Clinical Epidemiology

Unit of study descriptions for 2015

BETH5201 Ethics and Biotechnology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 6x2hr seminars & 1x8hr intensive; or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode. Assessment: 2x400wd tasks (2x10%); 1x1500wd essay (30%); 1x2500wd essay (40%); participation in seminars or online (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only.
This unit of study introduces students to the ethical, social and legal issues that underlie a wide range of biotechnologies, including: genetics, genomics, human reproduction, stem cell research, nanotechnology and emerging biotechnologies. Key concepts influencing debates in this area are covered, such as 'procreative beneficence', personhood, risk, consent, public engagement, and property in the body (including gene patenting). Topical case studies are included to keep up with recent developments in the field. Students will explore the ethical limits to research and knowledge.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5202 Human and Animal Research Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x8hr intensive or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode. Prerequisites: Prohibition: BETH5208 Assessment: Continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (10%); `Best 3¿ short weekly tasks (10%); 1x1500wd briefing paper (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study critically examines research ethics in its wider context, from structuring research to its dissemination. It explores the ethical underpinnings of research in humans and non-human animals including the justifications for engaging in research, key concepts in research ethics and research integrity. The unit also reviews the history of research and the impact of research abuse on participants, both human and animal.Participants are also encouraged to develop practical skills in relation to their own research.
Textbooks
All readings are made available via elearning.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Stacy Carter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x8hr Intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prerequisites: A three-year undergraduate degree in science; medicine; nursing; allied health sciences; philosophy/ethics; sociology/anthropology; history; or other relevant field; or by special permission. Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A critical history of public health and an examination of public health law provide important context. Students also explore the ethical dimensions of central public health problems, including modifying lifestyles, managing communicable diseases, researching communities, responding to global health challenges and using evidence. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format).
BETH5204 Clinical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x8hr Intensives or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode. Assessment: 1x1500wd case study (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%); continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (10%); `Best 3¿ short weekly tasks (10%). Mode of delivery: Online
This unit will provide students with an overview of the ethical issues that underlie the delivery of healthcare. Students will explore major conceptual models for ethical reasoning in the clinical context; key ethical concepts in the clinical encounter (such as consent, professionalism and confidentiality); major contexts in which ethical issues arise in clinical practice; and the design and delivery of clinical ethics consultation. The unit will also consider specific issues and populations within clinical practice, such as the care of vulnerable populations . Learning activities will include lectures (in an intensive format), facilitated discussion, case study activities, readings and weekly discussions.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5208 Introduction to Human Research Ethics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 2a Classes: Block mode (1.5 days) and online Prohibitions: BETH5202 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (80%); 1x 300wd task (10%); participation in class/online (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study introduces students to human research ethics in its wider context. It explores the ethical underpinnings of the research endeavour including the justifications for engaging in research and research integrity. The unit also reviews the history of research and the impact of research abuse on human participants. Participants are also encouraged to develop practical skills in relation to their own research.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
CEPI5102 Literature Searching

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Reema Harrison, A/Prof Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: offered online. Assessment: completion of online quizzes (20%), 1x 2000word assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
Students will learn how to formulate a searchable question; the pros and cons of different information sources; how to structure an electronic database search; important fields in MEDLINE; useful practical tips for searching MEDLINE; methodological filters, journal citation reports, bibliometrics, and how to organise and manage references. The assignment requires students to demonstrate their search skills for clinical problems (marks allocated for how many relevant articles found, the content terms used, the methodological terms used, and the databases searched) and to demonstrate skills in the use of information tracking interfaces and Endnote.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5200 Quality and Safety in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Merrilyn Walton, Dr Reema Harrison Session: Semester 1 Classes: offered online Assessment: online participation (40%), short answer questions and word assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Online
The unit has six major content areas delivered as modules covering: An understanding Q&S in Healthcare; Professional and ethical practice; Clinical governance; Improving Healthcare. At the end of the unit students will: understand the background to quality and safety in health care, from Australian and international perspectives; understand the nature of health care error including the methods of error detection and monitoring, and quality indicators; understand the role of good communication and other professional responsibilities in quality and safety in healthcare; have developed an understanding of clinical governance, accountability and systems management; have considered methods for improving healthcare such as getting research into practice, clinical practice guidelines and clinical practice improvement. This unit consists of online discussions and activities based around key provided readings and other resources.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5203 Introduction to Systematic Reviews

