Cataract and Refractive Surgery

 

Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Core units

OPSC5001 Ophthalmic Anatomy

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Yves Kerdraon, Dr Simon Taylor and Dr Richard Parker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of basic human anatomy Assessment: Academic Honesty and Academic Writing Tasks ( barrier task (Pass/Fail) 1 x 2500 word assignment (20%), online presentation (20%), online journal club (10%) and 1 x 3 hour exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have knowledge of anatomy relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. In particular, students must show detailed knowledge of the anatomy of the eye, the orbit and periorbital structures, and the visual pathways. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in greater depth fullfilling the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study the successful student will be able to (1) Describe the normal anatomical organisation of the human eye, orbit and its contents, and the head and neck, including the cells, organs and tissues, (2) describe the principle components of the human visual system and their function in detail and (3) describe how diagnostic imaging may be used in ophthalmic practise.
Textbooks
Prescribed texts: Clinical Anatomy of the Eye Snell RS and Lemp MA; Wolff's Anatomy of the Eye and Orbit (8th ed). AJ Bron et al (eds) HK Lewis, London 1997. Additional texts: Histology of the Human Eye M Hogan J Alvarado, J Wedell WB Saunders, Philadelphia, 1971; Gray's Anatomy (38th Ed) Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh, 1989; The Eye Basic Sciences in Practice (Chapters 1 and 2) J Forrester et al Saunders Company Ltd London 1996; The Human Nervous System, An Anatomical Viewpoint (5th Ed) ML Barr and JA Kiernan Harper and Row, Philadelphia 1988; Clinical Anatomy and Physiology of the Visual System, 3rd Edition, By Lee Ann Remington; 2016-2017 Basic and Clinical Science Course; Section 2: Fundamentals and Principles of Ophthalmology (older editions also quite acceptable). Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology.
OPSC5003 Ophthalmic Optics

Credit points: 9 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Con Petsoglou, Dr Chameen Samarawickrama, Dr Kelechi Obuehi Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online Assumed knowledge: Undergraduate knowledge of physics relating to light and optics Assessment: 2 x 2500 word assignments (30%), presentation (15%), wiki on an allocated topic (10%) and 1 x 3hr exam (45%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of optics relevant to the practise of ophthalmology. Particular emphasis is placed on the topics of physical, geometrical, physiological and instrument optics. The advanced material covered provides the students with an opportunity to explore the subject in greater depth fullfilling the requirements for a post-graduate level qualification. On completion of this unit of study the sucessful students are able to (1) describe the physical properties of light and lasers especially with reference to their interaction with the eye and instruments, (2) describe the geometrical principles of light and the laws governing lights interaction with materials, (3) outline the optical properties, limitations and image formation of common ophthalmic instruments and the design aspects that improve image quality, (4) decribe the physiological optics of the human eye and how it is evaluated and the normal changes of accommodation with age. In particular the use of optical instruments for this purpose and (5) describe the process of objective and subjective refraction and how this impacts prescription of spectacles, contact lenses or surgical management of ametropia.
Textbooks
Prescribed texts: Clinical Optics AR Elkington and HJ Frank, Blackwell Science, 3rd Ed, 2000; Optics, Refraction and Contact Lenses, Basic and Clinical Science Course, American Academy Ophthalmology, 2013. Additional texts: Optics MH Freeman, Butterworths-Heinemann Medical; 10th Ed, 1990; Optics for Clinicians M Rubin, Triad Publishing, 3rd Ed, 1993; Physics for Ophthalmologists DJ Coster 1st Ed 1994; The Fine Art of Prescribing Glasses Without Making a Spectacle of Yourself Hardcover - April 30, 2004, by Benjamin Milder (Author), Melvin L. Rubin (Author).
OPSC5018 Cataract and Refractive Surgery 1

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof. Michael Lawless and A/Prof Colin Chan Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online Assessment: 3 x 2000 word written assignments (90%), and online discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
Note: This unit is only offered in Semester 1.
This unit of study provides candidates with the theoretical and practical foundations of the practise of cataract and refractive surgery. Successful students can demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of corneal refractive surgery. On completion, successful students are able to: (1) Describe how an excimer laser and femtosecond laser work, (2) Describe how PRK, LASIK and SMILE laser are performed, (3) Demonstrate knowledge of the theory behind the lasers involved, (4) Describe indications and contraindications for the above procedures, (5) Understand the importance of corneal imaging in refractive surgery, (6) Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of systemic disease on refractive surgery patients, (7) Describe the management of corneal related refractive surgery complications, (8) Describe the causes and treatments of corneal ectasia, (9) Discuss lens based approaches to refractive surgery, (10) Have an understanding of the management of lens based related refractive surgery adverse events
Textbooks
LASIK: Advances, Controversies and Custom, Louis E Probst; Mastering Refractive IOLs: The Art and Science, David F Chang, Slack publishers; The Art of LASIK, Machet, Slade, Probst. 2nd edition Slack Publishers; Step by Step LASIK Surgery, Vajpayee R., Jaypee publishers.
OPSC5019 Cataract and Refractive Surgery 2

