International Public Health

 

Unit of study descriptions

BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit begins with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of public health (and how it might be different to clinical medicine) and of public health ethics. It introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A range of practical public health problems and issues will be considered, including ethical dimensions of communicable and non-communicable diseases in populations, and the ethical challenges of public health research. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format).
BETH5206 Introduction to Public Health Ethics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online) Prohibitions: BETH5203 Assessment: 2xOnline Quiz (40%); 1x1500wd essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: Students enrolled in the Graduate Diploma or Master of Public Health may choose to take BETH5203 (6CP) instead of BETH5206 (2CP). This unit is available to Master of Public Health (MPH) students only.
BETH5206 Ethics and Public Health introduces you to a range of ethical issues that arise within the practice of public health. It begins with an orientation to the field: we will discuss conceptualisations of public health, what ethics is, and how ethics relates to evidence. We will talk about the origins and development of public health ethics as a (relatively new) field, and how it is distinguished from other areas of ethics. Your learning will then be structured around three sets of important concepts. The first are concepts central to utilitarian reasoning: benefit, harm and cost. The second cluster of concepts relates to the proper relationship between the citizen and the state (including public health as an institution): they are freedom, liberty and paternalism. The third cluster includes fairness, justice and equity, concepts that are often used rhetorically in public health, but not always carried through into practice. We will focus on two main case studies to apply what you learn. Throughout this unit you will be encouraged to ask questions, and to compare and debate competing answers to those questions. What is public health? What does it mean to say that something is harmful? To what extent should we each be free to engage in practices that harm our health? What is the proper role of the state in attempting to change the health of populations? What is equity and why does it matter (and if it matters, why aren't we doing more about it)? This is a Core Unit for Graduate Diploma and Master in Public Health students. Most learning occurs in the context of two teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5208 Introduction to Human Research Ethics

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 2a Classes: Block mode (1.5 days) or online Prohibitions: BETH5202 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (80%); 1x 400wd task (10%); participation in class/online (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study introduces students to human research ethics in its wider context. It explores the ethical underpinnings of the research endeavour including the justifications for engaging in research and research integrity. The unit also briefly reviews the history of research and the impact of research abuse on human participants.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5209 Medicines Policy, Economics and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Wendy Lipworth, Narcyz Ghinea Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online. Assumed knowledge: A degree in science, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, allied health, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, law, communications, public policy, business, economics, commerce, organisation studies, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Online work (15%) 1x minor essay (35%) 1x major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Medicines save lives but they can be costly and can have serious adverse effects. Value-laden decisions are continuously being made at individual, institutional, national and international levels regarding the medicines we need, want and can afford. In this unit of study, we will explore and critique global and national policies and processes related to medicines, examining how research and development agendas are set; how medicines are assessed and evaluated; and how new technologies are translated into practice. We will also explore broader trends such as globalisation, commercialisation and changing consumer expectations. By the end of the course, students will understand the forces shaping the development, regulation, funding and uptake of medicines both nationally and internationally, and the political, ethical, legal and economic issues that are at stake. This course is designed to appeal to a wide range of students from ethics, law, public health, health care, policy, communications, economics, business, politics, administration, and biomedical science.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided
CEPI5311 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (Part 1)

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clement Loy Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 or CEPI5202 or CEPI5312 Assessment: Class dsicussion/presentations (40%), written assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, principles and use of evidence in making decisions about population screening. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a basic understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Course notes will be provided
CEPI5312 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (1 and 2)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Clement Loy Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr seminar/week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 or CEPI5202 or CEPI5311 Assessment: Class discussion/presentations (40%) and two written assignments (60%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, principles and use of evidence in making decisions about population screening. It will then move to more advanced topics including: application of test results to individual patients, place of tests in diagnostic pathways, impact of tests on patient outcome, tests with continuous outcome, receiver-operator characteristic curves, systematic review of diagnostic tests, predictive models, monitoring, diagnostic tests in the health system, and over-diagnosis. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a comprehensive understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Course notes will be provided
CHSC6906 Health in China

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd essay (25%) and 1000wd individual presentation (25%) and seminar participation (10%) and 2000wd case study research paper (40%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a critical overview of China's contemporary health system and health issues. It uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the interaction between health and China's development process. Through the use of case studies this unit provides students with concrete examples of current and future issues faced by China's health system, including: health policy formation; health services financing, delivery and evaluation; ethical issues in health services delivery; health inequalities; and, China's epidemiological and demographic transitions.
DENT5013 Preventative Dentistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hayley Dixon and Dr Andrea Lenard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 7 x 2 hr workshop/tutorial sessions. Prerequisites: PUBH5018, PUBH5010 Assessment: Individual written assignments (70%), tutorial discussion and group-work participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Dental disease remains prevalent in Australia. The AIHW reports that in 2010, 55% of 6 year olds; 48% of 12 year olds in their deciduous and permanent dentitions, respectively.
The burden of this disease is significant and falls inequitably on those who are the most socially disadvantaged and those least able to access expensive treatment.
The most ethical and cost-effective manner of addressing oral disease is through preventative dental care.
To that end, this unit of study will permit post-graduate students with pre-existing oral health education to gain an advanced understanding of the factors that place an individual at risk of dental disease, including dental caries, oral cancer and periodontal disease. Students will examine the impact of such disease through a public health lens.
Students will also learn the theoretical basis for preventative dental care and how this knowledge may be applied for population-level effect.
Particular emphasis will be placed on the Australian context.
The ability to source and identify high-quality information is key to the practice of public health. As such, students will learn how to search and critically analyse the dental evidence base in order to identify robust material.
The course may also be suitable for other MPH and MIPH students who wish to obtain an understanding of oral health disease prevention and oral health promotion.
Teaching in this topic will draw on the expertise of public health academics and clinical oral health professionals.
improvement through effective oral health promotion strategies.
Textbooks
Textbook:
DENT5014 Dental Health Services

