Indigenous Health Promotion

Unit of study descriptions for 2015

INDH5211 Community Profiling & Setting Priorities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Dickson Session: Session 1 Early Census Classes: 6-day intensive workshop Assessment: written assignment (75%), class presentation (20%) and reflective practice journal (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is the first of six sequential, interdependent modules, only provided for students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion. Students will be introduced to the overarching principles of health promotion, its conceptual and technical components and its role in preventing or reducing the impact of injury and ill health. Different concepts of health will be explored with a particular emphasis on indigenous approaches to understanding health and wellbeing. Students will then commence the development of a comprehensive profile of their chosen community. Particular attention will be given to finding, understanding, managing and presenting statistical, epidemiological and other forms of data in a way that is accessible to the students, their professional colleagues, other health and funding agencies and community members. The development of a community profile will enable students to define and understand how their community functions, the determinants of health that impact on their chosen community, and identify priority health issues. It will act as a foundation for the development of appropriate and effective health promotion programs. The final 20 per cent of INDH5211 will be dedicated to commencing INDH5212.
INDH5212 Health Promotion Program Planning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Dickson Session: Semester 1a Classes: 6-day intensive workshop Assessment: written assignment (95%) and reflective practice journal (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is the second of six sequential, interdependent modules, only provided for students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion. Students will explore in detail the conceptual components of a planned health promotion course. This will include the theory and practice of community engagement and participation, defining and understanding the priority health issue, its risk factors and contributing factors, exploring theories and models relevant to health behaviour, identifying target groups and stakeholders, searching the literature for evidence and ideas, and resource mobilisation. Students will also be introduced to formative research and the value of developing effective partnerships. The final 20 per cent of INDH5212 will be dedicated to commencing INDH5213.
INDH5213 Goals, Objectives and Strategies

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Dickson Session: Semester 1b Classes: 6-day intensive workshop Assessment: written assignment (80%), class presentation (15%) and reflective practice journal (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is the third of six sequential, interdependent modules, only provided for students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion. Students will develop the specific, measureable, achievable, realistic and time-limited (SMART) goal, objectives and strategies they and their community will use to address the identified priority health issue. They will understand how and when to use the three broad types of strategies in health promotion - education, mobilisation, and advocacy - to effectively address the factors contributing to the health issue. They will further explore relevant theories and models that will assist the development process and analyse and critique case studies of effective health promotion programs. Students will also be introduced to process, impact and outcome evaluation.
INDH5221 Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Dickson Session: Session 2 Early Census Classes: 5 day intensive workshop Assessment: written assignment and development of promotional materials (65%), development and recording of a radio sting (30%) and reflective practice journal (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is the fourth of six sequential, interdependent modules, only provided for students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion. This unit of study introduces students to the fundamental role of communication in health promotion and its theory and practice. Students will explore, define and understand the role of interpersonal, small group, limited and mass reach communication in changing attitudes, beliefs, values and behaviour. They will be introduced to social marketing theory and practice and will gain practical experience in this area, which also includes social media. Students will also explore case studies of effective communication campaigns that have used education, mobilisation and advocacy to influence individual behaviour, impact on populations and change the minds of decision-makers. The final 20 per cent of INDH5221 will be dedicated to commencing INDH5224.
INDH5224 Research and Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Dickson Session: Intensive August Classes: 5 day intensive workshop Assessment: written assignment (95%) and reflective practice journal (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is the fifth of six sequential, interdependent modules, only provided for students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion. Students will explore the role of evaluative, descriptive and intervention research in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion and define and understand the different methodologies used in quantitative and qualitative research . They will examine ethical issues in research and identify research methods that will assist their communities in identifying health issues and effective solutions without causing harm or being exploitative. Students will also understand how and when to conduct process, impact and outcome evaluations that will encourage transparency and accountability and provide evidence of the effectiveness of their health promotion program. The final 20 per cent of INDH5224 will be dedicated to commencing INDH5227.
INDH5227 Art, Science and Politics of Prevention

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Michelle Dickson Session: Intensive September Classes: 5 day workshop Prerequisites: INDH5211, INDH5212, INDH5213, INDH5221, INDH5224 Prohibitions: INDH5226 Assessment: class presentation (50%), written assignment (45%) and reflective practice journal (5%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This is the last of six sequential, interdependent modules, only provided for students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Indigenous Health Promotion. Students will be introduced to and learn from highly regarded national and international health professionals who have used art, science and politics to effect significant changes to the policy and practice of preventative health. Students will also reflect on and apply the knowledge and skills learned throughout their academic year by producing a comprehensive presentation and written report. The presentation will be delivered to a panel of health promotion professionals and will demonstrate the skills and knowledge each student has mastered. The written report will include a detailed description of their community profile, priority health issue, target group and stakeholders, and the goal, objectives and strategies they and their community will implement to effectively address their health issue. Students will also be required to include an evaluation plan and to demonstrate their understanding of health promotion theories and models, literature searching and research methodologies. The presentation and written report will demonstrate the student's knowledge of health promotion tools and processes and will be developed in partnership with their workplace and community, where applicable.
Textbooks
Plater S. & Dickson M. (2013). The Chook Book: A step-by-step guide to the development, planning, implementation and evaluation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion programs.