Health Communication

Unit of study descriptions for 2014

ARTS7000 Academic Communication for Postgraduates

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Louise Katz Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x1-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd critical analysis exercise (20%), 1x1500wd essay (35%), 1x2500wd reflection journal (20%), 1x seminar presentation equivalent to 500 words (20%), participation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: It is strongly advised that all students enrolling in this elective complete it during their first semester of study, or in Summer or Winter school when available. ARTS7000 is recommended for two main groups: 1) International postgraduate students who have not completed their Bachelor award at a university where English was the medium of instruction. 2) Domestic postgraduates who have not been in an academic environment for a prolonged period of time.
This unit of study is designed to support International students in developing an understanding of critical analysis and its use as an effective basis for argument. Students will be introduced to the critical and communication practices appropriate to postgraduate study in the humanities. They will develop key attributes in the areas of research and inquiry, ethical, social and professional understanding, and communication relevant to their academic studies and in preparation for their professional lives.
BETH5207 Arts in Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode, 2x2 days (4 hour combined lectures/tutorials) Assessment: 2x300-400wd online tasks (25%), 1x1,500wd essay (25%), 1x2,500wd essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The 'art of health' is more than an historic catchphrase; it is a literal phenomenon. In the past century the visual, literary and performing arts have emerged as vital components of a blossoming 'arts in health' movement which values the contribution of the arts to human health and wellbeing. This unit gives students practical examples of how to incorporate the arts into public health and health care. The course offers a rich and detailed exploration of varying debates in the scholarly and practice-based fields of arts-and-health, which include but are not limited to: status and uses of art therapy; music,
psychology and medicine; narrative, literature and the 'narrative medicine' movement; hospital art, design and architecture; and the role of art in public health, health research, and social marketing campaigns. Students will be treated to a diverse range of guest lecturers from the fields of visual performing arts and related areas of expertise. This course will appeal to students of public health; literary, visual and performing arts; social work; psychology; and related disciplines, who want to understand more about the interconnectedness of the arts with human health.
the arts with human health.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
None specified
HPOL5000 Introduction to Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x 2-day workshops, online lectures and discussions Assessment: 1 x 1500wd written assignment (30%); 1 x 3000wd written assignment (50%); Online learning quiz (5%); online problem based learning exercise (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
To develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy. To give an overview of the political choices and frameworks - national and global - that shape policymaking.
Learning objectives:
- acquire a critical understanding of the basic history and features of the Australian health system
- understand the main frameworks used to analyse and make policy
- understand the main issues in the translation of policy into practice
- demonstrate the capacity to apply these understandings in particular settings through case studies.
Content:
This unit explores the main structures and institutions that make health policy. The unit examines debates over policy frameworks, and the evidence and advocacy in setting priorities. Conflicts over health policy will be placed in broader contexts - comparing different health systems and assessing global influences. Case studies will be used to examine the relationships between policy and practice.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other recommended reading materials will be available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5001 Economics and Finance for Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie,, A/Prof Stephen Jan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: Health Economics Exercise (50%), Health finance assignment (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the financial and economic aspects of health policy. It introduces the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance. Learning objectives:
- understand the main models and debates regarding health funding in developed OECD countries and the implications for equity, delivery and governance of health services.
- apply this knowledge to current Australian and global health systems and debates over reform.
- understand the role of economic analysis in evaluating health policy change
- be familiar with theoretical frameworks underlying health economics and analysis.
Content:
This unit introduces the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance to examine the workings of health systems in Australia and comparable countries. It looks at the main models of health system funding and their implications for the structure, planning and delivery of services. The first module focuses on the basic concepts and methodologies of health economics and political economy and their contribution to policy analysis. The second module places funding structures in a broader political and policy context. Topics include the debates over the public-private mix and governance and accountability - who makes decisions about funding priorities? To whom should decision makers be held accountable and for what aspects of their work? How does health finance shape broader policy reform?
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended reading materials available from eLearning site.
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, Professor Stephen Leeder Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (50%), 1x3000 word assignment (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit develops skills for the effective critical appraisal of health policy. It familiarizes students with the principles, and limitations, of evidence-based health policy and how this is shaped by the health and political systems.
Learning objectives:
- to develop critical appraisal skills to critique the research that underpins policy
- to identify and analyse the main influences on policy development
- to evaluate existing policy frameworks and processes in relation to evidence, political context and broader community values
Content:
This unit builds policy analysis and analytical skills by exploring policy design, implementation and evaluation. It looks at the methods and limitations of evidence-based health policy and the problems of integrating equity concerns when developing and applying health policy. The workshops focus on the critical use of epidemiological and public policy analysis to build the evidence base for policy, taking into account political and social contexts.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning
MECO6900 News Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Giles Session: Semester 1,Summer Main Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Prohibitions: MECO4101 Assessment: 1x1900wd news story reporting package (40%), 1x2500wd news feature story reporting package (50%), participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This core unit introduces students to news writing skills required by print media, including the elements of journalistic style, the structure of news and feature articles, interviewing, researching, news gathering and editing skills. The unit of study focuses on journalistic news writing but will also be useful to anyone seeking to work in fields that require professional communication skills, such as public relations and communication management, or corporate roles that require strong writing ability.
MECO6901 Dealing with the Media