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrea Lenard Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 2 hour (maximum) session fortnightly in Semester Two. Sessions will consist of a combined tutorial/workshop format. It is recommended that students will need to dedicate 2-3 hours per week to cover essential reading and preparation for fortnightly sessions for successful completion of the course, excluding preparation time for course assessment. Prerequisites: PUBH5018, PUBH5010 Assessment: Working shop participation (20%), Assignment 1 (25%), Assignment 2(40%), quiz(15%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with an appreciation of the role and scope of oral health services within the Australian health care system by offering both foundational and applied knowledge required for analysis and evaluation of oral health service delivery. On the completion of this unit of study, students will understand the underpinning principles that contextualise primary oral health care; identify and articulate the socioeconomic and socio-political determinants that impact on the delivery and management of oral health services; and to critically evaluate the appropriateness of existing and proposed oral health services and programs for different population groups
Textbooks
LIN, V, SMITH, J and FAWKES, S 2014, Public health practice in Australia: the organised effort, 2nd edn, Allen and Unwin, Crows Nest, New South Wales
DENT5015 Population Oral Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex Holden Session: Semester 2 Classes: 30hrs consisting of 10x(1hr lecture/seminar and 2hr tutorial) Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or SUST5004 Assessment: individual written assignments (80%), tutorial discussion and group-work participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
To provide students with sufficient background and appreciation of the importance of population oral health and to provide them with the opportunity to develop skills and acquire essential knowledge in this field for the effective practice of population oral health. This unit focuses on the determinants of oral health and the importance of upstream measures to attack the root cause of oral diseases and the planning, implementing and evaluating of these approaches. The following topics will be covered: principles of population health approach, planning and policy framework for population oral health, the changing profile oral health and patterns of oral health care; water fluoridation (including legislation, benefits/risks, the politics of fluoridation, the arguments for and against water fluoridation, how to respond to antifluoridationists; how to promote and extend water fluoridation,), overview of policies and initiatives regarding dental services - the example of New South Wales; and oral health workforce and emerging workforce issues. On the completion of this unit of study students should be able to demonstrate ability to design/develop, implement and evaluate population based oral health programs to improve overall oral health and reduce inequalities in oral health.
Textbooks
Recommended Reading:
GLOH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne, Ms Kerri Anton Session: Semester 2 Classes: face to face students: 13x1.5hr lecture and 11x1.5hr tutorial, 1x4hr workshop and 1x8hr presentation online students: 13x1.5hr online lecture and 11 weeks of tutorial discussion, 4hr online workshop content and 8hr online presentation content Assessment: 1x3000 word written essay (50%) tutorial facilitation and participation (20%) -face-to-face students will each facilitate a 1.5hr tutorial session -online students will each facilitate a 1-week online discussion board 1 x student group presentation (25%) -face-to-face student groups will give a 30-min oral presentation (accompanied by a powerpoint) -online student groups will upload a 30-min powerpoint presentation peer evaluation of student presentation (5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives candidates essential knowledge of prevention and control of communicable diseases in low- and middle-income countries using country-specific examples. After successfully completing this unit of study, candidates will understand the key issues in communicable diseases and their control in developing countries, as well as gain the knowledge and insight on how prevention and control mechanisms and programs are developed for these diseases in resource-poor settings. The unit covers disease emergence, respiratory tract infections (including TB), vector-borne infections, food- and water-borne infections, neurological infections, neglected tropical diseases, bloodborne and sexually transmitted infections (including HIV) and drug-resistant infections.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5000 Introduction to Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 1 Classes: block mode with compulsory intensive workshops on campus. 2 x 2-day workshops, online lectures and discussions Assessment: Online learning quiz (5%); online problem based learning exercise (15%); 1 x 1500wd written assignment (30%); 1 x 3000wd written assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy. It gives an overview of the political choices and frameworks - national and global - that shape policymaking. The unit examines policy frameworks, and the roles of politics, evidence and advocacy in setting policy priorities. Analysis and debates regarding health policy will be placed in broader contexts - comparing different health systems and priorities for health. Case studies will be used to examine the relationships between policy and practice.
Learning outcomes. By the end of this unit students will be able to: (i) Define the boundaries and key features of health policy; (ii) Understand the basic history and features of the Australian health system; (iii) Identify policy instruments and how they function; (iv) Understand the main frameworks used for analysing policy; (v) Understand the factors influencing how policy issues are prioritized in health; (vi) Gain skills in policy communication, including preparation of a policy brief.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other recommended reading materials will be available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5001 Economics and Finance for Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block mode with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus or online only mode. Block mode. 2 x 2 day workshops or online only Assessment: Health Economics Exercise (50%), Health finance assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance to examine the workings of health systems in Australia and comparable countries. Topics covered include the debates over the public-private mix and governance and accountability - who makes decisions about funding priorities? To whom should decision makers be held accountable and for what aspects of their work? How does health finance shape broader policy reform, such as universal health coverage?
Learning outcomes. By the end of this unit students will be able to: (i) apply basic concepts and methodologies of health economics and political economy in policy analysis; (ii) understand the role of economic analysis in planning and evaluating health policy change; (iii) understand the main models and debates regarding health system funding and the implications for equity, delivery and governance of health services; (iv) be familiar with theoretical frameworks underlying health economics and current debates over health finance.(v) apply this knowledge to current Australian and global health systems and debates over reform.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended reading materials available from eLearning site.
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Associate Professor James Gillespie Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus or online only mode. Block mode 2 x 2 day workshops plus online discussion or online only with pre-recorded lectures and online discussion. Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (35%), participation grade (5 x short online or face-to-face learning activities) (15%), 1x3000 word policy research project proposal (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop skills for undertaking policy research and analysis. The unit takes a multidisciplinary approach to familiarise students with fundamental frameworks and methodologies that can be applied to analyse policy from multiple disciplines including public health, social and political sciences, behavioural sciences, public policy and history.
Learning outcomes. By the end of the unit students will be able to: (i) Apply a critical analysis to questions of policy success or failure; (ii) Understand and explain the different methodological approaches that can be applied in policy analysis and research; (iii) Identify appropriate research methodologies, data collection methods and analysis for specific policy research questions; (iv) Design a health policy research project.
Textbooks
Sarantakos, S. (2013). Social Research (4th ed.). New York: Palgrave Macmillan. Other required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning.
HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus or online only mode. Block mode 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 tutorials (tutorials offered face-to-face or online) or online only. Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
The aim of this unit is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy, and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, and investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching makes extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field.
Learning outcomes. By the end of this unit students will be able to: (i) Explain the effects of globalization on health of populations; (ii) Demonstrate how events and trends in health and non-health areas affect global health policy; (iii) Identify and classify the different types of actors/institutions that influence health policy; (iv) Undertake a policy stakeholder analysis with reference to power, influence and interests; (v) Develop strategies to influence global health policy development and implementation; (vi) Define global health governance and its role in structuring and regulating global health policy.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning and the Common Law System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Alexandra Fowler Session: Intensive April,Intensive August,Intensive March,Intensive September Classes: S1CIMR (Group A): Mar 5, 6 and 8, 9 (9-5); S1CIAP (Group B): Mar 26, 27 and Apr 9 and 10 (9-5); S2CIAU (Group C): Jul 30, 31 and Aug 2, 3 (9-5); S2CISE (Group D): Aug 20, 21 and Sep 3, 4 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6881 Assessment: in-class test (30%) and take-home exam (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students are recommended to enrol well in advance of classes in order to complete pre-class readings (normally available to enrolled students 3 weeks prior to the first class). Law graduates from a non-common law jurisdiction are also recommended to complete classes for this unit during the first week of their commencing semester.
This is a compulsory unit for all postgraduate students who do not hold a law degree or equivalent from a common law jurisdiction entering the: Master of Administrative Law and Policy; Master of Business Law; Master of Environmental Law; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Health Law; Master of Labour Law and Relations as well as Graduate Diplomas offered in these programs. The unit has been designed to equip students with the necessary legal skills and legal knowledge to competently apply themselves in their chosen area of law. Instruction will cover the legislative process; the judiciary and specialist tribunals; precedent; court hierarchies; legal reasoning; constitutional law; administrative law; contracts; and torts. Some elements of the unit will be tailored in accordance with the requirements of the particular specialist programs.
MIPH5004 International Health Independent Study 1

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student under individual supervision Prohibitions: MIPH5005 or MIPH5037 Assessment: 1x 2000word written report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: The student is required to complete an International Health Independent Study Registration Form, signed by the student and the supervisor, and return the form to the MIPH Office.
This unit gives students the opportunity to undertake a special project (a research project or a field placement) in their area of interest in international public health . Students may research their chosen topic or analyse data already collected, then write a report, usually about 2000 words. Alternatively, students may choose to undertake a placement with an international aid agency or with relevant sections of health services overseas or in Australia and then write a report about it. Students arrange with an international public health academic to be their supervisor on a project and agree to expected deliverables. The supervisor provides guidance and assesses the report.
MIPH5005 International Health Independent Study 2

