Clinical Neurophysiology

 

Clinical Neurophysiology

Compulsory units

Graduate Diploma students must complete 6 credit points of compulsory units of study
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
Master's students must complete 12 credit points of compulsory units of study
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
CLNP5001 Basic Sciences in Clinical Neurophysiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Miguel Iglesias Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums Assessment: Online quizzes (20%); video assignments (30%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); online exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students can apply for a waiver if they have completed equivalent study within the last 5 years. Evidence of previous study and completion of an examination is required.
This unit of study provides the core anatomical, physiological and electrical knowledge required for the practice of clinical neurophysiology. In order to obtain and interpret information regarding the function of the neural systems, clinicians must be able to accurately record and quantify electrical signals from a myriad of neurological structures. This unit describes the methods by which these electrical signals are generated, recorded, processed and presented for interpretation. It also examines the neurological systems and processes responsible for signal generation, and introduces the role of clinical neurophysiology in diagnosis of systemic disease.
Textbooks
(Recommended) Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Bear, Connors and Paradiso, 4th ed 2015, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; Clinical Neurophysiology by Daube and Rubin, 4th ed 2016, Oxford University Press; The Clinical Neurophysiology Primer by Blum and Rutkove, 2007, Humana Press inc.

Stream specific units

Graduate Certificate students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study
Graduate Diploma students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study
Master's students must complete 24 credit points of stream specific units of study
CEPI5100 Introduction to Clinical Epidemiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Fiona Stanaway Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Offered online (no fixed-time webinars) and face-to-face (daytime tutorials) Prohibitions: PUBH5010 Assessment: Completion of online quizzes (15%), tutorial participation (10%), assignment 1 (15%), assignment 2 (60%) Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Online
Note: It is recommended that this is completed as soon as possible after enrolment into your first unit of Study.
This unit introduces the concept of clinical epidemiology and provides students with core skills in clinical epidemiology at an introductory level. Topics covered include asking and answering clinical questions; basic and accessible literature searching techniques; study designs used in clinical epidemiological research; confounding and effect modification; sources of bias; interpretation of results including odds ratios, relative risks, confidence intervals and p values; applicability of results to individual patients; critical appraisal of clinical epidemiological research literature used to answer questions of therapy (RCTs and systematic reviews), harm, prognosis, diagnosis, screening and clinical guidelines.
Textbooks
Online readings and resources to be provided on the eLearning website.
CLNP5001 Basic Sciences in Clinical Neurophysiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Miguel Iglesias Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums Assessment: Online quizzes (20%); video assignments (30%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); online exam (40%). Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students can apply for a waiver if they have completed equivalent study within the last 5 years. Evidence of previous study and completion of an examination is required.
This unit of study provides the core anatomical, physiological and electrical knowledge required for the practice of clinical neurophysiology. In order to obtain and interpret information regarding the function of the neural systems, clinicians must be able to accurately record and quantify electrical signals from a myriad of neurological structures. This unit describes the methods by which these electrical signals are generated, recorded, processed and presented for interpretation. It also examines the neurological systems and processes responsible for signal generation, and introduces the role of clinical neurophysiology in diagnosis of systemic disease.
Textbooks
(Recommended) Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain. Bear, Connors and Paradiso, 4th ed 2015, Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; Clinical Neurophysiology by Daube and Rubin, 4th ed 2016, Oxford University Press; The Clinical Neurophysiology Primer by Blum and Rutkove, 2007, Humana Press inc.
CLNP5002 Diagnostic Electroencephalography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Karen Storchenegger Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, discussion forums, 2 day face-to-face workshop (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2x short essays (30%); participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); clinical case discussions (10%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Critical Care and Internal Medicine students must request special permission to enrol in this unit of study.
Electroencephalography (EEG) forms the basis of multiple neurophysiological techniques and is a powerful tool in its own right. This unit will introduce the standardised systems and nomenclature for EEG recordings, examine the characteristics of normal recordings and illustrate the pathological changes associated with intracranial lesions, systemic disease and critical illness. The utility of EEG in the diagnosis and management of seizure disorders will be examined in detail.
CLNP5003 Clinical Neurophysiology Techniques

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr James Burrell Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 2 day face-to-face workshop (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2x short essays (20%); short answer clinical cases (10%) participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (10%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Clinical neurophysiologists are required to have expertise in a number of different diagnostic and monitoring modalities. This unit will cover the most commonly used diagnostic techniques (other than EEG) and will focus on nerve conduction studies and sensory evoked potential recordings.
CLNP5004 Advanced Electroencephalography

