Clinical Neurophysiology

 

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Unit of study descriptions

CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
CEPI5200 Quality and Safety in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Merrilyn Walton Session: Semester 1 Classes: offered online Assumed knowledge: clinical experience strongly recommended Assessment: online participation (20%); 3x1000 word assignments and 1x1500 word assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
The unit has four major content areas delivered as modules covering:- An understanding Q&S in Healthcare; Professional and ethical practice; Understanding systems and the effect of complexity on patient care; Improving Healthcare. At the end of the unit students will: understand the background to quality and safety in health care, from Australian and international perspectives; understand the nature of health care error including the methods of error detection and monitoring, and quality indicators; understand the role of good communication and other professional responsibilities in quality and safety in healthcare; have developed an understanding of clinical governance, accountability and systems management; have considered methods for improving healthcare such as getting research into practice, clinical practice guidelines and clinical practice improvement. This unit consists of online discussions and activities based around key provided readings and other resources.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5300 Research Grants: theory and practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clement Loy Session: Semester 1 Classes: 12 online or face-to-face sessions and 1 face-to-face workshop (June) Corequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Prohibitions: CEPI5505 Assessment: 1 x written research proposal(40%); online class presentations (30%); peer assessment (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit of study, the student will develop his/her own research proposal, to a standard suitable for a peer-reviewed granting body. Each section of a grant proposal (Aims, Background/Significance, Methods, Analysis) will be discussed, with the student presenting and refining the corresponding section of his/her own proposal in a synchronous online workshop setting. This will then be complemented by online presentations from experienced researchers on the practical aspects of clinical research, followed by synchronous online class discussion. Topics include: observational studies, randomized controlled trials, diagnostic test evaluation, qualitative studies, funding application, ethical approval, publication strategies and grant administration. The unit will conclude with a one-day, face- to-face, mandatory workshop- where students will learn about budgeting, peer review of research grants, and present their completed research proposal.
CLNP5001 Basic Sciences in Clinical Neurophysiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Hastings Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (20%); submission of short answer questions (30%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups etc (10%); 1 x online exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Online
In order to obtain and interpret information regarding the function of the neural systems, clinicians must be able to accurately record and quantify electrical signals from a myriad of neurological structures. This unit of study describes the methods by which these electrical signals are recorded, processed and presented for interpretation, examines the neurological systems and processes responsible for the signal generation and introduces the role of clinical neurophysiology in diagnosis of systemic disease.
CLNP5002 Diagnostic Electroencephalography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Alison Szekely Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 2 face-to-face days (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (20%); submission of short answer questions (30%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups etc (10%); 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Electroencephalography (EEG) forms the basis of multiple neurophysiological techniques and is an extremely powerful tool in its own right. This unit will introduce the standardised systems and nomenclature for EEG recordings, examine the characteristics of normal recordings and illustrate the pathological changes associated with intracranial lesions, systemic disease and critical illness. The utility of EEG in the diagnosis and management of seizure disorders will be examined in detail.
CLNP5003 Clinical Neurophysiology Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Hastings Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 2 face-to-face days (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (20%); submission of short answer questions (30%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups etc (10%); 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Clinical neurophysiologists are required to have expertise in a number of different diagnostic and monitoring modalities. This unit will cover the most commonly used diagnostic techniques (other than EEG) and will particularly focus on nerve conduction studies and sensory evoked potential recordings.
CLNP5004 Advanced Electroencephalography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Hastings Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 2 face-to-face days (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (20%); submission of short answer questions (30%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups etc (10%); 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit covers advanced aspects of diagnostic electroencephalography, including the specific technical requirements for continuous video EEG monitoring, seizure recognition during invasive EEG monitoring, current techniques in cortical mapping of seizures and its utility in tailored cortical resection.
CLNP5005 Neuromonitoring in Anaesthesia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Hastings Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (15%); submission of short answer questions (20%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups and/or online activities (25%); 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Despite their widespread use, the effect of general anaesthetic agents on the brain and spinal cord is still poorly understood. Wide interpatient variability in responses to these agents, intraoperative hemodynamic fluctuations and underlying disease processes are all threats to the central nervous system. This unit will examine the techniques available to monitor the function and wellbeing of the brain and nervous system during anaesthesia and surgery.
CLNP5006 Intraoperative Monitoring I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Rehak Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 1 face-to-face day (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (20%); submission of short answer questions (30%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups etc (10%); 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Unexpected postoperative motor deficit is arguably one of the most devastating potential complications of surgery. This unit will examine the methods used for monitoring the function and safety of cranial and peripheral motor nerves, the techniques used for risk reduction during spinal instrumentation and the use of motor evoked potential monitoring in both spinal and non-spinal surgery.
CLNP5007 Intraoperative Monitoring II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Rehak Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 1 face-to-face day (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online MCQ quizzes (20%); submission of short answer questions (30%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups etc (10%); 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Inadvertent intraoperative damage to the sensory components of the nervous system is often subtle and difficult to predict. This unit focuses on intraoperative monitoring of the somatosensory and auditory systems for both neurological and non-neurological surgery. The rationale for test selection for various surgical procedures is also examined.
CRIT5005 Clinical Communication and Decision Making

