Public Health

Errata
Item Change Date
1 PUBH5025 Physical Activity and Public Health - Compulsory attendance at 2 x 1 day workshops Assessment: Attendance and participation at workshop (20%), 1x written assignment (1500-2000 words) (80%)  23/01/2014
 2 PUBH5026 Mass Media Campaigns & Social Marketing - Classes: face-to-face/ on-campus 2-day residential workshop (lectures, workshops, small group sessions, and student participation and student presentations)  23/01/2014
 3 PUBH5117 Communicable Disease Control - Prerequisite removed.  23/01/2014
 4

PUBH5212 Categorical Data Analysis - Students studying in distance mode must have access to a computer running a version of Microsoft Windows compatible with the latest version of SAS

 23/01/2014
 5 PUBH5213 Survival Analysis - Students studying in distance mode must have access to a computer running a version of Microsoft Windows compatible with the latest version of SAS  23/01/2014

Unit of study descriptions for 2014

BACH5343 Individual and Societal Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1hr lecture/wk, 1x1hr tutorial/wk Prohibitions: BACH5041 Assessment: 2000 word essay (40%), tutorial presentation (30%), online activities (30%) Campus: Cumberland Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit offers students an insight into the challenges and opportunities associated with population ageing and what is required to meet the needs of the increasing numbers of older people and those who will interact with them. It addresses the social and individual dimensions of ageing, health and well-being and the transitions that occur in later life. There will be an emphasis on the policy and practice implications of an ageing society and the role of various public and private providers (government, health care practitioners, family, voluntary) in providing services and care to older people. Students will be expected to develop a critical understanding of the issues related to ageing and the life course in three specific study areas: 1) Population and social issues; 2) Policies and services; 3) Health promotion and quality of life for older people, their families and carers.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Ian Kerridge Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x8hr Intensives; or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face block mode. Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assumed knowledge: A three-year undergraduate degree in science, medicine, nursing, allied health sciences, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: 1xOnline Quiz (5%); 1xOnline Quiz (15%); 2x500wd short answer (40%); 1x2500wd essay (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This unit of study provides students with an overview of the broader philosophical, ethical, socio-political and cultural issues that underlie public health and public health research. Students will first review the history of public health and examine the values that underpin health promotion and disease prevention. The second part of the unit examines the place of facts and values in public health and the construction and use of information, with particular reference to evidence-based-medicine. The third part of the unit examines the cultural, moral and social context of public health including the social determinants of health, the construction of health services, the determination of research priorities and issues relating to human rights and global health.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format).
BETH5206 Introduction to Public Health Ethics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Ian Kerridge Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2x8hr intensives; or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in block mode. Prohibitions: BETH5203 Assessment: 2xOnline Quiz (40%); 3x500wd short answer (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This unit introduces the ethics of public health. Ethics is the study of what should be done. In public health this requires thinking about what we want healthcare to achieve, both for communities and individuals. As this always involves prioritization and compromise it is important to understand; how and why we focus on some health issues and not others; why we focus on some populations and not others; how we weigh up the benefits, harms and costs of intervening in people's lives; whether our interventions are fair, just and undermine or promote human rights; and how we can best engage with communities and maintain their trust. None of these issues can be understood simply by reference to evidence, efficiency, policy or law. This is where an understanding of ethics can help. By the end of the Unit you will be able to identify the values and ideas upon which public health rests and ready to start thinking proactively about the ethical and legal issues that are raised by public health interventions and health policy. This is a Core Unit for Graduate Diploma and Master in Public Health students.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a book of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5207 Arts in Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode, 2x2 days (4 hour combined lectures/tutorials) Assessment: 2x300-400wd online tasks (25%), 1x1,500wd essay (25%), 1x2,500wd essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The 'art of health' is more than an historic catchphrase; it is a literal phenomenon. In the past century the visual, literary and performing arts have emerged as vital components of a blossoming 'arts in health' movement which values the contribution of the arts to human health and wellbeing. This unit gives students practical examples of how to incorporate the arts into public health and health care. The course offers a rich and detailed exploration of varying debates in the scholarly and practice-based fields of arts-and-health, which include but are not limited to: status and uses of art therapy; music,
psychology and medicine; narrative, literature and the 'narrative medicine' movement; hospital art, design and architecture; and the role of art in public health, health research, and social marketing campaigns. Students will be treated to a diverse range of guest lecturers from the fields of visual performing arts and related areas of expertise. This course will appeal to students of public health; literary, visual and performing arts; social work; psychology; and related disciplines, who want to understand more about the interconnectedness of the arts with human health.
the arts with human health.
All assessments must be completed to pass this Unit.
Textbooks
None specified
CEPI5200 Quality and Safety in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Merrilyn Walton Session: Semester 1 Classes: offered online Assumed knowledge: clinical experience strongly recommended Assessment: online participation (40%) and 1x4500word assignment (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
The unit has six major content areas delivered as four modules; Module 1 Understanding Q&S in Healthcare; Module 2 Professional and ethical practice; Module 3 Clinical governance; Module 4 Improving Healthcare. At the end of the unit students will: understand the background to quality and safety in health care, from Australian and international perspectives; understand the nature of health care error including the methods of error detection and monitoring, and quality indicators; understand the role of good communication and other professional responsibilities in quality and safety in healthcare; have developed an understanding of clinical governance, accountability and systems management; have considered methods for improving healthcare such as getting research into practice, clinical practice guidelines and clinical practice improvement. This unit consists of online discussions and activities based around key provided readings and other resources.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5214 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: offered online - 8 self-paced modules each comprising: course notes, lecture, demonstrations, exercises, quizzes (formative) Prerequisites: PUBH5018, PUBH5010 Assessment: formative assessment through quizzes (30%), submitted assignment (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, to guide them to resources to improve their conference abstract and manuscript writing and submission. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, writing cover letters and responding to reviewer's comments. Students will learn skills needed to act as a peer-reviewer.
Textbooks
No mandatory text - readings available online.
CEPI5310 Advanced Statistical Modelling

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lec/tut/week x 12 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5212 Assessment: 2 x data analysis report (2x50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Evening or On-line
This unit covers statistical analysis techniques that are commonly required for analysing data that arise from clinical or epidemiological studies. Students will gain hands on experience applying model-building strategies and fitting advanced statistical models. In particular, students will learn a statistical software package called Stata, how to handle non-linear continuous variables, and how to analyse correlated data. Correlated data arise from clustered or longitudinal study designs, such as, cross-over studies, matched case-control studies, cluster randomised trials and studies involving repeated measurements. Statistical models that will be covered include fixed effects models, marginal models using Generalised Estimating Equations (GEE), and mixed effects models (also known as hierarchical or multilevel models). This unit of study focuses on data analyses using Stata and the interpretation of results.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
CHSC6906 Health in China

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ying Zhang Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 2000wd essay (25%) and 1000wd individual presentation (25%) and seminar participation (10%) and 2000wd case study research paper (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit provides a critical overview of China's contemporary health system and health issues. It uses a multidisciplinary approach to examine the interaction between health and China's development process. Through the use of case studies this unit provides students with concrete examples of current and future issues faced by China's health system, including: health policy formation; health services financing, delivery and evaluation; ethical issues in health services delivery; health inequalities; and, China's epidemiological and demographic transitions.
DENT5013 Preventative Dentistry

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Wendell Evans Session: Semester 2 Classes: 30hrs consisting of 10x(1hr lecture/seminar and 2hr tutorial) Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 and PUBH5018) or DENT6000 Assessment: individual written assignments (70%), tutorial discussion and group-work participation (30%) Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
To provide students with sufficient background and appreciation of the importance of preventive dentistry and oral health promotion and to provide them with the opportunity to develop skills and acquire essential knowledge in this field for the effective practice of population oral health. The following topics will be covered: principles of prevention; oral diseases and conditions of public health concern - a review; the epidemiology of the common oral problems; prevention of dental caries; prevention of periodontal disease; prevention of other diseases of oral health concern; evidence-based preventive dental care; principles of health education, health protection, and oral health promotion; and analysis of health education and oral health promotion initiatives. On the completion of this unit of study, the student will be able to: understand the efficacy and effectiveness of risk reduction strategies in relation to the common oral problems and conditions; select interventions and strategies for the prevention and control of oral disease and the promotion of oral health; and understand the limitations of health education and the potential for oral health improvement through effective oral health promotion strategies.
Textbooks
Fejerskov O, Kidd E (Editors) with Nyvad B and Baelum V. Dental caries: the disease and its clinical management. Oxford: Blackwell Munksgaard, 2008.
DENT5014 Dental Health Services