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Olaf Werder Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd campaign proposal (35%), 1x300wd media release (20%), 1x200wd oral campaign presentation (15%), 1x2000wd campaign evaluation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Dealing with the Media combines theoretical and practical perspectives on public communication campaigns. It offers students the opportunity to design, implement and evaluate a communication campaign of public interest and to pitch it to specific media. It examines the relationships that exist between all stakeholder groups in the public communication campaign process including client, public relations practitioner, journalist and citizen.
MECO6902 Legal & Ethical Issues in Media Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Dwyer Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x2500wd essay (40%), 1x1000wd presentation (20%), 1x1000wd online comment piece (30%), participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
MECO6902 will introduce students to key legal and ethical issues relevant to journalism and the professional fields of public communication. Students will be given an introductory survey of the main ethical theories in Western thought to establish a framework within which to examine specific ethical issues that relate to media systems. They will also be introduced to the structure of Australia's legal system in comparison with other legal systems, and explore selected law, regulation and policy issues.
MECO6904 Dissertation Part 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Giles Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x0.5-hr supervisor consultations/semester Assessment: A completed research proposal and, where necessary, an ethics application, together with research and writing contributing to a dissertation of 12000 words, for completion in MECO6905. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit requires students to commence the conduct of their own research projects under the supervision of a member of staff and write a dissertation of 12000 words (completed in the second semester of enrolment in MECO6905). In some cases these projects will give students the opportunity to extend lines of enquiry suggested by units of study already completed for the degree. In other cases, students may have an interest in an area not covered by the coursework programs offered during their candidature that can be developed as a supervised project.
MECO6905 Dissertation Part 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Giles Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 6x0.5-hr supervisor consultations/semester Prerequisites: MECO6904 Assessment: completion of writing for a dissertation of 12000 words Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit requires completion of a dissertation of 12000 words, begun in the previous semester. Together with MECO6904, the unit allows students to conduct their own research projects under the supervision of a member of staff.
MECO6919 Health Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Olaf Werder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd commentary and critique (20%), 1x500wd discussion leadership (20%), 1x1000wd research project on health issue (20%), 1x2500wd research paper (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces key concepts in health communication. Students will explore micro- and macro-level theories of health (behaviour) communication that inform the design and implementation of health communication campaigns, planned and unplanned effects of communication campaigns, and the evaluation of such campaigns. It aims to give students a critical and practical understanding of theory and research concerning the role of communication in health promotion efforts.
MECO6927 Organisational Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Olaf Werder Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2x1000wd class tests (40%), 1x3000wd communication case study research project (50%), participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces key concepts in organisational communication. Students will explore various structures of organisations and how those structures affect the flow of communication within workplaces. Upon the completion of the unit, students will develop their understanding of key concepts in organisational communication and apply them to analyse communication problems in organisations. Students will also be able to offer well-grounded criticism on selected organisational issues.
MECO6928 Media and Communication Internship

