Diseases

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Vitali Sintchenko Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2×1hr lectures/week, 1×3hr practical classes and/or 2×2hr tutorials/week Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate bacteriology and virology; basic concepts of epidemiology Assessment: written examination (40%), progressive assessments comprising written assignment (20%), journal club presentation (20%), laboratory work and tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will provide students with knowledge about detection, monitoring and control of existing and emerging pathogens, and with the necessary skills to plan epidemic preparedness strategies, to identify optimal strategies for disease prevention, containment or eradication and to evaluate their effectiveness. This module offers a multidisciplinary framework for understanding the principles of interventions against infectious diseases and focuses on the study of global infectious disease threats in the context of their routes of transmission and potential intervention strategies, as well as the reasons for the success or failure of control programs. The core of this unit is a series of lectures, practical demonstrations and problem-solving tutorials describing real-life examples of diagnostic and surveillance strategies and vaccination policies, community outbreak investigations and epidemic/pandemic preparedness planning. A significant proportion of the lectures are delivered by invited expert infectious disease practitioners and laboratory scientists. The main principles will be illustrated using examples from pandemic and seasonal influenza, arbovirus diseases, tuberculosis, zoonotic and food- and water-borne bacterial infections. A large portion of this unit is based at the State reference laboratories of the Institute of Clinical Pathology and Medical Research at Westmead Hospital, Sydney Medical School - Westmead Campus.
Textbooks
Plotkin SA, Orenstein WA, Offit PA. Vaccines. Saunders, 2008. Heymann DL, Nunn M. Control of communicable diseases manual. American Public Health Association, 2008. Kimball AM. Risky trade: Infectious disease in the era of global trade. Ashgate, 2006. Webber R. Communicable disease epidemiology and control: A global perspective. CABI Publishing, 2013. A set of recently published journal papers and reviews will also be provided for reading.
MEDF5005 Health Research Methods and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Timothy Schlub Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x compulsory in person interactive full day workshops, 4x optional in person 3hr tutorials, 5x online lectures and discussions, 2x online elective module readings Assessment: Study design and ethics assignment (40%), statistics assignment (20%), statistics exam (20%), online self-study elective task (10%), online quizes (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study introduces students to the fundamental skills that are required for postgraduate research in medicine and health. Students will learn how to conduct research that is scientifically and ethically sound, and be able to critically appraise and review literature. Students will understand the strengths and limitations of common study designs and develop simple but important statistical analysis skills, including how to present and interpret data, basic data management skills, and how to determine the required sample size for a study. Obtaining ethics approval is necessary for any study involving the collection or analysis of data involving humans, animals or their tissues. Hence, this unit will also cover ethics in research and when and how to apply for ethics approval. These fundamental skills promote a scholarly attitude towards knowledge and understanding, and are essential for engagement with the research community.
MEDF5301 Project (Advanced Masters)

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress and implementation of their project Assessment: 2,000 wd written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10,000 wds, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval to enrol is conditional upon the submission of a brief project outline and identification of an appropriate project supervisor, as negotiated with the course coordinator.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master degree. The project may take the form of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. Candidates in some disciplines may be able to undertake a work placement and will be required to negotiate the form of scholarly written work, related to their placement, to be submitted for assessment. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto a study that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. On completion of the project/work placement the successful candidate will be able to plan and execute a substantial research project or scholarly work . Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit their project report/dissertation/publication. If the candidate cannot submit their work erolling once in MEDF5301 or once in both Part A and Part B then they must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of project units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until they submit.
MEDF5302 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part A)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress and implementation of their project Assessment: 2,000 wd written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10,000 wds, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval to enrol is conditional upon the submission of a brief project outline and identification of an appropriate project supervisor, as negotiated with the course coordinator.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master degree. The project may take the form of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. Candidates in some disciplines may be able to undertake a work placement and will be required to negotiate the form of scholarly written work, related to their placement, to be submitted for assessment. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto a study that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. On completion of the project/work placement the successful candidate will be able to plan and execute a substantial research project or scholarly work. Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit their project report/dissertation/publication. If the candidate cannot submit their work erolling once in MEDF5301 or once in both Part A and Part B then they must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of project units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until they submit.
MEDF5303 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part B)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress and implementation of their project Assessment: 2,000 wd written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10,000 wds, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval to enrol is conditional upon the submission of a brief project outline and identification of an appropriate project supervisor, as negotiated with the course coordinator.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master degree. The project may take the form of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. Candidates in some disciplines may be able to undertake a work placement and will be required to negotiate the form of scholarly written work, related to their placement, to be submitted for assessment. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto a study that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. On completion of the project/work placement the successful candidate will be able to plan and execute a substantial research project or scholarly work. Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit their project report/dissertation/publication. If the candidate cannot submit their work erolling once in MEDF5301 or once in both Part A and Part B then they must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of project units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until they submit.
MIPH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 1.5 hr lecture per week for 13 weeks; 1x 1.5hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks plus 1x 1 day peer-learning session through group presentations; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1 x group presentation (25%), 1x2500 word written essay (50%), tutorial facilitation (20%) and peer evaluation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit gives candidates an insight into the prevention and control of communicable diseases in developing countries using country-specific examples presented by professionals with field experience. The unit covers tropical diseases (including schistosomiasis and leprosy), as well as vector-borne conditions (including yellow fever and dengue), zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza and Ebolavirus disease.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5115 Women's and Children's Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Camille Raynes-Greenow and Dr Ying Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x2000 word individual assignment, (50%), 1x group report (30%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit gives an introduction to the health status of women and children in low and middle income countries and highlights the interconnectedness of women's and children's health. It presents some of the major causes of mortality and morbidity and interventions and approaches to improving outcomes from a public health perspective. Issues covered include perinatal mortality, contraception, nutrition, HIV, cancer, diarrhoeal disease, vaccine preventable diseases and childhood disability.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5116 Culture, Health, Illness and Medicine

