Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Therapy)

Occupational Therapy

Bachelor of Applied Science (Occupational Therapy)

Students complete 192 credit points of units of study comprising:
(a) 156 credit points of core units listed in the sequence below; and
(b) 36 credit points of elective units, including
(i) a minimum of 6 credit points from the Behavioural or Social Sciences, refer to table on this page.
(ii) 6 credit points from the Biomedical Sciences, refer to table on this page.
The pass course:
(a) is full-time only over 4 years study
[[b||Note:]] All Occupational Therapy students must complete the relevant pre-placement requirements prior to all work integrated learning or fieldwork placements.

Year 1

Semester 1 - Core units
BIOS1168 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Cliffton Chan, Dr Joanna Diong Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures Assessment: Mid semester theory exam (25%), end semester practical exam (50%), end semester theory exam (25%) Practical field work: 2hr practical class/week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 Unit Coordinators are Dr Cliffton Chan and A/Prof Leslie Nicholson, Semester 2 unit coordinator is Dr Joanna Diong
This unit of study introduces the basic concepts in musculoskeletal anatomy prior to a more detailed study of the gross anatomical structure of the upper limb as it relates to functional activities. Students will also study the histological structure of musculoskeletal tissues and surface anatomy of the upper limb. Material will be presented in lectures, practical sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
HSBH1007 Health Science and Research

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rowena Forsyth Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: HSBH2007 Assessment: Group assessment (30%), written individual assignment (30%), 1x1.5-hr exam (40%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The unit of study introduces students to key research paradigms in health, and to the major approaches to designing and evaluating research in health. Students will be introduced to key concepts of qualitative and quantitative methodology including research ethics, research design and research methods.
Textbooks
Wilson, L. & Black, D. (2013). Health, science research/research methods HSBH1007 and BACH2410. Sydney: McGraw Hill.
OCCP1096 Understanding Occupation-People-Context

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Celine Diaz Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week and self-directed learning Assessment: Video demonstration and related report (50%), viva (30%) and weekly reading tasks (20%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Understanding people's occupations in context and the importance of occupation to their health and well-being is fundamental to all areas of occupational therapy practice. In this unit, students will develop the skills and knowledge needed to collect and organise information about individuals' engagement in occupations within their various contexts from their perspectives. They will use a client-centred perspective to explore participation in day-to-day activities, investigate various theoretical perspectives of human occupations, develop the therapeutic communication skills to discover where, when, how and why people engage in occupations, and examine the contextual and personal factors that affect occupational choices and participation in occupations.
OCCP1097 Analysing Occupations and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joanne Hinitt Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: Written report (35%), referencing list (20%), Exam (45%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The ability to analyse occupations, roles, activities, tasks and the environment is a core occupational therapy competency. Categories of activity which occupational therapists may observe and analyse include: self-care, mobility, domestic, social, educational, play, leisure, economic, and community. Using various methods of analysis, students will develop the skills to observe and analyse activities performed by children, youth and adults. In doing so, students will learn: How do I determine what enables (and hinders) people's participation in and performance of activities? How do I measure and summarise a person's time use? How do I identify environmental factors that influence people's performance in activities? How might I structure and adapt activities to enable performance, regardless of a person's health condition?
Semester 2 - Core units
OCCP1098 Teaching Occupations and Performance

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yu-Wei Ryan Chen Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lecture/week, 1hr tutorial/week, and self-directed learning. Assessment: Case-based learning portfolio (50%); final exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Whether in working in partnership with one person or a group of people, teaching and learning is a fundamental, collaborative process applicable to all areas of occupational therapy practice. The unit applies principles of evidence based practice in relation to teaching and learning in occupational therapy. Students will develop proficiency using a range of processes to facilitate people's engagement in activities and routines in everyday life. In doing so, students will answer the following questions: How do I help people learn to perform activities and develop new routines where they live, work and play? What specific methods do I use to foster learning within different contexts? How do I best consider the learning process for persons with or without health conditions?
OCCP1099 Occupational Performance: Healthcare 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Celine Diaz Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assessment: Case study report (50%) and practical exam/VIVA (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many adults experience difficulty performing daily activities and require interdisciplinary team services in a hospital setting. Occupational therapy services can help enhance, restore, or maintain performance in self-care, mobility, and other primary activities necessary to return to and live in the community. Mindful of a client-centred approach, students will acquire basic assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills relevant for adults within physical healthcare contexts such as an acute hospital, and begin assuming the role occupational therapists perform within healthcare teams. In doing so, students will learn: What occupational therapy processes do I use when a person's performance of self-care and mobility activities is significantly challenged? Within physical health care settings, how do I help enhance, restore, or maintain performance in daily life activities of concern? How do I incorporate a client-centre approach within healthcare systems?
OCCP1100 Professional Practice I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Celine Diaz, Dr Merrolee Penman Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop based flexible delivery (3 hours per week) Assessment: Group presentation (30%), individual assignment (70%), fieldwork assessment (Pass/Fail). Students must pass the practical work component of this unit as assessed on the fieldwork assessment in order to gain a pass for this unit. Practical field work: Practice education placement totaling a minimum 40 hours. Students may be allocated to placement outside of the semesters during semester breaks. Students are required to attend all defined mandatory classes and placement sessions to meet the expected overall program requirement of 1000 practice education hours. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: This unit of study includes a work integrated learning placement. Students must be aware of and complete all pre-placement requirements.
Establishing a professional identity and integrating and applying theory to practice are essential to occupational therapy service provision. This unit will focus on professionalism in preparation for practice in all areas. Additionally, students will develop an understanding of occupational therapy strategies implemented across diverse areas, develop essential core teamwork skills and elements of professional communication (written and verbal) skills, and cultivate a professional approach to work. Students will participate in supervised practical experience equivalent to 40 hours. This can occur outside of the semesters during semester breaks.
Elective
Elective (non-OT) [6] (see note 1), refer to table on this page.