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Giles Session: Semester 1,Semester 2,Summer Early,Summer Late,Summer Main,Winter Main Prerequisites: 12 credit points from core units of study in Master of Publishing, Master of Media Practice or Master of Health Communication. Assessment: 20day internship (pass/fail), 1x1500wd reflective journal (30%), 1x2500wd research essay (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
This elective offers Masters of Publishing, Health Communication and Media Practice students 20 days work experience in media, publishing and communication roles relating to their degree. Internships require critical reflection on professional practice and foster skills, knowledge and experience that enhance employment prospects. Placements may include reporting, editing, producing, designing, researching, publishing, public and media relations, campaigns, and other tasks. Available to Media and Communications Master students only, following the completion of at least 2 core units of study and subject to Department permission.
MECO6930 Publication Design

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Megan Le Masurier Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x3-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x500wd digital booklet (15%), 1x500wd text title design (15%), 1x1000wd production and print draft layout (20%), 1x3000wd digital magazine (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: This unit is co-taught between the Department of Media and Communications and the Sydney College of the Arts (SCA).
Publication design focuses on the design and production of magazines and other small-scale publications in print and online form. The unit of study explores the visual language of contemporary magazines and introduces students to basic design principles. Students learn about the complex interplay of text, image and sequence occurring in magazine design through the practical experience of creating their own publication using Adobe InDesign software. The unit links creative design processes to current digital and print practice.
MECO6934 Social Marketing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Giles Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1500wd introspective essay (25%), 1x2500wd social marketing project (45%), 1x1500wd campaign critique (20%), 1x500wd project presentation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit examines the nature of social marketing, and how marketing communication concepts, frameworks and techniques developed for commercial marketers can address social issues based on an understanding of what moves and motivates people. This unit provides students with a deeper understanding of how marketing management is used to improve societal outcomes. It will be of particular interest to those who want to gain practical insight into how to manage and evaluate the special communication needs of the non-commercial sector.
MIPH5014 International Health Promotion

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 13 weeks; 1x 1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks Assessment: 1500 words essay (30%), 2500 words report (50%), tutorial participation and attendance (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Students who have enrolled in PUBH5033 should contact the unit co-ordinator to seek permission before enrolling in MIPH5014, as there is some overlap between the two units of study.
This unit of study aims to provide students with an understanding of the principles, theory and methods that are employed in health promotion and prevention. The unit will give attention to the full spectrum of health promotion and prevention programs, from the development of local level initiatives to global policies to achieve health goals. It will have a strong practical and methodological focus, with the objective of enabling students to develop knowledge and skills for planning, implementing and evaluating health promotion programs. Models and methods that are commonly used in health promotion and disease prevention will be described and discussed by using real life examples. Among the major issues examined are the health impact of social and economic development at the national and global levels, prevention and control of non-communicable and communicable diseases, including cigarette smoking, hygiene practices, capacity building and workforce development for health promotion and prevention.
Textbooks
Unit notes supplied by School.
MIPH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture per week for 13 weeks; 1x 1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks plus 1x 1 day peer-learning session through group presentations; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x group presentation (25%), 1x2500 word written essay (50%), tutorial facilitation (20%) and peer evaluation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit gives candidates an insight into prevention and control of communicable diseases in developing countries using country-specific examples presented by professionals with field experience. The unit covers tropical diseases (including schistosomiasis and leprosy), as well as vector-borne conditions (including yellow fever and dengue), zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5115 Women's and Children's Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Heather Jeffery Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks. Assessment: 1x1500 word essay, problem based (60%), Short essay (team of 4 and formative) 20%, tutorial facilitation (15%), peer evaluation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to give students an overview of the health status of women and children in international settings. It also aims to examine causes of major health problems and possible approaches to improving the health of women and children in resource-poor countries. The unit covers a variety of issues in women's and children's health, including approaches to prevention of maternal and fetal, neonatal and child mortality, poverty, mother to child HIV transmission, women and violence, family planning, diarrhoeal disease, pneumonia, and vaccine preventable diseases.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5116 Culture, Health, Illness and Medicine