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Student under individual supervision Prohibitions: MIPH5004 or MIPH5037 Assessment: 1x 4000word written report (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: The student is required to complete an International Health Independent Study Registration Form, signed by the student and the supervisor, and return the form to the MIPH Office.
This unit gives students the opportunity to undertake a special project (a research project or a field placement) in their area of interest in international public health . Students may research their chosen topic or analyse data already collected, then write a report, usually about 4000 words. Alternatively, students may choose to undertake a placement with an international aid agency or with relevant sections of health services overseas or in Australia and then write a report about it. Students arrange with an international public health academic to be their supervisor on a project and agree to expected deliverables. The supervisor provides guidance and assesses the report.
MIPH5008 Travel and Tropical Medicine

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Manalo, Dr Paula Fogarty Session: Intensive October Classes: 1x 2 day intensive lectures Assessment: 1x 2000word individual essay (80%) and attendance (20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to provide an overview of common health issues and emerging travel-related diseases, with a general look at prevention and control of these problems for travellers or those intending to work in tropical or resource-poor settings for a significant period of time. During the short course, students will also explore issues such as pre-travel preparations, vaccinations, protection from vector-borne diseases, gastrointestinal illnesses in travellers, refugee health, disater preparedness focusing on water and sanitation and travel health issues in humanitarian and disater relief settings. The teaching method is face-to-face teaching only. Attendance is compulsory.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5037 International Health Independent Study

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Student under individual supervision Prohibitions: MIPH5004 or MIPH5005 Assessment: 1x 4000-6000 word report in a format suitable for submission to an academic journal Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is only available to students who have substantial project management experience and therefore do not wish to do MIPH5219 or MIPH5220. The student is required to complete an International Health Independent Study Registration Form, signed by the student and the supervisor, and return the form to the MIPH Office.
This is a capstone unit only available to students with substantial international development project management experience who do not wish to do MIPH5219 or MIPH5220. This unit gives students the opportunity to undertake a special project in an area of interest in international public health. Students research their chosen topic or analyse data already collected. The project can be done as part of a placement with an international aid agency or with relevant sections of health services overseas or in Australia. Students arrange with an international public health academic to be their supervisor on the project. Students write a 4000 to 6000 word report on their project; the report should be in a format suitable for submission for publication in an a academic journal.
MIPH5115 Women's and Children's Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Camille Raynes-Greenow, Dr Ying Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 9 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial per week for 8 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x5000 word individual assignment, (50%), 1x 8 page group report (30%), tutorial participation (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit is an introduction to the health status of women and children in low and middle income countries and highlights the interconnectedness of women's and children's health. It presents some of the major causes of mortality and morbidity and interventions and approaches to improving outcomes from a public health perspective. Each week a different expert covers relevant issues such as perinatal mortality, contraception, nutrition, HIV, cancer, diarrhoeal disease, vaccine preventable diseases and childhood disability.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5117 Global Non-Communicable Disease Control

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Rohina Joshi Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1x2hr-lecture/week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 2000word written assignment (90%) and class participation (10%) or online discussion (10%). Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit aims to provide candidates with an understanding of the causes and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) with a focus on low and middle income countries (LMIC). These diseases are associated with social and economic development and the demographic and health transitions. Topics covered in the unit include cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, primary health care in relation to NCDs, health promotion for NCDs and approaches to NCD research in developing countries. Lectures are given by health professionals with direct experience of NCD control in LMICs.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5124 Health Issues and Humanitarian Emergencies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Bronwen Blake, Professor Michael Dibley, Professor Lyndal Trevena Session: Intensive November Classes: 2x 2 day workshop Assessment: 1 x 2500 word written assignment (70%), written reflective pieces (20%), attendance and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit gives students an overview of public health aspects of humanitarian emergencies in developing country situations and the range of appropriate responses. This includes considering problems faced by government and non-government organisations in humanitarian emergency relief efforts. Topics covered in the unit include international and human rights law, the role of donor agencies, refugee health, nutritional emergencies, site planning for refugee camps, water and sanitation, sexual violence, protection of vulnerable groups, and communicable disease surveillance and control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5127 Mental Disorders in Global Context

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Maree Hackett Session: Intensive September Classes: 1x 2day workshop Assessment: 1x 2000 word essay (90%) plus class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to present an overview and critique of mental disorders in an international context. It covers broad issues related to the classification of disorders, their prevalence and population burden and their determinants. While the focus of the module is on international epidemiology, the course also aims to promote understanding of the economic and humanitarian implications of the burden of mental and substance use disorders for prevention, treatment and health policy. The unit will cover what a mental disorder is, how frequent and how disabling mental disorders are and what the major correlates and determinants of mental disorders are,with a focus on health policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5128 Dissertation A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Minimum 70% or greater WAM in the first 24 credit points of coursework Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is only available after completion of 48 credit points.
MIPH5129 Dissertation B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Minimum 70% or greater WAM in the first 24 credit points of coursework Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is only available after completion of 48 credit points. This unit is delivered at the University of Sydney.
MIPH5130 Dissertation C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: Minimum 70% or greater WAM in the first 24 credit points of coursework Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit is only available after completion of 48 credit points.
MIPH5131 Foundations of International Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Bernays, Professor Robert Cumming Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 12 weeks; 2x1 day seminars and 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (25%), 1xgroup presentation (25%), 1x2500 word assignment (40%) and tutorial discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Departmental permission required for non-MIPH students
The unit aims to provide candidates with a multidisciplinary perspective of the interplay between health and development in low- and middle-income countries from a range of social science and public health disciplines. The unit will cover the following themes: health and development, Sustainable Development Goals, poverty and health, gender and health, , climate change and health, population ageing,, human rights and health, health systems, human resources for health, and primary health care. At the end of the unit, students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the relation between health and development; demonstrate an understanding of how health systems operate in developing countries; and demonstrate an understanding of the role played by the various international organisations and agencies in health in less developed settings.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearnng site.
MIPH5132 Global Disease Burden and Research Methods

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ying Zhang, Professor Michael Dibley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 13 weeks;1x1hr tutorial per week for 10 weeks (face to face students only); 10xonline tutorials that each run for one week (online students only); plus 1x1 day seminar on qualitative methods (face to face students only) and 1x1 day seminar on quantitativemethods (face to face students only); week long online qualitative and quantitative methods seminars (online students only) Assessment: qualitative and quantitative methods exercise (10%); 1x 1500 word case scenario based research methods written assessment (10%); 1x 3000 word individual essay (60%); and tutorial facilitation discussion (20%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Note: Departmental permission required for non-MIPH students
This unit introduces candidates to the global burden of disease in low and middle income countries and to field research methods (quantitative and qualitative methods) used to assess disease burden. Through the lectures, readings and tutorial discussions, students will learn about conditions, diseases, risk factors, causative determinants and the influence of socio-cultutral-economic-political and environmental factors that contribute most to the burden of disease in low- and middle-income countries. This unit provides candidates with an understanding of the major conditions responsible for illness, disability and premature mortality. The design and implementation of disease control and health promotion programs for developing country populations will be discussed based on an understanding of the biological, environmental, behavioral, social and cultural aspects of major health problems. Topics covered in the unit include the global burden of disease; methods for conducting both quantitative and qualitative applied field research; and the epidemiology, control and prevention strategies for communicable diseases- malaria, tuberculosis, neglected tropical illnesses, HIV; zoonoses; perinatal conditions; non-communicable siseases- cardiovascular diseases, mental helath; injury; disease priorities for child health and nutrition; planetary and environmental health i.e. air pollution.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearnng site.
MIPH5134 Primary Care in Low Resource Settings