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cynthia Hunter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop; 1 x 2hr seminar per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x3000 word essay (65%) and 1x1hr class facilitation (25%), class participation 10%. Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide an integrated and interpretive approach to an understanding of health-related behaviours of populations in international settings, by synthesizing anthropological knowledge and methodology, and the interactions of culture, biology, psychology and environment. The teaching process is by student-led, lecturer-guided, discussion based review and critical analysis of relevant topics. During the unit, students will explore a range of issues in global and multicultural health from an anthropological perspective. Methodological approaches will encompass ethnography and other anthropological data collection methods. The issues covered will include cultural influences on health, illness and healing, such as indigenous and traditional beliefs and systems, gender and cultural change and the impact of modernization and development on illness and healing. The impact examines disease and illness patterns - their distribution and persistence, mental illness and culture and attitudes towards the use of medications; and the provision of culturally sensitive and appropriate services. The emphasis will be on covering a range of topic areas relevant to the students enrolled, and those of particular importance in contemporary international and multicultural health contexts.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5118 Global Perspectives of HIV/AIDS

This unit of study is not available in 2017

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joel Negin Session: Semester 2a Classes: 4 days of intensive lectures spread over a 1 month period; also offered fully online Assessment: 1xgroup report (20%), peer evaluation (10%), 1x2000 word individual assignment (60%), and participation in discussions (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit offers a detailed and evidence-based assessment of the global HIV situation to equip students with the latest understanding of HIV distribution and trends globally, its social and economic implications, the measures being taken to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, the gaps that need to be addressed in HIV control, and the politics around global HIV issues. Examples from different parts of the world, particularly less developed settings, are used to illustrate key issues influencing the HIV control agenda globally. Emphasis is placed on developing a critical and analytical approach to assessing the HIV situation and developing interventions for its control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5131 Foundations of International Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Robert Cumming, Associate Professor Joel Negin, Dr Sarah Bernays Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 12 weeks; 2x1 day seminars and 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (25%), 1xgroup presentation (25%), 1x2500 word assignment (40%) and tutorial discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Departmental permission required for non-MIPH students
The unit aims to provide candidates with a multidisciplinary perspective of the interplay between health and development in low- and middle-income countries from a range of social science and public health disciplines. The unit will cover the following themes: health and development, Millennium Development Goals, poverty and health, gender and health, , climate change and health, population ageing,, human rights and health, health systems, human resources for health, and primary health care. At the end of the unit, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relation between health and development; demonstrate an understanding of how health systems operate in developing countries; and demonstrate an understanding of the role played by the various international organisations and agencies in health in less developed settings.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearnng site.
MIPH5135 Health Systems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Joel Negin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; plus 2x 0.5 day workshops; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x1500 word research paper (40%), 1x2000 word solution proposal (50%), and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Health systems are complex and multi-faceted. Successful health systems require attention to political economy, governance, institutions, and local context. This unit will cover health systems in developing countries to equip students with a conceptual understanding and a set of tools to address major public health challenges from a health systems perspective. With a focus on evidence-based decision making, the unit will provide an understanding of health systems including specific topics such as health workforce, financing, service delivery, information systems and policy, and how these impact health interventions and health status in less developed countries. A multi-sectoral, integrated model will be used to understand the varied aspects of development challenges related to health systems. A case study approach will then provide students with concrete examples of health systems challenges and will strengthen students' ability to view health problems in a holistic, multi-faceted manner. The unit will provide students with the tools needed to make a practical difference in health systems in less developed countries with emphasis on implementation of health projects and bringing interventions to scale.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5219 International Health Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; 1x1 day workshop; 1x1hr tutorial per week for 8 weeks; 1x1 day peer learning session through group presentations Prohibitions: MIPH5220 Assessment: 1x 40minutes (30 minute presentation plus 10 minutes questions and answers) group presentation (20%), peer evaluation on group participation (15%), 1x group written assignment (40%) and 1x short individual written assignment (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Effective international health projects management contributes to the achievement of health and development in developing countries. The Unit aims to give students a good understanding of the concepts and key elements of project design and evaluation, and to demonstrate tools and techniques used in effective project management at different stages. A detailed step by step application of the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) in project design will be presented, including stakeholder analysis, problem and objective analysis, and the logframe matrix. The Unit also gives students an opportunity for hands-on practice through the design of a project in an international setting and allows them to consider the challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management. The key topic areas covered include: concepts and principles of international project management; context and situation analysis; the LFA for project design; project management functions including managing information, resources, risk, quality and change; and project monitoring and evaluation. At the end of the course, students should be able to: identify the key aspects of the LFA to project design; develop a project proposal in international settings; recognise challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management; and apply a systematic approach to project planning and management in international settings.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
NURS5071 Contemporary Health Leadership