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cynthia Hunter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop; 1 x 2hr seminar per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x3000word essay (75%) and 1x1hr class facilitation (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit aims to provide an integrated and interpretive approach to an understanding of health-related behaviours of populations in international settings, by synthesizing anthropological knowledge and methodology, and the interactions of culture, biology, psychology and environment. The teaching process is by student-led, lecturer-guided, discussion based review and critical analysis of relevant topics. During the unit, students will explore a range of issues in global and multicultural health from an anthropological perspective. Methodological approaches will encompass ethnography and other anthropological data collection methods. The issues covered will include cultural influences on health, illness and healing, such as indigenous and traditional beliefs and systems, gender and cultural change and the impact of modernization and development on illness and healing. The impact examines disease and illness patterns - their distribution and persistence, mental illness and culture and attitudes towards the use of medications; and the provision of culturally sensitive and appropriate services. The emphasis will be on covering a range of topic areas relevant to the students enrolled, and those of particular importance in contemporary international and multicultural health contexts.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5117 Global Non-Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rohina Joshi Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 2000word written assignment (90%) and class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit aims to provide candidates with an understanding of the causes and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in developing countries. These diseases are associated with social and economic development and the demographic and health transitions. Topics covered in the unit include cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, primary health care in relation to NCDs, health promotion for NCDs and approaches to NCD research in developing countries. Lectures are given by health professionals with direct experience of NCD control in developing countries.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5118 Global Perspectives of HIV/AIDS

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joel Negin Session: Semester 2a Classes: 4 days of intensive lectures spread over a 1 month period; also offered fully online Assessment: 1xgroup report (20%), peer evaluation (10%), 1x2000 word individual assignment (60%), and participation in discussions (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit offers a detailed and evidence-based assessment of the global HIV situation to equip students with the latest understanding of HIV distribution and trends globally, its social and economic implications, the measures being taken to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, the gaps that need to be addressed in HIV control, and the politics around global HIV issues. Examples from different parts of the world, particularly less developed settings, are used to illustrate analysis of the key issues influencing the HIV control agenda globally. Emphasis is placed on developing a critical and analytical approach to assessing the HIV situation and developing interventions for its control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PSYC5011 Applying Models of Health Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 one hour lecture and two hours of tutorials per week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), presentation of intervention (40%), write up of intervention (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The student will be given the opportunity to develop an intervention based on social cognitions models. The process can be followed from start to finish allowing the individual to utilise knowledge and skills gained in other units of study. It is an intended outcome for students enrolled in the MApplSc (HealthPsych) that students can demonstrate an understanding of the key models and theories in Health Psychology which are seen by many to be the foundations of the subject area. The aim of this unit of study is to allow students to identify an area of Health Psychology where an intervention would be appropriate, review existing literature on the topic, formulate the intervention, and evaluate the intervention on a pilot level.
PUBH5019 Cancer Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monica Robotin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3hr per week online lectures, discussion and other activities for 13 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 Assessment: 2 assignments (65%), 5 online tutorials (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to provide students with specific information on the concepts, methods and applications underpinning cancer prevention and control at population level. It is designed to address specific educational needs of students in various programs within the School of Public Health and to offer a broad-based perspective on cancer control, ranging from primary prevention, screening and early intervention, tertiary prevention and palliative care. Emphasis will be given to cancers with the greatest impact at population level and where evidence demonstrates that policies and interventions are capable of reducing cancer incidence, mortality, prolonging survival and improving quality of life. Although focusing on specific Australian conditions, the information will be presented in the context of regional cancer control efforts. At the completion of the unit, students will be equipped with the basic tools to design, plan, implement and evaluate cancer control programs in Australia or their own countries.
Textbooks
Readings will be available on the eLearning site for this unit.
PUBH5026 Mass Media Campaigns & Social Marketing