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid, Dr Fiona Stanaway and Professor Jonathan Craig Session: Semester 2a Classes: offered online Corequisites: CEPI5102 Assessment: submission of weekly tasks and participation in discussion (18%) and assignment 1x 2500word report (82%) Mode of delivery: Online
Students will learn how to critically appraise a review of the effectiveness of an intervention; how to do a meta-analysis; how to weigh up benefits and harms (applicability); how to avoid misleading meta-analyses and how to find or do better systematic reviews. At the end of this unit, participants should be able to: search for systematic reviews; critically appraise reviews of randomised controlled trials, do a meta-analysis of randomised trials using available software; and use meta-analytic methods for weighing up benefits and harms of an intervention in individual patient management and practice policy development. The assignment task involves: outlining a clinical or health policy decision; identifying a systematic review of randomized controlled trials; critically appraising a systematic review of randomized controlled trials; consideration of the applicability of the evidence and what additional information is required to better inform decision making.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5204 Advanced Systematic Reviews

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lisa Askie, A/Prof Angela Webster Session: Semester 2b Classes: (face to face) 1x2hr seminar/week for 6 weeks Corequisites: CEPI5203 Assumed knowledge: PUBH5211 Assessment: critical appraisal assignment (50%), data analysis assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of this unit is to critically appraise and apply, at an advanced level, the best evidence on systematic reviews. This unit extends beyond the 'Introduction to Systematic Reviews' unit by exploring in-depth important issues around systematic reviews. At the end of the unit, students should be able to understand the advantages of individual participant data meta-analyses; critically appraise a review of observational studies; understand differences in systematic review of observational studies compared with randomized trials; understand the potential pitfalls of meta-regression; perform and interpret a sub-group and meta-regression analysis; analyse continuous data and understand the methods by which missing data can be imputed; and understand the common problems in meta-analysis of continuous data. The seminar sessions are interactive and based on discussion of reading material. Two sessions are based in the computer lab.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
CEPI5205 Doing a Systematic Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student project under supervision (can be studied by distance) Prerequisites: CEPI5203 Corequisites: CEPI5102 Assumed knowledge: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 - Please speak to the Unit Coordinator if you have not successfully completed these units prior to enrolling in CEPI5205 Assessment: 1 x 3000 word systematic review (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This project unit provides an opportunity to apply skills learnt in other units and further develop knowledge and skills by undertaking a systematic review (ideally including a meta analysis) in a topic area nominated by the student. The student will be supported by a supervisor allocated to them, but the project will be student-driven. The assessment task is to undertake a systematic review and present the review in the form of a paper suitable for submission to a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.
CEPI5206 Intro Teaching Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid, Professor Jonathan Craig Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student project under supervision. Prerequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Corequisites: PUBH5208 and CEPI5203 Prohibitions: CEPI5207 Assessment: course materials developed and evaluation report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The aim of this unit is to further students' knowledge and skills in teaching clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Students have the opportunity to develop their own teaching modules based upon the modules they have been exposed to in the Clinical Epidemiology Program at the University of Sydney. There is no additional face-to-face teaching. Participants are expected to develop, teach and evaluate a clinical epidemiology module of at least 3 hours teaching time. Participants will use the unit coordinator as a supervisor for their work in this unit. By the end of this unit participants will have developed, delivered and evaluated a teaching module in Clinical Epidemiology by: developing materials about clinical epidemiology relevant to the target audience and setting; developed a method of teaching which is relevant to the target audience and setting; developing and using an assessment tool appropriate for the teaching module; developing and using a method of evaluation appropriate for the teaching module.
Textbooks
Recommended: Straus SE, Glasziou P, Richardson WS, Haynes RB. Evidence-base medicine. How to practice and teach EBM. 4th Edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.
CEPI5207 Advanced Teaching Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid, Professor Jonathan Craig Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student project under supervision. Prerequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Corequisites: PUBH5208 and CEPI5203 Prohibitions: CEPI5206 Assessment: 1 x 2500 word essay, course materials developed and evaluation report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit aims to further participants knowledge and skills in teaching clinical epidemiology - at an advanced level. Participants have the opportunity to develop their own teaching modules based upon the modules they have been exposed to in the Clinical Epidemiology Program at the University of Sydney. There is no additional face-to-face teaching. Participants are expected to develop, teach and evaluate a clinical epidemiology module of at least 9 hours teaching time. They are also expected to nominate a topic in the area of Teaching Clinical Epidemiology and explore the area in an essay. By the end of this unit participants will have developed, delivered and evaluated a teaching module in Clinical Epidemiology by: developing materials about clinical epidemiology relevant to the target audience and setting; developed a method of teaching which is relevant to the target audience and setting; developing and using an assessment tool appropriate for the teaching module; developing and using a method of evaluation appropriate for the teaching module; explored, through an essay, an academic area of interest in Teaching Clinical Epidemiology.
Textbooks
Recommended: Straus SE, Glasziou P, Richardson WS, Haynes RB. Evidence-base medicine. How to practice and teach EBM. 4th Edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.
CEPI5214 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: offered online - 8 self-paced modules each comprising: course notes, lecture, demonstrations, exercises, formative self-assessment and quizzes Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010). Please speak to the Unit Coordinator if you have not successfully completed these units prior to enrolling in CEPI5214. Assessment: Discussion board participation (5%), module based quizzes (25%), submitted assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, to guide them to resources to improve their conference abstract and manuscript writing and submission to a peer reviewed journal. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, improving tables and figures for manuscripts, writing cover letters and responding to reviewer's comments. Students will learn skills needed to act as a peer-reviewer.
Textbooks
No mandatory text books - readings available online.
CEPI5305 Translating Research Into Practice