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: four intensive, on-campus study days Assessment: written work part 1 (20%), written work part 2 (50%) and essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
The need for leadership across all clinical disciplines has been shown to be integral to safe practice and strong staff morale. Providing a clear and unambiguous framework for practice and fostering skills in moral stewardship is known to enable personal growth and strong clinical care. This unit explores a range of issues for clinicians including their legal and ethical obligations, concepts of accountability and collegiality, and strategies to increase resilience and emotional intelligence. It aims to equip students to take initiative, create supportive and sustaining clinical environments, have the courage of their convictions, and to celebrate curiosity.The Australian health care system has experienced significant clinical, structural and socio-political transformations over the last two decades (collectively referred to as reform). The need for stronger and more effective leadership has never been more evident, particularly at the clinical interface. The chronic recruitment and retention issues and the changed nature of the nursing workforce and health workforce generally, vis-à-vis different levels of carers with diverse skill mix, have constructed a healthcare environment in which experienced (advanced) clinicians are positioned at the core of leadership development. While the concept of leadership is not new, the provision of leadership in the clinical arena is now a central component of clinical practice for all health professionals, regardless of experience, education or position. As we increasingly experience a globalised world, we recognise that leadership is not the same in all contexts. This unit is structured on an innovative case-based approach. Through using case studies along with the theoretical constructs / perspectives, students are encouraged to critique the achievements and failures of real-time leadership scenarios (and the leaders). This approach to student learning moves away from the traditional 'constructivistic approach' to management education, which is both subjective and prescriptive (Darmer 2000). The case study method facilitates examination of real leadership scenarios through which students can gain greater insight into the challenges that confront leaders in complex environments and how these challenges impact decision-making processes.As a postgraduate unit of study, this unit pursues critical analysis of the context in which leadership occurs. In the process of completing this unit, students cover a broad range of topics and explore the literature from a number of disciplines including management, sociology and nursing. While this unit of study is broad, it is designed to allow students to gain a more detailed understanding of the multiple and often conflicting contexts in which health leadership is now situated.
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll, Dr Erin Mathieu Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Prohibitions: BSTA5011,CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. It is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2011.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan and A/Professor Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5027 Public Health Program Evaluation Methods