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Peter Dennison Session: Semester 2 Classes: 30hrs consisting of 10x(1hr lecture/seminar and 2hr tutorial) Prerequisites: PUBH5018, PUBH5010 Assessment: individual written assignments (70%), tutorial discussion and group-work participation (30%) Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
To provide students with sufficient background and appreciation of the role and scope of dental health services within health care and to provide them with the opportunity to develop skills and acquire essential knowledge in this field for the effective practice of population oral health. The following topics will be covered: dental services in the twenty first century; the primary health care approach; assessment of the role of Western Dentistry (the limits of conventional dentistry); the limitations of a "high-risk" approach for the prevention of dental caries; the common risk factor approach: a rational basis for promoting oral health and strategies for developing oral health care programs in deprived communities; priorities in oral health care services; review of the Save our Kids Smiles program in New South Wales; the prevention of social inequalities in oral health; adult access to dental care in Australia; and ethnic indicators of dental health schoolchildren resident in areas of multiple deprivation. On the completion of this unit of study, students will be able to: understand the principles governing primary health care; understand the principles governing the delivery and management of dental services; and develop resources and implement and manage appropriate dental services for populations.
Textbooks
Pine CM (Editor). Community oral health. Oxford: Wright, 1997.
DENT5015 Population Oral Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Shanti Sivaneswaran Session: Semester 2 Classes: 30hrs consisting of 10x(1hr lecture/seminar and 2hr tutorial) Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or SUST5004 Assessment: individual written assignments (80%), tutorial discussion and group-work participation (20%) Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
To provide students with sufficient background and appreciation of the importance of population oral health and to provide them with the opportunity to develop skills and acquire essential knowledge in this field for the effective practice of population oral health. This unit focuses on the determinants of oral health and the importance of upstream measures to attack the root cause of oral diseases and the planning, implementing and evaluating of these approaches. The following topics will be covered: principles of population health approach, planning and policy framework for population oral health, the changing profile oral health and patterns of oral health care; water fluoridation (including legislation, benefits/risks, the politics of fluoridation, the arguments for and against water fluoridation, how to respond to antifluoridationists; how to promote and extend water fluoridation,), overview of policies and initiatives regarding dental services - the example of New South Wales; and oral health workforce and emerging workforce issues. On the completion of this unit of study students should be able to demonstrate ability to design/develop, implement and evaluate population based oral health programs to improve overall oral health and reduce inequalities in oral health.
Textbooks
Recommended Reading:
HPOL5000 Introduction to Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x 2-day workshops, online lectures and discussions Assessment: 1 x 1500wd written assignment (30%); 1 x 3000wd written assignment (50%); Online learning quiz (5%); online problem based learning exercise (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
To develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy. To give an overview of the political choices and frameworks - national and global - that shape policymaking.
Learning objectives:
- acquire a critical understanding of the basic history and features of the Australian health system
- understand the main frameworks used to analyse and make policy
- understand the main issues in the translation of policy into practice
- demonstrate the capacity to apply these understandings in particular settings through case studies.
Content:
This unit explores the main structures and institutions that make health policy. The unit examines debates over policy frameworks, and the evidence and advocacy in setting priorities. Conflicts over health policy will be placed in broader contexts - comparing different health systems and assessing global influences. Case studies will be used to examine the relationships between policy and practice.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other recommended reading materials will be available on the unit's eLearning site
HPOL5001 Economics and Finance for Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie,, A/Prof Stephen Jan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: Health Economics Exercise (50%), Health finance assignment (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the financial and economic aspects of health policy. It introduces the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance. Learning objectives:
- understand the main models and debates regarding health funding in developed OECD countries and the implications for equity, delivery and governance of health services.
- apply this knowledge to current Australian and global health systems and debates over reform.
- understand the role of economic analysis in evaluating health policy change
- be familiar with theoretical frameworks underlying health economics and analysis.
Content:
This unit introduces the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics, political economy and finance to examine the workings of health systems in Australia and comparable countries. It looks at the main models of health system funding and their implications for the structure, planning and delivery of services. The first module focuses on the basic concepts and methodologies of health economics and political economy and their contribution to policy analysis. The second module places funding structures in a broader political and policy context. Topics include the debates over the public-private mix and governance and accountability - who makes decisions about funding priorities? To whom should decision makers be held accountable and for what aspects of their work? How does health finance shape broader policy reform?
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended reading materials available from eLearning site.
HPOL5003 Analysing Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, Professor Stephen Leeder Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus. 2 x two day workshops plus online discussion Assessment: 1x2500 word assignment (50%), 1x3000 word assignment (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit develops skills for the effective critical appraisal of health policy. It familiarizes students with the principles, and limitations, of evidence-based health policy and how this is shaped by the health and political systems.
Learning objectives:
- to develop critical appraisal skills to critique the research that underpins policy
- to identify and analyse the main influences on policy development
- to evaluate existing policy frameworks and processes in relation to evidence, political context and broader community values
Content:
This unit builds policy analysis and analytical skills by exploring policy design, implementation and evaluation. It looks at the methods and limitations of evidence-based health policy and the problems of integrating equity concerns when developing and applying health policy. The workshops focus on the critical use of epidemiological and public policy analysis to build the evidence base for policy, taking into account political and social contexts.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London. Other required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning
HPOL5007 Global Health Policy

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, Dr Anne Marie Thow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance Education with compulsory Intensive workshops on Campus or online. 2 x 2 day workshops plus 4 tutorials (tutorials offered face-to-face or online) Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (35%), Tutorial discussion papers or online discussion (15%), 1 x 3000 word essay (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit explores the impact of globalization the health of populations and policy making processes. It also investigates the potential to improve health outcomes globally through policy. The aim of this course is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to identify and articulate political and policy processes at the global level, become familiar with institutions and actors involved in global health policy and utilize strategies for influencing policy making at the global level. The unit will explore global health threats that transcend national boundaries; especially those whose causes or results transcend the capacity of individual states to influence. We analyse the influence and power of institutions and actors in the development and implementation of global health policy, including the World Health Organisation, UNICEF, the World Bank, the WTO, the Gates Foundation and NGOs. We will also investigate the governance of global health policy responses. Teaching will make extensive use of current case studies from recognised experts in the field.
Textbooks
Buse K, Mays N, Walt G (2012). Making health policy. Second edition. Open University Press: London.
LAWS6252 Legal Reasoning & the Common Law System

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: S103 (Group A) & S104 (Group B): A/Prof Belinda Smith and S108 (Group C) & S109 (Group D): Mr Michael Skinner Session: Int April,Int August,Int March,Int Sept Classes: S103 (Group A): Mar 4-7 (9-5), S104 (Group B): Mar 21, 22 & Apr 11, 12 (9-5), S108 (Group C): Jul 29-31 & Aug 1 (9-5), S109 (Group D): Sep 5, 6 & 19, 20 (9-5) Prohibitions: LAWS6881 Assessment: in-class test (25%) and take-home exam (75%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: International students who are required to enrol in this unit must undertake classes during the first week of their study. Health Law and Public Health students should enrol in LAWS6881 Introduction to Law for Health Professionals in lieu of LAWS6252, if available. This unit is not available to MLawIntDev students who have been granted a reduced volume of learning. Students must attend all classes on the timetabled dates as prescribed for their enrolled session/group. An Absent Fail grade may be granted to students who fail to attend the correct session/group.
This is a compulsory unit for all postgraduate students who do not hold a law degree or equivalent from a common law jurisdiction entering the: Master of Administrative Law and Policy; Master of Business Law; Master of Environmental Law; Master of Environmental Science and Law; Master of Global Law; Master of Health Law; Master of International Business and Law; Master of Labour Law and Relations; Master of Law & International Development as well as Graduate Diplomas offered in these programs. The unit has been designed to equip students with the necessary legal skills and legal knowledge to competently apply themselves in their chosen area of law. Instruction will cover the legislative process; the judiciary and specialist tribunals; precedent; court hierarchies; legal reasoning; constitutional law; administrative law; contracts; and torts. Some elements of the unit will be tailored in accordance with the requirements of the particular specialist programs.
LAWS6839 Critical Issues in Public Health Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roger Magnusson Session: Int August Classes: Intro Class: Aug 4 (6-8) then Aug 6-8 & 28 (9-5) Assessment: short response question (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%) or short response question (20%), 3000-3500wd essay (40%) and take-home exam (40%) or short response question (20%) and two 3000-3500wd essays (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Core unit for GradDipPubHL students. MHL students may select this unit as one of the three core units required in addition to LAWS6252 or LAWS6881.
This unit provides an introduction to key topics in public health law, and a foundation for further study in this field. It begins by exploring the use of law - both historically and conceptually - as a tool for protecting the public's health, for responding to health risks and implementing strategies designed to promote public health. It reviews the sources of public health law, considers the strategies that law can deploy to protect and promote health, as well as debates about the appropriate limits for law in the protection of public health in a liberal democracy.
The unit also provides a review of the law's role within several critical areas, including: acute public health threats (with a focus on SARS, pandemic influenza, and bioterrorism); sexual health and STIs; and tobacco control.
Key topics include: The definition and role of public health law; Case studies illustrating the sources of public health law; The legal framework for managing pandemic influenza and other acute public health threats; An introduction to tobacco control law; and Law's role in promoting sexual health.
Throughout the unit, students will be trained to identify legal issues and to explore their health significance, or impact on population health. Students will be encouraged and expected to critically evaluate the success of public health laws and their underlying strategies for protecting and promoting health. Students will also explore the tension between the public health interest, and competing public and private interests.
Students wishing to extend their knowledge of public health law can enrol in the companion unit, LAWS6848 Law & Healthy Lifestyles. These units comprise a core program in public health law.
Textbooks
Useful references include: Christopher Reynolds, Public and Environmental Health Law, Federation Press, 2011 [Australia focus], Lawrence O. Gostin, Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint, University of California Press, 2nd ed, 2008 [US focus]
LAWS6848 Law and Healthy Lifestyles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Roger Magnusson Session: Int March Classes: Intro Class: Mar 10 (6-8) then Mar 12-14 & Apr 4 (9-5) Assessment: one short response question (20%) and 6000wd essay (80%) or one short response question (20%), 3000-3500wd essay (40%) and one take-home exam question (40%) or one short response question (20%) and two 3000-3500wd essays (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Core unit for GradDipPubHL students. This unit replaced LAWS6848 New Directions in Public Health Law and Policy and may be substituted for LAWS6839 Critical Issues in Public Health Law as a core unit in the MHL.
This unit responds to growing interest in the law's response to tobacco use, obesity, poor diet, alcohol abuse and sedentary lifestyle - the leading causes of preventable disease in Australia, the United States, and increasingly, in developing economies. Cancer, heart disease, stroke, diabetes and tobacco-related diseases are society's greatest killers, but what can law do - and what should it be doing - to prevent and control them?
Although law's relationship with the behavioural risk factors for these non-communicable diseases (or NCDs) is complex and contested, governments are experimenting with a wide range of legal strategies to encourage healthier lifestyles. This unit focuses on developments in Australia and the United States, and places legal developments in these countries within an international context.
The aim of this course is to equip students with conceptual skills to think powerfully about law's role in the prevention of NCDs and their risk factors, and to participate effectively in debates about appropriate, workable, legal and regulatory interventions. Through a comparative approach that draws on legal responses to NCDs in both Australia and the United States, students will explore the tension between personal responsibility and freedom, and the broader public interest in a healthy population and a productive economy.
Key topics include: Frameworks for thinking about law, and environments that support healthier lifestyles; Global health governance and the prevention of non-communicable diseases; Tobacco control: where to from here? Personal responsibility for health, and law's role; Regulating alcohol; Obesity prevention; and Law's role in improving diet and nutrition, and encouraging active living.
Throughout the unit, students will be encouraged to critically evaluate the success of the strategies law adopts to protect and promote public health, to explore new strategies that law might adopt, and to reflect on the tension between the public interest in protecting health, and competing interests.
Textbooks
Useful references include: Christopher Reynolds, Public and Environmental Health Law, Federation Press, 2011 [Australia focus] and Lawrence O. Gostin, Public Health Law: Power, Duty, Restraint, University of California Press, 2nd ed, 2008 [US focus]
MECO6919 Health Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Olaf Werder Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr seminar/week Assessment: 1x1000wd commentary and critique (20%), 1x500wd discussion leadership (20%), 1x1000wd research project on health issue (20%), 1x2500wd research paper (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit introduces key concepts in health communication. Students will explore micro- and macro-level theories of health (behaviour) communication that inform the design and implementation of health communication campaigns, planned and unplanned effects of communication campaigns, and the evaluation of such campaigns. It aims to give students a critical and practical understanding of theory and research concerning the role of communication in health promotion efforts.
MIPH5008 Travel and Tropical Medicine

