Clinical Epidemiology

Errata
item Errata Date
1.

The following unit has been cancelled for 2019:

CEPI5555 Making Decisions in Clinical Practice.

18/12/2018
2.

The unit PUBH5005 Qualitative Research in Health has been cancelled. It has been replaced by the following unit:

PUBH5505 Qualitative Research in Health

22/2/2019
3.

The following unit has been cancelled:

PUBH5006 Advanced Qualitative Analysis and Writing

22/2/2019
4.

The following unit has been added as a Part B Elective:

HPOL5000 Health Policy and Health Economics
Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Anne Marie Thow, A/Prof Alison Hayes Session: Semester 1 Classes: online students: week by week online activities including online lectures and/or videos, 6 interactive tutorials with online content via discussion boards, interactive reading (approx 10 hours per week) block mode students: 2 x 1 day workshops plus 6 interactive tutorials (either face to face or online) with online lectures and/or videos (approx 10 hours per week) Prohibitions: PUBH5032 Assessment: assessable tutorials (30%) multiple choice online exam, 2 hr, open book (30%) 6 short reports (300-500 words each) on health policy and health economic evaluation, submitted online (40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit aims to develop a critical and comparative understanding of the history, theory and practice of health policy as well as provide students with an understanding of the main concepts and analytical methods of health economics and political economy. It gives an overview of the political choices and frameworks that shape decision making in health. By the end of this unit students will be able to: Define the boundaries and key features of health policy; Identify policy instruments and how they function; Understand the main frameworks used for analysing health policy, and different approaches and perspectives regarding setting priorities in health policy; Apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples; Critically analyse the role of economic evidence in informing policy decisions in health decision-making in Australia.
Textbooks:Recommended: Buse, K, Mays, N and Walt, G. Making Health Policy (2nd Ed). Open University Press, 2012. Copies of the text are available in the University of Sydney library. Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site

22/2/2019

Clinical Epidemiology

Core units

CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.

Capstone Units (these units are also found in Part A Electives)

Students taking a Master award course must take a minimum of 6 credit points of capstone units.
CEPI5205 Doing a Systematic Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Giovanni Strippoli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student driven project (can be studied by distance) Prerequisites: CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315 Assumed knowledge: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 1 x 3000 word systematic review (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Please speak to the Unit Coordinator if you have not successfully completed the assumed knowledge units prior to enrolling in CEPI5205
This project unit provides an opportunity to apply skills learnt in other units and further develop knowledge and skills by undertaking a systematic review (ideally including a meta analysis) in a topic area nominated by the student. The unit is student-driven with no direct supervision, but the student will have three chances to interact with the unit coordinator, to define the research questions, to discuss the selected methodology, and prior to submission. The assessment task is to undertake a systematic review of randomised trials and present the review in the form of a paper suitable for submission to a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.
CEPI5207 Teaching Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid Session: Semester 1 Classes: student project under supervision. Prerequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Corequisites: (CEPI5311 or CEPI5312) and (CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315) Prohibitions: CEPI5206 Assessment: Project report (75%) and Participation (25%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit aims to further a student's knowledge and skills in teaching clinical epidemiology. Students will undertake a project under supervision where they will develop a teaching and learning resource based upon the teaching and learning they have been exposed to in the Clinical Epidemiology Program at the University of Sydney. There is no additional face-to-face teaching. By the end of this unit, students are expected to develop, teach, assess and evaluate a clinical epidemiology teaching and learning resource of at least 9 hours-equivalent face-to-face teaching time. Students will also reflect on their own learning in during this unit of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Straus SE, Glasziou P, Richardson WS, Haynes RB. Evidence-base medicine. How to practice and teach EBM. 4th Edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.
CEPI5215 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 self-paced modules each comprising: course notes, lecture, demonstrations, exercises, quizzes Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Prohibitions: CEPI5214 Assumed knowledge: Some basic knowledge of summary statistic is assumed Assessment: quizzes (30%), assignment 1 (20%), assignment 2 (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students without the pre-requisites are encouraged to contact the unit coordinator to discuss their motivation and experience.
Students will work at their own pace through 9 modules covering research integrity, medical style, abstracts, presentations and posters, constructing a paper, data visualisation, manuscript submission, responding to reviewers comments, publication dissemination, and reviewing a paper. This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, typical issues they may face, and link to resources to help them maintain integrity through their publishing careers. It will guide them to reliable evidence based resources to improve their conference abstract, presentation and poster design, and manuscript style and writing.. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, choosing a journal, keywords, improving tables and figures for manuscripts through open source software, copyright, writing cover letters and response letters to reviewers. Students will learn about measuring research impact and ways to improve research reach, dealing with the media and press releases, using social media in dissemination, digital archiving and basic skills needed to act as a quality peer-reviewer. This is an online unit
Textbooks
No mandatory text book-readings available online.
CEPI5300 Research Grants: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Germaine Wong Session: Semester 1 Classes: 11 online or face-to-face sessions and 1 face-to-face workshop (June) Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Prohibitions: CEPI5505 Assessment: 1 x written research proposal (60%); online class presentations (30%); workshop participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit of study, the student will develop his/her own research proposal, to a standard suitable for a peer-reviewed granting body. Each section of a grant proposal (Abstract, Aims, Background, Significance, Methods) will be discussed, with the student presenting and refining the corresponding section of his/her own proposal in a synchronous online workshop setting. This will be complemented by online presentations from experienced researchers on the practical aspects of clinical research. Topics include: observational studies, randomised controlled trials, diagnostic test evaluation, qualitative studies, economic evaluation, and process evaluation. The unit will conclude with a one-day, face-to-face, mandatory workshop where students will learn about budgeting, qualitative research, strategies and grant administration, research ethics and peer review of research grants.
CEPI5507 Clinical Epidemiology Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katy Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: student project under supervision - a minimum of five meetings with supervisor (face-to-face or distance) Prerequisites: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 3 presentations to the supervisor (10%), a written output equivalent to 5000 words or subject to the journal's word count limit (90%). Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit is to conduct a clinical epidemiology project and write a report on the project in the form of a paper suitable for publication. The project will involve: drafting and refining the project proposal; data collection; data analysis; and produce a report suitable for publication. At the end of the unit, the student will be proficient in conducting and writing a report of a clinical epidemiology project. The report should be suitable for publication in a peer reviewed journal. This project unit is a capstone unit and student driven. It is the responsibility of the student to identify a suitable project, in consultation with a local clinical supervisor and the unit coordinator, based upon area of interest to the student and local capacity to provide support to the student. Feasibility is a critical criterion for selection of the topic given the tight time frame. Supervision is flexible but will include face to face meetings, email and telephone support. A minimum of five meetings are required and to be organised by the student, including one at the beginning and one at the end of semester.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.