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyndal Trevena Session: Semester 2a Classes: Online mini-lectures and readings available for 1-2 hours per week; group work online 2 hours per week. Face-to-face mode is delivered via 4 x 1 day workshops. Assessment: Formative assessment: abstract of 250 words (10%); contribution to group learning (20%); 2000 word case submission (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: Can be completed in either on-line or face to face mode
This unit of study is designed for students who have completed or are working towards a health degree. It assumes some clinical background knowledge and aims to prepare students to a basic level for applying public health principles in low resource primary healthcare settings. In the past, students with a non-clinical background have successfully completed this unit and there are no pre-requisites. The course will introduce and revise the fundamental aspects of effective primary health care, define different aspects of low-resource settings (health system, healthcare worker, patient factors etc) and their effect on knowledge translation. The key learning component will comprise a series of problems which will be solved in online or face-to-face groups and supported by guest lecturers, tutors and resources. Problems will include low-income country settings but also resource-challenged settings due to remoteness and/or socioeconomic and other disadvantage. Students will be expected to be self-directed adult learners during this unit. This unit of study can be combined with MIPH5004 International Health Independent Study 1 (2cp) for a total of 6 credit points.Students can choose to do this course either by face-to-face or distance mode.
MIPH5135 Health Systems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Joel Negin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; plus 2x 0.5 day workshops; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x1500 word research paper (40%), 1x2000 word solution proposal (50%), and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Health systems are complex and multi-faceted. Successful health systems require attention to political economy, governance, institutions, and local context. This unit will cover health systems in developing countries to equip students with a conceptual understanding and a set of tools to address major public health challenges from a health systems perspective. With a focus on evidence-based decision making, the unit will provide an understanding of health systems including specific topics such as health workforce, financing, service delivery, information systems and policy, and how these impact health interventions and health status in less developed countries. A multi-sectoral, integrated model will be used to understand the varied aspects of development challenges related to health systems. A case study approach will then provide students with concrete examples of health systems challenges and will strengthen students' ability to view health problems in a holistic, multi-faceted manner. The unit will provide students with the tools needed to make a practical difference in health systems in less developed countries with emphasis on implementation of health projects and bringing interventions to scale.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5136 Nutrition in International Settings

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Dibley Session: Intensive August Classes: 2x2 day workshops Assessment: 1x 1000 word exercise on nutritional assessment (30%), 1x 2500 word assignment (60%), workshop attendance and participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with insights into the major nutrition-related public health problems in low- and middle-income countries; knowledge and practical skills about nutritional assessment; and the design and evaluation of nutritional interventions. The content areas include an overview of nutrition as a major determinant of health and disease; methods to assess community nutritional status; the impact of maternal and child under-nutrition on mortality and overall disease burden; design and evaluation of effective interventions; issues surrounding food security; agriculture and nutrition; and nutrition policies and resources. The unit is taught in two 2-day workshops, with the first workshop focusing on nutritional assessment and major nutrition-related public health problems in low- and middle-income countries, and the second workshop focusing on design and evaluation of interventions. On completion students should be able to recognise key nutritional problems facing low- and middle-income countries; have acquired knowledge and practical skills as to how these problems can be assessed; and gained insights into a number of different multi-sectoral approaches to address these problems.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5219 International Health Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; 1x1 day workshop; 1x1hr tutorial per week for 8 weeks; 1x1 day peer learning session through group presentations Prohibitions: MIPH5220 Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of public health in low and middle income countries Assessment: Important: Scaled marking will be implemented for this unit's group based assessment ie. group presentation, written group proposal, project group work contribution throughout the semester 1x 30minutes (20 minute presentation plus 10 minutes questions and answers) group presentation (20%), peer evaluation on group work participation and contribution (15%), 1x group written assignment- a project proposal (40%) and 1x short individual written assignment (25%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment for students from degrees other than MIPH.
Effective international health projects management contributes to the achievement of health and development in developing countries. The Unit aims to provide students with a good understanding of the concepts and key elements of a health project design and evaluation, and to demonstrate tools and techniques used in effective project management. A detailed step by step application of the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) in project design will be presented, including stakeholder analysis, problem and objective analysis, and the logframe matrix. The Unit also gives students an opportunity for hands-on practice through the design of a project in an international setting and allows them to consider the challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management. The key topic areas covered include: concepts and principles of international project management; context and situation analysis; the LFA for project design; real life project management cases; and project monitoring and evaluation. At the end of the course, students should be able to: identify the key aspects of the LFA to project design; develop a project proposal in international settings; recognise challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management; and apply a systematic approach to project planning and management in international settings.
Textbooks
Course materials are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5220 Managing International Health Projects

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Mu Li, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online, 5 modules delivered across 11 weeks and online tutorials for 13 weeks Prohibitions: MIPH5219 Assumed knowledge: General knowledge of public health in low and middle income countries Assessment: Important: Scaled marking will be implemented for this unit's group based assessments i.e. group presentation, written group proposal, project group work contribution throughout the semester. 1 x 20 minute (20 minute presentation uploaded online) group presentation (10%), tutorial contribution (7.5% marked by tutor), peer evaluation on group work participation and contribution (7.5% marked by project group members), 1 x group written assisgnment - a project proposal ( 35%) and 1 X individual written assisgnment (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: International students studying onshore should choose MIPH5219 (face to face). Department permission required for enrolment for students from degrees other than MIPH.
Managing international health projects effectively is critical to the achievement of health and development in resource-poor settings. This unit aims to give students an understanding of the tools and techniques used in effective project management at different stages in the project life cycle, including project planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation. The concepts, key elements and application of the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) will be presented, including stakeholder analysis and cross-cutting issues analysis, problem and objective trees, and the logframe matrix. Students will apply these principles to the design of a project and development of a project proposal related to an international setting, allowing them to consider the challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management. The key topic areas include: concepts and principles of international project management; context and situation analysis; key stages of project development; the LFA for project design; project management functions including managing information, resources, risk, quality and change; post project issues of evaluation and sustainability. This unit, as a fully online unit, is intended for local and international offshore students.
Textbooks
Course materials are available on the unit's e-learning site
PACS6921 Peace of Mind: The Psychology of Peace