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Giselle Manalo, Dr Paula Fogarty Session: Int October Classes: 1x 2day intensive lectures Assessment: 1x 2000word individual essay (90%) and attendance (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to provide an overview of common health issues and emerging travel-related diseases, with a general look at prevention and control of these problems for travellers or those intending to work in tropical or resource-poor settings for a significant period of time. Travel/public health regulations associated with outbreaks and disasters are also addressed. During the short course, students will also explore issues such as pre-travel preparations, protection from vector-borne diseases and vaccinations. The teaching method is face-to-face teaching. Attendance is compulsory.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5112 Global Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne, Dr Giselle Manalo Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2 hr lecture per week for 13 weeks; 1x 1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks plus 1x 1 day peer-learning session through group presentations; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x group presentation (25%), 1x2500 word written essay (50%), tutorial facilitation (20%) and peer evaluation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit gives candidates an insight into prevention and control of communicable diseases in developing countries using country-specific examples presented by professionals with field experience. The unit covers tropical diseases (including schistosomiasis and leprosy), as well as vector-borne conditions (including yellow fever and dengue), zoonoses and emerging infectious diseases such as pandemic influenza.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5115 Women's and Children's Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Heather Jeffery Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks, 1x1hr tutorial per week for 9 weeks. Assessment: 1x1500 word essay, problem based (60%), Short essay (team of 4 and formative) 20%, tutorial facilitation (15%), peer evaluation (5%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit aims to give students an overview of the health status of women and children in international settings. It also aims to examine causes of major health problems and possible approaches to improving the health of women and children in resource-poor countries. The unit covers a variety of issues in women's and children's health, including approaches to prevention of maternal and fetal, neonatal and child mortality, poverty, mother to child HIV transmission, women and violence, family planning, diarrhoeal disease, pneumonia, and vaccine preventable diseases.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5116 Culture, Health, Illness and Medicine

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cynthia Hunter Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop; 1 x 2hr seminar per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online. Assessment: 1x3000word essay (75%) and 1x1hr class facilitation (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit aims to provide an integrated and interpretive approach to an understanding of health-related behaviours of populations in international settings, by synthesizing anthropological knowledge and methodology, and the interactions of culture, biology, psychology and environment. The teaching process is by student-led, lecturer-guided, discussion based review and critical analysis of relevant topics. During the unit, students will explore a range of issues in global and multicultural health from an anthropological perspective. Methodological approaches will encompass ethnography and other anthropological data collection methods. The issues covered will include cultural influences on health, illness and healing, such as indigenous and traditional beliefs and systems, gender and cultural change and the impact of modernization and development on illness and healing. The impact examines disease and illness patterns - their distribution and persistence, mental illness and culture and attitudes towards the use of medications; and the provision of culturally sensitive and appropriate services. The emphasis will be on covering a range of topic areas relevant to the students enrolled, and those of particular importance in contemporary international and multicultural health contexts.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5117 Global Non-Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rohina Joshi Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 7 weeks; also offered fully online Assessment: 1x 2000word written assignment (90%) and class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit aims to provide candidates with an understanding of the causes and control of non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in developing countries. These diseases are associated with social and economic development and the demographic and health transitions. Topics covered in the unit include cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer, primary health care in relation to NCDs, health promotion for NCDs and approaches to NCD research in developing countries. Lectures are given by health professionals with direct experience of NCD control in developing countries.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5118 Global Perspectives of HIV/AIDS

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joel Negin Session: Semester 2a Classes: 4 days of intensive lectures spread over a 1 month period; also offered fully online Assessment: 1xgroup report (20%), peer evaluation (10%), 1x2000 word individual assignment (60%), and participation in discussions (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit offers a detailed and evidence-based assessment of the global HIV situation to equip students with the latest understanding of HIV distribution and trends globally, its social and economic implications, the measures being taken to prevent and treat HIV and AIDS, the gaps that need to be addressed in HIV control, and the politics around global HIV issues. Examples from different parts of the world, particularly less developed settings, are used to illustrate analysis of the key issues influencing the HIV control agenda globally. Emphasis is placed on developing a critical and analytical approach to assessing the HIV situation and developing interventions for its control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5124 Health Issues & Humanitarian Emergencies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Bronwen Blake, Associate Professor Michael Dibley, Associate Professor Lyndal Trevena Session: Int November Classes: 1x 4day workshop Assessment: Workshop activities (40%), 1x 2500word written assignment (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit gives students an overview of public health aspects of humanitarian emergencies in developing country situations and the range of appropriate responses. This includes considering problems faced by government and non-government organisations in humanitarian emergency relief efforts. Topics covered in the unit include international and human rights law, the role of donor agencies, refugee health, nutritional emergencies, site planning for refugee camps, water and sanitation, sexual violence, protection of vulnerable groups, and communicable disease surveillance and control.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5127 Mental Disorders in Global Context

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Maree Hackett Session: Int Sept Classes: 1x 2day workshop Assessment: 1x 2000 word essay (90%) plus class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to present an overview and critique of mental disorders in an international context. It covers broad issues related to the classification of disorders, their prevalence and population burden and their determinants. While the focus of the module is on international epidemiology, the course also aims to promote understanding of the economic and humanitarian implications of the burden of mental and substance use disorders for prevention, treatment and health policy. The unit will cover what a mental disorder is, how frequent and how disabling mental disorders are and what the major correlates and determinants of mental disorders are,with a focus on health policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
MIPH5134 Primary Care in Low Resource Settings

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate ProfessorProf Lyndal Trevena Session: Semester 2a Classes: On-line over 7 weeks or 2x1 day face to face workshop plus online sessions. Online mini-lectures and readings available for 1-2 hours per week; Group work online 2 hours per week Assessment: Formative assessment: Abstract of 250 words (10%), Contribution to group learning (20%), 2000 word case submission (70%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit of study is designed for students who have completed or are working towards a health degree. It will assume some clinical background knowledge and aims to prepare students to a basic level for applying public health principles in low resource primary health care settings. The course will introduce and revise the fundamental aspects of effective primary health care, define different aspects of low-resource settings (health system, healthcare worker, patient factors etc) and their effect on knowledge translation. The key learning component will comprise a series of problems which will be solved in online groups and supported by guest lecturers, tutors and resources. Problems will include low-income country settings but also resource-challenged settings due to remoteness and/or socioeconomic and other disadvantage. Students will be expected to be self-directed adult learners during this unit. This unit of study can be combined with MIPH5004 International Health Independent Study 1 (2crp) for a total of 6 credit points.
MIPH5135 Health Systems in Developing Countries

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joel Negin, Associate Professor Alexandra Martiniuk Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x 2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; plus 2x 0.5 day workshop Assessment: 1x1500 word research proposal (40%), 1x2000 word case study report (50%), and participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Health systems are complex and multi-faceted. Successful health systems require attention to political economy, governance, institutions, and local context. This unit will cover health systems in developing countries to equip students with a conceptual understanding and a set of tools to address major public health challenges from a health systems perspective. With a focus on evidence-based decision making, the unit will provide an understanding of health systems including specific topics such as health workforce, financing, service delivery, information systems and policy, and how these impact health interventions and health status in less developed countries. A multi-sectoral, integrated model will be used to understand the varied aspects of development challenges related to health systems. A case study approach will then provide students with concrete examples of health systems challenges and will strengthen students' ability to view health problems in a holistic, multi-faceted manner. The unit will provide students with the tools needed to make a practical difference in health systems in less developed countries with emphasis on implementation of health projects and bringing interventions to scale.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5136 Nutrition in International Settings

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Michael Dibley Session: Int August Classes: 2x2 day short course Assessment: 1x 1000 word exercise on nutritional assessment (30%), 1x 2500 word assignment (60%), workshop attendance and participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The aim of this unit is to provide students with insights into the major nutrition-related public health problems in low- and middle-income countries; knowledge and practical skills about nutritional assessment; and the design and evaluation of nutritional interventions. The content areas include an overview of nutrition as a major determinant of health and disease; methods to assess community nutritional status; the impact of maternal and child under-nutrition on mortality and overall disease burden; design and evaluation of effective interventions; issues surrounding food security; agriculture and nutrition; and nutrition policies and resources. The unit is taught in two 2-day workshops, with the first workshop focusing on nutritional assessment and major nutrition-related public health problems in low- and middle-income countries, and the second workshop focusing on design and evaluation of interventions. On completion students should be able to recognise key nutritional problems facing low- and middle-income countries; have acquired knowledge and practical skills as to how these problems can be assessed; and gained insights into a number of different multi-sectoral approaches to address these problems.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
MIPH5219 International Health Project Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Mu Li Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture per week for 10 weeks; 1x1 day workshop; 1x1hr tutorial per week for 8 weeks; 1x1 day peer learning session through group presentations. Assessment: 1x 40minutes group presentation (20%), peer evaluation on group participation (15%), 1x group written assignment (40%) and 1x 1000 word individual assignment (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Effective international health projects management contributes to the achievement of health and development in developing countries. The Unit aims to give students a good understanding of the concepts and key elements of project design and evaluation, and to demonstrate tools and techniques used in effective project management at different stages. A detailed step by step application of the Logical Framework Approach (LFA) in project design will be presented, including stakeholder analysis, problem and objective analysis, and the logframe matrix. The Unit also gives students an opportunity for hands-on practice through the design of a project in an international setting and allows them to consider the challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management. The key topic areas covered include: concepts and principles of international project management; context and situation analysis; the LFA for project design; project management functions including managing information, resources, risk, quality and change; and project monitoring and evaluation. At the end of the course, students should be able to: identify the key aspects of the LFA to project design; develop a project proposal in international settings; recognise challenges and practical issues faced by people involved in international health project management; and apply a systematic approach to project planning and management in international settings.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
NTDT5608 Public Health and Community Nutrition

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBA Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4 hrs lectures and 2 tutorials per week Prerequisites: NTDT5601, NTDT5503, NTDT5604 and NTDT5602 Corequisites: NTDT5305 and NTDT5307 Assessment: 2 hr exam (45%); 4 assignments (55%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study introduces students to the concepts and principles underlying, and issues associated with, nutrition in community and public health contexts. It covers the principles of health promotion and teaches the students how to plan, implement and evaluate nutrition promotion strategies. The scope and distribution of chronic diseases and the role of nutrition in the etiology of diseases such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes and obesity is examined. This unit of study also investigates the food habits of culturally and linguistically diverse groups, nutritional intakes and requirements of people across the lifespan, and the current nutrition policies and guidelines aimed at preventing chronic diseases.
Textbooks
Lawrence M & Worseley (eds). Public Health Nutrition - from Principles to Practice. Sydney: Allen & Unwin. 2007.
NURS5094 Principles of Chronic Disease Management

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: distance education/intensive on campus, up to 4 study days Assessment: online activities and project and assignment (100%) Campus: Mallett Street Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit of study will evaluate the burden and impact of chronic diseases on Australian society, and the local and international chronic disease models and programs that have been developed. Students will explore the principles of chronic disease prevention and management, including relevant evidence-based decision-making processes and practices, the concepts of self-management, and coordinated, quality care. The National Health Priority Areas of arthritis and musculoskeletal conditions, asthma, cancer control, cardiovascular health, diabetes mellitus, injury prevention and control, mental health, and obesity will be examined from both population and personal illness experience perspectives. Unit content will be informed by person-centred, interdisciplinary approaches to care and service delivery as these relate to the management of chronic conditions.
PSYC5011 Applying Models of Health Behaviour