Part A Electives

Graduate Certificate students must select 12 credit points from Part A. Graduate Diploma students must select a minimum of 18 credit points from Part A. Master students must select a minimum of 18 credit points from Part A, in addition to their 6 credit points of capstone units. For further information, check the course requirements for award.
CEPI5200 Quality and Safety in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Merrilyn Walton Session: Semester 1 Classes: offered online Assessment: 4 online reflective statements (20%); 4 x 1500 word assignments (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: People working in health care will benefit from this course.
This course is specifically designed for health professionals who are working in health care. It will equip participants with underpinning knowledge about patient safety. There are 4 modules that students are required to participate in that cover quality and safety principles, professionalism and ethics, risk management and risk information, complexity theory, clinical governance and the impact of adverse events, methods to measure and make improvements in health care. Each module provides for discussion to enable the participants to ask questions and describe their experiences. Students are required to write a reflective statement about the main learning after each module. The modules, tools and the discussions are designed to enable participants to change behaviours by understanding the main causes of adverse events-poor team work, busyness, hierachies. The course provides foundation knowledge about quality and safety; governments around the world are concerned to address unsafe care. The course will better prepare health professional to understand the complexity of health care and take steps to minimise the opportunities for errors and address vulnerabilities in the system.
Textbooks
Runciman, Bill, Merry A Walton M. Safety and Ethics in Healthcare: A Guide to Getting it Right. 2007 Asgate Publisher.
CEPI5315 Introduction to Systematic Reviews

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid Session: Semester 1 Classes: all students will work through four online-modules and participate asynchronously in weekly online tutorials or in-campus tutorials (depending on mode enrolled) over 12 weeks Corequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Prohibitions: CEPI5203 or CEPI5102 or CEPI5314 Assessment: module assessment tasks (30%) and 1 x 4500 word assignment (70%) after the modules are completed Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
In this unit of study, we aim to introduce you to systematic reviews and meta-analyses of relevance to healthcare with a particular focus on systematic reviews of randomized controlled trials. Students can choose to learn in online or normal day (on-campus) mode. All students will work through four online modules, delivered over twelve weeks, addressing the following topics at an introductory level: What and why systematic reviews (and meta-analysis); How to formulate answerable healthcare questions and searching for systematic reviews; How a systematic review is conducted and understanding the principles of meta-analysis; and How to appraise, interpret and apply the results of systematic reviews (and meta-analyses). Students will have the opportunity to discuss unit of study learning materials in online tutorials or via weekly (on-campus) tutorials. Readings and other learning materials will be available via eLearning.
Textbooks
Readings and access to other learning resources are available through the unit's elearning site
CEPI5314 Introduction to Systematic Reviews (TAV)

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid, Professor Jonathan Craig Session: Semester 1 Classes: all students will work though three online-modules and participate in weekly tutorials (online or on-campus depending on mode enrolled) over 12 weeks Prerequisites: CEPI5102 Corequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Prohibitions: CEPI5203 or CEPI5315 Assessment: module assessment tasks (30%) and 1 x 4000 word assignment (70%) after the modules are complete Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: For pre-2017 students only
In this unit of study, we aim to introduce you to systematic reviews and meta-analyses of relevance to healthcare with a particular focus on systematic reviews of randomised controlled trials. This is a TAV (Transitional Arrangement Version) of CEPI5315 for the cohort of students who enrolled before 2017 AND have completed CEPI5102 Literature searching. Students can choose to learn in online or normal day (on-campus) mode. All students will work through three online modules, delivered over twelve weeks, addressing the following topics at an introductory level: What and why systematic reviews (and meta-analysis); How a systematic review is conducted and understanding the principles of meta-analysis; and How to appraise, interpret and apply the results of systematic reviews (and meta-analyses). Students will have the opportunity to discuss unit of study learning materials in online tutorials or via weekly (on-campus) tutorials. Readings and other learning materials will be available via eLearning.
Textbooks
Readings and access to other learning resources are available through the unit's elearning site.
CEPI5204 Advanced Systematic Reviews

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Lisa Askie Session: Semester 2b Classes: (face to face) 1x2hr seminar/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5211 Corequisites: CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315 Assessment: critical appraisal assignment (50%), data analysis assignment (50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
The aim of this unit is to critically appraise and apply, at an advanced level, the best evidence on systematic reviews. This unit extends beyond the 'Introduction to Systematic Reviews' unit by exploring in-depth important issues around systematic reviews. At the end of the unit, students should be able to understand the advantages of individual participant data meta-analyses; critically appraise a review of observational studies; understand differences in systematic review of observational studies compared with randomized trials; understand the potential pitfalls of meta-regression; perform and interpret a sub-group and meta-regression analysis; analyse continuous data and understand the methods by which missing data can be imputed; and understand the common problems in meta-analysis of continuous data. The seminar sessions are interactive and based on discussion of reading material. Two sessions are based in the computer lab.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
CEPI5205 Doing a Systematic Review

