Bachelor of Applied Science/Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Exercise and Sport Science)

Exercise and Sport Science

Bachelor of Applied Science (Exercise and Sport Science)

Students complete 144 credit points, comprising:
(a) 12 credit points of core units of study from Table A
(b) a major (48 credit points) in Exercise Science
(c) a minor (36 credit points) in Physical Activity and Health
(d) optionally, a second minor (36 credit points) or second major (48 credit points)
(e) optionally, up to 12 credit points of elective units from Table O
(f) any additional elective units of study from Table A or Table S to satisfy a total of 144 credit points for the course.

Bachelor of Applied Science / Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Exercise and Sport Science)

Students must complete 192 credit points, comprising:
(a) 12 credit points of core units of study from Table A
(b) a major (48 credit points) in Exercise Science; and
(c) a minor (36 credit points) in Physical Activity and Health; and
(d) a second major (48 credit points) from this table (Table A) or Table S (Shared Pool) in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook
(e) 12 credit points of units of study from Table O (Open Learning Environment) in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook; and
(f) a minimum of 24 credit points at 4000-level from Table A or Table S (Shared Pool) in the Interdisciplinary Studies Handbook, including:
(i) a research, community, industry or entrepreneurship project (12 to 36 credit points); and
(ii) any additional elective units of study from Table A or Table S required to make up the 192 credit point total

Bachelor of Applied Science / Bachelor of Advanced Studies (Exercise and Sport Science) with Honours

Students complete the requirements for the pass degree, and
(a) at least 36 and a maximum of 48 credit points of additional Honours units at 4000 level or above, including:
(i) an Honours research project of at least 12 and a maximum of 36 credit points, and
(ii) at least 12 and a maximum of 36 credit points of Honours coursework, as required
(iii) Honours subject areas and units of study for honours within the Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences are listed in Table A for the relevant faculty or Table S (Shared Pool) in the Interdiscplinary Studies Handbook.

1000-level units of study

Degree core
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan, Dr Joanna Diong Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures Assessment: Mid semester theory exam (25%), end semester practical exam (50%), end semester theory exam (25%) Practical field work: 2hr practical class/week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 Unit Coordinators are Dr Cliffton Chan and A/Prof Leslie Nicholson, Semester 2 unit coordinator is Dr Joanna Diong
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Online test (5%), mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.

Electives

Electives for the degree may be selected from Table A (below) or Table S
EXSS1039 Introduction to Body Composition Methods

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 13 x 2 hour lectures, 6 x 2 hour practicals, 1x1 hour practical Assessment: Quizzes (10%) mid-semester exam (20%), practical exam (20%) and final exam (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Measurement or estimation of body composition is frequently undertaken in clinical practice, research studies and sports performance settings. An in depth understanding of the scientific rationale of body composition methodologies and their applications would assist exercise scientists and exercise physiologists to more capably support their clients. This unit would cover laboratory (e. g. air displacement plethysmography, dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry) and field methods (e. g. bioelectrical impedance analysis/spectroscopy and anthropometry) of body composition, body composition across the lifespan/gender differences/ethnicity differences, and body composition in health and disease. Anthropometry is the measurement of body dimensions, proportions and composition, and has particular application in health professions such as dietetics and sports science and will be a focus of this unit of study. Along with technical skills, students will also learn about uses and Interpretation of body composition data.
Textbooks
Stewart A, Marfell-Jones M, Olds T and de Ridder H. (2011). International standards for Anthropometric Assessment.Lower Hutt New Zealand: International Society for the Advancement of Kinanthropometry. (Note: an update of this text is imminent)
EXSS1040 Introduction to Strength and Conditioning

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jonathan Freeston Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lecture hours: 13 hours Tutorial hours: 6.5 hours Laboratory hours: 19.5 hours Assessment: Strength and Conditioning Program Design (20%), Strength and Conditioning Program Supervision (15%), Strength and Conditioning Program Evaluation Report (30%) and Final Exam (35%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This introductory unit will provide students with fundamental skills and understanding of strength and conditioning practice. Students will learn how to safely and effectively supervise strength and conditioning activities, and to design, implement and evaluate a basic strength and conditioning program.
Additional elective units of study to be offered from 2021. Availability of units of study may vary from year to year.