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 one hour lecture and two hours of tutorials per week Assessment: Tutorial participation (10%), presentation of intervention (40%), write up of intervention (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
The student will be given the opportunity to develop an intervention based on social cognitions models. The process can be followed from start to finish allowing the individual to utilise knowledge and skills gained in other units of study. It is an intended outcome for students enrolled in the MApplSc (HealthPsych) that students can demonstrate an understanding of the key models and theories in Health Psychology which are seen by many to be the foundations of the subject area. The aim of this unit of study is to allow students to identify an area of Health Psychology where an intervention would be appropriate, review existing literature on the topic, formulate the intervention, and evaluate the intervention on a pilot level.
PUBH5010 Epidemiology Methods and Uses

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x 1hr lecture and 1x 2hr tutorial per week for 13 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Prohibitions: BSTA5011 Assessment: 1x 4page assignment (30%) and 1x 2.5hr supervised open-book exam (70%). For distance students, it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Evening or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On
This unit provides students with core skills in epidemiology, particularly the ability to critically appraise public health and clinical epidemiological research literature. This unit covers: study types; measures of frequency and association; measurement bias; confounding/effect modification; randomized trials; systematic reviews; screening and test evaluation; infectious disease outbreaks; measuring public health impact and use and interpretation of population health data. It is expected that students spend an additional 2-3 hours preparing for their tutorials.
Textbooks
Webb, PW. Bain, CJ. and Pirozzo, SL. Essential Epidemiology: An Introduction for Students and Health Professionals Second Edition: Cambridge University Press 2011.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan and Professor Petra Macaskill Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: 1x4 page assignment (30%) and 1x2.5hr open-book exam (70%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Evening or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5019 Cancer Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monica Robotin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3hr per week online lectures, discussion and other activities for 13 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 Assessment: 2 assignments (65%), 5 online tutorials (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to provide students with specific information on the concepts, methods and applications underpinning cancer prevention and control at population level. It is designed to address specific educational needs of students in various programs within the School of Public Health and to offer a broad-based perspective on cancer control, ranging from primary prevention, screening and early intervention, tertiary prevention and palliative care. Emphasis will be given to cancers with the greatest impact at population level and where evidence demonstrates that policies and interventions are capable of reducing cancer incidence, mortality, prolonging survival and improving quality of life. Although focusing on specific Australian conditions, the information will be presented in the context of regional cancer control efforts. At the completion of the unit, students will be equipped with the basic tools to design, plan, implement and evaluate cancer control programs in Australia or their own countries.
Textbooks
Readings will be available on the eLearning site for this unit.
PUBH5020 Chronic Disease Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Monica Robotin Session: Semester 1 Classes: 24 hrs online lectures; 12 hrs online discussion Prerequisites: PUBH5010 Assessment: assignments (70%), on-line tutorials (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This course offers a broad-based integrated perspective on chronic disease prevention. The course reviews the epidemiology of selected chronic diseases with the highest impact at population level in Australia (cardiovascular diseases; cancer; chronic lung disease; diabetes and chronic renal disease). The information will focus on Australian settings, but presented within the context of a regional perspective of chronic disease prevention.
Teaching will focus on the interrelationships between the biological and epidemiological aspects of chronic diseases, the interplay between determinants of health and chronic disease, and the balance between high risk and population based strategies for reducing disease burden, and exploring their applicability to disease prevention. Students will be involved in evaluating the effectiveness of different prevention strategies and will examine the role of health policy in developing effective and sustainable chronic disease management programs in different settings (in Australia and the region).
Textbooks
Readings will be available on the eLearning site for this unit
PUBH5024 Obesity and Health Promotion

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Louise Hardy Session: Int August Classes: 2.5 one-day workshops including participation in small group work during the workshop. Prerequisites: PUBH5010, PUBH5033 and PUBH5020 Prohibitions: PUBH5021 Assumed knowledge: Core MPH content, especially health promotion/disease prevention and epidemiology Assessment: Workshop participation and small group work presentation (30%) and 1x written assignment (2000 words) (70%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit will build on introductory public health core units of study, and apply them to consideration of global obesity as a public health problem. The unit will develop students' skills in national level, international and global approaches to obesity monitoring, prevention programs and policies, extending research methods, critical appraisal skills, introductory health promotion and disease prevention in MPH. Students will develop an understanding of surveillance systems to monitor obesity, and develop skills in evidence based obesity prevention interventions in diverse social, cultural and community contexts. The course will include discussions of policies and international approaches to obesity prevention, as part of global non-communicable disease prevention and control.
Textbooks
Pre-readings will be provided
PUBH5025 Physical Activity and Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman Session: Int August Classes: Compulsory attendance at 2 x 1 day workshops, followed by two weeks on line discussion. Prerequisites: PUBH5010, PUBH5033, (PUBH5031 or QUAL5005) Prohibitions: PUBH5022 Assumed knowledge: Content of Core MPH electives noted as prerequisites Assessment: Attendance and participation at workshop (10%), participation in two weeks on-line discussion (10%), 1x written assignment (1500-2000 words) (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This course will build on introductory public health core units of study and apply them to an examination of physical activity and public health. The epidemiological and other evidence for health and social benefits and reasons for activity will be considered, as well as evidence-based strategies and settings for increasing physical activity at the population level. The course will consider the differences between local level 'exercise programs' and large scale public efforts, and develop an understanding of policy and advocacy as applied to physical activity promotion.
Textbooks
Bauman, A., Bellow, B., Vita, P., Brown, W., Owen, N. Getting Australia Active I: towards better practice for the promotion of physical activity. National Public Health Partnership. Melbourne, Australia, March 2002 ISBN: 0-9580326-2-9
PUBH5026 Mass Media Campaigns & Social Marketing

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan; Professor Adrian Bauman (coordinators), Assoc Prof Tom Carroll Session: Int August Classes: face-to-face/ on-campus 2-day residential workshop (lectures, workshops, small group sessions, and student participation and presentations) + 2 weeks of online discussions Prerequisites: PUBH5033 Assumed knowledge: Training in research methods epidemiology is advised but not essential. Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (70%); in class participation and participation in 2 weeks on-line discussion (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit focuses on mass-reach public health campaigns used to promote health and prevent disease. Building on introductory Masters of Public Health units of study in health promotion/disease prevention [or equivalent], this unit describes the rationale for mass-media led campaigns, social marketing interventions, and how they fit into a comprehensive approach to population health promotion and chronic disease prevention. The major themes covered are the principles of mass-reach communications in public health; designing campaigns [formative evaluation]; developing public health campaigns as part of comprehensive health promotion; understanding the messages, branding and marketing of campaigns; process and impact evaluation of campaigns; the differences between campaigns and social marketing initiatives; and the role of ancillary and supportive health promotion strategies, including media placement and advocacy. The Unit will equip students with skills to plan, design, implement and evaluate public health campaigns.
Textbooks
Course readings will be provided before the workshop. These are required readings, and there is some individual student preparation required for presentation at the workshop and for the on-line two weeks discussions.
PUBH5027 Intro - Public Health Program Evaluation

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman, Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 day residential workshop in semester 2 Prerequisites: completion of core MPH units is recommended [but not essential] Assessment: in class participation (20%) and one 1500 word assignments at the end of the unit (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit of study is taught over two days of residential workshop and is an introduction to Public health program evaluation principles. It builds on core MPH methods subjects, but extends learning objectives to develop skills in practical and applied public health and health promotion program planning, evaluation and research methods. Both qualitative and quantitative methods will be used in program evaluation discussions, but the major focus will be on measuring the implementation of programs, and assessing program impact. There is an emphasis on evaluating 'real world' programs that address chronic disease prevention and health promotion, but other broad public health content areas will also be used as examples. The unit comprises four areas of discussion, including the [i] principles of evaluation; [ii] research designs and methodological issues for community and applied public health settings; [iii] methods for measuring program impact and outcomes; and [iv] the principles of research translation and dissemination. Attendance at the two days of residential teaching is compulsory for participants.
Textbooks
Recommended: Bauman A, Nutbeam D. Evaluation in a Nutshell. McGraw Hill Sydney (2nd Edition, 2013)
PUBH5030 Public Health: Achievements & Challenges

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Hudson Birden Session: Int March Classes: Available in block mode (2 day workshop) or online. Assessment: 1500 word assignment (70%), online discussions (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This unit provides a critical overview of foundational aspects of public health, introducing fundamental concepts and conceptual and historical contexts through which to view contemporary issues in public health. The unit begins with a review of human health status through history and the changing roles and major challenges that drove development of modern public health theory and practice. It then provides an overview of contemporary challenges in public health policy and program development through exposure to leading commentators, activists and theoreticians on public health. It culminates with an anticipation of major problems that public health practitioners will be challenged with over the near future (5-20 years).The particular problems of societal inequities and inequalities as drivers of health status, and the importance of multi-disciplinary approaches to contemporary health problems are addressed.
PUBH5031 Introductory Qualitative Methods

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jo Lander; Dr Clare Hooker Session: Semester 1 Classes: This unit can only be studied by distance through recorded lectures, readings and online discussion. Prohibitions: QUAL5005, PUBH5500 Assessment: Short answer questions (15%), 1 x 1500 word critical appraisal essay and checklist (85%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Note: This Unit is only available to students who enrolled in KF000 Graduate Diploma in Public Health or KC052 Master in Public Health prior to 2013 and is a compulsory core unit for those degrees. It cannot be taken concurrently with PUBH5500 or QUAL5005. PUBH5500 or QUAL5005 may be substituted for PUBH5031.
This unit aims to give a basic introduction to qualitative research and how it differs from quantitative research. It presents 3 data collection techniques (interviews, focus groups, observation) used in qualitative research and demonstrates their relevance to public health issues. It introduces basic qualitative analysis and critical appraisal of qualitative research articles. Learning is largely self- directed with some online discussion.
PUBH5032 Making Decisions in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Gillespie, Professor Kirsten Howard Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-day workshop; fully online version available Assessment: Written assignment of 2000 words (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This unit introduces students to the methods by which evidence is translated, used and abused when governments make decisions affecting public health. Students will become familiar with the main tools used by health economists and policy analysts. The unit will emphasize the role of different forms of evidence and values for priority-setting and policy-making.
Unit technical content is unified by common themes and case studies. Students will apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples (including specific indigenous health issues) to critically consider the role of economic evidence in health decision-making in Australia.
Students will then use policy analysis methods to critically examine the Australian health care system and decision-making in public health. The unit will pay particular attention to questions of power and equity, including the position of indigenous peoples. Finally, it will look at how evidence is framed and used in decision-making.
Teaching will make use of contemporary case studies so students learn how technical analytical tools are used in practical examples of policy development, decision-making and public debate.
The unit gives public health students an essential basic knowledge of both disciplines (health economics and health policy) and lays the groundwork for more advanced studies.
PUBH5033 Disease Prevention and Health Promotion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philayrath Phongsavan Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 workshops, face-to-face tutorials and online discussion; fully online version available Assessment: 1x1500 word assignment (25%); 1x2500 word assignment (45%); online discussion participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
This core unit of study will provide students with an introduction to and critical overview of evidence-based prevention and health promotion as a fundamental component of efforts to address chronic disease prevention and reduce health inequalities in populations. The unit is divided into three modules: (i) principles underlying disease prevention and health promotion, (ii) evidence-based planning disease prevention and health promotion programs, and (iii) implementing and evaluating health promotion programs for disease prevention. The unit will illustrate the principles of prevention and health promotion programs in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander and non-Aboriginal populations. It will develop students' skills in: identifying problems and setting prevention priorities; planning and implementing programs, and; evaluating the impact of programs on population health. The unit will address diverse disease prevention and health promotion programs, including individual change programs, interpersonal (family, social environments), organisational (worksites, primary care), and community-wide programs. Students will develop an understanding of approaches used to enhance inter-sectoral action, community participation and consultation, the development of partnerships and the use of policy and advocacy. These approaches will be particularly applied to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health promotion settings.
Textbooks
Course Readings Provided
PUBH5034 Public Health Capstone