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan; Professor Adrian Bauman (coordinators), Assoc Prof Tom Carroll Session: Int August Classes: face-to-face/ on-campus 2-day residential workshop (lectures, workshops, small group sessions, and student participation and presentations) + 2 weeks of online discussions Prerequisites: PUBH5033 Assumed knowledge: Training in research methods epidemiology is advised but not essential. Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (70%); in class participation and participation in 2 weeks on-line discussion (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit focuses on mass-reach public health campaigns used to promote health and prevent disease. Building on introductory Masters of Public Health units of study in health promotion/disease prevention [or equivalent], this unit describes the rationale for mass-media led campaigns, social marketing interventions, and how they fit into a comprehensive approach to population health promotion and chronic disease prevention. The major themes covered are the principles of mass-reach communications in public health; designing campaigns [formative evaluation]; developing public health campaigns as part of comprehensive health promotion; understanding the messages, branding and marketing of campaigns; process and impact evaluation of campaigns; the differences between campaigns and social marketing initiatives; and the role of ancillary and supportive health promotion strategies, including media placement and advocacy. The Unit will equip students with skills to plan, design, implement and evaluate public health campaigns.
Textbooks
Course readings will be provided before the workshop. These are required readings, and there is some individual student preparation required for presentation at the workshop and for the on-line two weeks discussions.
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 workshops, face-to-face tutorials and online discussion; fully online version available Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%); 1x2500 word assignment (45%); online discussion participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This core unit of study will provide students with an introduction to and critical overview of evidence-based prevention and health promotion as a fundamental component of efforts to address chronic disease prevention and reduce health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) principles underlying disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) evidence-based planning disease prevention and health promotion programs, and (iii) implementing and evaluating health promotion programs for disease prevention. The unit will illustrate the principles of prevention and health promotion programs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal populations. It will develop students' skills in: identifying problems and setting prevention priorities; planning and implementing programs, and; evaluating the impact of programs on population health. The unit will address diverse disease prevention and health promotion programs, including individual change programs, interpersonal (family, social environments), organisational (worksites, primary care), and community-wide programs. Students will develop an understanding of approaches used to enhance inter-sectoral action, community participation and consultation, the development of partnerships and the use of policy and advocacy. These approaches will be particularly applied to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion settings.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5101 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x 4000 word written report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students negotiate with a public health staff member to be their supervisor on an agreed project. The student or supervisor informs the Unit co-ordinator, who emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit permission to allow the student to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to systematically complete a self-directed project in one of the main content areas of the course. Students should contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project.
PUBH5102 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x 2000 word written report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students negotiate with a public health staff member to be their supervisor on an agreed project. The student or supervisor informs the Unit co-ordinator, who emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit permission to allow the student to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to systematically complete a self-directed project in one of the main content areas of the course. Students should contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project.