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman, A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 day residential workshop in semester 2 Assessment: In-class participation (20%) and one 1500 word assignments at the end of the unit (80%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study is taught over two days of residential workshop and is an introduction to public health program evaluation principles. It builds on core MPH methods subjects, but extends learning objectives to develop skills in practical and applied public health and health promotion program planning, evaluation and research methods. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be used in program evaluation discussions, but the major focus will be on measuring the implementation of programs, and assessing public health program impact. There is an emphasis on evaluating 'real world' programs that address chronic disease prevention and health promotion, but other broad public health content areas will also be used as examples. The unit comprises four areas of discussion, including the [i] principles of evaluation; [ii] research designs and methodological issues for community and applied public health settings; [iii] methods for measuring program impact and outcomes; and [iv] the principles of research translation and dissemination. Attendance at the two days of residential teaching is compulsory for participants.
Textbooks
Recommended: Bauman A, Nutbeam D. Evaluation in a Nutshell. McGraw Hill Sydney (2nd Edition, 2013)
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 half-day workshops, face-to-face tutorials and online discussion; fully online version available Prohibitions: MIPH5014 Assessment: 1 quiz (10 multiple choice questions) (10%); 1x1500 word assignment (20%); 1 presentation (10%); 1x3000 word assignment (50%); tutorial participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This core unit of study introduces students to evidence-based health promotion as a fundamental approach to preventing disease and reducing health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) building blocks of disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) using evidence and evaluating disease prevention and health promotion programs, and (iii) using research to inform policy and practice. This unit will give students an understanding of disease prevention and health promotion and their relationship to public health, introduce design, implementation, and evaluation of disease prevention and health promotion interventions, and develop and refine students' research, critical appraisal, and communication skills. The role of translation of research into policy and practice to enhance public health impact will also be explored. The unit will also illustrate how the principles of prevention and health promotion are applied in Aboriginal settings.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5416 Vaccines in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aditi Dey, Dr Frank Beard, Professor Peter McIntyre Session: Semester 2 Classes: Preparatory online lectures and 1x 2day workshop at the Children's Hospital Westmead Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or PUBH5018 Assessment: 2x short online quizzes (10%) plus 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students who have not done the core units of study in epidemiology (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) or biostatistics (PUBH5018) but have previous demonstrable experience in these study areas will be required to request permission from the unit of study coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Permission is required to ensure that students have a basic grounding in epidemiology and biostatistics. The coordinator emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit to advise whether or not the student has permission to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of immunisation principles, the impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs), how to assess the need for new vaccines and how to implement and monitor a new vaccination program. This unit covers the history and impact of vaccination; basic immunological principles of immunisation; surveillance of diseases, vaccination coverage, vaccine effectiveness and adverse events; vaccine scares; risk communication; immunisation in the developing country context; assessing disease burden and new vaccines. Learning activities include short online preparatory lectures and a workshop with interactive lectures and small group case studies.
SEXH5200 Advanced STIs