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Clement Loy Session: Intensive May Classes: Block mode (2x 1day) Prerequisites: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: class presentations (15%) and 1x essay (85%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Generally speaking, implementation of research evidence into clinical practice is slow and incomplete. For instance, about 30% of patients do not receive treatment of proven effectiveness, while 20% receive treatments which are unnecessary or potentially harmful. This unit of study aims to help you translate research findings into clinical practice in your workplace. Before the first workshop, you will be asked to identify an evidence-practice gap in your area of clinical practice. In the workshop we will provide you with a theoretical framework for implementing change in clinical practice, and work through barriers to, and enablers for change. We will then review effective strategies for change implementation, and look at some real life examples. We will discuss methods for measuring the effectiveness of change implementation, and for identifying problems during implementation. By the end of this unit of study, you will be able to plan and carry out a knowledge implementation project.
NB. Students enrolled in this unit of study should have had some work experience in the health care setting.
Textbooks
Grol R, Wensing M, Eccles M. Improving patient care: the implementation of change in clinical practice. Elsevier, Edinburgh 2005.
CEPI5306 Clinical Practice Guidelines

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Jonathan Craig, Dr Martin Howell Session: Semester 2a Classes: offered online Assessment: 1 x 4-page critical appraisal and barriers assessment (50%), online discussions and quizzes (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
During this unit students will evaluate guideline development; critical appraisal of guidelines; introduction to implementation and evaluation of guidelines; involvement of consumers in guidelines; examination of hospital-based and community-based guidelines. Group and individual critical appraisal work is required.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5308 Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Madeleine King, Professor Martin Stockler Session: Semester 1b Classes: online learning, expected student effort: 6-8 hours per week including 1.5 hour online lecture, readings and quizzes each week for six weeks Assessment: completion of online quizzes (25%), 1x3300 word assignment (75%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aim of this unit is to enable students to appraise patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) and incorporate them into clinical research. PROMs include: symptoms, side-effects, health-related quality of life, satisfaction and preferences. Topics include: definitions, structure and functions of PROMs; item-generation and selection; questionnaire design; assessing validity, reliability and responsiveness to clinically important change; utilities and preferences; developing and appraising studies using PROMs. The online sessions comprise six lectures outlining the principles, with illustrative examples (approx 90 minutes per lecture), plus a series of 5 related quizzes (approx 30 minutes). The written assignment may be one of four options (student's choice): 1) a protocol for the development and validation of a new PROM; 2) a protocol for the revalidation of an existing PROM in a population in which it has not previously been validated; 3) a protocol for application of an existing PROM for a specific purpose in a specific patient population and clinical context; 4) an appraisal of the application of an existing PROM as an outcome in a clinical study.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided. Streiner DL, Norman GR. Health Measurement Scales: a practical guide to their development and use. 4th Ed. Oxford University Press, 2008. (course textbook)
CEPI5310 Advanced Statistical Modelling