Year 2

Semester 1 - Core units
HSBH1003 Health, Behaviour and Society

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Mairwen Jones and Dr Nicole Wedgwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prohibitions: BACH1130 or BACH1132 or BACH1133 or BACH1134 or BACH1161 or BACH1165 Assessment: Sociology in-class test (20%), Psychology group class presentation (20%), Weekly quizzes on Sociology and Psychology (10%), 2-hr end of semester exam (Sociology and Psychology) (50%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces you to areas of psychology and sociology relevant to health and wellbeing and is an important component of your professional degrees. The unit aims to develop a 'sociological imagination', which is a quality of mind that will be used to prompt you to question common-sense assumptions regarding health and wellbeing. You will also gain familiarity with some key areas of contemporary psychology. The unit will introduce you to tools which will be useful for understanding and practicing in health and wellbeing, by helping you to understand the lives of those people you will help through your work.
Textbooks
Germov, J (2018), BACH1161 Second Opinion: An Introduction to Health Sociology , Melbourne: Oxford University Press.
OCCP2085 Occupational Performance: Home and Family

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Sandi Lightfoot-Collins Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x1hr lecture week, 1x2hr tutorial/week Assumed knowledge: OCCP1099 Assessment: Written Assignment (50%); Written Assignment and Technical Drawings (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many adults who experience challenges performing day-to-day activities could benefit from services in order to continue living in the community. Occupational therapy is useful to enhance, restore, or maintain performance of and participation in self-care, mobility, domestic, social, and leisure activities within the home. Paying particular attention to the typical social context (family) within which people live, students will further develop assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills relevant to the performance of daily life activities within the home. In doing so, students will learn: Within a home context, how do I best provide occupational therapy services from a client-centred perspective? How do I involve families when focusing on the performance of day-to-day activities within the home? How might home environments be modified to enhance safety and performance of everyday activities? How do I convey the conceptual design in both a graphic and written manner, and conform to required legislation and funding body requirements?
This unit of study builds on units such as OCCP1099: Occupational Performance: Healthcare I, to extend students' knowledge of occupational therapy practice beyond the hospital setting.
Textbooks
No specific textbook is required for this unit.
OCCP2086 Professional Practice 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Merrolee Penman Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture seminar/week Prerequisites: OCCP1099 and OCCP1100 Assessment: Individual assessment (40%), final exam (60%) and fieldwork assessments (Pass/Fail). Students must pass the practical work component of this unit as assessed on the fieldwork assessment in order to gain a pass for this unit. Practical field work: Practice education placement totaling a minimum 80 hours incorporating clinical simulation on campus, embedded in the unit. Students are required to attend all defined mandatory classes and placement sessions to meet the expected overall program requirement of 1000 practice education hours. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: This unit of study includes a work integrated learning placement. Students must be aware of and complete all pre-placement requirements.
Professional practice involves problem solving, professional reasoning and collaborative teamwork. This unit continues the focus on professional development in preparation for practice across all areas. During the semester, students will further develop their understanding of how professional reasoning informs the occupational therapy process, along with their professional therapeutic and teamwork communication. Students will participate in supervised fieldwork experiences in a simulated health care setting.
OCCP2088 Occupational Performance: Child and Family

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yu-Wei Ryan Chen Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/week, 1x1hr tutorial/week Assessment: In-tutorial test (20%), written assessment (30%), final exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
For children, youth, and families living in the community and who experience performance challenges, occupational therapy is useful to enhance, restore, or maintain participation in day-to-day activities. Integrating an understanding of childhood development with family-centred practice, students will develop specific assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills to promote participation in day-to-day activities from infancy through childhood. In doing so, students will learn: How do I provide occupational therapy within a family context? How can I promote quality in life through participation in everyday occupation? How do I consider the complex interaction of a person's capacity (physical, emotional and cognitive functioning) with environmental factors whilst focusing on the performance of activities of concern to families?
Semester 2 - Core units
BIOS1171 Neuroscience

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jin Huang, Dr Alan Freeman Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3 hours of lectures per week, 2 hours of practical classes per week, with a small online component Prohibitions: BIOS1137 or BIOS2103 or ANAT2010 Assessment: Mid-semester examination (40%), end-semester examination (60%) Practical field work: 2 hours per week Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Semester 1 coordinator is Dr Jin Huang, Semester 2 coordinator is Dr Alan Freeman
This unit of study introduces fundamental concepts of nervous system organisation and function. Anatomy of the brain and spinal cord is studied using models to understand the cortical and subcortical pathways as well as integrating centres that control movements and posture. The physiology component introduces students to mechanisms of signal generation and transmission, basic mechanisms of spinal reflexes, the function of the sensory systems and autonomic nervous system and motor pathways. Case studies aimed at identifying simple neural problems associated with sensory and motor systems are specifically designed for students following professional preparation degrees. This unit includes a few laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied. Successful completion of practical class quizzes is compulsory.
OCCP2084 Occupational Performance: Healthcare 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Justin Scanlan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week, equivalent of 2hr tutorial/week Assessment: Written report (50%), oral assessment (50%) and group facilitation skills competencies assessment (Pass / Fail) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many adults experience significant challenges performing daily life activities due to mental illness or other psychosocial issues, and need interdisciplinary team services within mental health (and other psychosocial) settings. Occupational therapy can enhance, restore, or maintain performance and participation in daily routines and activities, enabling individuals to return to and live in the community. Mindful of a client-centred approach, students will acquire basic assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills relevant for adults within mental health and psychosocial contexts and begin assuming the role occupational therapists perform within healthcare teams. Students will learn: What assessments, intervention and evaluation processes do occupational therapists use when a person's routines and daily activities are challenged due to the effects of a mental illness or other psychosocial issues? Within mental health settings, how do I help enhance, restore, or maintain performance in daily life activities of concern? How do I incorporate a client-centred approach within healthcare systems? How can groups be used to support individuals to overcome the impacts psychosocial issues to promote satisfying and health-promoting occupational engagement.
OCCP2087 Occupational Performance: Community

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joan O'Donnell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1hr lecture/week, 2hr tutorial/week Assessment: Community Access and Participation Workbook (50%) and written exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many adults experience challenges participating in community, social and civic activities. These individuals may benefit from occupational therapy services to enhance, restore, or maintain participation in environments outside the home. Considering a broad community context, students will further develop their assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills relevant to activities such as transportation or shopping. In doing so, students will learn: How can I advocate for and promote people's participation in activities within their local communities?
Elective (non-OT) [6] (see note 1), refer to table on this page.