PUBH5111 Environmental Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Geoff Morgan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Mixed mode of 13 online lectures and 6 face-to-face/online case studies (13 sessions of 2 hours) . All the content for the unit can be completed online if necessary. Assessment: 1x written assignment (45%), 1x quiz (40%) and case study participation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
The unit will explore the major categories of environmental health hazards including air quality, water quality, food safety, chemical hazards (eg contaminated sites), physical hazards (eg noise and radiation), and microbiological hazards (eg Legionnaires' disease). Regional and global issues of sustainability, climate change and land use planning will also be covered. The unit aims to develop an understanding of environmental health hazard identification and risk assessment, as well as the principles of hazard regulation and control. The disciplines of epidemiology, toxicology and ecology will be used to characterise risks associated with environmental hazards and determine risk management options and risk communication strategies. Students completing this unit will appreciate the multi-disciplinary nature of environmental health issues and the need to work closely with commonwealth and state health and environment agencies as well as other government agencies including local government.
Textbooks
Environmental Health (Third Edition). Moeller DW. Harvard University Press;
PUBH5114 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2 Classes: : 13 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and/or associated readings and online activities. The teaching sessions are a combination of a one day face-to-face workshop and online seminars. Students unable to attend face-to-face sessions can do the entire course online. Prohibitions: PUBH5115 Assessment: 2 x 1500 word assignments (60%), compulsory online discussion participation (30%); online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for prevention and management of related problems. This fuller drug and alcohol elective covers all the content of PUBH5115 and goes on to assist the student to develop more advanced skills in research and in management of clinical services in relation to alcohol and drug use disorders, and to examine the needs of special populations.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5116 Genetics and Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Cust Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x 3 day workshop Assessment: 3x 30min online quiz (20%), small group assignment (30%) and take home exam of 6 questions (250 words each) (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit caters for practitioners, policy and decision-makers, students and researchers in public health, public policy, journalism, law, epidemiology, medicine, science, industry, ethics, philosophy, communication and advocacy. It gives a basic introduction to genetics and genetic epidemiology and covers issues like genetic determinants of disease, genetic testing and screening, psychosocial, legal and ethical aspects of genetics and genetic testing, genetic education and genetics and public policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5309 Translational Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Emeritus Professor Jack Dowie, Professor Glenn Salkeld Session: Semester 2b Classes: Weekly on-line Assessment: Multiple Choice Questions [MCQ] and creation of an original Annalisa Decision Aid construct (30%), 1500-2000 word Report (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Translational Health introduces the main existing translational methods and models in healthcare, most of which focus on 'knowledge translation' and 'bringing evidence into practice', i.e. on moving results from the basic sciences through clinical and public health science and guidelines into clinical and public health decision and policy making. Most of these models diagnose the problem of 'loss in translation' in terms of institutional and professional barriers and blocks along the translation pathways. While acknowledging these, Translational Health focuses on the modelling method - the 'language' and 'vocabulary' - most likely to perform the translation task effectively in relation to patient-centered practice. The technique underlying the method is Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (in contrast to conventional Decision Analysis) and the template for its practical implementation is the Annalisa 2.0+ software. It is shown how high quality clinical and public health decision making needs to be based on 'values translation' as well as 'knowledge translation'. And how the approach can facilitate the desirable 'backwards translation' to ensure research is practice-relevant in both content and format. Students choose from a set of topics within which to pursue the principles, follow empirical examples and develop their own analyses in a practicum.
PUBH5414 Public Health Advocacy