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Normal Day: compulsory attendance at 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr journal club per week; Block Mode: Only available to domestic students enrolled in one the HIV, STIs and Sexual Health degrees subject to permission from the unit of study coordinator. 3x1hr lectures per week; plus block intensive mode, 2-3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Written examination (35%); Short essays (15%); Online quizzes (30%); Journal club (10%); Participation in group exercises (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The Block Mode (BM) attendance is reserved for domestic students enrolled in one of the HIV, STIs and Sexual Health degrees only.
This unit aims to describe the epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and management strategies for the common Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs). On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Discuss the microbiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of the common STIs; (ii) Demonstrate an understanding of the clinical spectrum of STIs, including asymptomatic infection, genital manifestations, extragenital manifestations and problems related to pregnancy; and (iii) When discussing STI management, students will understand the impact of STIs at individual and population levels and how needs differ with risk activity groups and geographical locations. HIV infection will only be covered in the context of its interactions with other STIs. Course content will include the basic anatomy, physiology and clinical skills required for the investigation of STIs; the epidemiology, microbiology and clinical aspects of the following conditions: vaginal discharge, urethral discharge, genital ulceration, upper genital tract infections, sexually transmitted hepatitis, syphilis, anogenital warts and cancer, genital infestations, genital dermatology and other conditions likely to present in a sexual health context. Issues related to difficulties of access to treatment, the challenges faced in resource-poor settings and syndromic management will also be covered.
SEXH5202 Advanced HIV Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Roger Garsia, Dr Frederick Lee Session: Semester 2 Classes: Normal Day: compulsory attendance at 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr journal club per week; Block Mode: Only available to domestic students enrolled in one the HIV, STIs and Sexual Health degrees subject to permission from the unit of study coordinator. 3x1hr lectures per week; plus block intensive mode, 2-3 days, 9am - 5pm. Assessment: Written examination (40%); Case-based discussions and presentations (20%); Online quizzes (30%); Journal club (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: The Block Mode (BM) attendance is reserved for domestic students enrolled in one of the HIV, STIs and Sexual Health degrees only.
This unit aims to describe the epidemiology, biology, pathogenesis and clinical contexts of HIV infection.
On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Understand the laboratory, clinical and social aspects of the diagnosis and management of HIV infection. Course content will include underlying scientific principles of diagnostics, virology, immunology and pathogenesis as applicable to HIV infection; clinical aspects of HIV infection, including seroconversion, asymptomatic infection, early symptomatic disease, major opportunistic infections (including AIDS-related conditions), tumours and death. Emphasis will be placed on prophylaxis, antiretrovirals for prevention and treatment and the management of associated conditions. Legal, ethical and social contexts will also be discussed.
SEXH5205 Advanced Adolescent Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fiona Robards, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (20%); In-depth case discussion (20%); Online quiz (20%); 1500 word essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce the constructs of adolescent sexuality, explore the determinants of adolescent sexual health and to discuss the personal and public health implications of adolescent sexuality, with additional emphasis on a deeper exploration of an area of adolescent sexual health that is of particular interest to the student. The mainareas of learning are: adolescent sexuality, adolescent sexual health, reproductive health issues in adolescence, diversity, legal and ethical issues and sexual health promotion. On completion of this unit of study, students should be able to: (i) Describe the biological, developmental and socio-cultural contexts of adolescent sexual health as well as the constructs, challenges and diversities of adolescent sexuality. They will learn techniques used to optimise communication with adolescents and explore legal, ethical and public health implications of adolescent sexuality; and (ii) Understand and describe one area of adolescent sexual health that the student chooses to study in depth from a list of suggestions.
SEXH5206 Diagnostic Methods in Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Professor David Lewis Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online with a compulsory one week laboratory practical session towards the end of the course which will compliment the online learning Assessment: Online quizzes (25%); Case based assignments (20%); Discussion board participation (15%); Written exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students who are not enrolled in one of the HIV, STIs and Sexual Health degrees must apply to the unit of study coordinator for permission to enrol in this unit of study.
