Indigenous Health (Substance Use)

Unit of study descriptions for 2014

IHSU5001 Non-dependent Alcohol Use Disorders

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kate Conigrave, Dr Kylie Lee Session: Int February Classes: block mode (7.5 weekdays), followed by 50 hours of self-directed learning at home Assessment: 1 x written assignment (65%), 1 x oral presentation (15%), class participation and class attendance (10%), open book quiz (formative assessment) (10%), required reflective report (formative assessment) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit looks at substance use and misuse in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander (Indigenous) communities: its cultural and historical background, the scientific basis of addiction, its causes and how common it is (epidemiology). Students will consider the harms of of alcohol use: to body, mind, family and community. They will examine and critically consider approaches to prevent substance misuse and also early intervention and harm reduction measures. Both the clinical and public health settings will be examined. In this block we will provide examples focusing on non-dependent alcohol use. Case-based learning will draw on students' professional experience in the drug and alcohol field. In addition, students will be expected to draw on their cultural knowledge to develop their drug and alcohol client assessment and responses to substance misuse. Students will analyse their community setting and explore the role of the Indigenous drug and alcohol professional in providing drug and alcohol prevention, brief intervention and harm reduction to individuals and communities.
Textbooks
Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J & Conigrave K (2012). Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney, NSW: University of Sydney.
IHSU5002 Alcohol Dependence and Withdrawal

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kate Conigrave, Dr Kylie Lee Session: Int March Classes: block mode (5 days) followed by 50 hours of self-directed learning at home Corequisites: IHSU5001 Assessment: 1 x written assignment (50%), class participation (10%), completion of clinical placement and related written tasks (30%), open book quiz (formative assessment) (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit builds skills in clinical work and understanding of the science which explains addiction. Also, the block further develops understanding of community measures to address alcohol misuse and builds academic skills. Students will study alcohol dependence ('alcoholism') and withdrawal, including tools to assess and help clients. The cultural and geographical context of assessment and treatment is considered. The unit aims to improve students' skills in preventing relapse, including counseling, referral to appropriate services and understanding the role of medicines. Mental health problems linked to alcohol misuse will be examined. Students will develop their skills in writing a case management plan. After the block students will organise a half-day clinical placement in an alcohol treatment service.
Textbooks
Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J & Conigrave K (2012). Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney, NSW: University of Sydney.
IHSU5003 Cannabis, Tobacco and Depression

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kate Conigrave, Dr Kylie Lee Session: Int May Classes: block mode (5 days), followed by 50 hours of self-directed learning at home Corequisites: IHSU5002 Assessment: 1 x written assignment (80%), class participation (10%), open book quizzes (formative assessment) and clinical skills assessment (formative) (10%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit looks at how common cannabis, tobacco and related harms are in Indigenous Australian communities, as well as their impact and the science behind each of these substances (pharmacology). The link between cannabis use and depression and other psychiatric conditions will be explored. The nature and treatment of depression is examined, particularly in individuals who use cannabis. At the public health level, this unit focuses on tobacco and drug policy and how it influences programs at the local level and impacts on health of Indigenous Australians. Students will look at strategies to reduce smoking and cannabis related harm in individuals and communities. The health professional's role in influencing policy and programs in culturally secure ways will be explored.
Textbooks
Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J & Conigrave K (2012). Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney, NSW: University of Sydney
IHSU5004 Opioids and Injecting Drug Use

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kate Conigrave, Dr Kylie Lee Session: Int July Classes: block mode (5 days), followed by 50 hours of self-directed learning at home Corequisites: IHSU5003 Assessment: written assignment (60%), class participation (10%), clinical placement and related tasks (20%), formative open book quiz (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit develops students' skills in assessment and management of clients with opioid dependence. The role of opioid maintenance medicines such as methadone and buprenorphine will be examined. Also the prevention and management of blood borne virus infections and other harm reduction initiatives will be considered. Clinical assessment and management skills will be further developed. Communication skills in the health setting will be developed. Ways of advocating for change in the community and influencing policy are considered. After the block students will organise a half-day clinical placement in a drug and alcohol service.
Textbooks
Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J & Conigrave K (2012). Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney, NSW: University of Sydney.
IHSU5005 Amphetamines, Polydrug Use and Psychosis