Year 3

Semester 1 - Core units
OCCP3061 Professional Practice IIIA

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Merrolee Penman Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: Placement Preparation and debriefing Prerequisites: OCCP1096 and OCCP1097 and OCCP1098 and OCCP1099 and OCCP1100 and OCCP2084 and OCCP2085 and OCCP2086 and OCCP2087 and OCCP2088 and BIOS1168 Assessment: Practice education placement minimum of 36hrs/week for 7 weeks. Students are required to attend all preparation and debriefing classes and placement sessions to meet the expected overall programme requirement of 1000 practice education hours. Practical field work: Placement 40hrs/week for 7 weeks. Students are required to attend all preparation and debriefing classes and placement sessions to meet the expected overall program requirement of 1000 practice education hours. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive August
Note: This unit of study includes a work integrated learning placement. Students must be aware of and complete all pre-placement requirements.
To become a competent occupational therapy practitioner, students need to be able to integrate theory and practice in context and become skilled in applying the occupational therapy process for an agreed caseload. Continuing to build on OCCP1100 Professional Practice I and OCCP2086 Professional Practice II, all of which focus on professional development in context, students will participate in a seven-week, supervised full time experience within a professional service setting.
OCCP3065 Professional Practice IIIB

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Merrolee Penman Session: Intensive August,Intensive May Classes: Placement preparation and debriefing Prerequisites: OCCP1096 and OCCP1097 and OCCP1098 and OCCP1099 and OCCP1100 and OCCP2084 and OCCP2085 and OCCP2086 and OCCP2087 and OCCP2088 and BIOS1168 Corequisites: OCCP3061 Assessment: Fieldwork assessment (Pass/Fail) Practical field work: Fieldwork assessment (Pass/Fail) Compulsory placement-related assessment tasks (Satisfactory/ unsatisfactory) including Continuing Professional Development (CPD) plan, SPEF-R midway and final reflection, Peer Learning and Participation in the Learning Community. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive August
Note: This unit of study includes a work integrated learning placement. Students must be aware of and complete all pre-placement requirements.
To become a competent occupational therapy practitioner, students need to be able to integrate theory and practice in context and become skilled in applying the occupational therapy process for an agreed caseload. Continuing to build on OCCP1100 Professional Practice I, OCCP2086 Professional Practice II and OCCP3061 Professional Practice IIIA, all of which focus on professional development in contexts, students will participate in a seven-week, supervised full time experience within a professional service setting.
Semester 2 - Core units
OCCP3076 Occupational Performance: Education

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Joanne Hinitt Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hrs lecture/week, 1-hr tutorial/week and self-directed learning Assessment: Written Assessments (60%) Practical Skills Portfolio (40%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Many children and young people experience challenges engaging in activities associated with school and other educational contexts. Occupational therapy can help to enhance, restore, or maintain children's participation in school-related activities, and prepare for a transition to adulthood. Integrating an understanding of human development and educational systems, students will develop the assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills to promote the school performance of children and youth. In doing so, students will be able to answer the questions: How do I provide occupational therapy services that are collaborative and consider the concerns of all involved? How do I assist educational systems to provide an inclusive environment that promotes participation for all children and youth?
OCCP3077 Occupational Performance: Productivity

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jo Lewis Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3-hrs lecture/ tutorial/or seminar per week, self-directed learning Assessment: Workplace Assessment Report (40%), e-poster (40%), participation activities (20%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Some youth and adults experience challenges when engaging in productive (work and volunteer) activities. Occupational therapy can help to enhance and restore performance, and maintain participation in remunerative employment and related activities. Integrating an understanding of organisational systems with client-centred practice, students will develop the assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills to promote participation in economic and civic activities. In doing so, students will learn: How do I provide occupational therapy within employment and related contexts? How do I promote a person's productivity, given the complex demands of work activities, an individual's capacities, and opportunities available within the environment?
OCCP3078 Occupational Performance: Retirement

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sanetta Du Toit Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lecture/week, 1x2hr tutorial/wee, occasional workshops and site visit. Assessment: Practical tutorial group activity (40%), individual written reflective assignment (20%), case study-based Viva (40%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Older adults may experience challenges participating in day-to-day activities during their retirement years. Occupational therapy can enhance, restore, or maintain performance of daily life activities, help to prevent future challenges from occurring, and assist older adults to continue ageing in place or in assisted living environments within community contexts. In this unit of study students will take an evidence-based approach to occupational therapy service provision and develop occupational therapy assessment, intervention, and evaluation skills specific to older adults. In doing so, students will learn: How do I provide occupational therapy for older adults from a client-centred perspective? How do I promote quality of life and wellbeing through continuing engagement in day-to-day activities?
Elective (non-OT) [6] (see note 1), refer to table on this page.

Year 4

Semester 1 - Core units
OCCP4087 Health Promotion Through Occupation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gwynn Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2-hr workshop/week, 1-hr tutorial/week for 13 weeks Prerequisites: OCCP3065 Assessment: Written critical reflection (20%), presentation (small group) includes peer review (20%), major written project (small group) includes peer review¿ web based (45%), 3 x preparatory reading quizzes (5% each; total 15%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study critically examines the theoretical foundations and processes of working with communities in order to develop competencies for enabling occupation and promoting health and well-being at a community level. Students will gain knowledge on theories of community development and health promotion. Students will learn and apply community development tools to each stage of the occupational performance practice process. Enablement skills required for intervention at the level of the community will be explored and students will gain knowledge of ethical frameworks to support professional decision-making when working with communities. This unit of study develops the capacity of students to participate in the development of emerging roles for occupational therapy practice with communities and develops competence for working cross-culturally. It includes a specific emphasis on working with Indigenous Australians.
WFOT Minimum Standards for the Education of Occupational Therapists require critical reflexivity to develop knowledge, confidence, and the ability to work within a human rights framework. Student will explore both of these skill sets. This unit also aims to support the new (2019) Australian Occupational Therapy Competency Standards which require occupational therapist to specifically acknowledge the need to enhance their cultural responsiveness and capabilities for practice with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples.
Three Electives (OT or non-OT) [18] (see note 1), refer to table on this page.
Semester 2 - Core units
OCCP4088 Professional Practice IV

