Pain Management

Unit of study descriptions for 2014

PAIN5001 Introduction to Pain Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Nicholas Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
To introduce participants to the problem of pain within a multidisciplinary team framework and to highlight the extent of the problem in the community. The unit provides an overview of historical and philosophical models of pain and its management methods over time. Current classifications of pain are examined and the interrelationship between various paradigms of health and illness are outlined. Participants also begin to consider the principles of research design and biostatistics, and explore professional and ethical issues.
PAIN5002 Pain Mechanisms and Contributors

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Michael Nicholas and Dr Christopher Vaughan Session: Semester 1b,Semester 2b Classes: Online, approximately 20 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
To introduce and develop participants understanding about the basic neuroscience of pain and the interrelationship between psychological, physiological and environmental processes in pain. Neuro-anatomical, physiological, pharmacological, and biochemical mechanisms involved in nociception, including peripheral and central sensitisation are discussed. Theoretical bases are introduced and the ways in which psychological and environmental factors modify or maintain pain perception and behaviour are explored.
PAIN5003 Pain Treatment and Management Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Charles Brooker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
To introduce participants to the core principles of pain assessment, treatment and management. Participants consider the biopsychosocial model and the scientific basis for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. They explore principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, together with routes of drug administration. The role of physiotherapy and rehabilitation management, and the use of procedures such as neural blockade, simulation techniques and surgery are also considered.
PAIN5004 Pain Conditions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Philip Siddall Session: Semester 1b,Semester 2b Classes: On line, approximately 20 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
The unit provides an introduction to a range of pain conditions. Participants are encouraged to integrate and apply previous learning to specific pain problems, acute, chronic and cancer pain. Recent advances in pain relief techniques are introduced and specific issues in the management of pain in children and older people are considered.
PAIN5005 Orofacial Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Russell Vickers Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%) 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Orofacial pain is frequently reported in the general population and is severe. It encompasses several conditions that involve medical, dental and psychological variables such as neuralgia, neuropathic pain, and temporomandibular disorder and related headache syndromes. The purpose of this unit is to explore the principles of orofacial pain mechanisms, symptomatology and treatments. Topics include orofacial pain assessment, diagnostic tests including local anaesthetic blocks, specific pharmacology for orofacial pain, and multidisciplinary treatment approaches.
PAIN5006 Independent Studies in Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Grace Tague Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: learning contract (10%), 5000 word written assignments (or equivalent) (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
In this unit participants undertake independent study in a specific area of interest within the field of pain management. The learning goals, methodology, resources and outcomes are negotiated with a supervisor via a learning contract. This negotiation process enables participants to tailor their learning to a specific need and/or area of interest around a clinical, scientific, educational, managerial or administrative topic.
PAIN5010 Clinical Aspects of Neurobiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Philip Siddall Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit aims to build on information acquired from previous units, exploring the neurobiological contributors to pain, how they are influenced by the mind and their implications for assessment and management of different pain conditions. It examines nociceptive, neuropathic and neuroplastic mechanisms and their contribution to pain; the link between mind and body and how psychological processes contribute to and modify the experience of pain through modulation of the neurobiological components.
PAIN5011 Psychology of Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Overton Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit aims to provide a comprehensive study of current psychological perspectives and research on the experience and impact of pain. Theoretical models are introduced and the ways in which psychological processes might modify and/or maintain pain experience are explored. The processes explored include the roles of attention, learning, affect/mood, beliefs, self-talk, coping strategies, and interactions with environmental factors such as significant others, social contingencies and contexts (including culture, gender, workplace, etc.). Attention is given to incorporating psychosocial assessment within a biopsychosocial framework.
PAIN5013 Musculoskeletal Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Damien Finniss Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit explores aspects of the assessment and management of musculoskeletal pain. Topics include anatomical/physiological mechanisms, medical and non-medical assessment and management, together with regional pain syndromes.
PAIN5014 Cancer Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ghauri Aggarwal Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit addresses the biopsychosocial assessment and management of pain associated with cancer. Recent advances in pain relief techniques including delivery systems for patient control of pain are reviewed, together with appropriate assessment and treatment approaches for psychological factors such as depression, grief and stress.
PAIN5015 Pharmacology of Pain Medicine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Christopher Vaughan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit explores the pharmacology of analgesic drugs and their application in the clinical context. Using a case based approach a range of pain conditions and the pharmacological implications will be explored.
PAIN5016 Psychological Approaches in Pain Mgmt