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lec/tut/week x 12 weeks, also offered fully online. Prerequisites: PUBH5212 Assessment: 2 x data analysis report (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit covers statistical analysis techniques that are commonly required for analysing data that arise from clinical or epidemiological studies. Students will gain hands on experience applying model-building strategies and fitting advanced statistical models. In particular, students will learn a statistical software package called Stata, how to handle non-linear continuous variables, and how to analyse correlated data. Correlated data arise from clustered or longitudinal study designs, such as, cross-over studies, matched case-control studies, cluster randomised trials and studies involving repeated measurements. Statistical models that will be covered include fixed effects models, marginal models using Generalised Estimating Equations (GEE), and mixed effects models (also known as hierarchical or multilevel models). This unit of study focuses on data analyses using Stata and the interpretation of results.
Textbooks
No mandatory text books. Course notes are provided.
CEPI5505 Clinical Epidemiology Project 1

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jonathan Craig Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student project under supervision Prerequisites: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 and CEPI5102 Prohibitions: CEPI5300 Assessment: 3 meetings with supervisor (face to face or distance) and 1 x 2000word assignment Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit provides students with an opportunity to develop a Clinical Epidemiology study proposal under supervision. The proposal will include: background to the project; project plan; project significance; justification of the project; project method; budget; and ethical implication of project. At the end of the unit, the student will be proficient in writing research proposals suitable for submission to an appropriate funding body. Student assignment involves writing a study proposal suitable for submission to a funding body.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.
CEPI5506 Clinical Epidemiology Project 2