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Samantha Soe Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 2 day face-to-face workshop (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online quizzes (20%); 2x short essays (20%); clinical case discussions (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: It is strongly recommended that students who do not have 1 - 2 years EEG experience complete CLNP5002 prior to enrolment in this unit of study. Internal Medicine students must request special permission to enrol in this unit of study.
This unit covers advanced aspects of diagnostic electroencephalography, including the specific technical requirements for continuous video EEG monitoring, seizure recognition during invasive EEG monitoring, current techniques in cortical mapping of seizures and its utility in tailored cortical resection.
CLNP5005 Neuromonitoring in Anaesthesia

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Hastings Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); short essays (20%); participation in webinar tutorials and/or discussion groups (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (20%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Critical Care students must request special permission to enrol in this unit of study.
This unit will examine the techniques available to monitor the function and wellbeing of the brain and nervous system during anaesthesia and surgery. Despite their widespread use, the effect of general anaesthetic agents on the brain and spinal cord is still poorly understood. There is wide interpatient variability in responses to these agents, and intraoperative hemodynamic fluctuations and underlying disease processes are all threats to the central nervous system which may be mitigated by careful monitoring.
CLNP5006 Intraoperative Monitoring I

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Rehak, Ryan Hamer Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 1 day face-to-face workshop (compulsory) Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2x short essays (30%); clinical case discussions (20%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Critical Care students must request special permission to enrol in this unit of study.
Unexpected postoperative neurologic deficit is arguably one of the most devastating potential complications of surgery. This unit examines the fundamental neurophysiological techniques necessary for continuous functional monitoring of the human nervous system during at risk surgical procedures. In particular, this unit provides the theoretical and practical knowledge underpinning somatosensory evoked potentials, brainstem auditory evoked potentials, motor evoked potentials and electromyography as they relate to various surgical disciplines.
CLNP5007 Intraoperative Monitoring II

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Adam Rehak, Ryan Hamer Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning, webinars and/or discussion forums, 1 day face-to-face workshop (compulsory) Prerequisites: CLNP5006 Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: Online quizzes (10%); 2x short essays (30%); clinical case discussions (20%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
This unit of study builds on CLNP5006 and focuses on how multimodal monitoring can be used in a broad range of cranial, spinal and peripheral nerve procedures to minimise the likelihood of neurological trauma. Students will acquire the theoretical knowlede and practical skills to perform the various modalities of intraoperatrive neurophysiological monitoring and understand the structures at risk during a particular surgery.
CLNP5008 Applied Clinical Neurophysiology

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Matt Silsby, Dr James Burrell Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion forums Corequisites: CLNP5001 Assessment: online quizzes (20%), short answer questions (20%), participation in generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (10%); online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit provides an overview of the neuromuscular, central nervous system, and neurosurgical disorders commonly encountered in clinical neurophysiology laboratories. Presenting symptoms, diagnoses and the application of common neurophysiological techniques are explored.
Textbooks
Electromyography and neuromuscular disorders: clinicalelectrophysiologic correlations by Preston, David C; Shapiro, Barbara Ellen; 2013. Merritt's Neurology by Louis, Elan D; Mayer, Stephan A; Rowland, Lewis P; 2016
INTM5002 Basic Neurology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Justin Garber Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (50%) 1 x 1000 word case study (25%); online quizzes (10%); participation in the generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); participation in online discussion forums (5%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates with experience working in an Australian or New Zealand clinical setting.
The Basic Neurology syllabus covers the requirements of trainee physician practice. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of common neurological conditions and the essentials of management of these conditions. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important neurological conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th ed, Mcgraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th ed Oxford Medicine Online 2016.
INTM5102 Advanced Neurology

Credit points: 3 Teacher/Coordinator: A/Prof Leo Davies, Dr Peter Puhl Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures, webinars, discussion boards and podcasts Assessment: on-line exam (45%) 1 x 1000 word case study (30%) online quizzes (10%) and participation in online discussion forums (15%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: This unit of study is available only to registered medical graduates working in an Australian clinical setting.
The Advanced Neurology syllabus is at a level appropriate for practitioners undertaking specialist training in Neurology or with an interest in the field. The content is focussed on diagnosis and investigation of important but less common neurological conditions and advanced management of common and important neurological diseases. The module learning materials are linked to a library of clinical cases representing common and important neurological conditions.
Textbooks
Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine 19th edition, McGraw-Hill 2015; Oxford Textbook of Medicine, 5th edition Oxford Medicine Online 2016.