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alexandra Barratt, , Dr Philayrath Phongsavan, Dr Jo Lander Session: Semester 2 Classes: One 1-day workshop plus self-directed project Prerequisites: PUBH5010 and PUBH5018 and PUBH5030 and PUBH5033 and (PUBH5500 or QUAL5005 or PUBH5031) Corequisites: PUBH5032 Assessment: project product (70%), literature review (20%) reflective diary (10%). All assessments are compulsory. Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
Note: This unit of study is an elective for students commencing in 2013. It is a core unit for Masters students who commenced in 2010, 2011 or 2012.
This unit provides students with an opportunity to draw together and integrate their learning in the four aspects of Public Health - knowledge, values, action and outcomes -and apply these to a practical project. A one-day workshop and a study guide will prepare students for this task. Students will be expected to complete a task which illustrates how a public health problem can be analysed and an appropriate response formulated. Students may design a simple study and complete an ethics application, prepare a ministerial briefing paper or develop a health promotion evaluation plan. Students will also complete an assessable literature review and an online reflective journal.
PUBH5040 Practice Placement in Public Health

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alexandra Barratt, Dr Jo Lander Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b,Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: Self-directed work placement with supervision and mentoring provided by the host institution and the School of Public Health Prerequisites: 48 credit points of MPH, including core units Assessment: Placement proposal (20%), reflective journal (10%), supervisor report (30%), project or portfolio (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study is only available to students who commenced their Public Health studies from 2010 onwards. It is available only to students with a weighted average mark of 75% or more in the first 24 credit points completed, and satisfactory placement project proposal. If you wish to undertake a placement this should be discussed with the unit coordinator well before the start of the Semester in which the placement is to be undertaken.
This unit gives high-achieving students who have completed their MPH and have an average weighted mark of 75% or more in their first 24 units of coursework the opportunity to undertake a supervised work placement in a Public Health institution. Places are limited and selection of candidates will be based on academic merit. During this placement you will undertake a project which will make a useful contribution to the workplace. Your project proposal, the project or portfolio itself and your reflection on your progress towards it will form part of your assessment for the unit.
The placement will consist of a minimum of 216 hours' work in a practice placement, that is approximately 6 weeks' full-time work (or equivalent part-time work). Initially placements will only be possible in Australia, although this may change in the future. The Public Health institutions would normally be located outside university environments. Examples include NSW Department of Health Public Health Units or Health Promotion Units, government supported agencies such as the Sax Institute and Family Planning NSW, and non-government organisations such as NSW Cancer Council or advocacy groups.
PUBH5041 Practice Placement in Public Health 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alexandra Barratt, Dr Jo Lander Session: Semester 1,Semester 1a,Semester 1b Classes: Self-directed work placement with supervision and mentoring provided by the host institution and the School of Public Health. Prerequisites: 48 credit points of MPH, including core units Assessment: Placement proposal (20%), reflective journal (10%), supervisor report (30%), project or portfolio (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study is only available to students who commenced their Public Health studies from 2010 onwards. It is available only to students with a weighted average mark of 75% or more in the first 24 credit points completed, and satisfactory placement project proposal. If you wish to undertake a placement, this should be discussed with the unit coordinator well before the start of the Semester in which the placement is to be undertaken.
This unit gives high-achieving students who have completed their MPH and have an average weighted mark of 75% or more in their first 24 units of coursework the opportunity to undertake a supervised work placement in a Public Health institution. Places are limited and selection of candidates will be based on academic merit. During this placement you will undertake a project which will make a useful contribution to the workplace. Your project proposal, the project or portfolio itself and your reflection on your progress towards it will form part of your assessment for the two related units (PUBH5041 and PUBH5042).
The placement will consist of a minimum of 216 hours' work in a practice placement, that is approximately 6 weeks' full-time work (or equivalent part-time work). Initially placements will only be possible in Australia, although this may change in the future. The Public Health institutions would normally be located outside university environments. Examples include NSW Department of Health Public Health Units or Health Promotion Units, government supported agencies such as the Sax Institute and Family Planning NSW, and non-government organisations such as NSW Cancer Council or advocacy groups.
PUBH5042 Practice Placement in Public Health 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Alexandra Barratt, Dr Jo Lander Session: Semester 2,Semester 2a,Semester 2b Classes: Self-directed work placement with supervision and mentoring provided by the host institution and the School of Public Health. Prerequisites: 48 credit points of MPH, including core units and PUBH5041 Assessment: Supervisor report Part 2 (20%); project or portfolio (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Professional Practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: This unit of study is only available to students who commenced their Public Health studies from 2010 onwards. It is available only to students with a weighted average mark of 75% or more in the first 24 credit points completed, and satisfactory placement project proposal. If you wish to undertake a placement, this should be discussed with the unit coordinator well before the start of the Semester in which the placement is to be undertaken.
This unit gives high-achieving students who have completed their MPH and have an average weighted mark of 75% or more in their first 24 units of coursework the opportunity to undertake a supervised work placement in a Public Health institution. Places are limited and selection of candidates will be based on academic merit. During this placement you will undertake a project which will make a useful contribution to the workplace. Your project proposal, the project or portfolio itself and your reflection on your progress towards it will form part of your assessment for the two related units (PUBH5041 and PUBH5042).
The placement will consist of a minimum of 216 hours' work in a practice placement, that is approximately 6 weeks' full-time work (or equivalent part-time work). Initially placements will only be possible in Australia, although this may change in the future. The Public Health institutions would normally be located outside university environments. Examples include NSW Department of Health Public Health Units or Health Promotion Units, government supported agencies such as the Sax Institute and Family Planning NSW, and non-government organisations such as NSW Cancer Council or advocacy groups.
PUBH5101 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x 4000 word written report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students negotiate with a public health staff member to be their supervisor on an agreed project. The student or supervisor informs the Unit co-ordinator, who emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit permission to allow the student to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to systematically complete a self-directed project in one of the main content areas of the course. Students should contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project.
PUBH5102 Special Project in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Assessment: 1x 2000 word written report (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students negotiate with a public health staff member to be their supervisor on an agreed project. The student or supervisor informs the Unit co-ordinator, who emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit permission to allow the student to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to systematically complete a self-directed project in one of the main content areas of the course. Students should contact an academic staff member associated with the area of their project and negotiate the details of the project design and the method and frequency of contact with the supervisor during the project.
PUBH5111 Environmental Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Geoff Morgan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Mixed mode of 13 online lectures and 6 face-to-face/online case studies (13 sessions of 2 hours) . All the content for the unit can be completed online if necessary. Assessment: 1x written assignment (45%), 1x quiz (40%) and case study participation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
The unit will explore the major categories of environmental health hazards including air quality, water quality, food safety, chemical hazards (eg contaminated sites), physical hazards (eg noise and radiation), and microbiological hazards (eg Legionnaires' disease). Regional and global issues of sustainability, climate change and land use planning will also be covered. The unit aims to develop an understanding of environmental health hazard identification and risk assessment, as well as the principles of hazard regulation and control. The disciplines of epidemiology, toxicology and ecology will be used to characterise risks associated with environmental hazards and determine risk management options and risk communication strategies. Students completing this unit will appreciate the multi-disciplinary nature of environmental health issues and the need to work closely with commonwealth and state health and environment agencies as well as other government agencies including local government.
Textbooks
Environmental Health (Third Edition). Moeller DW. Harvard University Press;
PUBH5114 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2 Classes: : 13 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and/or associated readings and online activities. The teaching sessions are a combination of a one day face-to-face workshop and online seminars. Students unable to attend face-to-face sessions can do the entire course online. Prohibitions: PUBH5115 Assessment: 2 x 1500 word assignments (60%), compulsory online discussion participation (30%); online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for prevention and management of related problems. This fuller drug and alcohol elective covers all the content of PUBH5115 and goes on to assist the student to develop more advanced skills in research and in management of clinical services in relation to alcohol and drug use disorders, and to examine the needs of special populations.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5115 Alcohol, Drug Use and Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Carolyn Day Session: Semester 2a Classes: 7 weeks of 2hr teaching sessions and associated online activities. The teaching sessions are a combination of face-to-face and online seminars. Students unable to attend face to face sessions can do the entire course online. Prohibitions: PUBH5114 Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment (60%); compulsory online discussion participation (30%); online quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus or On-line
This unit aims to assist students in developing an evidence-based understanding of the epidemiology of alcohol and drug use and its impact on health, and the effectiveness of methods for the prevention and management of related problems.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5116 Genetics and Public Health

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Cust Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1x 3 day workshop Assessment: 3x 30min online quiz (20%), small group assignment (30%) and take home exam of 6 questions (250 words each) (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit caters for practitioners, policy and decision-makers, students and researchers in public health, public policy, journalism, law, epidemiology, medicine, science, industry, ethics, philosophy, communication and advocacy. It gives a basic introduction to genetics and genetic epidemiology and covers issues like genetic determinants of disease, genetic testing and screening, psychosocial, legal and ethical aspects of genetics and genetic testing, genetic education and genetics and public policy.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site.
PUBH5117 Communicable Disease Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Grant Hill-Cawthorne Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 x 2hr online lecture and 2hrs online group discussion per week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 (or equivalent) Assessment: online discussion and other online activities (20%), online quiz (10%), and 2 x 2000 word written assignments (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This fully online unit aims to provide students with an understanding of the burden of communicable diseases of public health significance in Australia, as well as the biology, epidemiology and surveillance for and control of those communicable diseases. By the end of this unit, the student will have the theoretical background to take up a position as a member of a Communicable Diseases section of a Commonwealth or State Health Department or Public Health Unit. It is expected that the students undertake an extra hour per week of reading, research and preparation for discussion.
Textbooks
Recommended: Heymann. David L. (2008): Control of communicable diseases manual. American Public Health Association. Other readings provided on the course eLearning site.
PUBH5118 Indigenous Health Promotion