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Jonathan Craig Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student project under supervision Prerequisites: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 and CEPI5102 Corequisites: CEPI5300 or CEPI5505 Assessment: One 4000 word assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
The aim of this unit is to conduct a clinical epidemiology project and write a report on the project in the form of a paper suitable for publication. The project will involve: refining the project proposal; data collection; data analysis; and produce a report suitable for publication. At the end of the unit, the student will be proficient in conducting and writing a report of a clinical epidemiology project. The report should be suitable for publication in a peer reviewed journal.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan and Dr Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: 1x4 page assignment (30%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5019 Cancer Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monica Robotin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 24 hours online lectures, 15 hours online discussions Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 2 assignments (65%), 5 online tutorials (35%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to provide students with specific information on the concepts, methods and applications underpinning cancer prevention and control at population level. It is designed to address specific educational needs of students in various programs within the School of Public Health and to offer a broad-based perspective on cancer control, ranging from primary prevention, screening and early intervention, tertiary prevention and palliative care. Emphasis will be given to cancers with the greatest impact at population level and where evidence demonstrates that policies and interventions are capable of reducing cancer incidence, mortality, prolonging survival and improving quality of life. Although focusing on specific Australian conditions, the information will be presented in the context of regional and global cancer control efforts. At the completion of the unit, students will be equipped with the basic tools to design, plan, implement and evaluate cancer control programs in Australia or other countries.
Textbooks
Readings for this unit will be available on the eLearning site
PUBH5020 Chronic Disease Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monica Robotin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 24 hrs online lectures; 12 hrs online discussions Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: assignments (70%), on-line discussions (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course offers a broad-based integrated perspective on chronic disease prevention. The course reviews the epidemiology of selected chronic diseases with the highest impact at population level in Australia (cardiovascular diseases; cancer; chronic lung disease; diabetes and chronic renal disease). The information will focus on Australian settings, but presented within the context of a regional perspective of chronic disease prevention.
Teaching will focus on the interrelationships between the biological and epidemiological aspects of chronic diseases, the interplay between determinants of health and chronic disease, and the balance between high risk and population based strategies for reducing disease burden, and exploring their applicability to disease prevention. Students will be involved in evaluating the effectiveness of different prevention strategies and will examine the role of health policy in developing effective and sustainable chronic disease management programs in different settings (in Australia and the region).
Textbooks
Readings for this unit will be available on the eLearning site
PUBH5032 Making Decisions in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Gillespie Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-day workshop; fully online version available Assessment: Written assignment of 2000 words (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces students to the methods by which evidence is translated, used and abused when governments make decisions affecting public health. Students will become familiar with the main tools used by health economists and policy analysts. The unit will emphasize the role of different forms of evidence and values for priority-setting and policy-making.
Unit technical content is unified by common themes and case studies. Students will apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples (including specific indigenous health issues) to critically consider the role of economic evidence in health decision-making in Australia.
Students will then use policy analysis methods to critically examine the Australian health care system and decision-making in public health. The unit will pay particular attention to questions of power and equity, including the position of indigenous peoples. Finally, it will look at how evidence is framed and used in decision-making.
Teaching will make use of contemporary case studies so students learn how technical analytical tools are used in practical examples of policy development, decision-making and public debate.
The unit gives public health students an essential basic knowledge of both disciplines (health economics and health policy) and lays the groundwork for more advanced studies.
PUBH5116 Genetics and Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Cust, Dr Gabrielle Williams Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x 3 day workshop Assessment: 3x 30min online quiz (20%), small group assignment (30%) and take home exam of 6 questions (250 words each) (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit caters for practitioners, policy and decision-makers, students and researchers in public health, public policy, journalism, law, epidemiology, medicine, science, industry, ethics, philosophy, communication and advocacy. It gives a basic introduction to genetics and genetic epidemiology and covers issues like genetic determinants of disease, genetic testing and screening, psychosocial, legal and ethical aspects of genetics and genetic testing, genetic education and genetics and public policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5205 Decision Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Martin, Professor John Simes, Ms Hanna Carter, Dr Deme Karikios Session: Semester 2b Classes: Six 2 hour sessions (comprising lectures and computer practicals) Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Assumed knowledge: PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation Assessment: 1 x quiz (20%) and 1 written assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines quantitative approaches to public health and clinical decision-making. Topics of study include: decision trees and health-related utility assessment; incorporating diagnostic information in decision making; sensitivity and threshold analysis; and application of decision analysis to economic evaluation. Students gain practical skills using decision analysis software via computer practicals undertaken within Sessions 4 and 5. The assessment quiz (20%) is conducted in the first part of Session 5. Exercises are set at the end of most sessions and are reviewed at the start of the following session. Readings are also set after most sessions. Preparation time for each session is 1-2 hours.
PUBH5206 Controlled Trials

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Martin, Ms Liz Barnes, Dr Chee Lee Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x 1day workshops Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Assessment: a 2hr short answer/multiple choice in-class exam (40%), and a take-home exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces the principles underpinning the design and conduct of high quality clinical trials to generate good evidence for health care decision making. The topics include clinical trial design, randomization, sample size, measures of treatment effect, methodological issues, trial protocols, and ethical principles. The unit is delivered over 2 full days via formal lectures followed by practical sessions. Lecture notes will be provided.
Textbooks
Recommended: Keech A, Gebski V, Pike R. Interpreting and reporting clinical trials: a guide to the CONSORT statement and the principles of randomised controlled trials. Sydney: Australasian Medical Publishing Company; 2007
PUBH5208 Screening and Diagnostic Test Evaluation

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Gemma Jacklyn Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar or 2hr of online discussion per week for 7 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 1000 word critical appraisal (30%) and 1x 1500 word final assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit is designed to further develop concepts covered in the Epidemiological Methods and Uses Unit for those students seeking more detail on screening and diagnostic tests. It will cover a wider range of topics than clinical medicine alone. At the end of this unit, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the basic concepts of screening and diagnostic tests 2. Understand the sources of biases in diagnostic test evaluations 3. Critically appraise relevant articles on screening and diagnostic tests 4. Understand the principles and current approaches to population-based screening 5.Understand translation of current evidence of screening in clinical practice. The unit is based on weekly discussion of material provided in the unit workbook, session outlines and pre-reading. Students will be encouraged to contribute examples for discussion. This unit is offered in online/distance mode primarily. Face-to-face tutorials may also be offered.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5211 Multiple Regression and Stats Computing