General elective units

Graduate Diploma students complete 6 credit points of general elective or stream specific units of study
Master's students complete 12 credit points of general elective or stream specific units of study
CEPI5200 Quality and Safety in Health Care

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Merrilyn Walton Session: Semester 1 Classes: offered online Assessment: 4 online reflective statements (20%); 4 x 1500 word assignments (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: People working in health care will benefit from this course.
This course is specifically designed for health professionals who are working in health care. It will equip participants with underpinning knowledge about patient safety. There are 4 modules that students are required to participate in that cover quality and safety principles, professionalism and ethics, risk management and risk information, complexity theory, clinical governance and the impact of adverse events, methods to measure and make improvements in health care. Each module provides for discussion to enable the participants to ask questions and describe their experiences. Students are required to write a reflective statement about the main learning after each module. The modules, tools and the discussions are designed to enable participants to change behaviours by understanding the main causes of adverse events-poor team work, busyness, hierachies. The course provides foundation knowledge about quality and safety; governments around the world are concerned to address unsafe care. The course will better prepare health professional to understand the complexity of health care and take steps to minimise the opportunities for errors and address vulnerabilities in the system.
Textbooks
Runciman, Bill, Merry A Walton M. Safety and Ethics in Healthcare: A Guide to Getting it Right. 2007 Asgate Publisher.
CEPI5215 Writing and Reviewing Medical Papers

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Angela Webster Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: 9 self-paced modules each comprising: course notes, lecture, demonstrations, exercises, quizzes Prerequisites: (PUBH5010 or CEPI5100) Prohibitions: CEPI5214 Assumed knowledge: Some basic knowledge of summary statistic is assumed Assessment: quizzes (30%), assignment 1 (20%), assignment 2 (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students without the pre-requisites are encouraged to contact the unit coordinator to discuss their motivation and experience.
Students will work at their own pace through 9 modules covering research integrity, medical style, abstracts, presentations and posters, constructing a paper, data visualisation, manuscript submission, responding to reviewers comments, publication dissemination, and reviewing a paper. This unit aims to teach students the principles of research integrity in writing for medical journals, typical issues they may face, and link to resources to help them maintain integrity through their publishing careers. It will guide them to reliable evidence based resources to improve their conference abstract, presentation and poster design, and manuscript style and writing.. Students will learn about reporting guidelines, common pitfalls in writing and presenting research, choosing a journal, keywords, improving tables and figures for manuscripts through open source software, copyright, writing cover letters and response letters to reviewers. Students will learn about measuring research impact and ways to improve research reach, dealing with the media and press releases, using social media in dissemination, digital archiving and basic skills needed to act as a quality peer-reviewer. This is an online unit
Textbooks
No mandatory text book-readings available online.
CRIT5005 Clinical Reasoning and Communication

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Renee Lim Session: Semester 2 Classes: Online learning and compulsory face to face workshop (1x 2 days) Assessment: 5 x 300-500 word clinical case study tasks (30%); participation in on-line discussion tasks and quizzes (20%); participation in 2 day face to face communication skills training session (30%); 1 x 1500-2000 word written assignment (20%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Enrolments in this unit are limited and places will be allocated until the quota is reached.
Critical care medicine is practised in highly charged and stressful settings and requires many decisions to be made quickly with limited information and resources. There are also many 'players' and confusion and miscommunication can easily occur. The hierarchical nature of hospital based practice and tribal differences between professions bring their own challenges. This unit of study aims to help clinicians develop decision making and high level communication skills in order to effectively care for patients, engage carers and relatives and perform optimally as a team member or leader. The unit is built around complex clinical cases and includes simulations using actors and experts.
Textbooks
Online readings
CRIT5009 Teaching with Simulation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Clinical A/Prof Leonie Watterson Session: Semester 1 Classes: Online lectures; readings; appraisal of media; discussion groups and tutorials; block/intensive mode 2 days (8.30 am-5pm) (compulsory; conducted in a simulation centre). Assumed knowledge: Clinical experience in a critical care discipline including emergency medicine, intensive care, anaesthesia, surgery or retrieval medicine. Assessment: participation in online discussion (10%); 1200 word essay (20%); 4x simulation workshop activities (30%); portfolio of written assignments (short answer questions or other activities) (30%); post-course reflection (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Note: Please note: this unit of study is only available to medical graduates. Enrolments in this unit are limited and places will be allocated until the quota is reached.
Simulation is now a required learning and skill maintenance tool in critical care medicine. This unit will provide students with the skills and knowledge to: construct a challenging, yet safe learning environment with realistic simulation scenarios; manage the technology and the learning environment; and provide effective debriefing and productive feedback. The unit of study will also aim to enhance the student's skills as a teacher in a busy clinical setting, improving supervision and feedback and creating effective teams.
Textbooks
(Recommended) Manual of Simulation in Healthcare 2nd Edition, 2016, Riley R.H(Ed), Oxford University Press, ISBN 978-0-19-871762-1
CRIT5012 Mechanical Ventilation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Alex Yartsev Session: Semester 1 Classes: online lectures and case discussions, video tutorials Assumed knowledge: This unit is only suitable for medical graduates. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); generation and peer review of assessment items (10%); case-based discussion boards (10%); short answer questions (20%); final exam (50%) Mode of delivery: Online
Note: Students who have not completed CRIT5004 Physiology for Critical Care may need to undertake some revision. Revision resources will be provided.
Mechanical ventilation is a common supportive therapy in the critical care environment. Students in this unit of study will become familiar with mechanical ventilator design and function, learn to interpret ventilator waveforms and measured data, and develop an understanding of the physiological consequences of mechanical ventilation. Commonly used models of mechanical ventilators (including transport ventilators) are discussed and students will have the opportunity to become acquainted with their performance characteristics. Case-based discussions will be used to explore common strategies for ventilation in different clinical scenarios, including the operating theatre, the emergency department, the ICU and in the course of retrieval.
Textbooks
Pilbeam's Mechanical Ventilation: Physiological and Clinical Applications; Mosby (2012)
MEDF5002 Teaching in the Clinical Environment