This unit aims to introduce the student to the common methods used in the diagnosis and management of infections with the common Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), including HIV. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Understand the principles of Infection Control; methods used in diagnostic microbiology including specimen collection, storage and transport; specific diagnostic techniques and the interpretation of laboratory results; principle methods of detection for the following organisms/conditions: Chlamydia trachomatis, Candida albicans, Mycoplasmas genitaliums, Herpes simplex viruses, Human papillomaviruses, Molluscum contagiosum virus, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Treponema pallidum, Trichomonas vaginalis, tropical genital ulcerating conditions and genital ectoparasites; and (ii) Discuss methods used and interpretation of hepatitis serology; laboratory aspects of syndromic management of vaginal discharge, urethral discharge, rectal discharge and prostatism; the diagnosis and management of HIV infection; the diagnosis of HIV-related opportunistic infections and tumours, and genital cytological assessment. Course content will include reading materials and exercises. A compulsory intensive, one week face-to-face lab practicum allows students to consolidate their theoretical knowledge.
SEXH5401 Introduction-HIV,STIs and Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Vijayasarathi Ramanathan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); 2 x online quizzes (40%); 1 x 1500 word essay (20%); 1 x 2500 word essay (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit will explore the social, psychological, public health and medical aspects of sexual and reproductive health including common Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Students will develop an awareness of all aspects of sexual health including: diversity of values, opinions and behaviours in sexual health; sexual orientation; understand the effect of of socio-economic, ethnic, religious and cultural factors; current theories of sexuality and sexual behaviours and sexual rights of all individuals. Emphasis will be placed on healthy sexuality and the way in which STIs impact on society, present to clinical services. Students will be introduced to the principles of prevention and management of STIs and the importance of multidisciplinary approaches. The unit will introduce students to inquiry based learning and develop an understanding of the importance of evidence based practice.
Textbooks
Our Sexuality. 12th Edition, 2014 Robert L. Crooks, Karla Baur
SEXH5402 Intro Counselling for Health Professions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Fox Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: On-line plus block intensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Prohibitions: BIOS5071 Assessment: 1 x group work task (25%); Online quiz (20%); 1 x 2000 word assignment (20%); 1 x 2500 word assignment (25%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will introduce students to the microskills and basic theories of counselling in a health setting. This unit of study has two parts: an online component and a face-to-face intensive teaching block component. The intensive teaching block will include an extension of online content and provide skills development sessions. The intensive teaching block is compulsory. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Demonstrate the application of microskills to interpersonal communication, professional communication and in a counselling context; (ii) Apply basic counselling interventions in a health context; (iii) Critique the application of counselling and psychotherapy theories in health settings; (iv) Critique and discuss ethical issues in counselling; (v) Demonstrate the ability to develop a basic management plan for an individual or couple based on best available research and clinical evidence; and (vi) Develop an understanding of the self in practise.
Textbooks
Corey, Gerald (2011) Theory and Practice of Counselling and Psychotherapy. ISBN: 9780840028549;
SEXH5403 Counselling in Psychosexual Therapy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Fox Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Prerequisites: SEXH5402 and SEXH5404 Corequisites: SEXH5404 Prohibitions: BIOS5072 Assessment: 1x group work task (25%); online quiz (20%); 1x 2000 word assignment (20%); 1x 2500 word assignment (25%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Students will explore the application, practice and evidence base of a range of counselling techniques/models to sexual health settings. These will include: sexual dysfunction, fetishes and apraphilias, pornography and sex addictions/compulsive behaviours. The unit of study will be conducted in two stages. Stage one is an online component and stage two is a compulsory intensive teaching block. During the intensive teaching block students will extend their knowledge and practice of counselling and psychotherapeutic interventions for sexual health concerns through role-plays, as well as participate in a Sexual Attitude Re-Assessment Seminar (SARS). On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Apply a variety of counselling and/or psychotherapeutic techniques in addressing sexual health concerns; (ii) Critique the application of counselling and/or psychotherapeutic techniques in addressing sexual health concerns; (iii) Develop treatment/management plans for a variety of sexual health concerns; and (iv) Develop an awareness of sexual attitudes.
Textbooks
Long, L.L., Burnett, J.A., & Thomas, R.V. (2006). Sexuality counseling: An integrative approach. New Jersey: Pearson Ed.
SEXH5404 Variations in Sexual Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Vijayasarathi Ramanathan, Dr Michael Lowy Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); 2 x online quizzes (30%); 2 x 1500 word essays (40%); 1 x group work task (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will provide students an evidence-based approach to understand human sexual response; appreciate sexual functioning of abled and differently abled people across the lifespan; and equip students with adequate knowledge and skills to identify and manage a number of sexual concerns/problems/dysfunctions in both men and women. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Evaluate the concept of 'normality' in sexual functioning; (ii) Appreciate the role of sexual (health) literacy in achieving sexual health; (iii) Analyse different human sexual response models and how it influences our understanding of sexual functioning and understand the male and female sexual response cycle and factors that affect this; (iv) Describe a number of common male and female sexual dysfunctions and clinical presentations of each; (v) Evaluate the management options for a range of common sexual dysfunctions in both men and women; (vi) Recognise the role/influence of ageing and different ability (physical and intellectual) in sexual functioning; and (vii) Describe the role of cultural/religious values on sexuality and sexual functioning.