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Clare Skinner Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning and compulsory face to face intensive (1x2days) Assessment: 5 x 300-500 word clinical case study tasks (25%), participation in on-line discussion tasks and quizzes (10%), participation in 2 day face to face communication skills training session (30%), 1 x 1,500-2,000 word written assignment (35%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Critical care medicine is practiced in highly charged and stressful settings and requires many decisions to be made quickly with limited information and resources. There are also many 'players' and confusion and miscommunication can easily occur. The hierarchical nature of hospital based practice and tribal differences between professions bring their own challenges. This unit of study aims to help clinicians develop decision making and high level communication skills in order to effectively care for patients, engage carers and relatives and perform optimally as a team member or leader. The content is built around complex clinical cases and includes simulations using actors and experts.
Textbooks
Online readings
MEDF5002 Teaching in the Clinical Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Imogene Rothnie Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 day face to face workshop 9am-5pm (not compulsory) and online learning Assessment: 20% personal learning plan (1500 words); 20% online activities; 60% portfolio of evidence of learning (4500 words equivalent) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: This unit is designed for health professionals working and teaching in a clinical environment. The requirements and composition of the portfolio of evidence of learning is negotiated by each student with the unit coordinator and will vary depending on individual learning goals and situation.
Almost all healthcare professionals are involved in education and training throughout their careers. This Unit of Study provides a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching and learning in the health professional environment. The unit will cover 3 main areas: planning for and facilitating learning in the clinical environment; assessing performance and providing constructive feedback; fostering the development of students as professionals. Each of these areas will be underpinned by best evidence from clinical education research and will address current challenges and opportunities in the learning environment. This will include the role of new technologies from the perspective of both educators and learners. Participants in the course will gain a framework they can use to support their teaching, and will develop a portfolio of evidence to support their professional development as clinician educators.
MEDF5301 Project (Advanced Masters)

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress and implementation of their project Assessment: 2,000 wd written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10,000 wds, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval to enrol is conditional upon the submission of a brief project outline and identification of an appropriate project supervisor, as negotiated with the course coordinator.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master degree. The project may take the form of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. Candidates in some disciplines may be able to undertake a work placement and will be required to negotiate the form of scholarly written work, related to their placement, to be submitted for assessment. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto a study that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. On completion of the project/work placement the successful candidate will be able to plan and execute a substantial research project or scholarly work . Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit their project report/dissertation/publication. If the candidate cannot submit their work erolling once in MEDF5301 or once in both Part A and Part B then they must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of project units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until they submit.
MEDF5302 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part A)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress and implementation of their project Assessment: 2,000 wd written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10,000 wds, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval to enrol is conditional upon the submission of a brief project outline and identification of an appropriate project supervisor, as negotiated with the course coordinator.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master degree. The project may take the form of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. Candidates in some disciplines may be able to undertake a work placement and will be required to negotiate the form of scholarly written work, related to their placement, to be submitted for assessment. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto a study that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. On completion of the project/work placement the successful candidate will be able to plan and execute a substantial research project or scholarly work. Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit their project report/dissertation/publication. If the candidate cannot submit their work erolling once in MEDF5301 or once in both Part A and Part B then they must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of project units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until they submit.
MEDF5303 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part B)

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress and implementation of their project Assessment: 2,000 wd written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10,000 wds, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval to enrol is conditional upon the submission of a brief project outline and identification of an appropriate project supervisor, as negotiated with the course coordinator.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master degree. The project may take the form of a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. Candidates in some disciplines may be able to undertake a work placement and will be required to negotiate the form of scholarly written work, related to their placement, to be submitted for assessment. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or patient enrolment onto a study that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. On completion of the project/work placement the successful candidate will be able to plan and execute a substantial research project or scholarly work. Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit their project report/dissertation/publication. If the candidate cannot submit their work erolling once in MEDF5301 or once in both Part A and Part B then they must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of project units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until they submit.
PAIN5002 Pain Mechanisms and Contributors

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Nicholas and Dr Christopher Vaughan Session: Semester 1b,Semester 2b Classes: Online, intensive mode, approximately 20 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce and develop participants understanding about the basic neuroscience of pain and the interrelationship between psychological, physiological and environmental processes in pain. Neuro-anatomical, physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical mechanisms involved in nociception, including peripheral and central sensitisation are discussed. Theoretical bases are introduced and the ways in which psychological and environmental factors modify or maintain pain perception and behaviour are explored.
PAIN5003 Pain Treatment and Management Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Brooker Session: Semester 1a,Semester 2a Classes: Online, intensive mode, approximately 20 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce participants to the core principles of pain assessment, treatment and management. Participants consider the biopsychosocial model and the scientific basis for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. They explore principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, together with routes of drug administration. The role of physiotherapy and rehabilitation management, and the use of procedures such as neural blockade, simulation techniques and surgery are also considered.
PAIN5021 Acute Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philip Corke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: Participation in online discussion (25%), 4000-5000 written assignment/s or equivalent (75%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aims of this unit are to provide a theoretical framework for the management of acute pain, to examine the specific contributors that are important in the development of acute pain conditions and to examine pharmacological and other approaches used in the management of acute pain. Topics that will be covered will include the principles of pre-emptive analgesia and evidence of effectiveness in preventing pain, pharmacological management of acute pain including approaches such as patient controlled analgesia, adjunctive approaches in managing acute pain and the transition from acute to chronic pain.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan and A/Professor Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.