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Lawless and A/Prof Colin Chan Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online Prerequisites: OPSC5018 Assessment: 3x2000 word written assignments (90%), and online discussion (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education
Note: This unit is only offered in semester 2.
This unit of study aims to provide candidates with the theoretical and practical foundations of the practise of cataract and refractive surgery. Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of corneal and intraocular refractive surgery. Candidates should be able to: (1) Describe how an excimer laser, femtosecond laser, conductive and thermal keratoplasty work; (2) Describe how PRK, LASIK. Arcuate keratotomy, conductive keratoplasty are performed; (3) Demonstrate knowledge of the theory behind the lasers involved; (4) Describe indications and contraindications for the above procedures; (5) Demonstrate an understanding of the impact of systemic disease on refractive surgery patients; (6) Describe the management of corneal related refractive surgery complications; (7) Describe the treatments for keratoconus; (8) Demonstrate an understanding of the economics of setting up a refractive surgery practice; (9) Discuss lens based approaches to refractive surgery; (10) Have an understanding of the management of lens based related refractive surgery adverse events; (11) Understand the evidence for and ethical issues related to refractive surgery.
Textbooks
Azar, Dimitri L., Refractive Surgery, 2nd ed. 2006; Buratto, L., Brint, Stephen, Custom LASIK: Surgical Techniques and Complications, 2003; Bores, Leo D., Refractive Eye Surgery, 2nd ed. 2001; Probst,Louis E.,LASIK: Advances, Controversies and Custom; Chang, David F.,Mastering Refractive IOLs: The Art and Science, Slack Inc. Machat, Jeffrey J., Slade, Stephen J., Probst, Louis E., The Art of LASIK, 2nd ed. Slack Inc.; Vajpayee, Rasik B., Melki, Samir A., Namrata, Sharma., Sullivan, Laurence, Step by Step LASIK Surgery; Vajpayee R., Taylor and Francis Brightbill, Frederick S., McDonnell, Peter J., McGhee, Charles N.J., Farjo, Ayad A.,Serdarevic, Olivia, Corneal Surgery: Theory, Technique and Tissue,4th ed. Mosby 2009; Krueger RR, Talamo JH, Lindstrom RL, Textbook of refractive laser assisted cataract surgery, Springer New York 2012.
OPSC5020 Practical Cataract and Refractive Surgery

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr John Males and A/Prof Michael Lawless Session: Intensive November Classes: Intensive on campus Prerequisites: OPSC5018 Corequisites: OPSC5019 Assessment: Online surgical logbook (40%), and observed structured clinical exam (60%) Mode of delivery: Clinical experience
This unit of study provides students with the practical experience and knowledge necessary to assess and perform refractive surgery. This is a mentor-based programme with students supervised in a number of clinical and laboratory environments. Emphasis is on pre-operative investigation, surgical skill and post-operative management. Students are required to observe and perform intra- and extra-ocular surgical techniques relevant to refractive surgery. They will rotate through a number of refractive surgical practices and observe refractive surgery taking place using a number of different refractive surgical systems. Students also attend a number of wet lab sessions designed to practise refractive surgical techniques on artificial, animal or human eyes. A logbook of observed and performed surgeries will be kept and used for assessment.
Textbooks
Azar, Dimitri L., Refractive Surgery, 2nd ed. 2006; Buratto, L., Brint, Stephen, Custom LASIK: Surgical Techniques and Complications, 2003; Bores, Leo D., Refractive Eye Surgery, 2nd ed. 2001; Probst,Louis E.,LASIK: Advances, Controversies and Custom; Chang, David F.,Mastering Refractive IOLs: The Art and Science, Slack Inc. Machat, Jeffrey J., Slade, Stephen J., Probst, Louis E., The Art of LASIK, 2nd ed. Slack Inc.; Vajpayee, Rasik B., Melki, Samir A., Namrata, Sharma., Sullivan, Laurence, Step by Step LASIK Surgery; Vajpayee R., Taylor and Francis Brightbill, Frederick S., McDonnell, Peter J., McGhee, Charles N.J., Farjo, Ayad A.,Serdarevic, Olivia, Corneal Surgery: Theory, Technique and Tissue,4th ed. Mosby 2009.