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Marguerite Tracy Session: Semester 2 Classes: 1 day face to face workshop 9am - 3pm (not compulsory) and online learning. Students who do not attend the workshop will be required to complete an alternative ungraded learning activity. Assessment: Personal learning plan (20%); online presentation (20%); portfolio of evidence of learning (50%); participation in online discussion forums (10%) Mode of delivery: Distance education/intensive on campus
Almost all healthcare professionals are involved in education and training throughout their careers. This unit of study provides a practical introduction to the theory and practice of teaching and learning in the health environment. The unit will cover 3 main areas: planning for and facilitating learning in the clinical environment; assessing performance and providing constructive feedback; and fostering the development of students as professionals. Each of these areas will be underpinned by best evidence from clinical education research and will address current challenges and opportunities in the learning environment. This will include the role of new technologies from the perspective of both educators and learners. Participants in the course will gain a framework they can use to support their teaching, and will develop a portfolio of evidence to support their professional development as clinician educators.
PAIN5003 Pain Treatment and Management Principles

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Elizabeth Devonshire and Dr Charles Brooker Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online, approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: participation in online discussion (20%), 4000-5000 word written assignment/s or equivalent (80%) Mode of delivery: Online
To introduce participants to the core principles of pain assessment, treatment and management. Participants consider the biopsychosocial model and the scientific basis for assessment, diagnosis and treatment. They explore principles of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, together with routes of drug administration. The role of physiotherapy and rehabilitation management, and the use of procedures such as neural blockade, simulation techniques and surgery are also considered.
PAIN5021 Acute Pain

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Philip Corke Session: Semester 1 Classes: Approximately 10 hours of study per week (equals 140 hours in total) Assumed knowledge: this unit is case based and is only suitable for experienced clinicians. Assessment: Participation in online discussion (25%), 4000-5000 written assignment/s or equivalent (75%) Mode of delivery: Online
The aims of this unit are to provide a theoretical framework for the management of acute pain, to examine the specific contributors that are important in the development of acute pain conditions and to examine pharmacological and other approaches used in the management of acute pain. Topics that will be covered will include the principles of pre-emptive analgesia and evidence of effectiveness in preventing pain, pharmacological management of acute pain including approaches such as patient controlled analgesia, adjunctive approaches in managing acute pain and the transition from acute to chronic pain.
PUBH5018 Introductory Biostatistics

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Dr Kevin McGeechan, Dr Erin Cvejic Session: Semester 1 Classes: 2 x 2hr lecture, 10 x 1hr lectures, 11 x 2hr tutorials, 2 x 1hr and 8 x 0.5hr statistical computing self directed learning tasks over 12 weeks - lectures and tutorials may be completed online Assessment: Weekly quizzes (10%), 1x4 page assignment (20%), 1 x 1hr online test (20%) and 1x1.5hr open-book exam (50%). For distance students it may be possible to complete the exam externally with the approval of the course coordinator. Mode of delivery: Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) day, Normal (lecture/lab/tutorial) evening, Online
This unit aims to provide students with an introduction to statistical concepts, their use and relevance in public health. This unit covers descriptive analyses to summarise and display data; concepts underlying statistical inference; basic statistical methods for the analysis of continuous and binary data; and statistical aspects of study design. Specific topics include: sampling; probability distributions; sampling distribution of the mean; confidence interval and significance tests for one-sample, two paired samples and two independent samples for continuous data and also binary data; correlation and simple linear regression; distribution-free methods for two paired samples, two independent samples and correlation; power and sample size estimation for simple studies; statistical aspects of study design and analysis. Students will be required to perform analyses using a calculator and will also be required to conduct analyses using statistical software (SPSS). It is expected that students spend an additional 2 hours per week preparing for their tutorials. Computing tasks are self-directed.
Textbooks
Course notes are provided.
SLEE5101 Introduction to Sleep Medicine