Textbooks
Prescribed: John P. Wincze and Risa B. Weisberg, Sexual Dysfunction: A Guide for Assessment and Treatment (3rd ed), Guildford Press (2015); Recommended: J Bancroft (ed), Human Sexuality and Its Problems (3rd ed), Churchill Livingstone (2008).
SEXH5405 Contraception and Reproductive Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ellie Freedman, Dr Mary Stewart, Dr Elina Safro, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-3.30pm at Family Planning NSW, Ashfield Assessment: Discussion board participation (20%); Online quiz (20%); Group case study presentation (30%); Written assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This course aims to provide students with an understanding of fertility control, including hormonal and non-hormonal reversible contraceptive methods, emergency contraception and permanent methods of contraception. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Discuss the available options for controlling fertility, including hormonal and non-hormonal reversible contraceptive methods, emergency contraception and permanent methods of contraception; (ii) Understand the reproductive health needs of women from adolescence through to menopause; (iii) Understand the consequences of unintended pregnancy and describe the options available to women; discuss the impact of unsafe abortion in an international context; (iv) Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of age, culture, tradition, society, personal beliefs, disability and health on contraceptive choices; and (v) Understand the effect of sexual violence on reproductive health.
Textbooks
Contraception: An Australian clinical practice handbook. 3rd Edition. Sexual Health and Family Planning Australia, 2012; Reproductive and sexual health: an Australian clinical practice handbook. 2nd Edition. Family Planning NSW, 2011.
SEXH5406 Professional Placement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Robb, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Christopher Fox. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-5pm; Professional Placement Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); 2,500 essay/report (30%); Presentation (30%); 2,500 word reflective essay (30%) Practical field work: Direct observation of profession-specific tasks; Reflective log book Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides students with an oppurtunity to draw together and integrate their learning and practice in a capstone experience. Students will draw on knowledge, values, experience and outcomes and apply these in a professional setting. The unit also provides students with an introduction to the essential practical competences in their specific Pathway. It emphasises the interdisciplinary nature of clinical practice excellence, within a framework of inquiry based learning and evidence based practice. In this unit: (i) Students from clinical backgrounds will be attached to sexual health and HIV clinics and observe or manage patient care under supervision for a total of 60 hours. Whenever possible, attachments will be tailored to complement the candidates' past clinical experience; (ii) Students from laboratory backgrounds will have relevant fieldwork or laboratory attachments for a total of 60 hours, together with some clinical exposure if applicable; (iii) Students from public health backgrounds will have relevant fieldwork or laboratory attachments for a total of 80 hours, together with some clinical exposure if applicable; and (iv) Students from counselling backgrounds will explore the design and application of counselling interventions in supervised placements for a total of 80 hours. The University will assist in locating clinical, laboratory, public health and counselling placements. In addition, students will work in inter-professional groups to reflect on their role in team management of HIV, STIs and Sexual Health, and learn how to develop a relevant research proposal. There is a compulsory on campus intensive teaching block for this unit of study in addition to the online learning activities. Exemptions and/or credit requests are not available for this unit.
SEXH5407 Sex Gender and Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Robb Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: 2,500 essay (30%); Presentation (30%); Reflective essay (30%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will equip students to develop a foundational knowledge and skills to work with gender and sexuality issues, including gender and sexual discourses and practices. Students will develop an understanding of sensitive practice skills to work with the LGBTIQ community. The unit will also introduce the social construction and attitudes in modern society regarding gendered violence, gendered inequality, and gender performativity. Students will be able to formulate therapeutic applications respond ethically and empathically to the specific gendered issues which present in client groups. On completion of the unit, students should be able to: (i) Have a foundational knowledge and sensitivity with gender terminology; (ii) Evaluate various sexual differences and practices within gender and sexual diverse individuals and communities; (iii) Explore the psychosocial issues surrounding gender and sexual minorities in the community; (iv) Respond to issues related gendered violence; and (v) Apply therapeutic skills and tools in response to gender and sexuality, including gender and sexual diverse individuals/communities.
SEXH5408 HIV/STI Program Delivery