Credit points: 18 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Merrolee Penman Session: Intensive August,Intensive March Classes: Placement preparation and debriefing Prerequisites: OCCP3061 and OCCP3065 Assessment: Fieldwork assessment (Pass/Fail) Compulsory placement-related assessment tasks (Satisfactory/unsatisfactory) including Continuing Professional Development (CPD) plan, peer review of CPD, SPEF-R midway reflection, Interprofessional Learning activities, and Participation in the Learning Community. Practical field work: Practice education placement 40hrs/week for 8 weeks. Students are required to attend all preparation and debriefing classes and placement sessions to meet the expected overall programme requirement of 1000 practice education hours. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Professional practice
Note: Department permission required for enrolmentin the following sessions:Intensive March
Note: This unit of study includes a work integrated learning placement. Students must be aware of and complete all pre-placement requirements.
Integrating theory and practice in context and becoming skilled in the application of the occupational therapy process is essential for meeting requirements for registration as an occupational therapist. Building on OCCP1100 Professional Practice I, OCCP2086 Professional Practice II and OCCP3061/OCCP3065 Professional Practice IIIA/IIIB, this unit concludes the focus on professional development in context with students responsible for a caseload approximating up to 80% of that expected of a new graduate in that specific position. Students will participate in an eight-week, supervised fulltime experience within a professional service setting.
OCCP4089 Evaluation in Professional Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kim Bulkeley Session: Semester 2 Classes: Workshop style delivery (approximately 6 days on campus) with associated self-study learning modules, or online equivalent Prerequisites: OCCP4087 Assessment: Quiz (25%), discussion board posts (20%), individual report (55%), Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
Working as a professional requires a high degree of autonomy, a dedication to life-long learning, a capacity to work in partnership with others, and an ability to reflect on the quality of one's practice and service delivery. This unit of study emphasises the role of evaluation and outcome measurment as a component of evidence-informed occupational therapy practice. Students will learn how to evaluate the process and outcomes of services, how to select, appraise, and apply outcome measurement in a practice context when evaluating outcomes of occupational therapy services. Students will develop skills for designing and disseminating program evaluation plans to contribute to monitoring, and evaluation for practice improvement.
Textbooks
Fawcett, A.J.L. (2007). Principles of assessment and outcome measurement for occupational therapist and physiotherapists: Theory, skills and application. Chichester, England: John Wiley and Sons (Call no 615.82.FAW - electronic copy also available).

Electives

(i) Students are required to complete 36 credit points of electives over the course of the degree.
(ii) a minimum of 6 credit points must come from the Behavioural or Social Sciences (or equivalent)
(iii) a minimum of 6 credit points must come from the Biomedical Sciences (or equivalent).
(iii) Otherwise, students may choose from Health Sciences elective units of study, as well as Occupational Therapy elective units of study listed below.
(iv) Students may also take broader University electives, with permission

Occupational Therapy Electives

OCCP4079 OT in Learning and Co-ord Difficulties

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/P Chris Chapparo Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hrs lecture/week Prerequisites: OCCP3076 Assessment: portfolio 3000wd (50%), Case based report 5000wd (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will provide opportunities for students to study the impact of learning difficulty on childrens' home and school occupational performance. During the semester, students will study: various explanations of difficulty with learning; common assessment procedures used by occupational therapists to identify problems; and interventions. The focus will be on direct intervention as experienced in private practice occupational therapy for children, and consultation with schools. Students will be required to have access to one typical child aged between 5 and 8 years for practical work throughout the semester.
OCCP4080 Upper Limb and Hand Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/tutorial per week and independent study. Prerequisites: OCCP1099 and BIOS1168 Assessment: Orthotic mastery demonstration and experiential report (50%), Case study report (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Weekly attendance is mandatory
Students will develop knowledge and skills required to provide therapy for people whose occupational performance is compromised by impairments in the upper limb and hand. Causes of impairments include disease, disorders and conditions that affect the peripheral and central nervous system, bones and joints and connective tissues. Skills developed will include orthotic prescription and fabrication, task-embedded joint mobility and muscle strengthening methods and use of oedema and scar management techniques. Students will learn to clearly articulate the theoretical and evidence-based rationale for interventions selected
OCCP4082 OT in Work Injury Prevention and Rehab

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jo Lewis Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hr lecture/tutorial/week Prerequisites: OCCP3077 Assessment: Work Health and Safety Portfolio (50%), Rehabilitation Report (30%), Case Conference Viva (20%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study will give students the opportunity to advance their assessment, intervention and professional communication in the area of workplace health and safety, rehabilitation and other areas of private practice, where there is a strong focus on client and customer centred services. Students will practice work health and safety assessments through hazard identification, risk assessments and development of an intervention plan in an industry. In this unit, students will conduct a functional assessment, as well as develop their communication skills, needed to negotiate and collaborate with other health professionals and stakeholders in this area of practice. Students will also refine their written communication skills to be able to produce professional reports. In all areas of this unit, there will be a focus on students articulating their clinical reasoning and justification in decision making.
OCCP4083 Mental Health Interventions

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nicola Hancock Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3hr workshop style lecture / week, and weekly online independent preparation tasks Prerequisites: OCCP2084 Assessment: Ten in-class quizzes (30%), written assessment (70%) and attendance requirements Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This elective unit will extend students' knowledge and skills in occupational therapy mental health practice. A large experiential learning component will build student confidence in working collaboratively with people living with mental illness to identify their needs and to use both occupational therapy specific and generic mental health strategies to support their mental health recovery. In line with current state and national directions, the unit will focus on trauma-informed care, well-being and recovery-oriented practice. We will cover adolescent, youth and adult mental health practice across acute, rehabilitation, community and forensic contexts.
Textbooks
Literature provided in class and within unit of study outline
OCCP4085 People with Intellectual Disability

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Kim Bulkeley Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr lecture/ week Prerequisites: OCCP3065 Assessment: Open book exam (28%), reading responses (27%) and fieldwork project report (45%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge, skill and attitudes about people with intellectual disability, with a focus on participation and support needs. Students will study three modules: Module 1 - Foundational concepts including: conceptions of disability; advocacy; empowerment; person centred approaches; individualised supports; policy; and legislation. Module 2 - Strategies and techniques for support: Active support; skill development; visual communication; person/environment fit; and goal setting. Module 3 - Lifespan and contextual perspectives: Children, young people and families; inclusive education; transition from school; employment; end of life supports; rural issues; and cultural perspectives. Classroom teaching will be supported by a small-group fieldwork project.
OCCP4086 Professional Elective - General

This unit of study is not available in 2020

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Chris Chapparo Session: Semester 1 Classes: Classes/modes of delivery will vary depending on the topic chosen Assessment: Two to three items of assessment equivalent to 6 credit points (100%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Distance education, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Departmental permission required for enrolment
This unit of study will present a topic for a professional elective that allows students to explore an area of occupational therapy practice in depth. The specific topic will be determined from time to time as teaching staff, visiting scholars and resources are available. The unit will extend the learning students have achieved in the topic in the first three years of the course requiring an increase in the depth of student understanding in the topic area than that required in earlier parts of the course.
OCCP4094 Technology for Living

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Bronwyn Simpson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x3hr siminarl/wk Prerequisites: OCCP2085 and OCCP2087 and OCCP2088 and OCCP3065 Assessment: 1 x 3000wd written workbook (30%), 15 minute Viva (20%) and 1 x 3000wd case report (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
It is becoming increasingly important for occupational therapists to be 'tech-savvy' in order to address client goals and facilitate independence and participation. Modern technology can support the independence of people with disabilities in important tasks such as work, study, communication and connecting with others, recreation, living safely and managing a household. This unit will explore the ways that modern electronic technologies such as computers, iPads and tablets, and telephones can be accessed and used by people of all ages with various disabilities. It will also explore technologies that enable people with disabilities to control their environment, such as operating entertainment systems, doors, lights, windows and emergency call systems. The unit will be practical and skills-based, involving demonstrations and hands-on use of technologies, real-life case studies and guest speakers. The theoretical underpinnings of this area will also be examined, by exploring relevant conceptual frameworks, assessment tools, and recent literature.
The unit provides a foundation for students wishing to develop their knowledge in this area of practice. It will also provide students with skills that can be applied to clients in many areas of practice, as well as providing information on resources and referral to specialised services.
OCCP4095 Stroke Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Margaret McGrath Session: Semester 1 Classes: 8 x 2 hour seminars and a series of online lectures Assessment: Online Quiz (30%), Participation in 8 seminars (10%), Written exam (60%) Practical field work: . Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit provides the opportunity for students from any discipline to increase their knowledge and experience of stroke rehabilitation. The aim of this unit is to develop students' understanding of the long-term nature of stroke recovery and rehabilitation after stroke. Topics will include stroke epidemiology, brain plasticity, person-centred goal setting, mobility, travel and driving, upper limb and cognitive retraining, communication, mood changes and self-management.

Recommended Electives for Biomedical Sciences

BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Jan Douglas-Morris Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 2hr lectures, 2hr practical-tutorial/week Prerequisites: BIOS1168 Assessment: Online test (5%), mid-semester practical exam (30%), end-semester practical exam (25%), end-semester theory exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study examines the detailed gross, radiological and surface anatomy of the lower limb, trunk and neck. Included are the anatomical analyses of functional activities which involve the lower limb, back and neck. Material will be presented in lectures, practical and tutorial sessions and online. Students will also be expected to undertake some independent learning activities. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is compulsory.
BIOS1155 Structure, Function and Disease A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Hegedus Session: Semester 1 Classes: Four 1hr lectures, one 2hr practical/week Assessment: Online quizzes (10%), Mid- semester examination (30%), End-semester examinations (60%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an entry-level unit designed to give students an overview of anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular and respiratory systems relevant for professional practice. The basic concepts of pharmacology will also be introduced to enable students to understand the action of drugs on each of the body systems as they are covered in this unit and in BIOS1158, Structure, Function and Disease B. Material will be presented in lectures and practical sessions. Students are expected to complete self-directed learning packages prior to some practical sessions. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied; attendance at such classes is strongly encouraged. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
Textbooks
Tortora, Gerard J., Bryan Derrickson. Introduction to the Human Body, Australia & New Zealand Edition. [Wiley Australia].
BIOS1167 Foundations of Biomedical Science

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Oakes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3 x 1hr lectures/week, 5 x 2hr tutorials during semester, small online module component. Assessment: Online quizzes (10%), Mid-semester examination (30%), End-semester examinations (60%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This is an entry level unit of study designed to give students an overview of the biological and biochemical processes that are fundamental to life. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to general chemistry or biochemistry units of study. Knowledge gained in this unit will enable students to understand the key principles of health and disease and the scientific basis for many of the professional practices they will undertake in their careers. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of the following topics: key concepts of body chemistry, important biological molecules, the structure and function of cells, the genetics of health and disease, growth and development, communication, metabolic processes, homeostasis, and the impacts of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit and to apply their knowledge to the relevance of these fundamental principles to health care practices.
BIOS1170 Body Systems: Structure and Function

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Jaimie Polson Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 3hr lectures, 2hr practical/week Prohibitions: BMED2403 or PHSI2005 or PHSI2006 Assessment: Mid semester exam (35%), end semester exam (55%), quizzes (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit will present the gross anatomy, functional histology, physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular, respiratory and urinary systems. Specific diseases of these systems that are commonly encountered in health care practice will be described. The unit will also cover the characteristics of the body's fluids and the concept of acid-base balance within the body. This unit includes laboratory classes in which human cadavers are studied. Attendance at practical classes iscompulsory. Students who achieve a pass will have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of anatomy and physiology. Students who achieve higher grades will be better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena. Practical class attendance for this unit is compulsory.
Textbooks
FH Martini, JL Nath, EF Bartholomew: (2014) Fundamentals of Anatomy and Physiology, 10th edition.
BIOS1172 Biological Aspects of Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Knight Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Distance education mode: independent learning package with email support. No on-campus attendance required Assessment: Mid-semester exam (30%), end-semester exam (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit of study examines the physiological changes associated with the normal processes of ageing and the decrease in functional capacity which occurs as a result. It will include a physiological explanation of ageing in relation to the cardiovascular, respiratory, immune, nervous, musculoskeletal, renal and endocrine systems and the skin. An understanding of the normal processes of ageing will help health professionals to interpret the ageing experience from the point of view of the client, understand the functional limitations which result from ageing, and differentiate 'normal' from 'abnormal' ageing. This is an entry level unit designed to give students an overview of topics relevant for professional practice. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to specialist clinical units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS1173 Disease in Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Peter Knight Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Distance education mode: independent learning package with email support. No on-campus attendance required Assessment: Mid-semester exam (30%), end-semester exam (70%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit of study examines the disease processes and other physical health issues, which are important as people age. Students will study the factors which are responsible for the increased incidence of disease in the aged, the role of environmental factors in the development of disease, the relationships between disease and functional limitation, and the measures which can be taken to minimise the development and biological impact of disease. Students will also examine the relationships between the biomedical effects of ageing and sexuality. There will be in-depth consideration of one common disease of the aged, and its management in terms of prevention, treatment and residual disability. This is an entry level unit designed to give students an overview of topics relevant for professional practice. Topics are not covered in the detail that is applicable to specialist clinical units of study. Students who achieve a pass have a basic working knowledge of professionally relevant aspects of ageing. Students who achieve higher grades are better able to integrate various aspects of the unit, and to apply their knowledge to solve problems or explain higher level phenomena.
BIOS3066 Current Issues in Healthcare