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kate Conigrave, Dr Kylie Lee Session: Semester 2b Classes: block mode (5 days), followed by 50 hours of self-directed learning at home Prerequisites: IHSU5001 and IHSU5002 Corequisites: IHSU5004 Assessment: 1 x written assignment (60%), 1 x oral presentation on the assignment (20%), class participation (10%), formative assessment quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit focuses on amphetamine-type stimulant drugs, such as 'ice'. It covers the science behind how stimulants work (pharmacology) and the effects and harms of stimulant and polydrug use. Topics include the needs of clients, and complications such as HIV, as well as treatment approaches. The scientific understanding of psychosis and the use of antipsychotic medicines are considered. The unit develops students' skills to design a program evaluation including describing the program rationale, goals, communication with key stakeholders, collecting and analysing data and giving the results back to the community.
Textbooks
Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J & Conigrave K (2012). Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney, NSW: University of Sydney.
IHSU5006 Substance Use Across the Lifespan

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kate Conigrave, Dr Kylie Lee Session: Int October Classes: block mode (5 days), followed by 50 hours of self-directed learning at home Corequisites: IHSU5005 Assessment: written assignments (80%), class participation (10%), open book quiz (formative) (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit focuses on amphetamine-type stimulant drugs, such as 'ice'. It covers the science behind how stimulants work (pharmacology) and the effects and harms of stimulant and polydrug use. Topics include the needs of clients, and complications such as HIV, as well as treatment approaches. The scientific understanding of psychosis and the use of antipsychotic medicines are considered. The unit develops students' skills to design a program evaluation including describing the program rationale, goals, communication with key stakeholders, collecting and analysing data and giving the results back to the community.
Textbooks
Lee K, Freeburn B, Ella S, Miller W, Perry J & Conigrave K (2012). Handbook for Aboriginal alcohol and drug work. Sydney, NSW: University of Sydney.
HPOL5000 Introduction to Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x 2-day workshops, online lectures and discussions Assessment: 1 x 1500wd written assignment (30%); 1 x 3000wd written assignment (50%); Online learning quiz (5%); online problem based learning exercise (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
To develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy. To give an overview of the political choices and frameworks - national and global - that shape policymaking.
Learning objectives:
- acquire a critical understanding of the basic history and features of the Australian health system
- understand the main frameworks used to analyse and make policy
- understand the main issues in the translation of policy into practice
- demonstrate the capacity to apply these understandings in particular settings through case studies.
Content:
This unit explores the main structures and institutions that make health policy. The unit examines debates over policy frameworks, and the evidence and advocacy in setting priorities. Conflicts over health policy will be placed in broader contexts - comparing different health systems and assessing global influences. Case studies will be used to examine the relationships between policy and practice.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other recommended reading materials will be available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5001 Economics and Finance for Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie,, A/Prof Stephen Jan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: Health Economics Exercise (50%), Health finance assignment (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the financial and economic aspects of health policy. It introduces the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance. Learning objectives:
- understand the main models and debates regarding health funding in developed OECD countries and the implications for equity, delivery and governance of health services.
- apply this knowledge to current Australian and global health systems and debates over reform.
- understand the role of economic analysis in evaluating health policy change
- be familiar with theoretical frameworks underlying health economics and analysis.
Content:
This unit introduces the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance to examine the workings of health systems in Australia and comparable countries. It looks at the main models of health system funding and their implications for the structure, planning and delivery of services. The first module focuses on the basic concepts and methodologies of health economics and political economy and their contribution to policy analysis. The second module places funding structures in a broader political and policy context. Topics include the debates over the public-private mix and governance and accountability - who makes decisions about funding priorities? To whom should decision makers be held accountable and for what aspects of their work? How does health finance shape broader policy reform?
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended reading materials available from eLearning site.
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, Professor Stephen Leeder Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (50%), 1x3000 word assignment (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit develops skills for the effective critical appraisal of health policy. It familiarizes students with the principles, and limitations, of evidence-based health policy and how this is shaped by the health and political systems.
Learning objectives:
- to develop critical appraisal skills to critique the research that underpins policy
- to identify and analyse the main influences on policy development
- to evaluate existing policy frameworks and processes in relation to evidence, political context and broader community values
Content:
This unit builds policy analysis and analytical skills by exploring policy design, implementation and evaluation. It looks at the methods and limitations of evidence-based health policy and the problems of integrating equity concerns when developing and applying health policy. The workshops focus on the critical use of epidemiological and public policy analysis to build the evidence base for policy, taking into account political and social contexts.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Prohibitions: BSTA5011 Assessment: 1x 4page assignment (30%) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Evening or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. It is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2011.