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Adjunct Professor Giovanni Strippoli Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: student driven project (can be studied by distance) Prerequisites: CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315 Assumed knowledge: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 1 x 3000 word systematic review (100%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Please speak to the Unit Coordinator if you have not successfully completed the assumed knowledge units prior to enrolling in CEPI5205
This project unit provides an opportunity to apply skills learnt in other units and further develop knowledge and skills by undertaking a systematic review (ideally including a meta analysis) in a topic area nominated by the student. The unit is student-driven with no direct supervision, but the student will have three chances to interact with the unit coordinator, to define the research questions, to discuss the selected methodology, and prior to submission. The assessment task is to undertake a systematic review of randomised trials and present the review in the form of a paper suitable for submission to a peer reviewed scientific, academic or professional journal.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.
CEPI5207 Teaching Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Sharon Reid Session: Semester 1 Classes: student project under supervision. Prerequisites: CEPI5100 or PUBH5010 Corequisites: (CEPI5311 or CEPI5312) and (CEPI5203 or CEPI5314 or CEPI5315) Prohibitions: CEPI5206 Assessment: Project report (75%) and Participation (25%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
This unit aims to further a student's knowledge and skills in teaching clinical epidemiology. Students will undertake a project under supervision where they will develop a teaching and learning resource based upon the teaching and learning they have been exposed to in the Clinical Epidemiology Program at the University of Sydney. There is no additional face-to-face teaching. By the end of this unit, students are expected to develop, teach, assess and evaluate a clinical epidemiology teaching and learning resource of at least 9 hours-equivalent face-to-face teaching time. Students will also reflect on their own learning in during this unit of study.
Textbooks
Recommended: Straus SE, Glasziou P, Richardson WS, Haynes RB. Evidence-base medicine. How to practice and teach EBM. 4th Edition, Churchill Livingstone, Edinburgh.
CEPI5215 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 self-paced modules each comprising: course notes, lecture, demonstrations, exercises, quizzes Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Prohibitions: CEPI5214 Assumed knowledge: Some basic knowledge of summary statistic is assumed Assessment: quizzes (30%), assignment 1 (20%), assignment 2 (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students without the pre-requisites are encouraged to contact the unit coordinator to discuss their motivation and experience.
Students will work at their own pace through 9 modules covering research integrity, medical style, abstracts, presentations and posters, constructing a paper, data visualisation, manuscript submission, responding to reviewers comments, publication dissemination, and reviewing a paper. This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, typical issues they may face, and link to resources to help them maintain integrity through their publishing careers. It will guide them to reliable evidence based resources to improve their conference abstract, presentation and poster design, and manuscript style and writing.. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, choosing a journal, keywords, improving tables and figures for manuscripts through open source software, copyright, writing cover letters and response letters to reviewers. Students will learn about measuring research impact and ways to improve research reach, dealing with the media and press releases, using social media in dissemination, digital archiving and basic skills needed to act as a quality peer-reviewer. This is an online unit
Textbooks
No mandatory text book-readings available online.
CEPI5300 Research Grants: Theory and Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Germaine Wong Session: Semester 1 Classes: 11 online or face-to-face sessions and 1 face-to-face workshop (June) Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Prohibitions: CEPI5505 Assessment: 1 x written research proposal (60%); online class presentations (30%); workshop participation (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening
In this unit of study, the student will develop his/her own research proposal, to a standard suitable for a peer-reviewed granting body. Each section of a grant proposal (Abstract, Aims, Background, Significance, Methods) will be discussed, with the student presenting and refining the corresponding section of his/her own proposal in a synchronous online workshop setting. This will be complemented by online presentations from experienced researchers on the practical aspects of clinical research. Topics include: observational studies, randomised controlled trials, diagnostic test evaluation, qualitative studies, economic evaluation, and process evaluation. The unit will conclude with a one-day, face-to-face, mandatory workshop where students will learn about budgeting, qualitative research, strategies and grant administration, research ethics and peer review of research grants.
CEPI5306 Clinical Practice Guidelines

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Martin Howell Session: Semester 2a Classes: offered online Assumed knowledge: clinical experience strongly recommended Assessment: 1 x 4-page critical appraisal and barriers assessment (50%), online discussions and quizzes (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
During this unit students will evaluate guideline development; critical appraisal of guidelines; introduction to implementation and evaluation of guidelines; involvement of consumers in guidelines; examination of hospital-based and community-based guidelines. Group and individual critical appraisal work is required.
Textbooks
Online readings and other learning resources will be provided.
CEPI5308 Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Martin Stockler Session: Semester 1b Classes: online learning, expected student effort: 6-8 hours per week including 1.5 hour online lecture, readings and quizzes each week for six weeks Assessment: completion of online quizzes (25% total), 1 assignment (2500-3000 maximum words (75%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aim of this unit is to enable students to appraise patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) and incorporate them into clinical research. PROMs include: symptoms, side-effects, health-related quality of life, satisfaction and preferences. Topics include: definitions, structure and functions of PROMs; item-generation and selection; questionnaire design; assessing validity, reliability and responsiveness to clinically important change; utilities and preferences; designing a study that includes a PROM; and appraising papers that report PROs. The online sessions comprise six lectures outlining the principles, with illustrative examples (approx 45 - 60 minutes per lecture), plus a series of 5 related quizzes (approx 30 minutes). The written assignment (2500 - 3000 word limit) is an appraisal of the application of an existing PROM(s) as an outcome in a clinical study.
Textbooks
Fayers P, Machin D. Quality of Life: The Assessment, Analysis and Reporting of Patient-reported Outcomes, 3rd Edition. 3 ed. Chichester, UK: Wiley Blackwell; 2016
CEPI5310 Advanced Statistical Modelling