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Diana Oakes Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lecture fortnightly, commencing week 2, plus independent on-line learning modules. Assessment: Online quiz (20%), written assignment (25%),I n-lecture activities (5%), end semester exam (50%). Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces students to selected developments that are impacting, or are likely to impact, on the practice and management of the health care in Australia. Because health care is driven by a multitude of forces, the scope of the developments studied is broad. Topics to be covered will be drawn from the basic sciences applicable to health care, and health management. Examples of the topics under consideration include a critical analysis of complementary and alternative medicine, advances in assisted reproductive technologies and emerging diseases and infections. Material will be presented in lectures, with use of self-directed learning and individual or group activities.
BIOS1169 Functional Musculoskeletal Anatomy B is recommended by the Course Director as your biomedical elective.

Recommended Electives for Behavioural or Social Sciences

HSBH1005 Human Development

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-hr lecture/week and weekly 1-hr tutorials Assessment: Quiz (20%), Essay (40%), and Exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study considers the important bio-psycho-social and functional changes that occur across the lifespan. Understanding bio-psycho-social factors associated with healthy human development is important for addressing our major national health priority areas. Areas discussed include healthy child development, the families impact on health, adolescent risk taking behaviour, mental health, social relationships and social support, dementia, healthy ageing and chronic diseases across the lifespan.
Textbooks
Recommended Readings as provided
BACH3128 Health Professionals and Globalisation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Zakia Hossain Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr seminar/week for Wk 2-13 Prerequisites: A minimum of 48 credit points Prohibitions: HSBH3009 Assessment: Online assessment (30%), Presentation and partication (20%), and 2 hr exam (50%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
The focus of this unit of study is on the meaning of globalisation and its impact on health. It examines social and cultural shifts and technological advancement and their impact on health and disability and professional practices. The unit examines the key drivers of globalisation and features of the shift from international to global health. The unit also aims to provide understanding of both the direct and indirect impact of global changes on biopsychosocial aspects of health and health care delivery and professional practices. The direct impact includes shifting disease, disability and behaviour patterns. The indirect impacts include those of, international health regulations, globalization of professional ethics and professional practices, global governance, movement of health professions, the advancement of medical technology and internet 'globalisation' on health care service delivery and professional practices. The unit analyses global health challenges such as disability inclusive development, climate change, C and NCDs, pharmaceuticals, and tobacco control from global perspectives. The unit provides students with skills in alaysing multidisciplinary approaches in health, public-private partnership and role of NGOs and community organizations in their profession.
Textbooks
Lee, K. and Collin, J. (eds). Global Change and Health, reprinted 2005,
BACH3146 Cyberpsychology and e-Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Andrew Campbell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2 hour workshop weekly. Prerequisites: completion of 48 credit points Assessment: Proposal for eHealth product (30%) Written Report (30%) Group Video documentary (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Cyberpsychology and e-health aims to provide an introduction into how digital industries impact human behaviour - specifically how societal and individual health is affected by the internet and other popular technologies. The course will be based on current research and policy guidelines set by the Australian and American Medical Associations, the American Psychological Association and Australian Psychological Society for the use of information technology in the following areas: how types of ICT functions may affect human behaviour; ethics and viability of delivering health resources online; the rise of serious games for health; social media in health; provision of therapy over the internet for general health and mental health; virtual reality use in health and wellbeing; quality control, data security, and assessment of general and specific online health resources; and future directions of information technology and its application to health and wellbeing.
Textbooks
Connolly, I., Palmer, M., Barton, H., and Kirwan, G. (Eds.). (2016). An introduction to cyberpsychology. Routledge.
BACH3147 Health at Work

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture/week, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: A minimum of 48 credit points Assessment: One 2500 word essay (50%), one 1-hour exam (40%) and tutorial participation (10%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study provides a critical introduction to health at work in the Australian and international contexts. It examines the nature, prevalence, origins, and management of disease and injury in the workplace. Topics covered include the distribution and impact of occupational injury, ill health and disease in Australia; different perspectives on occupational injury and disease causation; the effects of psychosocial factors and work organisation, and the roles of professionals, managers and workers in prevention and management.
CSCD1032 Human Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Maree Doble Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr lecture/wk, 13x1hr tutorials/sem Prerequisites: HSBH1003 Assumed knowledge: CSCD1034 Assessment: In-class presentation (30%), Child observation report (30%) final exam (40%) cultural competency module (0%) barrier Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Speech Pathology students must pass this unit in order to enrol in clinical units in Year 2
Students will acquire knowledge about typical communication development in English across the lifespan and in cultures relevant to the Australian context. Students will learn about the sequence of normal communication development from prelinguistic communication development through to adult language; the significance of context and function in the development of language; the universality of communication development, and the effect of gender in communication development. This unit of study prepares students to undertake observation of communication and to demonstrate understanding of the theories and facts in the normal acquisition of communication skills and apply this knowledge to people of different ages. Students will also begin accumulating knowledge about professional communication skills needed by health professionals to work with clients, carers and colleagues.
Textbooks
McLeod, Sharynne. (2015) Introduction to speech, language and literacy. edited by Sharynne McLeod and Jane McCormack, South Melbourne, Vic. : Oxford University Press
HSBH2008 Physical Activity and Population Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Leigh Wilson Session: Semester 1 Classes: 9 x 2-hr lectures/sem (Wk 2 to 9), 8 x1-hr practical project activity /sem, 4 x1-hr tutorials/sem and 1 x 2-hr prac/sem Prerequisites: 48 credit points of units Assessment: Individual Project Report (30%), Group Presentation (30%), Final Project report (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides students with an opportunity to develop an up-to-date critical understanding of the role of physical activity for the health of the population as well as the most promising principles that underpin mass-level physical activity interventions. Students will examine in detail the population's participation patterns and barriers to be physically active and has a primary focus on every-day incidental (non-sporting) physical activity for the prevention of physical and mental chronic disease. The unit is largely multi-disciplinary and it goes beyond disease prevention, to explore themes like positive wellbeing/happiness and maintenance of functional ability and independence to an older age.