PUBH5017 Public Health Program Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman, Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hr lecture x 10 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 and PUBH5018 and PUBH5033 Corequisites: PUBH5032 Assessment: Two short assignments during the course (each around 1000 words) (2x17.5%) 1x2500-3000wd assignment (35%) and online discussion and participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is taught online and face to face in alternate years [it is face to face in the odd numbered years eg. 2013, and online format in the even numbered years]. The aims and content of the unit are to develop skills in public health and health promotion program planning, evaluation and research. There is an emphasis on programs that address chronic disease prevention and health promotion, but other broad public health content areas will also be used as examples. The course goal is to understand program evaluation from a public health practice and research methodological perspective. The course will complement other courses in epidemiology or qualitative research methods, in bringing these together around assessing population-level program effects. The unit comprises five modules of work, including: principles of public health program (PHP) evaluation; research designs and methodological issues for PHP Evaluation; measurement issues in assessing public health programs; analysis and interpretation of PHP evaluation data, and research translation and dissemination. The work in this unit is divided into the five modules, and will include weekly student preparation and presentation of materials in both on-line and face-to-face formats. Students must have uninterrupted access to the internet [for on line] or be able to attend all interactive sessions [face to face format] in order to undertake the unit, as the course uses a sequential learning process to build evaluation skills and expertise.
Textbooks
Recommended: Bauman A, Nutbeam D. Evaluation in a Nutshell. McGraw Hill Sydney (2nd Edition, 2013).
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan and Professor Petra Macaskill Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: 1x4 page assignment (30%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Evening or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 workshops, face-to-face tutorials and online discussion; fully online version available Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%); 1x2500 word assignment (45%); online discussion participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This core unit of study will provide students with an introduction to and critical overview of evidence-based prevention and health promotion as a fundamental component of efforts to address chronic disease prevention and reduce health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) principles underlying disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) evidence-based planning disease prevention and health promotion programs, and (iii) implementing and evaluating health promotion programs for disease prevention. The unit will illustrate the principles of prevention and health promotion programs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal populations. It will develop students' skills in: identifying problems and setting prevention priorities; planning and implementing programs, and; evaluating the impact of programs on population health. The unit will address diverse disease prevention and health promotion programs, including individual change programs, interpersonal (family, social environments), organisational (worksites, primary care), and community-wide programs. Students will develop an understanding of approaches used to enhance inter-sectoral action, community participation and consultation, the development of partnerships and the use of policy and advocacy. These approaches will be particularly applied to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion settings.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5101 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x 4000 word written report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students negotiate with a public health staff member to be their supervisor on an agreed project. The student or supervisor informs the Unit co-ordinator, who emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit permission to allow the student to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to systematically complete a self-directed project in one of the main content areas of the course. Students should contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project.
PUBH5102 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x 2000 word written report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students negotiate with a public health staff member to be their supervisor on an agreed project. The student or supervisor informs the Unit co-ordinator, who emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit permission to allow the student to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to systematically complete a self-directed project in one of the main content areas of the course. Students should contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project.
PUBH5114 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2 Classes: : 13 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and/or associated readings and online activities. The teaching sessions are a combination of a one day face-to-face workshop and online seminars. Students unable to attend face-to-face sessions can do the entire course online. Prohibitions: PUBH5115 Assessment: 2 x 1500 word assignments (60%), compulsory online discussion participation (30%); online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for prevention and management of related problems. This fuller drug and alcohol elective covers all the content of PUBH5115 and goes on to assist the student to develop more advanced skills in research and in management of clinical services in relation to alcohol and drug use disorders, and to examine the needs of special populations.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5115 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2a Classes: 7 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and associated online activities. The teaching sessions are a combination of face-to-face and online seminars. Students unable to attend face to face sessions can do the entire course online. Prohibitions: PUBH5114 Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (60%); compulsory online discussion participation (30%); online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for the prevention and management of related problems.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5118 Indigenous Health Promotion