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Patrick Kelly Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2hr lec/tut/week x 12 weeks, also offered fully online. Prerequisites: PUBH5212 Assessment: 2 x data analysis report (2x50%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit covers statistical analysis techniques that are commonly required for analysing data that arise from clinical or epidemiological studies. Students will gain hands on experience applying model-building strategies and fitting advanced statistical models. In particular, students will learn a statistical software package called Stata, how to handle non-linear continuous variables, and how to analyse correlated data. Correlated data arise from clustered or longitudinal study designs, such as, cross-over studies, matched case-control studies, cluster randomised trials and studies involving repeated measurements. Statistical models that will be covered include fixed effects models, marginal models using Generalised Estimating Equations (GEE), and mixed effects models (also known as hierarchical or multilevel models). This unit of study focuses on data analyses using Stata and the interpretation of results.
Textbooks
No mandatory text books. Course notes are provided.
CEPI5311 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (Part 1)

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katy Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr synchronous seminar/week for 6 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 or CEPI5202 or CEPI5312 Assessment: Class discussion/presentations (40%), written assignment (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, principles and use of evidence in making decisions about population screening. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a basic understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Course notes will be provided
CEPI5312 Diagnostic and Screening Tests (1 and 2)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katy Bell Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x2hr synchronous seminar/week for 12 weeks Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Prohibitions: PUBH5208 or CEPI5202 or CEPI5311 Assessment: Class discussion/presentations (40%) and two written assignments (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
This unit of study introduces the student to basic concepts behind diagnostic and screening tests, including: test accuracy, sources of bias in test evaluation, critical appraisal of test evaluation studies, principles and use of evidence in making decisions about population screening. It will then move to more advanced topics including: application of test results to individual patients, place of tests in diagnostic pathways, impact of tests on patient outcome, tests with continuous outcome, receiver-operator characteristic curves, systematic review of diagnostic tests, predictive models, monitoring, diagnostic tests in the health system, and over-diagnosis. After completing this unit of study, the student should have a comprehensive understanding of contemporary issues and the methodology underlying, diagnostic and screening test evaluation and application.
Textbooks
Course notes will be provided
CEPI5507 Clinical Epidemiology Project

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Katy Bell Session: Semester 1 Classes: student project under supervision - a minimum of five meetings with supervisor (face-to-face or distance) Prerequisites: (CEPI5100 or PUBH5010) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 3 presentations to the supervisor (10%), a written output equivalent to 5000 words or subject to the journal's word count limit (90%). Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
The aim of this unit is to conduct a clinical epidemiology project and write a report on the project in the form of a paper suitable for publication. The project will involve: drafting and refining the project proposal; data collection; data analysis; and produce a report suitable for publication. At the end of the unit, the student will be proficient in conducting and writing a report of a clinical epidemiology project. The report should be suitable for publication in a peer reviewed journal. This project unit is a capstone unit and student driven. It is the responsibility of the student to identify a suitable project, in consultation with a local clinical supervisor and the unit coordinator, based upon area of interest to the student and local capacity to provide support to the student. Feasibility is a critical criterion for selection of the topic given the tight time frame. Supervision is flexible but will include face to face meetings, email and telephone support. A minimum of five meetings are required and to be organised by the student, including one at the beginning and one at the end of semester.
Textbooks
There are no essential readings for this unit.
CEPI5555 Making Decisions in Clinical Practice

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carissa Bonner, Danielle Muscat, Dr Heather Shepherd Session: Semester 2 Classes: Distance: 2 hours lectures and discussion per week for 9 weeks plus 6 x 0.5 day interactive group work, or Block Mode: 3 x 2 days face-to-face Prerequisites: CEPI5100 Assessment: 1 x assessment creating an online evidence summary with a 1000 word report on how it was developed (30%) 1 x assessment creating an online shared decision making tool with a 1000 word report on how it was developed (30%) 1 x assessment communicating with an online simulated patient with a 1000 word report reflecting on your experience and performance (30%) assessable discussion participation for online and face to face students (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education, Block mode
This unit gives students an overview of current approaches to making decisions in clinical practice. This includes evidence-based medicine, shared decision making tools, and effective communication for patients with varying health literacy. Topics covered in the unit include applying the GRADE approach including patient preferences and goals, pragmatic methods for finding and using research evidence, health literacy principles and policies, best-practice risk communication methods, patient-centred communication skills, shared decision making tools and more complex decision making (including older patients, multimorbidity, low health literacy and culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds). The unit is particularly well suited to health professionals and other people working in clinical organisations/environments, but is open to anyone.
Textbooks
Readings are available on the unit's eLearning site
INFO9003 IT for Health Professionals

Credit points: 6 Session: Semester 2 Classes: Lectures, Laboratories, Project Work - own time Prohibitions: INFO5003 Assessment: Through semester assessment (50%) and Final Exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Information technologies (IT) and systems have emerged as the primary platform to support communication, collaboration, research, decision making, and problem solving in contemporary health organisations. The essential necessity for students to acquire the fundamental knowledge and skills for applying IT effectively for a wide range of tasks is widely recognised. This is an introductory unit of study which prepares students in the Health discipline to develop the necessary knowledge, skills and abilities to be competent in the use of information technology for solving a variety of problems. The main focus of this unit is on modelling and problem solving through the effective use of using IT. Students will learn how to navigate independently to solve their problems on their own, and to be capable of fully applying the power of IT tools in the service of their goals in their own health domains while not losing sight of the fundamental concepts of computing.
Students are taught core skills related to general purpose computing involving a range of software tools such as spreadsheets, database management systems, internet search engine. Students will undertake practical tasks including scripting languages and building a small scale application for managing information. In addition, the course will address the issues arising from the wide-spread use of information technology in a variety of Health area.
PUBH5212 Categorical Data Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture, 5 x 1hr lectures, and 5 x 1hr tutorials over 6 weeks. Also available online - such students must have regular access to a reliable internet connection capable of streaming or downloading video recorded lectures. Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page report (30%) and 1x 8 page report (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
In this unit the biostatistical concepts covered in earlier units are extended to cover analysis of epidemiological studies where the outcome variable is categorical. Topics of study include: testing for trend in a 2 x r contingency table; the Mantel-Haenszel test for the combination of several 2 x 2 tables, with estimation of the combined odds ratio and confidence limits; multiple logistic regression; Poisson regression; modelling strategy. The assignments will involve practical analysis and interpretation of categorical data. Data analyses will be conducted using statistical software (SAS).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
PUBH5213 Survival Analysis