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Michael Walsh Session: Semester 2b Classes: Block intensive mode, 4 x 0.5 day sessions Assessment: Group work assignment (50%); Individual assignment (50%); Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: It is advisable for students to also undertake MIPH5118 or MIPH5112.
Effective project management in HIV and STIs is an important contributor to the health and development objectives of developing countries. The unit aims to give students a good understanding of the concepts, methodologies and approaches of international health project management in HIV and STIs. It will provide an introduction to the Logical Framework Approach and give students an opportunity for hands-on practice through the design of a project in an international setting. Potential challenges to delivery will also be explored.
Textbooks
Reading pack will be provided
SEXH5409 Medical Management of Interpersonal Violence

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Katherine Brown and Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online plus block/intensive mode: 2 days, (9am-5pm) at Camperdown/Darlington campus. Assessment: workbook (50%); participation on campus (10%); case study (20%); completion of 1 expert certificate (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This course has been designed particularly to meet the needs of doctors and nurses working in sexual assault forensic medicine but may be applicable for other health professionals with an interest in this area. Basic clinical background information such as simple anatomy would be an advantage.
Adult sexual assault is not uncommon and requires a holistic medical and forensic response, including skilled forensic examination. This course will concentrate on the physical aspects of sexual assault and its sequelae within the context of acute trauma. It will provide the student with the background to performing a forensic medical examination, collection of specimens and reporting requirements required by investigating authorities and the Courts. On completion of this unit, the student will be able to describe the basic anatomy of the anogenital region of females and males; the range of genital and bodily injuries; and written, graphic and photographic documentation required. The student will be prepared for the process of specimen collection, maintaining the chain of evidence and issues related to obtaining valid consent. The processes used in the analysis of forensic evidence, including DNA and drug testing will be described, together with the use of prophylaxis, counselling and follow up testing for sexually transmissible infections and pregnancy. Development of court reports will be discussed. The psychosocial aspects of acute trauma and their role in management will also be described. The assessment tasks will enable students to embed their knowledge in the legal and cultural context of their own workplace.
SEXH5410 Sexual Health Promotion 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Mr Ashley Ubrihien Session: Semester 1 Classes: On-line plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); Group work tasks (40%); 1 x 1500 word assignment (20%); 1 x 2000 word assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This course will engage students in learning about evidence-based prevention and health promotion as a fundamental component of efforts to address sexual health. The unit is divided into three sections: (i) theories underlying disease prevention and health promotion; (ii) evidence-based planning of campaigns and programs; and (iii) health communications and designing messages. Theories covered will include those that address individual-level change and group and social level change. Students will learn how to conduct needs assessments, plan programs, and address priority areas in sexual health promotion.
On completion of the unit, students should be able to: (i) Understand the importance of planning and management in health promotion; (ii)Describe the main constructs of major health promotion models; (iii) Describe the applicability of health promotion theory to sexual health promotion; (iv) Conduct needs assessments, plan and address priority areas; (v) Discuss ways to apply the principles of health literacy when selecting or developing sexual health promotion materials; and (vi) Effectively use assessment tools in planning sexual health promotion evaluation activities.
SEXH5412 Sexual Health and Relationships Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Amanda Robb Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); Critical essay (25%); Education lesson plan (20%); Individual health education sesson (25%); Reflective essay (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study will explore the evidence base, implications and considerations when delivering sexual health and relationships education from a public health perspective. Students will develop skills in the development and facilitation of training and education to different population groups. Students will be able to evaluate knowledge needs and synthesise information related to sexual and relationship education. On completion of the unit, students should be able to: (i) Plan and conduct a session which facilitates learning for a chosen population group/community using appropriate health education and learning frameworks; (ii) Develop the skills to enable people within a variety of settings to enhance their sexual health and relationship literacy; and (iii) Critically appraise various approaches to sexual health and relationship education development.
SEXH5414 Public Health: HIV, STIs and Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Michael Walsh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-4 hours of lectures per week, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. International students including Australian Awards Scholarship students must enrol into the face-to-face version Prohibitions: SEXH5008 and SEXH5101 and SEXH5102 Assessment: Written assignments (60%); Online quizzes (20%); Discussion board participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study is a combination of three (3), two (2) credit point units (SEXH5008, SEXH5101 and SEXH5102) and explores the epidemiological, behavioural and societal aspects of HIV, STIs and Sexual Health, with emphasis on the delivery of effective prevention and management strategies. Surveillance strategies, policy development and legislative responses will be discussed, with regards to the potential public health consequences. Areas covered include, the impact of culture, tradition, society, environment, life experiences, personal beliefs and health on sexual and other potential risk activities. Students will have opportunities to contextualise the materials within a range of professional, geographical and cultural contexts.
SEXH5415 Advanced Issues in Psychosexual Therapy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Fox Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block intensive mode, 4 days, 9am-5pm Prerequisites: SEXH5402 Assessment: Discussion board participation (10%); Online quiz (10%); 3,000 word essay (30%); 3,000 word reflective essay (30%); Presentation (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study explores advanced issues in psychosexual therapy and sexual health counselling. The unit of study will be conducted in two stages. Stage one is an online component and stage two is a compulsory intensive teaching block. Students will undertake advanced study of counselling practise with special population groups and ethical issues relating to the provision of sexual health counselling and psychosexual therapy. Students will explore specialist topics in sexual health counselling/ psychosexual therapy (e.g., sex and disability, HIV and STIs in a counselling context, sex in an ageing society). Throughout the unit of study, students will develop a critical understanding of ethical issues in the provision of sexual health counselling/ psychosexual therapy through the exploration of emergent trends in the practise of sexual health counselling/ psychosexual therapy.
SEXH5416 Advanced Readings in Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Fox and Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: there are no formal classes for this unit of study. students are expected to meet regularly (as negotiated in their learning contract) with the pathway coordinators or supervisor. Prerequisites: SEXH5401 or CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Assessment: Learning Contract (Barrier Task); Annotated Bibliography 30%; 6,000 word Essay 70% Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Departmental Permission Required. This unit of study is only available if there is a staff member able to provide academic supervision in the student's chosen area.
This unit of study has been designed to provide an opportunity for students to select an area within STIs, HIV and sexual health that they wish to investigate at an advanced level. This is an independent learning unit with support from academic staff. To satisfy the course requirements it is envisaged that the chosen topic will be thoroughly researched through an examination of currently available literature. Topics must be negotiated with the Pathway Coordinator. Students will be required to negotiate a learning contract with the Pathway Coordinator/supervisor in accordance with unit objectives and assessment procedures. On successful completion of this unit, the student should be able to: (1) Demonstrate a current knowledge and understanding of the chosen unit area; (2) Conduct a literature search relevant to the chosen study area; (3) Critically evaluate the literature; (4) Apply the concepts from the literature to the area of study; and (5) Assess their own needs for professional development.

Research Units of Study Descriptions - Australia Awards/international candidates only

MEDF4001 Medicine Research A

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit and the associated units, MEDF4002, MEDF4003, MEDF4004, and MEDF4005, are research units of study. The contents and assessments are determined according to each individual student's needs.
MEDF4002 Medicine Research B

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MEDF4001 Mode of delivery: Supervision
See MEDF4001.
MEDF4003 Medicine Research C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MEDF4002 Mode of delivery: Supervision
See MEDF4001.
MEDF4004 Medicine Research D

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Corequisites: MEDF4003 Mode of delivery: Supervision
See MEDF4001