Credit points: 6 Session: Intensive March Classes: 6-day intensive seminar or equivalent (35hrs total) Assessment: 1x1000wd equivalent Oral Presentation (20%), 1x1000wd Reflective journal (15%)m 1x3000wd Essay (65%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit explores the psychological dimensions of building peace in the world through cultivating inner peace or 'peace of mind'. We examine how it is that ordinary human beings can commit genocide and other mass atrocities, and how an understanding of underlying psychological processes can help with creating more peaceful communities. These inner processes include the effects of fear and trauma, and the development of empathy, resilience, healing and reconciliation.
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Mathieu, Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - faceto face or their equivalent online Prohibitions: BSTA5011,CEPI5100 Assessment: 1x 6 page assignment (25%), 10 weekly quizzes (5% in total) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature regarding public health and clinical issue. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. In addition to formal classes or their on-line equivalent,it is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours at least each week preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2017.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5020 Chronic Disease Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman Session: Semester 1 Classes: 20 hrs online lectures; 16 hrs online discussions Assumed knowledge: PUBH5033, PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or equivalent Assessment: 1000 word assignment (20%), 2000 word assignment (40%), on-line discussions (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course offers a public health approach to examining the global issue of chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, chronic lung disease) and their prevention. The course examines why chronic disease is a global problem, and describes WHO frameworks for chronic disease prevention. It also reviews the epidemiology of specific chronic diseases including trends in and surveillance of these conditions, and the global (and country level) burden of disease. Teaching will focus on clinical prevention, in particular, the role of primary care, other clinicians and allied health professionals in providing lifestyle advice for people with chronic disease (tertiary prevention) and for people without chronic disease (primary prevention). Students will be involved in evaluating the effectiveness of different prevention strategies and will examine the role of health policy and strategic planning in developing effective and sustainable chronic disease management programs and health services in different settings (in Australia and the region).
Textbooks
Readings for this unit will be available on the eLearning site
PUBH5026 Mass Media Campaigns and Social Marketing

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Philayrath Phongsavan, Professor Adrian Bauman (coordinators), Adjunct Professor Tom Carroll Session: Intensive August Classes: Face-to-face/ on-campus 2-day residential workshop (lectures, on-line discussions, and student participation and student presentations) Prerequisites: PUBH5033 Assumed knowledge: Training in research methods epidemiology is advised but not essential. Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (60%); on-line participation/discussion (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit focuses on mass-reach public health campaigns used to promote health and prevent disease. Building on introductory Masters of Public Health units of study in health promotion/disease prevention [or equivalent], this unit describes the rationale for mass-media led campaigns, social marketing interventions, and how they fit into a comprehensive approach to population health promotion and chronic disease prevention. The major themes covered are the principles of mass-reach communications in public health; designing campaigns [formative evaluation]; developing public health campaigns as part of comprehensive health promotion; understanding the messages, branding and marketing of campaigns; process and impact evaluation of campaigns; the differences between campaigns and social marketing initiatives; and the role of ancillary and supportive health promotion strategies, including media placement and advocacy. In addition, the role of, and evaluating social media campaigns will be included. The unit will equip students with skills to plan, design, implement and evaluate public health campaigns.
Textbooks
Course readings will be provided before the workshop. These are required readings, and there is some individual student preparation required for presentation at the first workshop and after the workshop to prepare for the on-line two weeks discussions.
PUBH5101 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: One or more of PUBH5010, PUBH5018 and QUAL5005 depending on the intended project Assessment: 1x 4000 word written report (100%) or as agreed with the supervisor and unit coordinator. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students should first contact the unit cooridnator to discuss their proposed topic or area of interest. They then contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project. Once the unit coordinator has agreed to the enrolment, the students applies to enrol via Sydney Student. The unit coordinator will then formally approve the enrolment.
This unit is intended for students nearing the end of their MPH. The Special Project is a self-directed unit focussed on a specific MPH-related topic of interest to the student. The project is supervised by an academic within the School. An external person can act as the main supervisor but a School academic would also be required. This project may be developed by the student or the student could develop a project in consultation with an intended supervisor. The student needs to meet with the supervisor during the semester. Preferably this would be at least three times but the frequency will depend on the project and the preference of the supervisor. The project is meant to be self-directed so there is not an expectation that the supervisor would have close involvement, although they can if they want to. The student would be expected to undertake approximately 80 to 100 hours of work for this unit. The format of the final report or other output can be whatever is appropriate, as agreed with the supervisor(s). The report is due no later than the Monday of Week 13, or a later date as agreed with the supervisor(s) and the unit coordinator.
PUBH5102 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: One or more of PUBH5010, PUBH5018 and QUAL5005 depending on the intended project Assessment: 1x 2000 word written report (100%) or as agreed with the supervisor and unit coordinator. Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students should first contact the unit coordinator to discuss their proposed topic or area of interest. They then contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project. Once the unit coordinator has agreed to the enrolment, the students applies to enrol via Sydney Student. The unit coordinator will then formally approve the enrolment.
This unit is intended for students nearing the end of their MPH. The Special Project is a self-directed unit focussed on a specific MPH-related topic of interest to the student. The project is supervised by an academic within the School. An external person can act as the main supervisor but a School academic would also be required. This project may be developed by the student or the student could develop a project in consultation with an intended supervisor. The student needs to meet with the supervisor during the semester. Preferably this would be at least three times but the frequency will depend on the project and the preference of the supervisor. The project is meant to be self-directed so there is not an expectation that the supervisor would have close involvement, although they can if they want to. The student would be expected to undertake approximately 50 to 50 hours of work for this unit. The format of the final report or other output can be whatever is appropriate, as agreed with the supervisor(s). The report is due no later than the Monday of Week 13, or a later date as agreed with the supervisor(s) and the unit coordinator.
PUBH5111 Environmental Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Geoff Morgan Session: Semester 2 Classes: The unit is delivered via face to face mode or via online mode. Both modes cover the same course content. Face to face students: Thirteen lectures (13 sessions of approximately 1.5 hours each) offered online, with the first (introductory) lecture delivered face to face as well as online; Six face to face tutorials (6 sessions of 2 hours each); One online group assignment plan discussion. Online students: Thirteen lectures (13 sessions of approximately 1.5 hours each) offered online; Six online tutorials (6 sessions of 2 hours equivelent each); One assignment plan online group discussion. Assessment: 1 x written assignment plan and group discussion (5%); 1 x written assignment 2000 words (70%); 10 x lecture multiple choice quiz (10 x 0.5 = 5%); 5 x tutorial quiz questions (10%);1 x tutorial briefing note (5%); 5 x group tutorial briefing note (5 x 1 = 5%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This course aims to describe the interrelation between our environment and human populations, local communities and individuals and the potential impact on health of environmental agents/contaminants. The unit will explore the major categories of environmental health hazards including air quality, water quality, chemical hazards (eg soils and contaminated sites), physical hazards (eg noise and radiation), microbiological hazards (eg Legionnaires' disease) and food safety. Regional and global issues of sustainability, climate change and land use planning will also be covered. The disciplines of epidemiology, toxicology and ecology will be applied within a risk assessment framework to characterise health risks associated with environmental hazards and determine risk management options and inform risk communication strategies. Students completing this unit will appreciate the multi-disciplinary nature of environmental health, the application of a risk assessment framework to characterise environmental health risks and inform risk management and risk communication, and the need to work closely with a broad range of stakeholders including commonwealth and state health, environment and planning agencies, local government, industry, researchers and the community.
Textbooks
(Recommended only): Environmental Health (Fourth Edition). Moeller DW. Harvard University Press, 2011; Environmental Health in Australia and New Zealand. Edited by Nancy Cromar, Scott Cameron and Howard Fallowfield, Oxford University Press, 2004; Enviromental Health, from Global to Local, 3rd Edition. Frumkin H. Wiley, 2016.
PUBH5114 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2 Classes: 13 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and/or associated readings and online activities. Students can complete the unit either online or in blended mode. The teaching sessions are a combination of online seminars and discussion activities for online students. Those enrolled in the blended mode, take part in online seminars and two compulsory one day face-to-face workshops. Prohibitions: PUBH5115 Assessment: 2 x 1500 word assignments (55%), compulsory discussion related activities (30%); online quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for prevention and management of related problems. This fuller drug and alcohol elective covers all the content of PUBH5115 and goes on to assist the student to develop more advanced understanding of research, policy and treatment services for alcohol and drug use disorders, and to examine the needs of special populations.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5115 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2a Classes: 7 weeks of 2 hr teaching sessions equivalent and/or associated online activities. studnets can complete the unit either online or in blended mode. the teaching sessions are a combination of online seminars and discussion activities for online students. students enrolled in the blended mode take part in online seminars and a compulsory one day face to face workshop. Prohibitions: PUBH5114 Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (55%); compulsory discussion related activities (30%); online quizzes (15%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for the prevention and management of related problems.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5205 Decision Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Martin Session: Semester 2b Classes: Six 2-hour sessions (inclusive of computer practicals) or online Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Assumed knowledge: PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation Assessment: 5 x practicals/exercises (10%), 1 X exam (30%), and 1 X assignment (60%) Practical field work: Three computer practicals (in class or online) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit examines quantitative approaches to public health and clinical decision-making. Topics of study include: decision trees and health-related utility assessment; incorporating diagnostic information in decision making; sensitivity and threshold analysis; and application of decision analysis to economic evaluation.Lectures are accompanied by practical exercises and readings. Students gain practical skills using decision analysis software (TreeAge) via computer practicals. Lectures and practicals may be completed online (however on-line students must purchase their own TreeAge software student licence).
PUBH5206 Controlled Trials