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 2b Classes: 1 x 2hr lecture, 5 x 1hr lectures, and 5 x 1hr tutorials over 6 weeks. Also available online - such students must have regular access to a reliable internet connection capable of streaming or downloading video recorded lectures. Corequisites: PUBH5211 Assessment: 1x 3 page assignment (20%) and 1x 10 page assignment (80%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
During this unit, students learn to analyse data from studies in which individuals are followed up until a particular event occurs (e.g. death, cure, relapse), making use of follow-up data for those who do not experience the event of interest. This unit covers: Kaplan-Meier life tables; logrank test to compare two or more groups; Cox's proportional hazards regression model; checking the proportional hazards assumption; and sample size calculations for survival studies. For each topic, participants are given materials to read beforehand. This is followed by a lecture, then participants are given a small number of exercise to do for the following week. These exercises are discussed in the tutorial at the next session before moving on to the next topic. That is, in most weeks the first hour is a tutorial, followed by the lecture given in the second hour. Participants are expected to run SAS programs in their own time. Preparation time for each session is 2-3 hours. The assignments both invlove use of SAS to analyse survival data sets.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided, along with links to additional readings through the library.
PUBH5216 Controlled Clinical Trials

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Chris Brown (Research Fellow), A/Prof Andrew Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: face to face:12x 1hr lec and 12x1hr tutorial, or online: 12x 1hr lec and 12x1hr tutorial (asynchronous) Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Prohibitions: PUBH5206 - Controlled trials (2CP) Assessment: 1x2.5hr open-book exam (60%) 1x1500 word assignment (30%) 6x online quizzes (10%) Mode of delivery: Online, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit introduces the principles underpinning the design and conduct of high quality controlled clinical trials to generate good evidence for health care decision making. The topics include clinical trial design, randomisation, sample size, measures of treatment effect, methodological issues, trial protocols, and ethical principles.
Textbooks
Reading materials are provided
PUBH5217 Regression Modelling

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Cvejic, Dr Kevin McGeechan Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1x1hr lec and 2hrs tuts / pracs per wk for 13wks Prerequisites: PUBH5018 Prohibitions: (PUBH5211 or PUBH5212 or PUBH5213) Assessment: 1x 4pg data analysis assignment (equivalent to 1200wds) (25%) and 10x online quizzes (15%) and 1x 10pg data analysis assignment (equivalent to 3000wds) (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: The statistical software package used in this unit is web-based. There is no cost/fee to use this software. Course notes will be provided, along with links to additional readings through the library.
In this unit, you will learn how to select and apply the appropriate regression modelling techniques for continuous, categorical, and time-to-event outcome data. Building on the skills developed in PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics, this unit will teach you how to compare two or more groups, incorporate several explanatory variables into a regression model, identify and adjust for confounders, test for effect modification, calculate adjusted effect estimates, conduct appropriate model checking, build the 'best' regression model, and interpret the results of a model. You will gain practical experience in fitting multiple linear regression, logistic regression, and proportional hazards (survival) models using the statistical software package SAS. This unit serves as a prerequisite for an advanced unit of study in biostatistics (CEPI5310 Advanced Statistical Modelling).
Textbooks
Course notes are provided, along with links to additional readings through the library.
PUBH5215 Introductory Analysis of Linked Data

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Intensive June,Intensive November Classes: block/intensive mode 5 days 9am-5pm Corequisites: (PUBH5010 or BSTA5011 or CEPI5100) and (PUBH5211 or PUBH5217 or BSTA5004) Assumed knowledge: Basic familiarity with SAS computing syntax and methods of basic statistical analysis of fixed-format data files Assessment: Reflective journal (30%) and 1x data analysis assignment (70%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: For data privacy and security reasons, the analysis required to complete the major assignment can only be performed on the computers in the Sydney School of Public Health Computer Lab. The computer lab is made available to students 24/7 for ten days after the end of the unit for the purpose of completing this assessment task.
This unit introduces the topic of linked health data analysis. It will usually run in late June and mid November. The topic is very specialised and will not be relevant to most MPH students. The modular structure of the unit provides students with a theoretical grounding in the classroom on each topic, followed by hands-on practical exercises in the computing lab using de-identified linked NSW data files. The computing component assumes a basic familiarity with SAS computing syntax and methods of basic statistical analysis of fixed-format data files. Contents include: an overview of the theory of data linkage methods and features of comprehensive data linkage systems, sufficient to know the sources and limitations of linked health data sets; design of linked data studies using epidemiological principles; construction of numerators and denominators used for the analysis of disease trends and health care utilisation and outcomes; assessment of the accuracy and reliability of data sources; data linkage checking and quality assurance of the study process; basic statistical analyses of linked longitudinal health data; manipulation of large linked data files; writing syntax to prepare linked data files for analysis, derive exposure and outcome variables, relate numerators and denominators and produce results from statistical procedures at an introductory to intermediate level. The main assignment involves the analysis of NSW linked data, which can be completed only in the Sydney School of Public Health Computer Lab, and is due 10 days after the end of the unit.
Textbooks
Notes will be distributed in class.
PUBH5224 Advanced Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Tim Driscoll Session: Semester 2 Classes: Weekly classes (combined lectures and tutorials) for 13 weeks. Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Assessment: 1x 1500 word assignment or equivalent class presentation (30%); 1x 4000 word assignment (or equivalent answers to specific methodological questions) (70%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day
This unit of study is intended for students who have completed Epidemiology Methods and Uses (or an equivalent unit of study) at a credit or higher level. It is designed to extend students' practical and theoretical knowledge of epidemiology beyond basic principles, provide students with an opportunity to consolidate critical appraisal skills and to acquire some of the practical knowledge and skills needed to design epidemiological research.
PUBH5302 Health Economic Evaluation