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sarah Overton Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit is primarily focused on the influence of psychological variables in the implementation of all treatments, both somatic and psychological. The bio-psychosocial model of chronic pain is revisited and the implications for interdisciplinary interventions are discussed. The evidence for interventions based on psychological principles is critically examined and implementation of these interventions in a range of clinical settings is explored.
PAIN5017 Disability and Pain Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Matthew Forster Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
The interface between pain assessment and treatment and the system of compensation for workplace-related injury and disability is the focus of this subject. Accordingly the role of pain management in rehabilitation following occupational injury or illness is addressed, together with the medical, legal, insurer, employer, trade union and rehabilitation provider perspectives and roles in providing protection, advocacy, compensation and treatment. Legislative and attitudinal changes in the social environment relating to occupational injury and treatment are considered together with challenges for pain management arising from dysfunction in the system of rehabilitation following injury.
PAIN5018 Pain in Children

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jane Thomas Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit provides an opportunity for students to understand the developmental physiology and psychology of infants and children, together with the pharmacology (particularly with reference to dose and route of administration) of pain management in children. Particular attention is given to management of acute pain in children, both post-operative and procedure-related pain, to methods of pain assessment in children of various ages, to non-pharmacological pain management strategies and to chronic pain presentations in children.
PAIN5019 Pain in Older People

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Brad Wood Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Readings and case studies will highlight the unique difficulties of elderly people who suffer from degenerative, painful conditions, often exacerbated by multiple losses, role changes, limited mobility and mood disorder. The emphasis will be on assessment and management of pain when complicated by these conditions.
PAIN5020 Complementary Therapies: Pain Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Russell Vickers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignments or equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit explores complementary therapies that may accompany conventional medical approaches in the management of pain. The evidence base is discussed, as well as the implications, costs and side effects of these therapies. The historical basis of each therapy is considered, together with current knowledge about their application and potential interactions with conventional medicines and treatments. Topics include: acupuncture, herbalism, homeopathy, hypnosis and relaxation techniques, yoga and meditation, osteopathy and chiropractic.
PAIN5021 Acute Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philip Corke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assessment: Participation in online discussion and completion of multiple choice questions (20%) 3000-4000 written assignments of equivalent (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
The aims of this unit are to provide a theoretical framework for the management of acute pain, to examine the specific contributors that are important in the development of acute pain conditions and to examine pharmacological and other approaches used in the management of acute pain. Topics that will be covered will include the principles of pre-emptive analgesia and evidence of effectiveness in preventing pain, pharmacological management of acute pain including approaches such as patient controlled analgesia, adjunctive approaches in managing acute pain and the transition from acute to chronic pain.
The following Units of Study are only available to Master's students who commenced their candidature prior to 2011
PAIN5007 Dissertation A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, supervised research, minimum 6hr/week Prerequisites: A candidate must have obtained a minimum weighted average mark of 70% in at least 24 credit points of coursework and obtained approval from the course-coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Enrolment must be done through the Faculty or School office. Assessment: PAIN5007 and PAIN5008 are assessed together through a dissertation up to 20,000 words Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The honours dissertation provides participants with an opportunity to undertake an advanced investigation into a topic or issue relevant to their professional interests. Participants develop a proposal for independent research on a topic or a substantial paper that demonstrates the application of scholarly literature to a practical problem or issue.
PAIN5008 Dissertation B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, supervised research, minimum 6hr/week Prerequisites: A candidate must have obtained a minimum weighted average mark of 70% in at least 24 credit points of coursework and obtained approval from the course-coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Enrolment must be done through the Faculty or School office. Assessment: PAIN5007 and PAIN5008 are assessed together through a dissertation up to 20,000 words Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The honours dissertation provides participants with an opportunity to undertake an advanced investigation into a topic or issue relevant to their professional interests. Participants develop a proposal for independent research on a topic or a substantial paper that demonstrates the application of scholarly literature to a practical problem or issue.
PAIN5009 Dissertation C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: Online, supervised research, minimum 6hr/week Prerequisites: A candidate must have obtained a minimum weighted average mark of 70% in at least 24 credit points of coursework and obtained approval from the course-coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Enrolment must be done through the Faculty or School office. Assessment: students write a dissertation up to 20,000 words Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The honours dissertation provides participants with an opportunity to undertake an advanced investigation into a topic or issue relevant to their professional interests. Participants develop a proposal for independent research on a topic or a substantial paper that demonstrates the application of scholarly literature to a practical problem or issue.