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2day workshop, 7 weeks x 2 hr lectures Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (70%), workshop and class participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Despite the many positive political, social and legal advances that have taken place in Australian society, it is impossible to ignore the fact after more than 200 years of colonisation, the gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous health outcome continues to be unacceptably wide. Using a health promotion framework, the unit will provide students with an opportunity to increase their understanding of the history and culture of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It is hoped that students will utilise this understanding to develop more congenial and productive relations with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in the community, and within the spheres of their chosen professions. During the unit students are encouraged to examine factors that determine health, to analyse the major factors that influence Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health outcomes, and the relationship between these factors. The course will provide opportunities to discuss and identify strategies to address the health disparities between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians.
Textbooks
Course reader will be provided.
PUBH5205 Decision Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Martin, Professor John Simes, Ms Hanna Carter Session: Semester 2b Classes: Six 2 hour sessions (comprising lectures and practical activities) Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and PUBH5010 Assumed knowledge: Recommended: PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation Assessment: 1 x quiz (20%) and 1 written assignment (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit examines quantitative approaches to public health and clinical decision-making. Topics of study include: decision trees and health related utility assessment; incorporating diagnostic information in decision making; sensitivity and threshold analysis; and application of decision analysis to economic evaluation. Sessions 3-4 include a practical component using decision analysis software. Exercises are set at the end of most sessions and are reviewed at the start of the following session. Readings are also set after most sessions. Preparation time for each session is 1-2 hours. An assessment quiz is held during the fifth session followed by a computing practical.
PUBH5206 Controlled Trials

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Martin, Ms Liz Barnes Session: Int August Classes: 2x 1day workshops Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Assessment: 1x2hr multiple choice and short answer exam (40%), 1x take home question exam (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit introduces the principles underpinning the design and conduct of high quality clinical trials to generate good evidence for health care decision making. The topics include clinical trial design, randomization, sample size, measures of treatment effect, methodological issues, trial protocols, and ethical principles. The unit is delivered over 2 full days via formal lectures followed by practical sessions. Lecture notes will be provided.
Textbooks
Recommended: Keech A, Gebski V, Pike R. Interpreting and reporting clinical trials: a guide to the CONSORT statement and the principles of randomised controlled trials. Sydney: Australasian Medical Publishing Company; 2007
PUBH5208 Screening and Diagnostic Test Evaluation

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Germaine Wong Session: Semester 2a Classes: 1 x 2hr seminar or 2hr of online discussion per week for 7 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 Assessment: 1x 1000 word critical appraisal (30%) and 1x 1500 word final assignment (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit is designed to further develop concepts covered in the Epidemiological Methods Unit for those students seeking more detail on screening and diagnostic tests. It will cover a wider range of topics than clinical medicine alone. At the end of this unit, participants should be able to: 1. Understand the basic concepts of screening and diagnostic tests 2. Understand the sources of biases in diagnostic test evaluations 3. Critically appraise relevant articles on screening and diagnostic tests 4. Understand the principles and current approaches to population-based screening 5. Translation of current evidence of screening in clinical practice The unit is based on weekly discussion of material provided in the unit workbook, session outlines and pre-reading. Students will be encouraged to contribute examples for discussion. This unit is offered in online/distance mode primarily. Face-to-face tutorials may also be offered.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5211 Multiple Regression and Stats Computing

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr per week for 13 weeks. This unit may be undertaken in face to face or online/distance mode. Students studying in distance mode must have access to a computer running a version of Microsoft Windows compatible with the latest version of SAS. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Assessment: 1x 4 page assignment (30%) and 1x 10 page assignment (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
This unit covers simple and multiple linear regression; one-way analysis of variance to compare more than 2 groups; analysis of covariance to compare groups adjusting for confounders; testing for effect modification; calculating adjusted means; strategies for selecting the 'best' regression model; examination of residuals; regression to the mean; associated SAS programming. Each topic is covered by a 1 hour statistics lecture, a 1 hour SAS lecture, a 1 hour SAS practical and a 1 hour statistics tutorial to discuss the interpretation of the results. Each fortnight there is an exercise on the material covered in the statistics lecture. The SAS practical allows the necessary computing to answer the questions for the statistics tutorial the following week. The assignments will involve practical analysis and interpretation of a data set and between 10% and 20% of the marks for each assignment are for the SAS computing program.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5212 Categorical Data Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Petra Macaskill Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture, 5 x 1hr lectures, and 5 x 1hr tutorials over 6 weeks. Also available online - such students must have access to a computer running Microsoft Windows. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page report (30%) and 1x 8 page report (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
In this unit the biostatistical concepts covered in earlier units are extended to cover analysis of epidemiological studies where the outcome variable is categorical. Topics of study include: testing for trend in a 2 x r contingency table; the Mantel-Haenszel test for the combination of several 2 x 2 tables, with estimation of the combined odds ratio and confidence limits; multiple logistic regression; Poisson regression; modelling strategy. The assignments will involve practical analysis and interpretation of categorical data. Data analyses will be conducted using statistical software (SAS).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5213 Survival Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Tim Schlub Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 1hr lecture and 1 x 1hr tutorial per week for six weeks both face to face and distance mode. Students studying in distance mode must have access to a computer running Microsoft Windows. Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page assignment (20%) and 1x 10 page assignment (80%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
During this unit, students learn to analyse data from studies in which individuals are followed up until a particular event occurs, e.g. death, cure, relapse, making use of follow-up data also for those who do not experience the event. This unit covers: Kaplan-Meier life tables; logrank test to compare two or more groups; Cox's proportional hazards regression model; checking the proportional hazards assumption; sample size calculations for survival studies. For each topic participants are given some material to read beforehand. This is followed by a lecture, then participants are given one or two exercises to do for the following week. These exercises are discussed in the tutorial at the next session before moving on to the next topic. That is, in most weeks the first hour is a tutorial and the lecture is given in the second hour. Participants are expected to run SAS programs in their own time. Preparation time for each session is 2-3 hours. The assignments both involve use of SAS to analyse a set of survival data.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5215 Introductory Analysis of Linked Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Judy Simpson Session: Int June,Int November Classes: block/intensive mode 5 days 9am-5pm Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or BSTA5011) and (PUBH5211 or BSTA5004) Assessment: Workbook exercises (30%) and 1x assignment (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit introduces the topic of linked health data analysis. It will usually run in late June and late November. The topic is a very specialised one and will not be relevant to most MPH students. The modular structure of the unit provides students with a theoretical grounding in the classroom on each topic, followed by hands-on practical exercises in the computing lab using de-identified linked NSW data files. The computing component assumes a basic familiarity with SAS computing syntax and methods of basic statistical analysis of fixed-format data files. Contents include: an overview of the theory of data linkage methods and features of comprehensive data linkage systems, sufficient to know the sources and limitations of linked health data sets; design of linked data studies using epidemiological principles;construction of numerators and denominators used for the analysis of disease trends and health care utilisation and outcomes; assessment of the accuracy and reliability of data sources; data linkage checking and quality assurance of the study process; basic statistical analyses of linked longitudinal health data; manipulation of large linked data files; writing syntax to prepare linked data files for analysis, derive exposure and outcome variables, relate numerators and denominators and produce results from statistical procedures at an introductory to intermediate level.The main assignment involves the analysis of NSW linked data, which can be done only in the School of Public Health Computer Lab, and is due 10 days after the end of the unit
Textbooks
Notes will be distributed in class.
PUBH5224 Advanced Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly lectures and tutorials for 13 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 Assessment: 1x 4000 word assignment (or equivalent answers to specific methodological questions) (70%), 1x 1500 word assignment or equivalent class presentation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
This unit of study is intended for students who have completed Epidemiology Methods and Uses (or an equivalent unit of study) at a credit or higher level. It is designed to provide students with an opportunity to consolidate critical appraisal skills, to acquire the practical knowledge and skills needed to design epidemiological research, and to extend students' theoretical knowledge of epidemiology beyond basic principles.
PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kirsten Howard Session: Int Sept Classes: 2x 2day compulsory workshops Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. This unit covers: principles of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation. The workshops consist of interactive lectures, class exercises and case history analyses.
Textbooks
A course manual will be provided to each student.
PUBH5307 Advanced Health Economic Evaluation

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Kirsten Howard Session: Int October Classes: 1 x 2day workshop Prerequisites: PUBH5018 and PUBH5010 Corequisites: PUBH5205 and PUBH5302 Assessment: 1x written assignment (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aims of this unit are to provide students with an understanding of the concepts, application and analytical techniques of more advanced methods of health economic evaluation and with practical working knowledge of how to conduct economic evaluations using stochastic and deterministic data. This unit will focus on students developing the hands-on skills of conducting economic evaluations, included detailed practical instruction in the use of decision analytic software such as TreeAge and Excel. The format will be in face to face workshops with lectures followed by computer based exercises directly relating to the lectures. The broad topic areas covered are: 1) analysis of health outcomes including survival and quality of life measures 2) analysis of costs 3) economic modeling, including conduct of sensitivity analyses (one way, multi-way and probabilistic sensitivity analysis) and 4) presenting and interpreting results of cost effectiveness analyses.
PUBH5308 Health Workforce Policy Analysis

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Deborah Schofield, Michelle Cunich Session: Int October Classes: 1x 2day workshop Assessment: Assignment on a selected health workforce policy analysis topic (100%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
The unit will examine the major components of health workforce planning in Australia. The Australia health workforce context will be considered (including total workforce size, payment mechanisms and employment arrangements) and the processes by which health workforce planning is influenced through government policy and workforce data translated and integrated with policy and planning explored. The framework for future labour force planning will be discussed. Current health workforce issues such as adequacy of the workforce, ageing of the workforce, the distribution of the workforce, professional registration, and special needs communities will be addressed. Approaches to planning for an adequate workforce and evaluating the quality of evidence on models of care will be examined including practical examples.
Textbooks
Australia's Health Workforce, Productivity Commission Research Report, 2005 Available at: http://www.pc.gov.au/study/healthworkforce/finalreport/index.html
PUBH5309 Translational Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Emeritus Professor Jack Dowie, Professor Glenn Salkeld Session: Semester 2b Classes: Weekly on-line Assessment: Multiple Choice Questions [MCQ] and creation of an original Annalisa Decision Aid construct (30%), 1500-2000 word Report (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
Translational Health introduces the main existing translational methods and models in healthcare, most of which focus on 'knowledge translation' and 'bringing evidence into practice', i.e. on moving results from the basic sciences through clinical and public health science and guidelines into clinical and public health decision and policy making. Most of these models diagnose the problem of 'loss in translation' in terms of institutional and professional barriers and blocks along the translation pathways. While acknowledging these, Translational Health focuses on the modelling method - the 'language' and 'vocabulary' - most likely to perform the translation task effectively in relation to patient-centered practice. The technique underlying the method is Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis (in contrast to conventional Decision Analysis) and the template for its practical implementation is the Annalisa 2.0+ software. It is shown how high quality clinical and public health decision making needs to be based on 'values translation' as well as 'knowledge translation'. And how the approach can facilitate the desirable 'backwards translation' to ensure research is practice-relevant in both content and format. Students choose from a set of topics within which to pursue the principles, follow empirical examples and develop their own analyses in a practicum.
PUBH5414 Public Health Advocacy

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Simon Chapman Session: Int Sept Classes: 1 x 2 day workshop Assessment: 1x letter to the editor of a newspaper (10%) and 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to familiarise students with the strategies of public health advocacy and to provide skills in content and discourse analysis of media coverage of health and medical issues. This unit covers the role of media advocacy in advancing public health policy; framing public health issues; news gathering, reporting and editing; strategies for media advocacy; political lobbying in public health advocacy. Teaching and learning activities include interactive lectures, case studies and small group work. Students will be expected to prepare for the sessions. Requirements will be distributed prior to the first day.
Textbooks
(recommended only)
PUBH5415 Injury Prevention

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Rebecca Ivers Session: Int October Classes: 1 x 2day workshop Assessment: 1 x 2000 word essay (90%) and participation in small group work during the workshop (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit aims to provide students with a clear understanding of the magnitude of the injury burden, both in higher and lower income countries, and the strategies that are required to address this burden. This unit will cover: injury definitions, measurement and surveillance; risk factor identification; intervention strategies and their evaluation; advocacy; cause-specific injury topics. During the 2 day workshop, guest speakers will outline issues relevant to the general injury prevention field and students will participate in interactive small group work which will focus on issues relevant to cause-specific injuries, in collaboration with guest contributors.
Textbooks
Students will be provided with a course manual. Recommended text: McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004.
PUBH5416 Vaccines in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rob Menzies, Dr Aditi Dey Session: Semester 2 Classes: Preparatory online lectures and 1x 2day workshop at the Children's Hospital Westmead Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or PUBH5018 Assessment: 2x short online quizzes (10%) plus 1x 2000 word assignment (90%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
Note: Students who have not done the core units of study in epidemiology (PUBH5010) or biostatistics (PUBH5018) but have previous demonstrable experience in these study areas will be required to request permission from the unit of study coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Permission is required to ensure that students have a basic grounding in epidemiology and biostatistics. The coordinator emails the Postgraduate Student Administration Unit to advise whether or not the student has permission to enrol.
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of immunisation principles, the impact of vaccination on the epidemiology of vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs), how to assess the need for new vaccines and how to implement and monitor a new vaccination program. This unit covers the history and impact of vaccination; basic immunological principles of immunisation; surveillance of diseases, vaccination coverage, vaccine effectiveness and adverse events; vaccine scares; risk communication; immunisation in the developing country context; assessing disease burden and new vaccines. Learning activities include short online preparatory lectures and a workshop with interactive lectures and small group case studies.
PUBH5417 Injury Epidemiology Prevention & Control

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Lisa Keay Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures and moderated discussions over 13 weeks (workload 6-8hr/week) Assessment: 1x 4000 word assignment (60%) and participation in two moderated online discussions (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This one-semester online unit teaches students about the principles of injury epidemiology, prevention and control. It provides a basis for the assessment and investigation of injury issues and the development, implementation and evaluation of injury prevention programs. The unit will cover: injury measurement and classification (descriptive methods); risk factor identification (analytic methods); evidence-based interventions for injury prevention; priority setting in injury control; injury prevention policy; strategies in injury control; implementing strategies in injury control; program evaluation in injury prevention; injury and Indigenous Australians and an international perspective on injury. During this unit, students will: gain an understanding of the epidemiology of injury, including the burden of injury, injury surveillance, methods for estimating the frequency and severity of injury, and methods for identifying risk factors; gain an understanding of the theories underpinning injury prevention and illustrate their application; develop an appreciation of the process of priority setting in injury, the design and implementation of injury prevention interventions, and the principles and conduct of evaluations.
Textbooks
Lecture notes, case studies and journal articles will be provided online from a password-protected site. Recommended text:. McClure R, Stevenson M, McEvoy S. The Scientific Basis of Injury Prevention and Control. Melbourne: IP Communications, 2004.
PUBH5418 Tobacco Control in the 21st Century

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Simon Chapman Session: Int August Classes: 1x3 day workshop of lectures and problem-focused discussions, followed by 4 weeks of problem-based online discussions Assessment: 2x 2000 word essays (60%), 1x 100 item online quiz (10%) and online discussion and participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
The unit consists of learning topics, each of which is supported by extensive Web based resources, and 4 moderated online discussion forums, each focusing on a problem related to tobacco use and control. Lecture topics include: history of tobacco use and control; the burden of illness from tobacco use; secondhand smoke: the research evidence; measuring tobacco use, uptake and cessation in communities; international trends in tobacco consumption; the tobacco industry; the WHO's Framework Convention on Tobacco Control and new forms of tobacco advertising and promotion. Problem focused discussion forums include: Harm reduction and tobacco control, regulation of tobacco, improving and implementing pack warnings; promoting smoking cessation, prevention of uptake (youth programs); denormalisation of the tobacco industry; controlling advertising; and controlling exposure to tobacco smoke, making news on tobacco and influencing political policy on tobacco.
Textbooks
(recommended only)
PUBH5419 Falls Prevention in Older People

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Cathie Sherrington and Dr Anne Tiedemann Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6-8 hours of online lectures and tutorials per week for 13 weeks Assessment: 1x 2000 word written assignment (60%), 1 x assignment with "short answer" questions (20%), participation in moderated online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: On-line
This fully online unit aims to teach students about the principles of falls prevention in the older person with an emphasis on the application of these principles in the field. This unit will focus on risk factors for falls and the development, implementation and evaluation of fall prevention programs. Students will learn about and discuss research methods for the understanding of, prediction of, and prevention of falls, critically evaluate journal articles, and discuss the development of fall prevention programs using case studies.
Textbooks
Recorded lectures, lecture notes, case studies and journal articles will be provided online from a password-protected site
PUBH5420 Public Health Advocacy Strategies

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Becky Freeman Session: Semester 2b Classes: 2 full days followed by 3 weeks of online Assessment: 2500 word essay (70%), online participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit builds on content from Public Health Advocacy PUBH5414. Students will have the opportunity to critique and analyse case studies from a variety of both successful and unsuccessful public health advocacy examples. There will be an emphasis on how online environments and social media tools are contributing to public health advocacy debates and campaigns. Recent examples of how online media have influenced health policy and programming will be presented. Students will examine and prepare writing for online media such as news, blogs, and social media. The lectures will include guest speakers from non-government organisations, government and other experienced stakeholders from across the public heath sector.
Textbooks
Recommended: Chapman S. (2007) Public Health Advocacy and Tobacco Control: Making Smoking History. Oxford: Blackwell.
PUBH5421 Infection Prevention in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical Professor Lyn Gilbert Session: Semester 2 Classes: block mode (2 x 3days) plus on-line tuts/discussion Assumed knowledge: Basic understand of medical microbiology and communicable disease epidemiology (e.g undergraduate degree in medicine, nursing, biomedical science etc.) Assessment: 2x2000 word essays/assignments (2x30%) 2x short answer question exams - ~150 word answers for each of 5 questions (2x15%) participation in on-line discussions (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit will provide students with an understanding of the individual and societal risks of healthcare-associated infections (HAI) and the rationale for, and barriers to, their prevention and control (PC). A basic understanding of medical microbiology and communicable disease epidemiology will be assumed. The unit will cover such important concepts as: ethical and economic implications; psychological, behavioural, cultural and professional influences; the varying roles, responsibilities and perspectives of clinicians, health support staff, administrators, patients and the community; potential uses and implications of new technology (such as information and decision support systems, electronic medical records and highly discriminatory microbial strain typing, including whole genome sequencing) in HAI surveillance. The course will also address the rationales and strategies for implementation of HAI-related policies, such as hand hygiene, aseptic technique and antimicrobial stewardship, and some reasons for and consequences of failure to implement them, for individual patients, the health system and the community.
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow, Dr Claire Hooker Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block / intensive - 5 days (1 x 3 days; 1 x 2 days) Online activities Assessment: Assignment 1 x 3000 word (55%), Assignment 2 x 2000 words (35%), Online activities (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
In this unit, students will develop a critical awareness of the determinants of effective communication, particularly in relation to health risks to the individual and to society.
The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement using traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided
PUBH5500 Advanced Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block mode (2 x 3 days) Prohibitions: QUAL5005 Assessment: 1 x practical with 500wd essay (35%); 1 x 2500wd essay (35%); 2 x 500wd short answers (10%, 10%); in-class participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode
This unit of study provides a comprehensive introduction to qualitative inquiry in health. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advanced-level introduction. Workshop One will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research questions can it answer? How can I search for qualitative literature? How do I design a qualitative study? You will learn about interviewing, focus groups and observation; participate in a focus group; and design and conduct your own interview. Workshop Two addresses: How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? How are methodologies and theories used in qualitative research? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will analyse your own interview data; and learn how to make arguments for qualitative research in health. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This advanced Unit will show you a new way of thinking critically about research and researching, and give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
PUBH5906 Dissertation A

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ONLY AVAILABLE TO CONTINUING STUDENTS WHO COMMENCED THEIR CANDIDATURE PRIOR TO 2011. A candidate must have obtained a minimum weighted average mark of 70% in at least 24 credit points of coursework and obtained approval from the course-coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Enrolment must be done through the Faculty or School office. The minimum weighted average mark of 70% must be maintained for the entire 48 credit points of coursework. Assessment: Research treatise Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The treatise gives the student an opportunity to produce a written piece of research work that is supervised by an academic member of staff. The aim is for the student to apply the knowledge and skills developed in their coursework to a particular topic or problem in public health. The student will produce a scholarly piece of written work that is suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. As a general guide, the treatise would be completed in three months (or six months part time). The supervisor will help you select a topic and define the research questions so that the treatise can be completed in this time.
PUBH5907 Dissertation B

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ONLY AVAILABLE TO CONTINUING STUDENTS WHO COMMENCED THEIR CANDIDATURE PRIOR TO 2011. A candidate must have obtained a minimum weighted average mark of 70% in at least 24 credit points of coursework and obtained approval from the course-coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Enrolment must be done through the Faculty or School office. The minimum weighted average mark of 70% must be maintained for the entire 48 credit points of coursework. Assessment: Research treatise Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The treatise gives the student an opportunity to produce a written piece of research work that is supervised by an academic member of staff. The aim is for the student to apply the knowledge and skills developed in their coursework to a particular topic or problem in public health. The student will produce a scholarly piece of written work that is suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. As a general guide, the treatise would be completed in three months (or six months part time). The supervisor will help the student select a topic and define the research questions so that the treatise can be completed in this time.
PUBH5908 Dissertation C