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Simon Chapman Session: Int Sept Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop Assessment: 1x letter to the editor of a newspaper (10%) and 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to familiarise students with the strategies of public health advocacy and to provide skills in content and discourse analysis of media coverage of health and medical issues. This unit covers the role of media advocacy in advancing public health policy; framing public health issues; news gathering, reporting and editing; strategies for media advocacy; political lobbying in public health advocacy. Teaching and learning activities include interactive lectures, case studies and small group work. Students will be expected to prepare for the sessions. Requirements will be distributed prior to the first day.
Textbooks
(recommended only)
PUBH5415 Injury Prevention

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rebecca Ivers Session: Int October Classes: 1 x 2day workshop Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (90%) and participation in small group work during the workshop (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to provide students with a clear understanding of the magnitude of the injury burden, both in higher and lower income countries, and the strategies that are required to address this burden. This unit will cover: injury definitions, measurement and surveillance; risk factor identification; intervention strategies and their evaluation; advocacy; cause-specific injury topics. During the 2 day workshop, guest speakers will outline issues relevant to the general injury prevention field and students will participate in interactive small group work which will focus on issues relevant to cause-specific injuries, in collaboration with guest contributors.
Textbooks
Students will be provided with a course manual. Recommended text: McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004.
PUBH5416 Vaccines in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Menzies, Dr Aditi Dey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Preparatory online lectures and 1x 2day workshop at the Children's Hospital Westmead Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or PUBH5018 Assessment: 2x short online quizzes (10%) plus 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
Note: Students who have not done the core units of study in epidemiology (PUBH5010) or biostatistics (PUBH5018) but have previous demonstrable experience in these study areas will be required to request permission from the unit of study coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Permission is required to ensure that students have a basic grounding in epidemiology and biostatistics. The coordinator emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit to advise whether or not the student has permission to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of immunisation principles, the impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs), how to assess the need for new vaccines and how to implement and monitor a new vaccination program. This unit covers the history and impact of vaccination; basic immunological principles of immunisation; surveillance of diseases, vaccination coverage, vaccine effectiveness and adverse events; vaccine scares; risk communication; immunisation in the developing country context; assessing disease burden and new vaccines. Learning activities include short online preparatory lectures and a workshop with interactive lectures and small group case studies.
PUBH5418 Tobacco Control in the 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Simon Chapman Session: Int August Classes: 1x3 day workshop of lectures and problem-focused discussions, followed by 4 weeks of problem-based online discussions Assessment: 2x 2000 word essays (60%), 1x 100 item online quiz (10%) and online discussion and participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
The unit consists of learning topics, each of which is supported by extensive Web based resources, and 4 moderated online discussion forums, each focusing on a problem related to tobacco use and control. Lecture topics include: history of tobacco use and control; the burden of illness from tobacco use; secondhand smoke: the research evidence; measuring tobacco use, uptake and cessation in communities; international trends in tobacco consumption; the tobacco industry; the WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and new forms of tobacco advertising and promotion. Problem focused discussion forums include: Harm reduction and tobacco control, regulation of tobacco, improving and implementing pack warnings; promoting smoking cessation, prevention of uptake (youth programs); denormalisation of the tobacco industry; controlling advertising; and controlling exposure to tobacco smoke, making news on tobacco and influencing political policy on tobacco.
Textbooks
(recommended only)
PUBH5419 Falls Prevention in Older People

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Cathie Sherrington and Dr Anne Tiedemann Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6-8 hours of online lectures and tutorials per week for 13 weeks Assessment: 1x 2000 word written assignment (60%), 1 x assignment with "short answer" questions (20%), participation in moderated online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This fully online unit aims to teach students about the principles of falls prevention in the older person with an emphasis on the application of these principles in the field. This unit will focus on risk factors for falls and the development, implementation and evaluation of fall prevention programs. Students will learn about and discuss research methods for the understanding of, prediction of, and prevention of falls, critically evaluate journal articles, and discuss the development of fall prevention programs using case studies.
Textbooks
Recorded lectures, lecture notes, case studies and journal articles will be provided online from a password-protected site
PUBH5420 Public Health Advocacy Strategies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Becky Freeman Session: Semester 2b Classes: 2 full days followed by 3 weeks of online Assessment: 2500 word essay (70%), online participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit builds on content from Public Health Advocacy PUBH5414. Students will have the opportunity to critique and analyse case studies from a variety of both successful and unsuccessful public health advocacy examples. There will be an emphasis on how online environments and social media tools are contributing to public health advocacy debates and campaigns. Recent examples of how online media have influenced health policy and programming will be presented. Students will examine and prepare writing for online media such as news, blogs, and social media. The lectures will include guest speakers from non-government organisations, government and other experienced stakeholders from across the public heath sector.
Textbooks
Recommended: Chapman S. (2007) Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking History. Oxford: Blackwell.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow, Dr Claire Hooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block / intensive - 5 days (1 x 3 days; 1 x 2 days) Online activities Assessment: Assignment 1 x 3000 word (55%), Assignment 2 x 2000 words (35%), Online activities (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
In this unit, students will develop a critical awareness of the determinants of effective communication, particularly in relation to health risks to the individual and to society.
The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement using traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided