Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology)

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise Physiology)

Students complete 192 credit points of units of study, including:
(a) 156 credit points of core units of study listed in the sequence below
(b) 6 credit points of selective units of study. Availability of selectives may vary from year to year.
(c) Optionally, up to 12 credit points of units of study in the Open Learning Environment as listed in Table O in the Interdisciplinary Studies handbook
(d) Additional elective units of study as required, chosen from the:
(i) Selective units listed below
(ii) the Health Sciences Undergraduate Electives Table, or
(iii) from the list of Tables S Electives in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook
The pass course:
(a) is full-time only over 4 years study
Year 1 - core units
EXSS1036 Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kate Edwards Session: Semester 1 Classes: 26-hrs lecture, 4-hrs tutorial and 8-hrs laboratory per semester Assessment: In class tests (3 x 15%) 40 minute MCQ and short answer tests in weeks 3, 6 and 8 and group practical report (15%) and 1.5 hour final written exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The aim of this unit is to provide students with an understanding of the fundamental principles of exercise physiology. This unit will cover the different physiological systems of the human body working at rest and then during exercise. We will cover the functional anatomy and physiology of muscle tissue, the cardiovascular and respiratory systems and understand how oxygen is extracted from the air and is delivered to working muscles. Energy transformation from fuel to mechanical work will be described and finally the mechanisms of fatigue will be discussed. A focus of Fundamentals of Exercise Physiology is the practical application of physiological measurements and critical evaluation of data for physiological understanding.
EXSS1037 Introduction to Exercise Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Helen Parker Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr lecture/wk; 1-hr tutorial/wk; 6-hrs lab/semester Corequisites: EXSS1036 Assessment: Excel worksheets (25%, 5% each worksheet), mid semester exam (45%) and case report (30%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This introductory unit will provide students with skills and understanding of measurement and analysis core to becoming a proficient exercise professional. Students will learn technical skills for exercise data collection, the data handling, calculations and analytical approaches to examining data, and research methods used to collect evidence. Critical thinking approaches will be used to develop skills for assessing quality of evidence in exercise science. A focus of 23 May 2019 Page 5 Introduction to Exercise Science is the development of discrete skills and understanding of their application for accuracy.
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan, Dr Joanna Diong Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures Assessment: Mid semester theory exam (25%), end semester practical exam (50%), end semester theory exam (25%) Practical field work: 2hr practical class/week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 Unit Coordinators are Dr Cliffton Chan and A/Prof Leslie Nicholson, Semester 2 unit coordinator is Dr Joanna Diong
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Online test (5%), mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BMED2403 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 Assessment: Mid semester exam (35%), end semester exam (55%), quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and urinary systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied. Attendance at practical classes iscompulsory. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena. Practical class attendance for this unit is compulsory.
Textbooks
FH Martini, JL Nath, EF Bartholomew: (2014) Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology, 10th edition.
EXSS1038 Principles of Biomechanics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rene Ferdinands Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures: 2 hours per week Practicals: 8 hours per semester Tutorials: 4 hours per semester Assessment: Mid semester exam: MCQ and short answer (40%), final exam: MCQ and short answer (55%), tutorial/practical quizzes (5%) and preliminary mathematics quiz (0%). Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit aims to develop an appreciation of how mechanical principles can be applied to understand the underlying causes of human movement. Topics include: kinematics, vectors, Newton's laws of motion, work, energy, power, and momentum; for both translational and rotational motion; and the influence of fluids on motion. Emphasis is placed on developing mathematical skills and analytical problem- solving techniques. The laboratory classes complement the lectures; providing opportunities to validate mechanical principles in a quantitative manner.
Textbooks
.Hamill J and Knutzen KM (2014) Biomechanical Basis of Human Movement 4th. Ed., Baltimore: Williams and Wilkins.
Year 2 - core units
BIOS3065 Anatomical Analysis of Exercise

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Prof Karen Ginn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture, 2hr practical, tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 and BIOS1169 Assessment: Quizzes (3x10%), mid-semester exam (35%), end semester exam (35%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will extend the student's knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomy by applying functional anatomy principles to the analysis of exercises. Relevant research and advanced knowledge of functional musculoskeletal anatomical concepts will be used to explore exercises designed to: strengthen and lengthen specific muscles; improve muscle coordination; develop dynamic stability; and prevent the development of muscle imbalances that may contribute to musculoskeletal injury. The application of musculoskeletal anatomy principles to increase exercise difficulty and variety will also be explored. This unit will include laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged.
Units of study offered from 2021. EXSS2XXX Movement Analysis, EXSS2XXX Exercise Training:Physiology and Biochemistry, EXSS2XXX Psychology of Exercise & Physical Activity, EXSS2XXX Exercise Delivery & EXSS2XXX Personalised Exercise Prescription
Year 3 - core units
EXSS3062 Motor Control and Learning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2 hrs per week Prerequisites: Completion of 48 credit points Prohibitions: EXSS2025 Assessment: In-class quizzes (5%), group motor learning project video and presentation (15%), group motor learning project written assessment (35%) and final exam (45%) Practical field work: 13 hrs Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides students with a broad overview of motor control and learning with the aim of stimulating students to think about the mechanisms of normal human movement. Both a behavioural and a neurophysiological approach are taken to understand the acquisition and execution of skilled motor actions. The behavioural approach is directed at the structures and processes underlying movement without considering their physical basis, while the neurophysiological approach is directed at the neuromuscular machinery and the functional neural connections that govern movement.
Textbooks
Magill, R.A. and Anderson, D. (2014) Motor Learning and Control: Concepts and Applications. (10th edition). New York: McGraw-Hill.; and Edwards, W.H. (2011). Motor learning and Control: From theory to practice. Belmont, USA; Wadsworth, Cengage learning.
Units of study offered from 2022. EXSS3XXX Physical Activity and Society, EXSS3XXX Practicum in Exercise Science 1, EXSS3XXX Nutrition for Exercise and Health, EXSS3XXX Fundamental Musculoskeletal, EXSS3XXX Practicum in Exercise Science 2, EXSS3XXX Exercise Physiology in Clinical Cases 1.
Year 4 - core units
Units of study offered from 2023. EXSS4XXX Exercise Physiology in Clinical Cases 2, EXSS3XXX Exercise Physiology in Clinical Cases 3, EXSS4XXX Advanced Musculoskeletal, EXSS4XXX Clinical Practice Unit A, EXSS4XXX Clinical Practice Unit B, EXSS4XXX Clinical Practice Unit C & EXSS4XXX Professional Reflections in Exercise Physiology.
Selectives units of study
EXSS1039 Introduction to Body Composition Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 13 x 2 hour lectures, 6 x 2 hour practicals, 1x1 hour practical Assessment: Quizzes (10%) mid-semester exam (20%), practical exam (20%) and final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Measurement or estimation of body composition is frequently undertaken in clinical practice, research studies and sports performance settings. An in depth understanding of the scientific rationale of body composition methodologies and their applications would assist exercise scientists and exercise physiologists to more capably support their clients. This unit would cover laboratory (e. g. air displacement plethysmography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and field methods (e. g. bioelectrical impedance analysis/spectroscopy and anthropometry) of body composition, body composition across the lifespan/gender differences/ethnicity differences, and body composition in health and disease. Anthropometry is the measurement of body dimensions, proportions and composition, and has particular application in health professions such as dietetics and sports science and will be a focus of this unit of study. Along with technical skills, students will also learn about uses and Interpretation of body composition data.
Textbooks
Stewart A, Marfell-Jones M, Olds T and de Ridder H. (2011). International standards for Anthropometric Assessment.Lower Hutt New Zealand: International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry. (Note: an update of this text is imminent)
EXSS1040 Introduction to Strength and Conditioning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jonathan Freeston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture hours: 13 hours Tutorial hours: 6.5 hours Laboratory hours: 19.5 hours Assessment: Strength and Conditioning Program Design (20%), Strength and Conditioning Program Supervision (15%), Strength and Conditioning Program Evaluation Report (30%) and Final Exam (35%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This introductory unit will provide students with fundamental skills and understanding of strength and conditioning practice. Students will learn how to safely and effectively supervise strength and conditioning activities, and to design, implement and evaluate a basic strength and conditioning program.
EXSS3040 Physiological Testing and Training

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Samuel Chalmers Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x2-hr practical for 8 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS2022 Assessment: Mid-semester exam (20%) practical activity report (30%), end semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and practical skills (laboratory and field-based) for the physiological assessment and training of elite athletes. The application of current tests and measurements in sports science together with training theory and practice will be critically reviewed. Special attention will be given to the role of speed, strength and endurance in sports performance. Fundamental questions concerning the nature of the training stimulus, training thresholds, plasticity of muscle, dose-response relationships, detraining and overtraining will be investigated. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies, practical test and measurement skills. On completion of this unit of study students will demonstrate competency within the sports testing environment and a capacity to provide well researched consultancy advice on sports training theory and practice.
EXSS3041 Management, Marketing and the Law