Credit points: 12 Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Prerequisites: ONLY AVAILABLE TO CONTINUING STUDENTS WHO COMMENCED THEIR CANDIDATURE PRIOR TO 2011. A candidate must have obtained a minimum weighted average mark of 70% in at least 24 credit points of coursework and obtained approval from the course-coordinator to enrol in this unit of study. Enrolment must be done through the Faculty or School office. The minimum weighted average mark of 70% must be maintained for the entire 48 credit points of coursework. Assessment: Research treatise Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The treatise gives the student an opportunity to produce a written piece of research work that is supervised by an academic member of staff. The aim is for the student to apply the knowledge and skills developed in their coursework to a particular topic or problem in public health. The student will produce a scholarly piece of written work that is suitable for submission to a peer-reviewed journal. As a general guide, the treatise would be completed in three months (or six months part time). The supervisor will help the student select a topic and define the research questions so that the treatise can be completed in this time.
QUAL5005 Introducing Qualitative Health Research

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 1 Classes: Block/intensive mode (2 x 2 days); This unit can also be studied by distance (11 x weekly online lectures and activities) Prohibitions: PUBH5500 Assessment: 1xpractical with 500-word essay (45%); 1x1500-word essay (40%); online or in class participation (15%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line
Note: This Unit is primarily aimed at Master of Public Health (MPH) students. Other students are encouraged to consider PUBH5500 instead of this Unit. MPH students who complete PUBH5500 can apply for a waiver for QUAL5005
An introduction to qualitative inquiry in health, QUAL5005 is perfect if you're a beginner and want to gain an overview of this research approach. Workshop One addresses: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research questions can it answer? How can I search for qualitative literature? How do I design a qualitative study? You will learn about interviewing, focus groups and observation; participate in a focus group; and design and conduct your own interview. Workshop Two addresses: How do you analyse qualitative data? How are theories used in qualitative research? What is good quality qualitative research? Can I generalise qualitative findings? You will analyse your own interview data; and learn how to make arguments for qualitative research in health. In both workshops you will meet working qualitative researchers and hear about their projects. This introductory Unit will give you the skills and confidence to begin evaluating and doing qualitative research for yourself.
SEXH5008 Sex and Society

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 2a Classes: Semester 2a: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. AusAID students must enrol into the face-to-face version Assessment: written assignment (50%), online quiz (30%), online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
Note: AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version
This unit will explore determinants of sexuality from a societal perspective, with particular reference to their potential impacts on public health. It is available in both online and face-to-face modes. Social science theories of sexuality will be considered, and cross-cultural and historical accounts of sexual practices will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on the impact of diversity, culture, society, environment, life experiences, personal beliefs and health on sexual activity and potential Public Health impacts such as the spread of STIs & HIV. Course content will include diversity; adolescence sexual development; sex education; sexual assault, gender; sexual orientation and sexual behaviour.
SEXH5101 Public Health Aspects of STIs

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 2a Classes: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online; Semester 2a Intensive: compulsory attendance at a teaching day in week 5 and attendance at 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, taken face-to-face for 3 weeks Assessment: written assignment (50%), online quiz (30%), online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Block Mode or On-line or Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day
Note: AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version.
This unit aims to provide a public health perspective of the community impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). It is available in both online and face to face modes. At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand the underlying principles of the surveillance systems used to monitor STIs; the core risk activity groups involved in the transmission of STIs; how the epidemiologies of STIs vary within and between societies; the public health impacts of STIs; and effective preventative strategies at individual and community levels. Course content will include an introduction to the basic biology of STIs; epidemiology and surveillance methods; STI service delivery considerations; STI/HIV interactions, impact of vulnerable at-risk populations; health promotion for STIs; policy approaches and ethical & legal issues.
SEXH5102 Public Health Aspects of HIV/AIDS

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 2a Classes: Session 1b: online only. Session2b: 2 hours of lectures per week, half semester, which can be taken either face-to-face or online. AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version. Assessment: written assignment (50%), online quiz (30%), online discussions (20%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) Day or On-line
Note: AusAID students must enrol in the face-to-face version
This unit aims to provide a public health perspective of the impact of HIV infection. It is available in both online and face to face modes. At the end of this unit, students will be able to understand the underlying principles of the surveillance systems used to monitor HIV infection; the core risk activity groups involved in the transmission of HIV; how the epidemiology of HIV infection varies within and between societies; the public health impacts of HIV infection; and effective prevention strategies. Course content will include an introduction to the basic science of HIV infection; epidemiology and surveillance; sexual blood borne and mother to child transmission; STI/HIV interactions; other methods of transmission; health promotion for HIV; government perspectives and ethical and legal issues.
SEXH5205 Advanced Adolescent Sexual Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Melissa Kang Session: Semester 2 Classes: fully online Assessment: continuous assessment including participation in group discussion, short answer questions, 1000 word assignments plus 2500 word essay or field report. Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: On-line
This unit aims to introduce the constructs of adolescent sexuality, explore the determinants of adolescent sexual health and to discuss the personal and public health implications of adolescent sexuality, with additional emphasis on a deeper exploration of an area of adolescent sexual health that is of particular interest to the student.
At the end of this unit of study, students will be able to describe the biological, developmental and socio-cultural contexts of adolescent sexual health as well as the constructs, challenges and diversities of adolescent sexuality. They will learn techniques used to optimize communication with adolescents and explore legal, ethical and public health implications of adolescent sexuality. They will also understand and describe one area of adolescent sexual health that the student chooses to study in depth from a list of suggestions.
The course is taught fully online using a range of assessments including group discussion, short answer questions and discussions based on case scenarios. It is divided into 6 modules: adolescent sexuality, adolescent sexual health, reproductive health issues in adolescence, diversity, legal and ethical issues and sexual health promotion.
SEXH5405 Contraception and Reproductive Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ellie Freedman, Dr Shailendra Sawleshwarkar Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online plus block/intensive mode 3 days (9am-5pm) at Family Planning NSW, Ashfield. Assumed knowledge: Basic biology Assessment: online discussion (25%), quiz (20%), case discussion (30%), assignment (25%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This course aims to provide students with an understanding of fertility, including hormonal and non-hormonal reversible contraceptive methods, emergency contraception and permanent methods of contraception. At the end of the unit students will be able to:
o Discuss the available options for controlling fertility, including hormonal and non-hormonal reversible contraceptive methods, emergency contraception and permanent methods of contraception.
o Understand the different reproductive health needs of women from adolescence through to menopause.
o Understand the consequences of unintended pregnancy and describe the options available to women; discuss the impact of unsafe abortion in an international context.
o Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of age, culture, tradition, society, personal beliefs, disability and health on contraceptive choices.
o Understand the effect of sexual violence on reproductive health.
Textbooks
Sexual Health and Family Planning Australia. Contraception: An Australian clinical practice handbook. 3rd Edition. Sexual Health and Family Planning Australia, 2012.
SEXH5407 Sex Gender and Sexuality

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Spring Cooper Session: Semester 2 Classes: On-line (1x2hr lecture and 2x1hr group disc and 1x1hr tutorial)/week plus block/intensive mode 4 days 9am-5pm Assessment: 2x Group work tasks (15%, 15%); Quiz (20%); 2x 1500 word Assignments (20%, 20%); Discussion board involvement (10%). Campus: Westmead Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit will provide the student with an understanding of the biological basis of sexual development from foetus to adulthood and the socio-cultural factors that determine their expression; sensitise the student to the terminology of gender discourse and an overview of the range of gender and sexual differences and practices in the community and associated psychosocial issues.
At the end of this unit students will be able to:
(i) Demonstrate an understanding of the terminology used in gender discourse.
(ii) Describe the biology of sexual development from fetus to adolescence and an understanding of the psychological and social factors that influence the process.
(iii) Describe syndromes of atypical sexual development and demonstrate an understanding of the medical, psychosocial and ethical concerns in the management.
(iv) Demonstrate an understanding of the biological, social and psychological factors that influence the expression of gender identity and sexual orientation in the community.
(v) Explore the Social and Psychological issues surrounding gender minorities in the community.
(vi) Discuss the social support systems and needs of gender minorities and their importance to wellbeing and quality of life.
(vii) Evaluate the legal and ethical concerns and problems faced by gender minorities in a global context.
(viii) Identify and prioritise research issues in the area of sex and gender.
Textbooks
Sexuality Now: Embracing Diversity (2009) Third Edition ed Janell L Carroll Thomson Wadsworth.
SEXH5410 Sexual Health Promotion 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Spring Cooper, Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 1 Classes: On-line plus block/intensive mode 3 days 9am-5pm Corequisites: SEXH5401 Assessment: 3 Group work tasks (15%, 15%, 15%); 3 X 1500 word Assignments (15%, 15%, 15%); Participation in online discussion boards (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This course will engage students in learning about evidence-based prevention and health promotion as a fundamental component of efforts to address sexual health. The unit is divided into three sections: (a) theories underlying disease prevention and health promotion, (b) evidence-based planning of campaigns and programs, and (c) health communications and designing messages.
Theories covered will include those that address individual-level change, and group and social level change. Students will learn how to conduct needs assessments, plan programs, and address priority areas.
Textbooks
Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs: A Primer, 5th Edition, authors: James F. McKenzie, Brad L. Neiger, Rosemary Thackeray.
SEXH5412 Sexual Health & Relationships Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr. Spring Cooper, Dr Anthony Santella Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: On-line (2x1hr gp disc)/week 1 block/intensive modes 3 days, 9am-5pm Assessment: Online Discussion (30%); MCQ (20%); Lesson Plan Project (20%); Policy Paper (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit of study will explore the evidence base, implications and considerations when delivering sexual health and relationships education in school and community settings from both Australian and global perspectives.
SEXH5413 Sexual Health Promotion 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anthony Santella, Dr Spring Cooper Session: Semester 2 Classes: On-line (1x2hr lec and 2x1hr gp disc and 1x1hr tute)/week; block/intensive mode 3 days 9am-5pm at Parramatta. Prerequisites: SEXH5410 Assessment: 3 Group work tasks (3x15%) 3 X 1500 word Assignments (3x15%) Participation in online discussion boards (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington Mode of delivery: Distance Education/Intensive on Campus
This unit of study will engage students in learning about evidence-based prevention and health promotion as a fundamental component of efforts to address sexual health. The unit focuses on implementing and evaluating sexual health campaigns and programs.
Theories covered will include those that address individual-level change, and group and social level change. Students will learn how to evaluate programs to ensure effectiveness. Evaluation methodology will include research design and how to measure changes in sexual attitudes and behaviours. Emphasis will be placed on analysis and interpretation of evaluation of data, particularly with regards to how evaluation feeds into research and new intervention design. Effective implementation and dissemination to the scientific community & the broader public will also be critically discussed.
Textbooks
Planning, Implementing, and Evaluating Health Promotion Programs: A Primer, 5th Edition, authors: James F. McKenzie, Brad L. Neiger, Rosemary Thackeray.