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Patrick Kelly and Dr Tim Schlub Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr per week for 13 weeks. This unit may be undertaken in face to face or online/distance mode. Students studying in distance mode must have access to a computer running a version of Microsoft Windows compatible with the latest version of SAS. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Assessment: 1x 4 page assignment (30%) and 1x 10 page assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit covers simple and multiple linear regression; one-way analysis of variance to compare more than 2 groups; analysis of covariance to compare groups adjusting for confounders; testing for effect modification; calculating adjusted means; strategies for selecting the 'best' regression model; examination of residuals; regression to the mean; associated SAS programming. Each topic is covered by a 1 hour statistics lecture, a 1 hour SAS lecture, a 1 hour SAS practical and a 1 hour statistics tutorial to discuss the interpretation of the results. Each fortnight there is an exercise on the material covered in the statistics lecture. The SAS practical allows the necessary computing to answer the questions for the statistics tutorial the following week. The assignments will involve practical analysis and interpretation of a data set and between 10% and 20% of the marks for each assignment are for the SAS computing program.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5212 Categorical Data Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture, 5 x 1hr lectures, and 5 x 1hr tutorials over 6 weeks. Also available online - such students must have access to a computer running a version of Microsoft Windows compatible with the latest version of SAS. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page report (30%) and 1x 8 page report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
In this unit the biostatistical concepts covered in earlier units are extended to cover analysis of epidemiological studies where the outcome variable is categorical. Topics of study include: testing for trend in a 2 x r contingency table; the Mantel-Haenszel test for the combination of several 2 x 2 tables, with estimation of the combined odds ratio and confidence limits; multiple logistic regression; Poisson regression; modelling strategy. The assignments will involve practical analysis and interpretation of categorical data. Data analyses will be conducted using statistical software (SAS).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5213 Survival Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Schlub Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week for six weeks both face to face and distance mode. Students studying in distance mode must have access to a computer running a version of Microsoft Windows compatible with the latest version of SAS. Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page assignment (20%) and 1x 10 page assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
During this unit, students learn to analyse data from studies in which individuals are followed up until a particular event occurs, e.g. death, cure, relapse, making use of follow-up data also for those who do not experience the event. This unit covers: Kaplan-Meier life tables; logrank test to compare two or more groups; Cox's proportional hazards regression model; checking the proportional hazards assumption; and sample size calculations for survival studies. For each topic participants are given some material to read beforehand. This is followed by a lecture, then participants are given one or two exercises to do for the following week. These exercises are discussed in the tutorial at the next session before moving on to the next topic. That is, in most weeks the first hour is a tutorial and the lecture is given in the second hour. Participants are expected to run SAS programs in their own time. Preparation time for each session is 2-3 hours. The assignments both involve use of SAS to analyse a set of survival data.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5215 Introductory Analysis of Linked Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Judy Simpson Session: Intensive June,Intensive November Classes: block/intensive mode 5 days 9am-5pm Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or BSTA5011 or CEPI5100) and (PUBH5211 or BSTA5004) Assessment: Workbook exercises (30%) and 1x assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces the topic of linked health data analysis. It will usually run in late June and late November. The topic is a very specialised one and will not be relevant to most MPH students. The modular structure of the unit provides students with a theoretical grounding in the classroom on each topic, followed by hands-on practical exercises in the computing lab using de-identified linked NSW data files. The computing component assumes a basic familiarity with SAS computing syntax and methods of basic statistical analysis of fixed-format data files. Contents include: an overview of the theory of data linkage methods and features of comprehensive data linkage systems, sufficient to know the sources and limitations of linked health data sets; design of linked data studies using epidemiological principles; construction of numerators and denominators used for the analysis of disease trends and health care utilisation and outcomes; assessment of the accuracy and reliability of data sources; data linkage checking and quality assurance of the study process; basic statistical analyses of linked longitudinal health data; manipulation of large linked data files; writing syntax to prepare linked data files for analysis, derive exposure and outcome variables, relate numerators and denominators and produce results from statistical procedures at an introductory to intermediate level. The main assignment involves the analysis of NSW linked data, which can be done only in the School of Public Health Computer Lab, and is due 10 days after the end of the unit.
Textbooks
Notes will be distributed in class.
PUBH5224 Advanced Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly classes (combined lectures and tutorials) for 13 weeks. Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 4000 word assignment (or equivalent answers to specific methodological questions) (70%), 1x 1500 word assignment or equivalent class presentation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended for students who have completed Epidemiology Methods and Uses (or an equivalent unit of study) at a credit or higher level. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to consolidate critical appraisal skills, to acquire the practical knowledge and skills needed to design epidemiological research, and to extend students' theoretical knowledge of epidemiology beyond basic principles.
PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Intensive September Classes: 2x 2day compulsory workshops Prerequisites: ((PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Corequisites: Prerequisites: ((PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. This unit covers: principles of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation. The workshops consist of interactive lectures and class exercises.
Textbooks
A course manual will be provided to each student.
PUBH5417 Injury Epidemiology Prevention & Control