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2day workshop, 7 weeks x 2 hr lectures Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (70%), workshop and class participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Despite the many positive political, social and legal advances that have taken place in Australian society, it is impossible to ignore the fact after more than 200 years of colonisation, the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcome continues to be unacceptably wide. Using a health promotion framework, the unit will provide students with an opportunity to increase their understanding of the history and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is hoped that students will utilise this understanding to develop more congenial and productive relations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the community, and within the spheres of their chosen professions. During the unit students are encouraged to examine factors that determine health, to analyse the major factors that influence Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes, and the relationship between these factors. The course will provide opportunities to discuss and identify strategies to address the health disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.
Textbooks
Course reader will be provided.
PUBH5414 Public Health Advocacy

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Simon Chapman Session: Int Sept Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop Assessment: 1x letter to the editor of a newspaper (10%) and 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to familiarise students with the strategies of public health advocacy and to provide skills in content and discourse analysis of media coverage of health and medical issues. This unit covers the role of media advocacy in advancing public health policy; framing public health issues; news gathering, reporting and editing; strategies for media advocacy; political lobbying in public health advocacy. Teaching and learning activities include interactive lectures, case studies and small group work. Students will be expected to prepare for the sessions. Requirements will be distributed prior to the first day.
Textbooks
(recommended only)
PUBH5415 Injury Prevention

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rebecca Ivers Session: Int October Classes: 1 x 2day workshop Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (90%) and participation in small group work during the workshop (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to provide students with a clear understanding of the magnitude of the injury burden, both in higher and lower income countries, and the strategies that are required to address this burden. This unit will cover: injury definitions, measurement and surveillance; risk factor identification; intervention strategies and their evaluation; advocacy; cause-specific injury topics. During the 2 day workshop, guest speakers will outline issues relevant to the general injury prevention field and students will participate in interactive small group work which will focus on issues relevant to cause-specific injuries, in collaboration with guest contributors.
Textbooks
Students will be provided with a course manual. Recommended text: McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004.
PUBH5418 Tobacco Control in the 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Simon Chapman Session: Int August Classes: 1x3 day workshop of lectures and problem-focused discussions, followed by 4 weeks of problem-based online discussions Assessment: 2x 2000 word essays (60%), 1x 100 item online quiz (10%) and online discussion and participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
The unit consists of learning topics, each of which is supported by extensive Web based resources, and 4 moderated online discussion forums, each focusing on a problem related to tobacco use and control. Lecture topics include: history of tobacco use and control; the burden of illness from tobacco use; secondhand smoke: the research evidence; measuring tobacco use, uptake and cessation in communities; international trends in tobacco consumption; the tobacco industry; the WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and new forms of tobacco advertising and promotion. Problem focused discussion forums include: Harm reduction and tobacco control, regulation of tobacco, improving and implementing pack warnings; promoting smoking cessation, prevention of uptake (youth programs); denormalisation of the tobacco industry; controlling advertising; and controlling exposure to tobacco smoke, making news on tobacco and influencing political policy on tobacco.
Textbooks
(recommended only)
SEXH5101 Public Health Aspects of STIs

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online; Semester 2a Intensive: compulsory attendance at a teaching day in week 5 and attendance at 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, taken face-to-face for 3 weeks Assessment: written assignment (50%), online quiz (30%), online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version.
This unit aims to provide a public health perspective of the community impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It is available in both online and face to face modes. At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand the underlying principles of the surveillance systems used to monitor STIs; the core risk activity groups involved in the transmission of STIs; how the epidemiologies of STIs vary within and between societies; the public health impacts of STIs; and effective preventative strategies at individual and community levels. Course content will include an introduction to the basic biology of STIs; epidemiology and surveillance methods; STI service delivery considerations; STI/HIV interactions, impact of vulnerable at-risk populations; health promotion for STIs; policy approaches and ethical & legal issues.
SEXH5102 Public Health Aspects of HIV/AIDS