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 4 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Alison Hayes Session: Intensive September Classes: 2x 2day compulsory workshops Prerequisites: ((PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018) or (HPOL5001 as a prerequisite and HPOL5003 as a co-requisite) Assessment: assignment 1 (40%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This unit aims to develop students' knowledge and skills of economic evaluation as an aid to priority setting in health care. This unit covers: principles of economic evaluation; critical appraisal guidelines; measuring and valuing benefits; methods of costing; modeling in economic evaluation. The workshops consist of interactive lectures and class exercises.
Textbooks
A course manual will be provided to each student.
PUBH5317 Decision modelling for economic evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Kirsten Howard and A/Prof Andrew Martin Session: Semester 2 Classes: 3 x 1 day workshops plus 1 x 2 day workshop Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) and PUBH5018 Corequisites: PUBH5312 Prohibitions: PUBH5205 PUBH5307 Assessment: completion of in class practicals (10%) 2 x in-class quizzes (30%) 2 x assignments (60% - 2 x 30%) (2 x 2000 word written assignments) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit combines decision theory and more advanced health economic concepts to provide students with hands-on skills in specialised analysis methods, and modelling techniques, for evaluating healthcare options and reaching recommendations in the face of uncertainty. Students will calculate and analyse data from clinical studies, extrapolate clinical study results to other settings, and construct models that synthesise evidence (and expert opinion) from multiple sources. Specific topics of study include: decision trees; expected utility theory; sensitivity and threshold analysis; the value of information (including screening and diagnostic tests); the calculation and analysis of costs and quality-adjusted survival using individual patient data (including bootstrapping techniques); Markov processes and micro-simulation; and presenting and interpreting the results of (health economic) evaluations. Lectures are accompanied by practical exercises and readings. Students gain experience applying the methods presented in lectures via computer practicals using Excel and decision analysis software (TreeAge).
Textbooks
Reading materials are provided
PUBH5005 Qualitative Research in Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 2 Classes: bm: 2x2 full day workshop + 1x1 full day workshop ol: 12xweekly online lectures + activities Prohibitions: PUBH5500 or QUAL5005 or QUAL5006 Assessment: 1xinterviewing activity(35%); 1x2000-word essay(35%); multiple choice quizzes(20%); 12xparticipation activities(10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit of study introduces you to qualitative research in health, providing you with core concepts and skills. It is designed for beginners and people who want an advancedlevel introduction. Over the course of the unit we will address: What is qualitative research? How is it different from quantitative research? What is its history? What research problems can it address? How do I design a qualitative study? What are the different (and best) ways to generate data? How do you analyse qualitative data? Is methodology different to method? What are ontology and epistemology? What is reflexivity (and aren't qualitative researchers biased)? What are the ethical issues? What is good quality qualitative research? How can I use qualitative evidence in policy or practice? You will get practical experience and skills through carrying out an observation, participating in a focus group, conducting an interview, analysing data, arguing for qualitative research in health, and appraising the quality of published literature. You will hear from working qualitative researchers about how they use qualitative methods in their work. This unit will give you the skills and confidence to begin conducting and using qualitative research.
PUBH5006 Advanced Qualitative Analysis and Writing

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Julie Mooney-Somers Session: Semester 1 Classes: bm: 5x1 full day workshop Prerequisites: PUBH5005 OR PUBH5500 OR QUAL5005 OR QUAL5006 Prohibitions: QUAL5003 Assumed knowledge: You should have a basic understanding of qualitative research Assessment: data coding(20%), draft themes(20%), draft analysis(20%), polished results and discussion(40%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
This advanced unit of study extends students' practical and theoretical knowledge of qualitative research to provide advanced concepts and skills in qualitative data analysis and writing. You should have a basic understanding of qualitative research. We will explore the principles of qualitative analysis, and learn about different analytic strategies and key analytic tools. You will learn how to develop codes and themes, use memos and analytic maps, and interpret data through the process of writing. You will learn about starting writing, structuring articles, making analytic arguments, and editing your own work. Most importantly, we will consider what it means to think and write 'qualitatively'. You will analyse a portfolio of qualitative data, and produce a results and discussion section for a journal article. After completing this unit you will have increased your experience, skills and confidence in qualitative data analysis and writing.

Part B Electives

Graduate Certificate students may not select any units of study from Part B. Graduate Diploma students can select up to a maximum 6 credit points from Part B. Master students can select up to a maximum of 12 credit points from Part B.
PUBH5019 Cancer Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Gemma Jacklyn Session: Semester 2 Classes: 10 x online modules (each comprising online lectures, readings, quiz), approx. 4 hours per week x 10 weeks, 4 x online group interactions (1 x peer assessment and 3 x online discussions) approx. 2 hours per session for preparation and posting. Prerequisites: PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 Assessment: 10 x online quizzes (10%); 1 x 1200-word individual written assignment ¿ critical appraisal task (20%); 1 x peer assessment exercise (5%); 1 x 400-word written assignment + anonymous peer assessment of each other's work based on pre-determined criteria. Final mark will be the median of all the peer marks. (10%); participation in 3 x online discussions (15%); 1 x 2500 word individual written assignment (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the concepts, methods and applications underpinning cancer prevention and control at population level. It is designed to a offer a broad-based perspective on public health approaches to cancer control across the continuum from prevention through diagnosis, screening, treatment, survivorship and palliative and supportive care. We will critically appraise policies and interventions that have potential to reduce cancer incidence and mortality, prolong survival and improve quality of life. Although each topic will be presented in the context of specific cancers and the Australian health care system, the principles and frameworks will be relevant for regional and global cancer control efforts. At the completion of the unit, students will be equipped with the basic tools to design, plan, implement and evaluate cancer control strategies and programs.
Textbooks
Elwood JM, Sutcliffe SB (Eds). Cancer Control. New York: Oxford University Press, 2010 (pp1-469)
PUBH5020 Chronic Disease Prevention and Control