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Chris Brown and Dr Andrew Martin Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2x 1 day workshops; or online Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Assessment: 6 x practicals (10%), 1 x short answer/multiple choice exam (40%) and 1 x take home exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit introduces the principles underpinning the design and conduct of high quality clinical trials to generate good evidence for health care decision making. The topics include clinical trial design, randomization, sample size, measures of treatment effect, methodological issues, trial protocols, and ethical principles. The unit is delivered over 2 full days via formal lectures followed by practical sessions. This material may be completed online.
Textbooks
Recommended: Keech A, Gebski V, Pike R. Interpreting and reporting clinical trials: a guide to the CONSORT statement and the principles of randomised controlled trials. Sydney: Australasian Medical Publishing Company; 2007. A list of suggested readings associated with the course will be provided.
PUBH5211 Multiple Regression and Stats Computing

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hrs per week for 13 weeks. This unit may be undertaken in face to face or online mode. All students must have regular access to a reliable internet connection capable of streaming or downloading video recorded lectures. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Assessment: Quizzes (10%); 1x 4 page assignment (20%); and 1x 10 page assignment (70%). The assignments will involve analysing data. Students must pass the final assignment to pass this unit of study. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: The statistical software package we shall be using in this unit is web-based. There is no cost/fee to use this software.
Students will learn how to analyse data using multiple linear regression. Multiple linear regression is a powerful statistical method for analysing a continuous outcome variable with several explanatory variables. This unit will cover how to compare more than two groups, adjust for confounders, test for effect modification, calculate adjusted means, conduct appropriate model checking, and teaches strategies for selecting the 'best' regression model. Students will learn how to apply these methods using the statistical package called SAS. The focus of this unit is on the application of fitting appropriate linear regression models and interpreting the results. The material in this unit is covered by lectures, tutorials, course notes and online discussions. This unit is the prerequiste for learning other types of regression models, such as logistic regression (PUBH5212) and survival analysis (PUBH5213).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5212 Categorical Data Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture, 5 x 1hr lectures, and 5 x 1hr tutorials over 6 weeks. Also available online - such students must have regular access to a reliable internet connection capable of streaming or downloading video recorded lectures. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page report (30%) and 1x 8 page report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
In this unit the biostatistical concepts covered in earlier units are extended to cover analysis of epidemiological studies where the outcome variable is categorical. Topics of study include: testing for trend in a 2 x r contingency table; the Mantel-Haenszel test for the combination of several 2 x 2 tables, with estimation of the combined odds ratio and confidence limits; multiple logistic regression; Poisson regression; modelling strategy. The assignments will involve practical analysis and interpretation of categorical data. Data analyses will be conducted using statistical software (SAS).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5213 Survival Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture, 5 x 1hr lectures, and 5 x 1hr tutorials over 6 weeks. Also available online - such students must have regular access to a reliable internet connection capable of streaming or downloading video recorded lectures. Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page assignment (20%) and 1x 10 page assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
During this unit, students learn to analyse data from studies in which individuals are followed up until a particular event occurs (e.g. death, cure, relapse), making use of follow-up data for those who do not experience the event of interest. This unit covers: Kaplan-Meier life tables; logrank test to compare two or more groups; Cox's proportional hazards regression model; checking the proportional hazards assumption; and sample size calculations for survival studies. For each topic, participants are given materials to read beforehand. This is followed by a lecture, then participants are given a small number of exercise to do for the following week. These exercises are discussed in the tutorial at the next session before moving on to the next topic. That is, in most weeks the first hour is a tutorial, followed by the lecture given in the second hour. Participants are expected to run SAS programs in their own time. Preparation time for each session is 2-3 hours. The assignments both invlove use of SAS to analyse survival data sets.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided, along with links to additional readings through the library.
PUBH5215 Introductory Analysis of Linked Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Judy Simpson Session: Intensive June,Intensive November Classes: block/intensive mode 5 days 9am-5pm Corequisites: (PUBH5010 or BSTA5011 or CEPI5100) and (PUBH5211 or BSTA5004) Assessment: Reflective journal (30%) and 1x assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit introduces the topic of linked health data analysis. It will usually run in late June and late November. The topic is a very specialised one and will not be relevant to most MPH students. The modular structure of the unit provides students with a theoretical grounding in the classroom on each topic, followed by hands-on practical exercises in the computing lab using de-identified linked NSW data files. The computing component assumes a basic familiarity with SAS computing syntax and methods of basic statistical analysis of fixed-format data files. Contents include: an overview of the theory of data linkage methods and features of comprehensive data linkage systems, sufficient to know the sources and limitations of linked health data sets; design of linked data studies using epidemiological principles; construction of numerators and denominators used for the analysis of disease trends and health care utilisation and outcomes; assessment of the accuracy and reliability of data sources; data linkage checking and quality assurance of the study process; basic statistical analyses of linked longitudinal health data; manipulation of large linked data files; writing syntax to prepare linked data files for analysis, derive exposure and outcome variables, relate numerators and denominators and produce results from statistical procedures at an introductory to intermediate level. The main assignment involves the analysis of NSW linked data, which can be done only in the Sydney School of Public Health Computer Lab, and is due 10 days after the end of the unit.
Textbooks
Notes will be distributed in class.
PUBH5224 Advanced Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly classes (combined lectures and tutorials) for 13 weeks. Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment or equivalent class presentation (30%); 1x 4000 word assignment (or equivalent answers to specific methodological questions) (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended for students who have completed Epidemiology Methods and Uses (or an equivalent unit of study) at a credit or higher level. It is designed to extend students' practical and theoretical knowledge of epidemiology beyond basic principles, provide students with an opportunity to consolidate critical appraisal skills and to acquire some of the practical knowledge and skills needed to design epidemilogocal research.
PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Alison Hayes Session: Intensive September Classes: 2x 2day compulsory workshops Prerequisites: ((PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. This unit covers: principles of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation. The workshops consist of interactive lectures and class exercises.
Textbooks
A course manual will be provided to each student.
PUBH5307 Advanced Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kirsten Howard Session: Intensive October Classes: 1 x 2day compulsory workshop Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Corequisites: PUBH5205 and PUBH5302 Assessment: 1x written assignment (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aims of this unit are to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, application and analytical techniques of more advanced methods of health economic evaluation and with practical working knowledge of how to conduct economic evaluations using stochastic and deterministic data. This unit will focus on students developing the hands-on skills of conducting economic evaluations, included detailed practical instruction in the use of decision analytic software such as TreeAge and Excel. The format will be in face to face workshops with lectures followed by computer based exercises directly relating to the lectures. The broad topic areas covered are: 1) analysis of health outcomes including survival and quality of life measures 2) analysis of costs 3) economic modeling, including conduct of sensitivity analyses (one way, multi-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis) and 4) presenting and interpreting results of cost effectiveness analyses.
PUBH5308 Health Workforce Policy Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Deborah Schofield, Dr Michelle Cunich Session: Intensive October Classes: On-line materials plus compulsory attendance at a two day workshop. Assessment: Assignment on a health workforce policy analysis topic of the student's choice (100%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit will examine the major mechanisms of health workforce planning in Australia. The nature of the Australian health workforce will be considered, and the processes by which planning is influenced through government policy and research translated and integrated with policy. Current health workforce issues such as adequacy of education and training programs, ageing, and the distribution of the workforce will be addressed. Current approaches to planning for an adequate health workforce, and evaluations of the quality of evidence on current health workforce models of care will be examined using practical examples.
Textbooks
Australia's Health Workforce, Productivity Commission Research Report, 2005 Available at: http://www.pc.gov.au/study/healthworkforce/finalreport/index.html
PUBH5415 Injury Prevention