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lisa Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures and moderated discussions over 13 weeks (workload 6-8hr/week) Assessment: 1x 4000 word assignment (60%) and participation in two moderated online discussions (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This one-semester online unit teaches students about the principles of injury epidemiology, prevention and control. It provides a basis for the assessment and investigation of injury issues and the development, implementation and evaluation of injury prevention programs. The unit will cover: injury measurement and classification (descriptive methods); risk factor identification (analytic methods); evidence-based interventions for injury prevention; priority setting in injury control; injury prevention policy; strategies in injury control; implementing strategies in injury control; program evaluation in injury prevention; injury and Indigenous Australians and an international perspective on injury. During this unit, students will: gain an understanding of the epidemiology of injury, including the burden of injury, injury surveillance, methods for estimating the frequency and severity of injury, and methods for identifying risk factors; gain an understanding of the theories underpinning injury prevention and illustrate their application; develop an appreciation of the process of priority setting in injury, the design and implementation of injury prevention interventions, and the principles and conduct of evaluations.
Textbooks
Lecture notes, case studies and journal articles will be provided online from a password-protected site. Recommended text:. McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow, Dr Claire Hooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block / intensive - 5 days Monday - Friday Assessment: Assignment 1 x 3000 word (55%), Assignment 2 x 2000 words (35%), Pre-block online activities (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students will develop a critical awareness of the determinants of effective communication, particularly in relation to health risks to the individual and to society.
The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement using traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided
PUBH5500 Advanced Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2x3 full day workshop in March/April Prohibitions: QUAL5005 Assessment: interviewing activity with 600wd reflection (35%); 2500wd essay (35%); multiple choice quizzes (2x10%); in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative inquiry in health. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Workshop One addresses: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research questions can it answer? How can I search for qualitative literature? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group and conducting an interview. Workshop Two addresses: How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? How are methodologies and theories used in qualitative research? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will get practical experience and skills through analysing your own interview data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This advanced unit will show you a new way of thinking critically about research and researching, and give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
QUAL5002 Qualitative Methodologies & Study Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Intensive May Classes: 2x3 full day workshop Prerequisites: Assumed Knowledge: Basic understanding of the nature of qualitative knowledge and the processes of qualitative research. Corequisites: PUBH5500 Assessment: group presentation (2x15%); peer review (2x10%); 4000wd assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Departmental permission is required for students who have not completed PUBH5500.
Qualitative methodologies are historical traditions and systems for planning and justifying research methods. This intermediate unit assumes a basic understanding of qualitative research and focuses on qualitative methodologies. Qualitative methodologies are informed by theories from sociology, anthropology, philosophy and other disciplines. They shape the research questions, objectives, design and outcome of a qualitative study. This course begins with general principles of qualitative methodology and study design. We examine several qualitative methodologies in detail, including: narrative inquiry, community based participatory research, ethnography, grounded theory, arts-based, and qualitative synthesis. We consider their historical and theoretical roots, the research practices they encourage, and their current status. The final session considers how we can use methodologies as resources rather than recipes, maintaining both flexibility and coherence in our study designs.