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Mr Dieter Wilhelmi Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, 1hr tutorial on two occasions Assessment: assignment (35%), end semester exam (65%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit presents management, marketing and legal issues that impact on Australian businesses. The management component provides an overview to the key elements in operating a small business within the sport, health or fitness industry. Management concepts that will be covered include business planning, total quality management, operations management, negotiation and leadership. The marketing component introduces marketing strategies such as market planning, market research and market segmentation. All businesses must demonstrate legal compliance. This unit highlights those areas of the law that have particular relevance to businesses operating within the health and fitness industry. Workplace contracts, insurance, sponsorship, consumer protection, liability and legislative obligations (harassment and discrimination) will be discussed. Students will develop an understanding of the various business legal structures and will be able to select an appropriate structure for a business of their choice.
HSBH3014 Workplace Injury Prevention/Management

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mark Halaki Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week and 1x2-hr tutorial or practical/week (Wk -1 to 8) Prerequisites: 48 credit points and (BIOS1168 and EXSS1018) Assessment: Workplace assessment (group task) (40%), quiz (10%), 1x2hr end of semester exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit provides a framework for exploring the role of health professionals in the field of workplace rehabilitation and occupational health and safety, with a focus on work injury prevention and early injury assessment and management. This unit will develop students' knowledge and skills in assessing the physical, cognitive and psychosocial demands of work and explore workplace modifications and functional restorative strategies to assist people with injuries and disability return to meaningful and productive employment. An evidence-based, approach will be used to explore the patterns, causation and management of workplace injury and illness, and associated legislation in NSW. Students will gain an understanding of the principles and practice of ergonomics, workplace assessments and functional evaluations and how these can be applied to the prevention and management of work injuries. To this effect, the role of the health professional as a consultant in the workplace will be discussed.
HSBH2008 Physical Activity and Population Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leigh Wilson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 9 x 2-hr lectures/sem (Wk 2 to 9), 8 x1-hr practical project activity /sem, 4 x1-hr tutorials/sem and 1 x 2-hr prac/sem Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: Individual Project Report (30%), Group Presentation (30%), Final Project report (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to develop an up-to-date critical understanding of the role of physical activity for the health of the population as well as the most promising principles that underpin mass-level physical activity interventions. Students will examine in detail the population's participation patterns and barriers to be physically active and has a primary focus on every-day incidental (non-sporting) physical activity for the prevention of physical and mental chronic disease. The unit is largely multi-disciplinary and it goes beyond disease prevention, to explore themes like positive wellbeing/happiness and maintenance of functional ability and independence to an older age.

This unit takes a lifespan approach and actively promotes an understanding of the direct and distal implications of physical inactivity at each life stage. Particular acknowledgement is given to physical activity as a behaviour that is not merely a lifestyle 'choice' as it is often thought by medicine and other individual-centred disciplines; but rather the outcome of a complex web of societal, cultural, economic, political and individual circumstances that lead to the formation of personal habits across the lifespan.

The entire unit will be largely interactive and will encourage students to discuss, debate, and critically evaluate the evidence, and provides the opportunity to have a project that will assist in future employment. At the start of the unit the students will be provided with an accessible and user-friendly set of skills and tools (e.g. statistics, physical activity measurement) to enable them to make the most of the learning experience.
HSBH3021 Environmental Stress and Physiological Strain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ollie Jay Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-hrs/wk for 9 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS1032 or EXSS2027 or BIOS1170 Assessment: 1x2hr final exam (50%), 4 x lab reports (5% each; 20% total), and 1 x 0.5hr case study oral exam (30%) Practical field work: (4 x 2hr prac)/sem Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and first-hand experience (through laboratory practicals) of how the human body responds to extreme environmental stressors (i.e. high altitude, hyperbaria, extreme heat, extreme cold), and how these conditions alter the capacity of humans to perform physical and mental tasks. Special attention will also be given to the theoretical basis of how these stressors can lead to decrements to human health in the form of injury (e.g. frostibite, heat exhaustion) and illness (e.g. pulmonary/cerebral oedema, actue mountain sickness, 'the bends'). This unit will also focus on how this information can be used to develop therapeutic, pharmacological, and/or technological interventions to improve human functioning in extreme environments and reduce the risk of illness and injury. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies and short practical assignments.
Units of study offered from 2021. EXSS1XXX Fundamentals of Bioenergetics, EXSS2XXX Health Care Professional Skills, EXSS2XXX The body clock and athletic performance, EXSS3XXX Exercise and Cancer, EXSS3XXX Body Composition in Health and Disease, EXSS3XXX Strength & Conditioning for Elite Sports Performance & EXSS3XXX High Performance Sport.