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rebecca Ivers Session: Intensive October Classes: 1 x 2day workshop Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (90%) and participation in small group work during the workshop (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Injury is the leading cause of death and disability in children, adolescents and people of working age in Australia and globally. This unit aims to provide students with a clear understanding of the magnitude of the injury burden, both in higher and lower income countries, and the strategies that are required to address this burden. During the 2 day workshop, guest speakers will outline issues relevant to the general injury prevention field and students will participate in interactive small group work which will focus on issues relevant to cause-specific injuries, in collaboration with guest contributors. Topics covered include road injury, occupational injury, fall injury, drowning, suicide, injury in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander populations, burns, and injury in resource poor settings.
Textbooks
Students will be provided with a course manual. Recommended text: McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004; Li, G, Baker, SP. Injury Research: Theories, Methods, and Approaches. Boston: Springer, 2012.
PUBH5416 Vaccines in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Aditi Dey, Dr Frank Beard, Professor Peter McIntyre Session: Semester 2 Classes: Preparatory online lectures and 1x 2day workshop at the Children's Hospital Westmead Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or PUBH5018 Assessment: 2x short online quizzes (10%) plus 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Students who have not done the core units of study in epidemiology (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) or biostatistics (PUBH5018) but have previous demonstrable experience in these study areas will be required to request permission from the unit of study coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Permission is required to ensure that students have a basic grounding in epidemiology and biostatistics. The coordinator emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit to advise whether or not the student has permission to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of immunisation principles, the impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs), how to assess the need for new vaccines and how to implement and monitor a new vaccination program. This unit covers the history and impact of vaccination; basic immunological principles of immunisation; surveillance of diseases, vaccination coverage, vaccine effectiveness and adverse events; vaccine scares; risk communication; immunisation in the developing country context; assessing disease burden and new vaccines. Learning activities include short online preparatory lectures and a workshop with interactive lectures and small group case studies.
PUBH5417 Injury Epidemiology Prevention and Control

This unit of study is not available in 2018

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Lisa Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures and moderated discussions over 13 weeks (workload 6-8hr/week) Assessment: 1x 4000 word assignment (60%) and participation in two moderated online discussions (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This one-semester online unit teaches students about the principles of injury epidemiology, prevention and control. It provides a basis for the assessment and investigation of injury issues and the development, implementation and evaluation of injury prevention programs. The unit will cover: injury measurement and classification (descriptive methods); risk factor identification (analytic methods); evidence-based interventions for injury prevention; priority setting in injury control; injury prevention policy; strategies in injury control; implementing strategies in injury control; program evaluation in injury prevention; injury and Indigenous Australians and an international perspective on injury. During this unit, students will: gain an understanding of the epidemiology of injury, including the burden of injury, injury surveillance, methods for estimating the frequency and severity of injury, and methods for identifying risk factors; gain an understanding of the theories underpinning injury prevention and illustrate their application; develop an appreciation of the process of priority setting in injury, the design and implementation of injury prevention interventions, and the principles and conduct of evaluations.
Textbooks
Lecture notes, case studies and journal articles will be provided online from a password-protected site. Recommended text:. McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004.
PUBH5418 Tobacco Control in the 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Becky Freeman Session: Intensive August Classes: 1x3 day workshop of lectures and problem-focused discussions, followed by 4 weeks of problem-based online discussions Assessment: 2x 2000 word essays (60%), 1x 100 item online quiz (10%) and online discussion and participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Distance education/intensive on campus
The unit consists of learning topics, each of which is supported by extensive Web based resources, and 4 moderated online discussion forums, each focusing on a problem related to tobacco use and control. Lecture topics include: history of tobacco use and control; the burden of illness from tobacco use; secondhand smoke: the research evidence; measuring tobacco use, uptake and cessation in communities; international trends in tobacco consumption; the tobacco industry; the WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and new forms of tobacco advertising and promotion. Problem focused discussion forums include: Harm reduction and tobacco control, regulation of tobacco, improving and implementing pack warnings; promoting smoking cessation, prevention of uptake (youth programs); denormalisation of the tobacco industry; controlling advertising; and controlling exposure to tobacco smoke, making news on tobacco and influencing political policy on tobacco.
Textbooks
(recommended only) Chapman S. Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking History. Oxford: Blackwell, 2007.
PUBH5420 Public Health Advocacy Strategies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Becky Freeman Session: Semester 2b Classes: 2 full days followed by 3 weeks of online Assessment: 2500 word essay (70%), online participation (30%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Students will have the opportunity to critique and analyse case studies from a variety of both successful and unsuccessful public health advocacy examples. There will be an emphasis on how online environments and social media tools are contributing to public health advocacy debates and campaigns. Recent examples of how online media have influenced health policy and programming will be presented. Students will examine and prepare writing for online media such as news, blogs, and social media. The lectures will include guest speakers from non-government organisations, government and other experienced stakeholders from across the public heath sector.
Textbooks
Recommended: Chapman S. (2007) Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking History. Oxford: Blackwell.
PUBH5421 Infection Prevention in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Lyn Gilbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: block mode (2 x 3days) Assumed knowledge: basic knowledge of medical microbiology, antimicrobial agents and communicable disease epidemiology and clinical features Assessment: 2x2000 word essays/assignments (2x30%); 2x short answer question exams -150 word answers for each of 5 questions (2x20%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Attendance, in person, at workshops is strongly recommended, to enable participation in discussions. However, lectures will be recorded and available online after the workshops. Students who are unable to attend some or all of workshop sessions can view them, but generally not the associated discussions, online. Assessments are online.
This unit will provide students with an understanding of the individual and societal risks of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and the rationale for, and barriers to, their prevention and control (PC). A basic understanding of medical microbiology and communicable disease epidemiology will be assumed. The unit will cover such important concepts as: ethical and economic implications; psychological, behavioural, cultural and professional influences; the varying roles, responsibilities and perspectives of clinicians, health support staff, administrators, patients and the community; potential uses and implications of new technology (such as information and decision support systems, electronic medical records and highly discriminatory microbial strain typing, including whole genome sequencing) in HAI surveillance. The course will also address the rationales and strategies for implementation of HAI-related policies, such as hand hygiene, aseptic technique and antimicrobial stewardship, and some reasons for and consequences of failure to implement them, for individual patients, the health system and the community.
PUBH5500 Advanced Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers (Semester 1); Andrea Smith (Semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2x3 full day workshop in March/April (semester 1); 2x3 full day workshops in August/September (semester 2) Prohibitions: QUAL5005 or QUAL5006 Assessment: interviewing activity with reflection (25%); 2000wd essay (25%); 2x group presentations (20%); multiple choice quizzes (20%); in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative inquiry in health. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This advanced unit will show you a new way of thinking critically about research and researching, and give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
PUBH5550 Climate Change and Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ying Zhang, Dr Melody Ding Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode (2 day workshop) or fully online. Assessment: 1x 1500 word essay (40%), 1x 2500 word essay (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides an overview of climate change in the context of public health. The unit begins with climate change models and explores causation and the ways in which climate change interacts with human behaviour and population health. It comprises three parts: 1) the scientific evidence, including the history/trend, exposure assessment, and the consequences of climate change and extremes, 2) responses to climate change, including adaptation and mitigation, to build community resilience, and 3) an integrated multi-disciplinary perspective, e.g. international environmental governance and law, environmental economics, and environmental and social injustice, to address climate change and health in a broader concept of sustainability and global change. This unit will provide both Australian and international perspectives on climate change and health, supported by theoretical and empirical research in both developed and developing countries. It will enable students to have a critical thinking about climate change and health.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided
QUAL5005 Introducing Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers (semester 1); Andrea Smith (semester 2) Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: block mode: 2x2 full day workshops in March/April (semester 1) or 2 x 2 full day workshops in August/September (semester 2) OR distance mode: 10 x weekly online lectures and activities (semester 1 only) Prohibitions: PUBH5500 or QUAL5006 Assessment: Interviewing activity with reflection (35%); multiple choice quizzes (20%); 1750-word essay (35%); online or in-class participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: This Unit is primarily aimed at Master of Public Health (MPH) students. Other students are encouraged to consider PUBH5500 instead. MPH students who complete PUBH5500 get an automatic waiver for QUAL5005
Introducing Qualitative Health Research is perfect if you're a beginner and want to gain an overview of this research approach. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? How are theories used in qualitative research? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. You will also meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This introductory Unit will give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating qualitative literature and doing qualitative research for yourself.
SEXH5008 Sex and Society