This unit takes a lifespan approach and actively promotes an understanding of the direct and distal implications of physical inactivity at each life stage. Particular acknowledgement is given to physical activity as a behaviour that is not merely a lifestyle 'choice' as it is often thought by medicine and other individual-centred disciplines; but rather the outcome of a complex web of societal, cultural, economic, political and individual circumstances that lead to the formation of personal habits across the lifespan.

The entire unit will be largely interactive and will encourage students to discuss, debate, and critically evaluate the evidence, and provides the opportunity to have a project that will assist in future employment. At the start of the unit the students will be provided with an accessible and user-friendly set of skills and tools (e.g. statistics, physical activity measurement) to enable them to make the most of the learning experience.
HSBH3012 Sydney Health Students Abroad

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nikki Wedgewood Session: Intensive December,Intensive June Classes: Online pre-departure lectures and briefing session, half-day debriefing session. Prerequisites: A minimum of 48 credit points Assessment: Pre-departure research (30%), field diary (30%), report (40%) Practical field work: 4-6 weeks working with a community-based organisation in a developing country. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students interested in participating must obtain permission from their course director before enrolling in FHS Abroad. Some degrees require participants have a minimum credit average.
Cultural practices, disease patterns and healthcare systems are vastly different in different countries around the globe. This unit provides students with the opportunity to gain international experience in a health services setting in a developing country. Students will participate in a 4-6 week health or care placement with a community-based organisation in South or Southeast Asia. As part of the unit, you will be expected to participate in local development programs, live within the community that you are visiting, and document and reflect on key health and development issues facing local populations. The unit will require you to demonstrate cultural sensitivity and an ability to adapt to new environments, a capacity for critical reflection and awareness of complex global health and development issues.
HSBH3013 FHS Indigenous Communities

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Josephine Gwynn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 6x2-hr workshops, 2 x 1 -hr debriefing sessions (in person), and online learning activities. Prerequisites: Successful completion of 72 credit points in an undergraduate degree Assessment: Pre-fieldwork preparation paper 1000wd (15%), completion of online cultural competence modules and 250 word critical reflection (30%) participation and contribution to online learning activities and discussion (10%), Fieldwork critical reflection and report (45%), Practical field work: 4-6 weeks working in an Indigenous community. Please note this will occur over the summer break at the end of Semester 2, and can occur anytime up to commencement of Semester 1 the following year. Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Field experience
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students are required to attend an interview with the unit of study course coordinator prior to enrolling (please email to arrange) and consult with their course director to ensure that there are no timetable conflicts with other Units of Study also being undertaken during semester 2.
This unit aims to prepare students to work with Aboriginal people, families and community. It provides theoretical and practical knowledge about relevant models of community development in Aboriginal communities. The unit will expand understanding on Aboriginal cultures and equip students with foundation skills to work with Aboriginal communities on localised projects. The course begins by introducing students to philosophies and practices of cultural competence in an Aboriginal community health service environment, and completion of 6 online modules on cultural competence. Students will be introduced to key concepts of Aboriginal health service delivery and apply these to local Aboriginal communities. Historical and political contexts (determinants) of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health will be explored. Students will build on these skills and knowledge by working with an Aboriginal community on a 4 week community development project.
Students will gain experience in working with Aboriginal communities through their placement in a health service organisation or similar. The placement options include Aboriginal Community Controlled organisations, and the Unit of Study endeavours to match the location of the project placement with that required by student, however this may not always be feasible. The FHS provides no financial support for attendance at the project placement and you are expected to cover the costs for travel, accommodation and incidentals.
Textbooks
Kickett-Tucker, D et al (Eds) Mia Mia Aboriginal Community Development-fostering cultural security. Melbourne, Australia: Cambridge University Press.
HSBH3015 Mental Health Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prerequisites: 48 credit points Assessment: 2x online assessments (20%) ,1x2000wd essay (50%) and participation (30%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Poor mental health poses a major challenge to our society, and health care professionals, among others, are charged with 'making a difference'. To do so, they need to be equipped with the most up-to-date knowledge of effective mental health approaches and interventions. This unit will overview major mental health conditions and significant social, philosophical, and historical influences on health care service delivery and reform to provide a context for contemporary rehabilitation practice. Students will be introduced to the goals, values and guiding principles of psychiatric rehabilitation and to practices that aim to address the culture of stigma and low expectations by society of people with mental health conditions. Rehabilitation interventions that have demonstrated efficacy in promoting recovery by reducing obstacles to participation for people with mental health conditions will be examined. Local and international research underpinning best practice in rehabilitation management and service delivery will be reviewed and consumer perspectives and experiences explored.
HSBH3016 Individual and Societal Ageing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Kate O'Loughlin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2x1-hr lecture, 1x1-hr tutorial/week Prerequisites: HSBH1003 or HSBH1013 Assessment: 1500wd essay (30%), tutorial and online activities (30%) and 1hr exam (40%) Campus: Camperdown/Darlington, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Bachelor of Health Sciences students must have completed 24 credit points of HSBH junior units for enrolment into this unit. All other students must have completed 48 credit points.
This unit offers students an insight into the challenges and opportunities associated with population ageing and what is required to meet the needs of the increasing numbers of older people and those who will interact with them. It addresses the social and individual dimensions of ageing, health and well-being and the transitions that occur in later life. There will be an emphasis on the policy and practice implications of an ageing society and the role of various public and private providers (government, health care practitioners, family, voluntary) in providing services and care to older people. Students will be expected to develop a critical understanding of the issues related to ageing and the life course and gain an understanding of initiatives and policy debates relating to population ageing and quality of life of older people, their families and carers.
HSBH3017 Disability, Sport and Social Inclusion