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 2a Classes: Session 1b: online only. Session2b: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version. Assessment: written assignment (50%), online quiz (30%), online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
Note: AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version
This unit aims to provide a public health perspective of the impact of HIV infection. It is available in both online and face to face modes. At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand the underlying principles of the surveillance systems used to monitor HIV infection; the core risk activity groups involved in the transmission of HIV; how the epidemiology of HIV infection varies within and between societies; the public health impacts of HIV infection; and effective prevention strategies. Course content will include an introduction to the basic science of HIV infection; epidemiology and surveillance; sexual blood borne and mother to child transmission; STI/HIV interactions; other methods of transmission; health promotion for HIV; government perspectives and ethical and legal issues.
SEXH5200 Advanced STIs

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Richard Hillman, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 1 Classes: Semester 1: compulsory attendance at 3x1hr lectures and 1x1hr journal club per week; Semester 1 Intensive (only available with permission of the unit of study coordinator): compulsory attendance during week 5 and then compulsory attendance at 3 x 1hr lectures and 1 x 1hr journal club for 9 weeks Assessment: written examination (40%), short written discussion topics (15%), multiple choice quizzes (35%), journal club (10%) Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to describe the epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and management strategies for the common sexually transmitted infections (STIs). HIV infection will only be covered in the context of its interactions with other STIs.
At the end of this unit, students will be able to discuss the microbiology, pathogenesis and epidemiology of the common STIs. They will be able to demonstrate an understanding of the clinical spectrum of STIs, including asymptomatic infection, genital manifestations, extragenital manifestations and problems related to pregnancy. When discussing STI management, students will understand the impact of STIs at individual, relationship and community levels and how needs differ with risk activity group and geographical location.
Course content will include the basic anatomy, physiology and clinical skills required for the investigation of STIs; the epidemiology, microbiology and clinical aspects of the following conditions: vaginal discharge, urethral discharge, genital ulceration, upper genital tract infections, sexually transmitted hepatitis, syphilis, anogenital warts and cancer, genital infestations, genital dermatology and other conditions likely to present in a sexual health context. Issues related to difficulties of access to treatment and the challenges faced in resource-poor settings will also be covered.
SEXH5202 Advanced HIV Infection

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Dr Roger Garsia, Associate Professor Richard Hillman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Semester 2 Normal: compulsory attendance at 3x1hr lectures/week and 1x1hr journal club per week; Semester 2 Intensive (only available with permission of the unit of study coordinator): compulsory attendance at a teaching day in week 5 and attendance at 3 x 1hr lectures/week and 1 x 1hr journal club for 9 weeks. Assessment: written examination (40%), case-based discussions (10%), multiple choice quizzes (30%), journal club (10%) and class presentations (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to describe the epidemiology, biology, pathogenesis and clinical contexts of HIV infection. At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand the laboratory, clinical and social aspects of the diagnosis and management of HIV infection. Course content will include underlying scientific principles of diagnostics, virology, immunology and pathogenesis as applicable to HIV infection; clinical aspects of HIV infection, including seroconversion, asymptomatic infection, early symptomatic disease, major opportunistic infections (including AIDS-related conditions), tumours and death. Emphasis will be placed on the roles of prophylaxis, antiretrovirals and the management of associated conditions. Legal, ethical and social contexts will also be discussed.
SEXH5205 Advanced Adolescent Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Kang Session: Semester 2 Classes: fully online Assessment: continuous assessment including participation in group discussion, short answer questions, 1000 word assignments plus 2500 word essay or field report. Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit aims to introduce the constructs of adolescent sexuality, explore the determinants of adolescent sexual health and to discuss the personal and public health implications of adolescent sexuality, with additional emphasis on a deeper exploration of an area of adolescent sexual health that is of particular interest to the student.
At the end of this unit of study, students will be able to describe the biological, developmental and socio-cultural contexts of adolescent sexual health as well as the constructs, challenges and diversities of adolescent sexuality. They will learn techniques used to optimize communication with adolescents and explore legal, ethical and public health implications of adolescent sexuality. They will also understand and describe one area of adolescent sexual health that the student chooses to study in depth from a list of suggestions.
The course is taught fully online using a range of assessments including group discussion, short answer questions and discussions based on case scenarios. It is divided into 6 modules: adolescent sexuality, adolescent sexual health, reproductive health issues in adolescence, diversity, legal and ethical issues and sexual health promotion.