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Professor Colin Sullivan Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Online lectures and self-directed online learning activities Assessment: 3 x EMQ and extended response quizzes (3x10%) 1 x 1500 word written assignment (30%) and 1 x online exam (40%) Mode of delivery: Online
This unit of study aims to develop an understanding of normal human sleep across the lifecycle and introduces common sleep breathing disorders and analysis of sleep recordings. Normal sleep and respiratory physiology will be discussed, as well as the methods used for measurement. This will be followed by an overview of obstructive and central sleep apnoea, and its causes. Current scoring guidelines for sleep stage scoring and respiratory event scoring will be explored and their practical application will be demonstrated using short examples of sleep studies. Learning will include regular short answer quizzes, as well as broader written assessments.
WARC5001 Research Translation, Impact and Evaluation

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Julie Redfern Session: Semester 2 Classes: online lectures, discussion forums, video tutorials Assumed knowledge: This unit of study is best suited to students who have a solid understanding of research methodology and clinical trials. It is not limited to but is ideally suited to people with a clinical background. Assessment: online quizzes (10%); case-based discussion boards (20%); research proposal (40%); evaluation assignment (30%) Mode of delivery: Online
To optimise healthcare delivery, we need evidence-based strategies to enable research translation and to assess impact. This unit of study will teach these skills including fostering and maintaining stakeholder engagement, pragmatic study design, cost effectiveness analysis, recognising and managing barriers and enablers to implementation and post-research translation. Participation in case-based discussions and preparation of a research proposal will enable students to develop the skills to enhance impact and hasten adoption of research into routine care. This unit of study will have a practical focus with the aim of facilitating students to deliver impactful research within the clinical setting.

Project units of study

Students accepted into the Master (Advanced) program must complete 12 credit points of project units of study. Students must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.
MEDF5301 Project (Advanced Masters)

Credit points: 12 Teacher/Coordinator: Students must have a University of Sydney staff member or university approved supervisor for their project. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress of their project. Assessment: 2000 word written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10000 words, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval of the project and supervisor by the Program Director must be confirmed prior to commencing the project.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master's degree. The project may take the form of analysis of an existing data set, a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. In some streams, critical care for example, projects may be available for students to select. It is essential, where there is the use of patient information or recruitiment of patient study subjects, that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. The candidate will be guided through the steps required to plan and execute a substantial research project, and prepare a scholarly work which may be a paper for publication. A candidate must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.
MEDF5302 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part A)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: Approval of the project and supervisor by the Program Director must be confirmed prior to commencing the project. Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students must have a University of Sydney staff member or affiliate or University approved supervisor for their project. Assessment: 2000 word written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10000 words, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval of the project and supervisor by the course coordinator must be confirmed prior to commencing the project.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master's degree. The project may take the form of analysis of an existing data set, a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. In some streams, critical care for example, prjects may be available for students to select. It is essential, where there is the use of patient information or recruitment of patient study subjects, that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. The candidate will be guided through the steps required to plan and execute a substantial research project and prepare a scholarly work which may be a paper for publication. Where appropriate students will prepare a work suitable for publication. A candidate must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.
MEDF5303 Project (Advanced Masters) (Part B)

Credit points: 6 Teacher/Coordinator: edf Session: Semester 1,Semester 2 Classes: Students will be required to have regular contact with their supervisor to discuss the progress of their project Assessment: 2000 word written project proposal (30%) and written final work of up to 10000 words, or a publication (as negotiated) (70%) Mode of delivery: Supervision
Note: Approval of the project and supervisor by the Program Director must be confirmed prior to commencing the project.
Candidates will work on an independent research project in an area of specific interest relevant to their master's degree. The project may take the form of analysis of an existing data set, a systematic review of the literature, a case series, survey or other project acceptable to the project supervisor. In some streams, critcal care for example, projects may be available for students to select. It is essential where there is the use of patient information or recruitment of patient study subjects that appropriate ethics approval is gained from the governing body where the project will take place. The candidate will be guided through the steps required to plan and execute a substantial research project and prepare a scholarly work which may be a paper for publication. A candidate must enrol in a minimum of 12 credit points of project units of study in order to submit their final written work.