Dissertation units

Master's candidates must enrol in 12 credit points of dissertation in addition to the 36 credit points of core units. These should be done either in one semester with Dissertation C or split over two semesters with both Dissertation A and Dissertation B. A candidate must be enrolled in order to submit the dissertation. If a candidate is not able to submit his/her thesis after enrolling in 12 credit points of dissertation units of study, he/she must re-enrol in a minimum of six credit points of dissertation units of study, with the concomitant financial liability, every semester until he/she submits.
OPSC5023 Dissertation Refractive Surgery A

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Lawless and Professor Gerard Sutton Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervision Prerequisites: OPSC5018 and OPSC5019 Assessment: Dissertation submitted after completion of 12 CP of dissertation units (OPSC5023 and OPSC5024) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of the theoretical and practical foundations of the practise of refractive surgery and that they have integrated this knowledge with prior learning and experience in their project. The dissertation may take one of two forms: a written output (report or formal academic composition) on work performed during the candidature from a supervised student project that contains between 8,000-20,000 words or a scientific paper that arises from a supervised student's project and has been submitted to a peer review journal for publication. The scientific paper must be embedded in a treatise with an expanded introduction and literature review as well as an expanded conclusion/discussion section. Additional methods and results not presented in the scientific paper should also be included. On completion of the dissertation units, the successful student will be able to: (1) Undertake a medical/scientific project and follow it to its completion. (2) Work constructively under the supervision of an ophthalmic supervisor. (3) Display scientific thinking and apply this to refractive surgery. (4) Attempt to publish their dissertation or learn how to publish their work.
Textbooks
Your Practical Guide to Writing a Thesis, Treatise or Dissertation at the University of Sydney, SUPRA Guide (http://supra.net.au/assets/file/Publications/SUPRAthesisguide.pdf)
OPSC5024 Dissertation Refractive Surgery B

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Lawless and Professor Gerard Sutton Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervision Prerequisites: OPSC5018 and OPSC5019 and OPSC5023 Assessment: Dissertation submitted after completion of 12 CP of dissertation units (OPSC5023 and OPSC5024) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of the theoretical and practical foundations of the practise of refractive surgery and that they have integrated this knowledge with prior learning and experience in their project. The dissertation may take one of two forms: a written output (report or formal academic composition) on work performed during the candidature from a supervised student project that contains between 8,000-20,000 words or a scientific paper that arises from a supervised student's project and has been submitted to a peer review journal for publication. The scientific paper must be embedded in a treatise with an expanded introduction and literature review as well as an expanded conclusion/discussion section. Additional methods and results not presented in the scientific paper should also be included. On completion of the dissertation units, the successful student will be able to: (1) Undertake a medical/scientific project and follow it to its completion. (2) Work constructively under the supervision of an ophthalmic supervisor. (3) Display scientific thinking and apply this to refractive surgery. (4) Attempt to publish their dissertation or learn how to publish their work.
Textbooks
Your Practical Guide to Writing a Thesis, Treatise or Dissertation at the University of Sydney, SUPRA Guide (http://supra.net.au/assets/file/Publications/SUPRAthesisguide.pdf)
OPSC5025 Dissertation Refractive Surgery C

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Michael Lawless and Professor Gerard Sutton Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Supervision Prerequisites: OPSC5018 and OPSC5019 Assessment: Dissertation 100% Mode of delivery: Supervision
Successful candidates will demonstrate to the examiners that they have a detailed and comprehensive knowledge of the theoretical and practical foundations of the practise of refractive surgery and that they have integrated this knowledge with prior learning and experience in their project. The dissertation may take one of two forms: a written output (report or formal academic composition) on work performed during the candidature from a supervised student project that contains between 8,000-20,000 words or a scientific paper that arises from a supervised student's project and has been submitted to a peer review journal for publication. The scientific paper must be embedded in a treatise with an expanded introduction and literature review as well as an expanded conclusion/discussion section. Additional methods and results not presented in the scientific paper should also be included. On completion of the dissertation units, the successful student will be able to: (1) Undertake a medical/scientific project and follow it to its completion. (2) Work constructively under the supervision of an ophthalmic supervisor. (3) Display scientific thinking and apply this to refractive surgery. (4) Attempt to publish their dissertation or learn how to publish their work.
Textbooks
Your Practical Guide to Writing a Thesis, Treatise or Dissertation at the University of Sydney, SUPRA Guide (http://supra.net.au/assets/file/Publications/SUPRAthesisguide.pdf)