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Adrian Bauman Session: Semester 1 Classes: 20 hrs online lectures; 16 hrs online discussions Assumed knowledge: PUBH5033, PUBH5010 or CEPI5100 or equivalent Assessment: 1000 word assignment (20%), 2000 word assignment (40%), on-line discussions (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: PUBH5020 is an advanced MPH elective, and some epidemiological concepts, such as population attributable risk are expected knowledge for understanding the Burden of Disease concept, that is important in NCD (chronic disease) prevention, and is part of Module 2 of this unit. In addition, this MPH elective predominantly takes a population and global perspective on NCD prevention, rather than a clinical or health services perspective
This course offers a public health approach to examining the global issue of chronic diseases (e.g. cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, cancer, chronic lung disease) and their prevention. The course examines why chronic disease is a global problem, and describes WHO frameworks for chronic disease prevention. It also reviews the epidemiology of specific chronic diseases including trends in and surveillance of these conditions, and the global (and country level) burden of disease. Teaching will focus on clinical prevention, in particular, the role of primary care, other clinicians and allied health professionals in providing lifestyle advice for people with chronic disease (tertiary prevention) and for people without chronic disease (primary prevention). Students will be involved in evaluating the effectiveness of different prevention strategies and will examine the role of health policy and strategic planning in developing effective and sustainable chronic disease management programs and health services in different settings (in Australia and the region).
Textbooks
Readings for this unit will be available on the eLearning site
PUBH5032 Making Decisions in Public Health

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Carmen Huckel Schneider, A/Prof Alison Hayes Session: Semester 2 Classes: 2-day workshop; fully online version available Assessment: Multiple choice assessment (50%); Written assignment of 1000 words (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
This unit introduces students to the methods by which evidence is translated, used and abused when governments make decisions affecting public health. Students will become familiar with the main tools used by health economists and policy analysts. The unit will emphasize the role of different forms of evidence and values for priority-setting and policy-making. Unit technical content is unified by common themes and case studies. Students will apply methods and principles of health economics e.g. resource scarcity, opportunity cost, efficiency and equity to practical real-life examples (including specific indigenous health issues) to critically consider the role of economic evidence in health decision-making in Australia.
Students will then use policy analysis methods to critically examine the Australian health care system and decision-making in public health. The unit will pay particular attention to questions of power and equity, including the position of indigenous peoples. Finally, it will look at how evidence is framed and used in decision-making. Teaching will make use of contemporary case studies so students learn how technical analytical tools are used in practical examples of policy development, decision-making and public debate. The unit gives public health students an essential basic knowledge of both disciplines (health economics and health policy) and lays the groundwork for more advanced studies.
PUBH5120 Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Ms Suzanne Plater Session: Semester 2 Classes: face-to-face students 5 x 1 day workshops over 12 weeks; participation assessable online students 5 x 3 days tutorials and discussions (equivalent to workshops) over 12 weeks; participation and online tutorial discussion assessable Prohibitions: PUBH5118 Assessment: workshop and online participation 15% 1 x 1000 word reflective essay 20% 1 x online multiple choice quiz 15% 1 x 3500 word report 50% Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit will significantly advance your philosophical, theoretical and practical understanding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories, cultures and societies within the context of public health. We will use case studies grounded in diverse urban, regional and remote communities and the life experiences of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to explore key constructs. These include transgenerational psychic trauma, racism, political structures and systems, cultural determinants, ethics, and global indigenous epistemologies. Together we will investigate the reasons why Australia has so far been unable to close the gap across almost all indicators of health and wellbeing, and explore innovative, ethical and effective solutions. Throughout this unit you will be encouraged to interact with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander academics, health professionals and community members, and your unit coordinator, tutors and fellow students, and feel confident to ask difficult questions and debate the responses. Our aim is to give you the practical and conceptual knowledge and skills necessary to work respectfully and effectively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples from across the nation.
Textbooks
None, readings provided
PUBH5422 Health and Risk Communication