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Michael Walsh Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. International students including Australia Awards Scholarship students must enrol into the face-to-face version Prohibitions: SEXH5414 Assessment: Written assignment (70%); Online quiz (20%); Online discussions (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit will explore determinants of sexuality from a societal perspective, with particular reference to their potential impacts on public health. Social science theories of sexuality will be considered, and cross-cultural and historical accounts of sexual practices will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on the impact of diversity, culture, society, environment, life experiences, personal beliefs and health on sexual activity and potential public health impacts on sexual and reproductive health including HIV. Course content will include diversity; adolescent sexual development; sex education; sexual assault, gender; sexual orientation and sexual behaviour.
SEXH5205 Advanced Adolescent Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Fiona Robards, Arlie Rochford, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online Assessment: Discussion board participation (30%); Case study (30%); 1500 Word essay (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit aims to introduce the constructs of adolescent sexuality, explore the determinants of adolescent sexual health and to discuss the personal and public health implications of adolescent sexuality, with additional emphasis on a deeper exploration of an area of adolescent sexual health that is of particular interest to the student. The mainareas of learning are: adolescent sexuality, adolescent sexual health, reproductive health issues in adolescence, diversity, legal and ethical issues and sexual health promotion. On completion of this unit of study, students should be able to: (i) Describe the biological, developmental and socio-cultural contexts of adolescent sexual health as well as the constructs, challenges and diversities of adolescent sexuality. They will learn techniques used to optimise communication with adolescents and explore legal, ethical and public health implications of adolescent sexuality; and (ii) Understand and describe one area of adolescent sexual health that the student chooses to study in depth from a list of suggestions.
SEXH5414 Public Health: Sexual and Reproductive Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Associate Professor Kirsten Black, Dr Michael Walsh Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-4 hours of lectures per week, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. International students including Australian Awards Scholarship students must enrol into the face-to-face version Prohibitions: SEXH5008 or SEXH5418 or SEXH5419 Assessment: Written assignments (70%); Online quizzes (20%); Discussion board participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study is a combination of three (3), two (2) credit point units (SEXH5008, SEXH5418 and SEXH5419) and deals with public helath aspects of sexual and reproductive health (SRH), Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and HIV. This unit addresses sexuality, sex education, HIV/AIDS and STIs, unintended pregnancies, access to SRH services, maternal mortality, sexual violence, sexual and reproductive rights and discrimination/stigmatisation of vulnerable populations. Aspects of HIV/STIs and reproductive health will be discussed in the context of the UN's Sustainable Development Golas (SDGs) focusing on SDG 3 on health and SDG 5 on gender equality and women's and girls' empowerment. The unit further explores the epidemiological, societal and population aspects of SRH, STIs and HIV. Surveillance strategies, policy development and legislative responses will be discussed, with regards to the potential public health consequences. Emphasis will be placed on the delivery of effective prevention and management strategies.
SEXH5418 Public Health Aspects of Reproductive Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Kirsten Black, Dr Michael Walsh Session: Semester 1a Classes: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. international students including Australia Awards Scholarship students must enrol into the face-to-face version. Assessment: Written assignment (70%); Online quiz (20%); Online discussions (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit deals with a range of public health aspects of reproductive and maternal health including unintended pregnancies, maternal morbidity and mortality, sexual violence, sexual and reproductive rights and access to sexual and reproductive health services. Emphasis will be placed on the delivery of effective prevention and management strategies. Aspects of reproductive health will be discussed in the context of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) focussing on SDG 3 on health and SDG 5 on gender equality and womens and girls empowerment.
SEXH5419 Public Health Aspects of HIV and STIs

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar, Dr Michael Walsh Session: Semester 2b Classes: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. international students including Australia Awards Scholarship students must enrol into the face-to-face version. Assessment: Written assignment (70%); Online quiz (20%); Online discussions (10%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit aims to provide a public health perspective on the impact of Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs) and HIV. On completion of this unit, students should be able to: (i) Understand the underlying principles of the surveillance systems used to monitor STIs and HIV; (ii) Understand the core risk activity groups involved in the transmissions of STIs and HIV; (iii) Understand how the epidemiologies of STIs and HIV vary within and between societies; (iv) Understand the public health impacts of STIs and HIV; and (v) Understand effective preventative strategies at individual and community levels. Course content will include an introduction to the basic biology of HIV and STIs; epidemilogy and surveillance methods; impact of vulnerable at-risk populations; prevention technologies and policy approaches.