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Nikki Wedgwood Session: Semester 1 Classes: 1x2-hr lecture and 1x1hr tutorial week Prerequisites: (HSBH1003 OR HSBH1013) and complete a minimum of 48 credit points Assessment: 2 x short answer assignments (2x15%), 1500wd written assignment (40%), Group Presentation (30%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
Note: Students must have completed 48 credit points to enrol in this unit.
The primary goal of this unit is to inform the understandings and practices of our future allied health professionals and health policymakers about: 1) sports participation from a disabled as well as able-bodied perspective (via reverse integration); 2) the dominant medical model of disability and how that shapes the approach of health professions towards people with impairments; 3) the social model of disability; 4) the potential role of sport, not just in the physical, but also the psychological and social rehabilitation, of people with impairments; 5) sport, not just as a physical activity, competition or leisure activity but as a social institution, which arises out of particular social and historical contexts in accordance with the interests of dominant social groups (ie able-bodied, medical profession); 6) how sporting practice is heavily shaped by social structures like gender and ableism but also that people who facilitate sport (like health professionals) are not completely constrained by these structures because ableism is ultimately either reproduced or challenged by everyday practices, attitudes and behaviours; 7) the role of sport in either promoting or reproducing the social inclusion and/or exclusion of people with impairments; 8) how sport can be emancipatory at the lived/embodied level; and 9) the role of sport in the lives of people with an intellectual disability.
HSBH3021 Environmental Stress and Physiological Strain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Ollie Jay Session: Semester 1 Classes: 3-hrs/wk for 9 weeks Prerequisites: EXSS1032 or EXSS2027 or BIOS1170 Assessment: 1x2hr final exam (50%), 4 x lab reports (5% each; 20% total), and 1 x 0.5hr case study oral exam (30%) Practical field work: (4 x 2hr prac)/sem Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit of study provides students with both theoretical knowledge and first-hand experience (through laboratory practicals) of how the human body responds to extreme environmental stressors (i.e. high altitude, hyperbaria, extreme heat, extreme cold), and how these conditions alter the capacity of humans to perform physical and mental tasks. Special attention will also be given to the theoretical basis of how these stressors can lead to decrements to human health in the form of injury (e.g. frostibite, heat exhaustion) and illness (e.g. pulmonary/cerebral oedema, actue mountain sickness, 'the bends'). This unit will also focus on how this information can be used to develop therapeutic, pharmacological, and/or technological interventions to improve human functioning in extreme environments and reduce the risk of illness and injury. Teaching and learning strategies include lectures, case studies and short practical assignments.
REHB3062 Public Offenders: Criminality and Rehab

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodd Rothwell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online Prohibitions: REHB3051 Assessment: short answer test (20%) , 2x MCQ tests (40%), 1500 word essay (40%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Distance education
This unit introduces students to issues relating to the rehabilitation of public offenders including adults (males and females) and youth offenders. Students will study the major theories of criminality and community attitudes impacting on government approaches to rehabilitation and incarceration policy. The unit will examine the different approaches and policies to the incarceration of adult males and females and young people and the goals of these approaches. Special attention will be paid to examining the nature of the objectives and desired outcomes of incarceration. Students will analyse the roles and functions of personnel employed within the prison system, including that of custodial personnel and professional workers. In particular the unit will look at the various health issues associated with public offender rehabilitation, including drug addiction, mental illness and HIV/AIDS, the health services available within the prisons and the role played by the various health professionals employed to deal with such problems. Students will also be introduced to the probation and parole system and to the various alternative to full-time incarceration, including community service, day release, work release, and weekend detention. They will examine the aims and objectives of these alternatives and the roles and functions of professional workers (including health workers) employed to administer these programs.
Textbooks
Henry H and Einstadter W (Eds.) (1998) The Criminality Theory Reader, New York University press, Taylor S, (2014) Crime and Criminality: A Multidisciplinary Approach, Routledge
REHB3064 Alcohol and Drug Misuse Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Rodd Rothwell Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prerequisites: (HSBH1006 and (HSBH1007 or HSBH2007) and HSBH1008 and HSBH1009) or 48 credit points of previous study. Prohibitions: REHB3061 Assessment: Short answer test (20%), Essay 2500 words (40%), 2 x online MCQ tests (40%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Distance education
Note: Students must have completed 48 credit points to enrol in this unit
This unit introduces students to issues relating to a major public health problem: the misuse of alcohol and other addictive drugs. The unit introduces students to two major aspects of this area: issues relating to the development of health prevention/health promotion policy, covering the philosophies of harm minimisation and zero tolerance; approaches to rehabilitation and treatment of those overusing both alcohol and other drugs. The unit commences with an analysis of public health policy approaches to the rehabilitation and treatment of people overusing alcohol and other harmful drugs. Students will be required to undertake an exercise involving an analysis of the effectiveness of the two major policy approaches to the problem of drug overuse and abuse: harm reduction and zero tolerance. They will be required to examine the evidence supporting these two approaches to public health policy. In the second part of the unit students will study the major therapeutic approaches to treatment and rehabilitation. This will include familiarisation with Alcoholics Anonymous, clinically based approaches including transactional analysis and other group therapy oriented approaches, the various behavioural therapies, therapeutic communities, methadone maintenance, needle exchange and recent trails in safe injection facilities. They will become familiar with the nature of services offered, the role of the various health professionals in these services and the nature of effective treatment and rehabilitation outcomes.
REHB3065 PTSD and Rehabilitation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lynda Matthews Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Prerequisites: 48 credit points Prohibitions: REHB3059 or REHB5063 or REHB5034 Assessment: 2x online assessments (20%),1x2000wd essay (50%) and participation (30%) Campus: Cumberland, Sydney Mode of delivery: Online
Exposure to traumatic events such as natural disasters, assaults and road accidents are relatively common in Australia. This unit introduces the clinical entity of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Students will learn about the nature of traumatic stressors and the course of posttraumatic reactions. Evidence-based approaches to treatment and rehabilitation of PTSD are examined with interventions for both acute and persistent forms of the disorder being presented. The impact of a range of barriers to social and economic participation of people with PTSD will be explored and the legal and compensation issues associated with the disorder will be considered.