This unit of study is not available in 2019

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Claire Hooker, Associate Professor Julie Leask, Professor Phyllis Butow Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block/intensive 2 blocks of 2 x 9-5 full days; please check with the coordinator for scheduling Assessment: Assignment 1: 1 x 2500 word (35%), Assignment 2: 1 x 2500 words or equivalent (35%), online activities (30%). Attendance at intensives is compulsory and 80% attendance is required to pass the unit of study. Mode of delivery: Block mode
In this unit, students learn how to communicate effectively with respect to health risks, both to individuals with health concerns, and with respect to risks to the public. The first half covers individual health risk communication in clinical settings, including: theories of health communication, patient centred care and shared decision making; evidence-based communication skills; research paradigms including interaction analysis; cross-cultural communication in health care; discussing prognosis; and informed consent. The second half explores risk communication for public health, including: how to effectively manage outbreak or other crisis situations; how to communicate about issues where the risk is low but ublic concern is high (such as with respect to the fluoridation of water); and how to best manage controversies. We teach theories of risk perception and communication with particular application to public health incident responses. We give practical guides to media messages, risk message framing, public engagement, traditional and social media, and the ethical aspects of public communication. The unit offers students the opportunity to learn from outstanding guest lecturers who work in these areas and interactive opportunities for students to try their skills in risk communication and decision making.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format). Most supplementary readings can be accessed through the library or online.
BETH5202 Human and Animal Research Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 4x8hr intensive or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Prohibitions: BETH5208 Assessment: Continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (10%); 2x400wd short tasks (10%); 1x1500wd essay (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit of study critically examines research ethics in its wider context, from how research is structured to its dissemination. It explores the ethical underpinnings of a variety of research methods and their uses in humans and non-human animals including the justifications for engaging in research, key concepts in research ethics and research integrity. The unit also briefly examines the history of research and the impact of research abuse on participants, both human and non-human animal.
Textbooks
All readings are made available via elearning.
BETH5203 Ethics and Public Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 2 Classes: 5x7hour intensives; or Distance Education (online). Prohibitions: BETH5206 Assessment: 5xOnline Quiz (50%); 1x2500wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
This unit provides students with an overview of the ethical and political issues that underlie public health and public health research. The unit begins with some fundamentals: the nature of ethics, of public health (and how it might be different to clinical medicine) and of public health ethics. It introduces key concepts in public health ethics including liberty, utility, justice, solidarity and reciprocity, and introduces students to different ways of reasoning about the ethics of public health. A range of practical public health problems and issues will be considered, including ethical dimensions of communicable and non-communicable diseases in populations, and the ethical challenges of public health research. Throughout, the emphasis is on learning to make sound arguments about the ethical aspects of public health policy, practice and research. Most learning occurs in the context of five teaching intensives, which are highly interactive and focus on the development and application of reasoning skills.
Textbooks
Students are provided with a list of readings (in digital format).
BETH5204 Clinical Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: TBC Session: Semester 1 Classes: 4x8hr Intensives or Distance Education (online). Attendance is compulsory if enrolled in face-to-face mode Assessment: 1x1500wd case study (30%); 1x2500wd essay (50%); continuous assessment (short weekly tasks) (10%); 2x400wd Short Tasks (10%) Mode of delivery: Block mode, Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit will facilitate students to critically review the ethical issues that underlie the delivery of healthcare. Students will explore: dominant theoretical approaches to ethical reasoning in the clinical context; key ethical concepts in the clinical encounter (such as consent, professionalism and confidentiality); major contexts in which ethical issues arise in clinical practice; and the role of clinical ethics consultation. The unit will also consider specific issues and populations within clinical practice, such as ethical aspects of healthcare at the beginning and end of life.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5208 Introduction to Human Research Ethics

Credit points: 2 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Professor Ainsley Newson Session: Semester 2 Classes: Block mode (1.5 days) or online Corequisites: GENC5020 Prohibitions: BETH5202 Assessment: 1x1500wd essay (80%); 1x 400wd task (10%); participation in class/online (10%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: If an insufficient number of students opt to attend seminars on campus, the co-ordinator may choose to teach this Unit of Study in online mode only. Students will be contacted if this occurs.
This unit of study introduces students to human research ethics in its wider context. It explores the ethical underpinnings of the research endeavour including the justifications for engaging in research and research integrity. The unit also briefly reviews the history of research and the impact of research abuse on human participants.
Textbooks
All readings are accessed online via elearning.
BETH5209 Medicines Policy, Economics and Ethics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Associate Professor Wendy Lipworth, Dr Narcyz Ghinea Session: Semester 2 Classes: Fully online. Assumed knowledge: A degree in science, medicine, pharmacy, nursing, allied health, philosophy/ethics, sociology/anthropology, history, law, communications, public policy, business, economics, commerce, organisation studies, or other relevant field, or by special permission. Assessment: Online work (15%) 1x minor essay (35%) 1x major essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Medicines save lives but they can be costly and can have serious adverse effects. Value-laden decisions are continuously being made at individual, institutional, national and international levels regarding the medicines we need, want and can afford. In this unit of study, we will explore and critique global and national policies and processes related to medicines, examining how research and development agendas are set; how medicines are assessed and evaluated; and how new technologies are translated into practice. We will also explore broader trends such as globalisation, commercialisation and changing consumer expectations. By the end of the course, students will understand the forces shaping the development, regulation, funding and uptake of medicines both nationally and internationally, and the political, ethical, legal and economic issues that are at stake. This course is designed to appeal to a wide range of students from ethics, law, public health, health care, policy, communications, economics, business, politics, administration, and biomedical science.
Textbooks
Readings will be provided
HPOL5006 Business of Health

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof James Gillespie, Prof John Buchanan Session: Intensive July Classes: block/intensive mode - 5 days, 9am-5pm with preliminary online readings. Corequisites: HPOL5001 or SMBA6001 Assessment: workshop tutorial assessments and presentation (20%); 1x2000wd report (30%); 1x3000 wd essay (50%) Mode of delivery: Block mode
Note: Department permission required for enrolment
Note: Students who do not meet the recommended co-requisites may be granted entry if they have at least one year's work experience in a related field.
Healthcare is now one of the largest employers and sectors in the Australian economy. Approximately two thirds of its funding comes from government, while two thirds of services are provided by the private sector. This unit explores this complex mix, building an understanding of the inter-relationships among the players in the industry, public and private. The course will explore the financial and regulatory environment in which providers operate and identify the main business models used by different players in the industry, including service providers, private insurers, employers, and government regulators. The unit draws on expert lecturers, international comparisons and case studies to give an understanding of the incentives and constraints that shape strategies to create value in health care. By the end of the unit students will: Have an understanding of the 'eco-system' of health care; Be able to navigate the regulatory and technological aspects of business in the health sector; Be able to identify and evaluate public and private business strategies in the main health care sectors.
Textbooks
Required and recommended readings and reference lists will be available through eLearning.